asp.net pdf viewer component : Show pdf thumbnail in html software control dll winforms web page wpf web forms guide6-part136

Schemas and Database Objects
48
You can also use it in select statements. For example, if you want to number the returned rows of a SELECT in
sequential order, you can use:
Example 4.2. numbering returned rows of a SELECT in sequential order
SELECT NEXT VALUE FOR mysequence, col1, col2 FROM mytable WHERE ...
In version 2.0, the semantics of sequences is exactly as defined by SQL:2008. If you use the same sequence twice in
the same row in an INSERT statement, you will get the same value as required by the Standard.
The correct way to use a sequence value is the NEXT VALUE FOR expression.
HyperSQL adds an extension to Standard SQL to return the last value returned by the NEXT VALUE FOR expression
in the current session. After a statement containing NEXT VALUE FOR is executed, the value that was returned for
NEXT VALUE FOR is available using the CURRENT VALUE FOR expression. In the example below, the NEXT
VALUE FOR expression is used to insert a new row. The value that was returned by NEXT VALUE FOR is retrieved
with the CURRENT VALUE FOR in the next insert statements to populate two new rows in a different table that has
a parent child relationship with the first table. For example if the value 15 was returned by the sequence, the same
value 15 is inserted in the three rows.
Example 4.3. using the last value of a sequence
INSERT INTO mytable VALUES 2, 'John', NEXT VALUE FOR mysequence
INSERT INTO childtable VALUES 4, CURRENT VALUE FOR mysequence
INSERT INTO childtable VALUES 5, CURRENT VALUE FOR mysequence
The INFORMATION_SCHEMA.SEQUENCES table contains the next value that will be returned from any of the
defined sequences. The SEQUENCE_NAME column contains the name and the NEXT_VALUE column contains the
next value to be returned. Note that this is only for getting information and you should not use it for accessing the next
sequence value. When multiple sessions access the same sequence, the value returned from this table by one session
could also be used by a different session, causing a sequence value to be used twice unintentionally.
Identity Auto-Increment Columns
Each table can contain a single auto-increment column, known as the IDENTITY column. An IDENTITY column is a
SMALLINT, INTEGER, BIGINT, DECIMAL or NUMERIC column with its value generated by a sequence generator.
In HyperSQL 2.0, an IDENTITY column is not by default treated as the primary key for the table (as a result, multi-
column primary keys are possible with an IDENTITY column present). Use the SQL standard syntax for declaration
of the IDENTITY column.
The SQL standard syntax is used, which allows the initial value and other options to be specified.
<colname> [ INTEGER | BIGINT | DECIMAL | NUMERIC ] GENERATED { BY DEFAULT |
ALWAYS} AS IDENTITY [( <options> )]
/* this table has no primary key */
CREATE TABLE vals (id INTEGER GENERATED BY DEFAULT AS IDENTITY, data VARBINARY(2000))
/* in this table id becomes primary key because the old syntax is used - avoid this syntax */
CREATE TABLE vals (id INTEGER IDENTITY, data VARBINARY(2000))
/* use the standard syntax and explicity declare a primary key identity column */
CREATE TABLE vals (id INTEGER GENERATED BY DEFAULT AS IDENTITY PRIMARY KEY, data
VARBINARY(2000))
When you add a new row to such a table using an INSERT INTO <tablename> ... statement, you can use
the DEFAULT keyword for the IDENTITY column, which results in an auto-generated value for the column.
Show pdf thumbnail in html - software control dll:C# PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
www.rasteredge.com
Show pdf thumbnail in html - software control dll:VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
www.rasteredge.com
Schemas and Database Objects
49
The IDENTITY() function returns the last value inserted into any IDENTITY column by this session. Each session
manages this function call separately and is not affected by inserts in other sessions. Use CALL IDENTITY() as
an SQL statement to retrieve this value. If you want to use the value for a field in a child table, you can use INSERT
INTO <childtable> VALUES (...,IDENTITY(),...);. Both types of call to IDENTITY() must be
made before any additional update or insert statements are issued by the session.
In triggers and routines, the value returned by the IDENTITY() function is correct for the given context. For example,
if a call to a stored procedure inserts a row into a table, causing a new identity value to be generated, a call to
IDENTITY() inside the procedure will return the new identity, but a call outside the procedure will return the last
identity value that was generated before a call was made to the procedure.
The last inserted IDENTITY value can also be retrieved via JDBC, by specifying the Statement or PreparedStatement
object to return the generated value.
The next IDENTITY value to be used can be changed with the following statement. Note that this statement is not
used in normal operation and is only for special purposes, for example resetting the identity generator:
ALTER TABLE ALTER COLUMN <column name> RESTART WITH <new value>;
For backward compatibility, support has  been retained for CREATE  TABLE  <tablename>(<colname>
IDENTITY, ...) as a shortcut which defines the column both as an IDENTITY column and a PRIMARY KEY
column. Also, for backward compatibility, it is possible to use NULL as the value of an IDENTITY column in an
INSERT statement and the value will be generated automatically. You should avoid these compatibility features as
they may be removed from future versions of HyperSQL.
In the following example, the identity value for the first INSERT statement is generated automatically using the
DEFAULT keyword. The second INSERT statement uses a call to the IDENTITY() function to populate a row in the
child table with the generated identity value.
CREATE TABLE star (id INTEGER GENERATED BY DEFAULT AS IDENTITY PRIMARY KEY, 
firstname VARCHAR(20),
lastname VARCHAR(20))
CREATE TABLE movies (starid INTEGER, movieid INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, title VARCHAR(40)) 
INSERT INTO star (id, firstname, lastname) VALUES (DEFAULT, 'Felix', 'the Cat')
INSERT INTO movies (starid, movieid, title) VALUES (IDENTITY(), 10, 'Felix in Hollywood')
HyperSQL 2.1 also supports IDENTITY columns that use an external, named SEQUENCE object. This feature is not
part of the SQL Standard. The example below uses this type of IDENTITY. Note the use of CURRENT VALUE FOR
seq here is multi-session safe. The returned value is the last value used by this session when the row was inserted
into the star table. This value is available until the transaction is committed. After commit, NULL is returned by the
CURRENT VALUE FOR expression until the SEQUENCE is used again.
CREATE SEQUENCE seq
CREATE TABLE star (id INTEGER GENERATED BY DEFAULT AS SEQUENCE seq PRIMARY KEY, 
firstname VARCHAR(20),
lastname VARCHAR(20))
CREATE TABLE movies (starid INTEGER, movieid INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, title VARCHAR(40)) 
INSERT INTO star (id, firstname, lastname) VALUES (DEFAULT, 'Felix', 'the Cat')
INSERT INTO movies (starid, movieid, title) VALUES (CURRENT VALUE FOR seq, 10, 'Felix in
Hollywood')
Tables
In the SQL environment, tables are the most essential components, as they hold all persistent data.
If TABLE is considered as metadata (i.e. without its actual data) it is called a relation in relational theory. It has one or
more columns, with each column having a distinct name and a data type. A table usually has one or more constraints
which limit the values that can potentially be stored in the TABLE. These constraints are discussed in the next section.
software control dll:How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB Thumbnail item. Make the ToolBox view show.
www.rasteredge.com
software control dll:C# Word - Header & Footer Processing in C#.NET
using RasterEdge.XDoc.Word; Create Footer & Header. The following C# sample code will show you how to create a header and footer in section.
www.rasteredge.com
Schemas and Database Objects
50
A single column of the table can be defined as IDENTITY. The values stored in this column are auto-generated and
are based on an (unnamed) identity sequence, or optionally, a named SEQUENCE object.
Views
A VIEW is similar to a TABLE but it does not permanently contain rows of data. A view is defined as a QUERY
EXPRESSION, which is often a SELECT statement that references views and tables, but it can also consist of a
TABLE CONSTRUCTOR that does not reference any tables or views.
A view has many uses:
• Hide the structure and column names of tables. The view can represent one or more tables or views as a separate
table. This can include aggregate data, such as sums and averages, from other tables.
• Allow access to specific rows in a table. For example, allow access to records that were added since a given date,
while hiding older records.
• Allow access to specific columns. For example allow access to columns that contain non-confidential information.
Note that this can also be achieved with the GRANT SELECT statement, using column-level privileges
A VIEW that returns the columns of a single ordinary TABLE is updatable if the query expression of the view is an
updatable query expression as discussed in the  Data Access and Change  chapter. Some updatable views are insertable-
into because the query expression is insertable-into. In these views, each column of the query expressions must be a
column of the underlying table and those columns of the underlying table that are not in the view must have a default
clause, or be an IDENTITY or GENERATED column. When rows of an updatable view are updated, or new rows are
inserted, or rows are deleted, these changes are reflected in the base table. A VIEW definition may specify that the
inserted or updated rows conform to the search condition of the view. This is done with the CHECK OPTION clause.
A view that is not updatable according to the above paragraph can be made updatable or insertable-into by adding
INSTEAD OF triggers to the view. These triggers contain statements to use the submitted data to modify the contents
of the underlying tables of the view separately. For example, a view that represents a SELECT statements that joins
two tables can have an INSTEAD OF DELETE trigger with two DELETE statements, one for each table. Views that
have an INSTEAD OF trigger are called TRIGGER INSERTABLE, TRIGGER UPDATABLE, etc. according to the
triggers that have been defined.
Views share a name-space with tables.
Constraints
A CONSTRAINT is a child schema object and can belong to a DOMAIN or a TABLE. CONSTRAINT objects can be
defined without specifying a name. In this case the system generates a name for the new object beginning with "SYS_".
In a DOMAIN, CHECK constraints can be defined that limits the value represented by the DOMAIN. These constraints
work exactly like a CHECK constraint on a single column of a table as described below.
In a TABLE, a constraint takes three basic forms.
CHECK
A CHECK constraint consists of a <search condition> that must not be false (can be unknown) for each row
of the table. The <search condition> can reference all the columns of the current row, and if it contains a
<subquery>, other tables and views in the database (excluding its own table).
NOT NULL
software control dll:How to C#: File Format Support
PowerPoint Pages. Annotate PowerPoint. Text Search. Insert Image. Thumbnail Create. VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB Microsoft Office 2003 PowerPoint Show
www.rasteredge.com
software control dll:VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
How to Process Image Using VB.NET. In this section, we will show you all VB.NET Image Cropping Assembly to Crop Image, VB.NET Image Thumbnail Creator Control SDK
www.rasteredge.com
Schemas and Database Objects
51
A simple form of check constraint is the NOT NULL constraint, which applies to a single column.
UNIQUE
A UNIQUE constraint is based on an equality comparison of values of specific columns (taken together) of one row
with the same values from each of the other rows. The result of the comparison must never be true (can be false or
unknown). If a row of the table has NULL in any of the columns of the constraint, it conforms to the constraint. A
unique constraint on multiple columns (c1, c2, c3, ..) means that in no two rows, the sets of values for the columns can
be equal unless at lease one of them is NULL. Each single column taken by itself can have repeat values in different
rows. The following example satisfies a UNIQUE constraint on the two columns
Example 4.4. Column values which satisfy a 2-column UNIQUE constraint
1,
2
2,
1
2,
2
NULL,
1
NULL,
1
1,
NULL
NULL,
NULL
NULL,
NULL
If the SET DATABASE SQL UNIQUE NULLS FALSE has been set, then if not all the values set of columns are null,
the not null values are compared and it is disallowed to insert identical rows that contain at least one not-null value.
PRIMARY KEY
A PRIMARY KEY constraint is equivalent to a UNIQUE constraint on one or more NOT NULL columns. Only one
PRIMARY KEY can be defined in each table.
FOREIGN KEY
A FOREIGN key constraint is based on an equality comparison between values of specific columns (taken together)
of each row with the values of the columns of a UNIQUE constraint on another table or the same table. The result
of the comparison must never be false (can be unknown). A special form of FOREIGN KEY constraint, based on its
CHECK clause, allows the result to be unknown only if the values for all columns are NULL. A FOREIGN key can
be declared only if a UNIQUE constraint exists on the referenced columns.
Constraints share a name space with assertions.
Assertions
An ASSERTION is a top-level schema objects. It consists of a <search condition> that must not be false (can
be unknown). HyperSQL does not yet support assertions.
Assertions share a name-space with constraints
Triggers
A TRIGGER is a child schema object that always belongs to a TABLE or a VIEW.
Each time a DELETE, UPDATE or INSERT is performed on the table or view, additional actions are taken by the
triggers that have been declared on the table or view.
Triggers are discussed in detail in  Triggers  chapter.
software control dll:XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
By clicking a thumbnail, you are redirect to a to search text-based documents, like PDF, Microsoft Office Word In addition, you may customize to show or hide
www.rasteredge.com
software control dll:VB.NET Image: Sharpen Images with DocImage SDK for .NET
This guiding page will show you how to sharpen an image in a Visual Basic .NET image processing application. Besides, we would like
www.rasteredge.com
Schemas and Database Objects
52
Routines
Routines are user-defined functions or procedures. The names and usage of functions and procedures are different.
FUNCTION is a routine that can be referenced in many types of statements. PROCEDURE is a routine that can be
referenced only in a CALL statement.
There is a separate name-space for routines.
Because of the possibility of overloading, each routine can have more than one name. The name of the routine is
the same for all overloaded variants, but each variant has a specific name, different from all other routine names and
specific names in the schema. The specific name can be specified in the routine definition statement. Otherwise it is
assigned by the engine. The specific name is used only for schema manipulation statements, which need to reference a
specific variant of the routine. For example, if a routine has two signatures, each signature has its own specific name.
This allows the user to drop one of the signatures while keeping the other.
Routines are discussed in detail in chapter  SQL-Invoked Routines  .
Indexes
Indexes are an implementation-defined extension to the SQL Standard. HyperSQL has a dedicated name-space for
indexes in each schema.
Statements for Schema Definition and Manipulation
Schemas and schema objects can be created, modified and dropped. The SQL Standard defines a range of statements
for this purpose. HyperSQL supports many additional statements, especially for changing the properties of existing
schema objects.
Common Elements and Statements
These elements and statements are used for different types of object. They are described here, before the statements
that can use them.
identifier
definition of identifier
<identifier> ::= <regular identifier> | <delimited identifier> | <SQL language
identifier>
<delimited identifier> ::= <double quote> <character sequence> <double quote>
<regular identifier> ::= <special character sequence>
<SQL language identifier> ::= <special character sequence>
A <delimited identifier> is a sequence of characters enclosed with double-quote symbols. All characters
are allowed in the character sequence.
A <regular identifier> is a special sequence of characters. It consists of letters, digits and the underscore
characters. It must begin with a letter. All the letters are translated to their upper-case version.
The database setting, SET DATABASE SQL REGULAR NAMES FALSE can be used to relax the rules for regular
identifier. With this setting, an underscore character can appear at the start of the regular identifier, and the dollar sign
character can be used in the identifier.
software control dll:VB.NET Image: VB.NET Code to Create Watermark on Images in .NET
Add Watermark to Image. In the code tab below we will show you the We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff files
www.rasteredge.com
software control dll:VB.NET Image: VB.NET DLL for Image Basic Transforming in .NET
VB.NET demo code below will show you how to crop a local image by We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff files
www.rasteredge.com
Schemas and Database Objects
53
A <SQL language identifier> is similar to <regular identifier> but the letters can range only from
A-Z in the ASCII character set. This type of identifier is used for names of CHARACTER SET objects.
If the character sequence of a delimited identifier is the same as an undelimited identifier, it represents the same
identifier. For example "JOHN" is the same identifier as JOHN. In a <regular identifier> the case-normal
form is considered for comparison. This form consists of the upper-case equivalent of all the letters. When a database
object is created with one of the CREATE statements or renamed with the ALTER statement, if the name is enclosed
in double quotes, the exact name is used as the case-normal form. But if it is not enclosed in double quotes, the name
is converted to uppercase and this uppercase version is stored in the database as the case-normal form.
The character sequence length of all identifiers must be between 1 and 128 characters.
A reserved word is one that is used by the  SQL Standard for special purposes.  It is similar to a <regular
identifier> but it cannot be used as an identifier for user objects. If a reserved word is enclosed in double quote
characters, it becomes a quoted identifier and can be used for database objects.
Case sensitivity rules for identifiers can be described simply as follows:
• all parts of SQL statements are converted to upper case before processing, except identifiers in double quotes and
strings in single quotes
• identifiers, both unquoted and double quoted, are then treated as case-sensitive
• most database engines follow the same rule, except, in some respects, MySQL and MS SQLServer.
CASCADE or RESTRICT
drop behavior
<drop behavior> ::= CASCADE | RESTRICT
The <drop behavior> is a required element of statements that drop a SCHEMA or a schema object. If <drop
behavior> is not specified then RESTRICT is implicit. It determines the effect of the statement if there are other
objects in the catalog that reference the SCHEMA or the schema object. If RESTRICT is specified, the statement
fails if there are referencing objects. If CASCADE is specified, all the referencing objects are modified or dropped
with cascading effect. Whether a referencing object is modified or dropped, depends on the kind of schema object
that is dropped.
IF EXISTS
drop condition (HyperSQL)
<if exists clause> ::= IF EXISTS
This clause is not part of the SQL standard and is a HyperSQL extension to some commands that drop objects (schemas,
tables, views, sequences and indexes). If it is specified, then the statement does not return an error if the drop statement
is issued on a non-existent object.
SPECIFIC
specific routine designator
<specific routine designator> ::= SPECIFIC <routine type> <specific name>
<routine type> ::= ROUTINE | FUNCTION | PROCEDURE
This clause is used in statements that need to specify one of the multiple versions of an overloaded routine. The
<specific name> is the one specified in the <routine definition> statement.
software control dll:C# Word - Run Processing in C#.NET
The following demo code will show you how to create a run in current paragraph. The following demo code will show you how to operate this work.
www.rasteredge.com
software control dll:C# Word - Table Cell Processing in C#.NET
using RasterEdge.XDoc.Word; Create and Add Cells in Table. The following demo code will show how to create a table cell and add to table.
www.rasteredge.com
Schemas and Database Objects
54
Renaming Objects
RENAME
rename statement (HyperSQL)
<rename statement> ::= ALTER <object type> <name> RENAME TO <new name>
<object type> ::= CATALOG | SCHEMA | DOMAIN | TYPE | TABLE | CONSTRAINT | INDEX
| ROUTINE | SPECIFIC ROUTINE
<column rename statement>  ::= ALTER TABLE <table name>  ALTER COLUMN <name>
RENAME TO <new name>
This statement is used to rename an existing object. It is not part of the SQL Standard. The specified <name> is the
existing name, which can be qualified with a schema name, while the <new name> is the new name for the object.
Commenting Objects
COMMENT
comment statement (HyperSQL)
<comment statement> ::= COMMENT ON { TABLE  | COLUMN | ROUTINE } <name> IS
<character string literal>
Adds a comment to the object metadata, which can later be read from an INFORMATION_SCHEMA view. This
command is not part of the SQL Standard. The strange syntax is due to compatibility with other database engines
that support the statement. The <name> is the name of a table, view, column or routine. The name of the column
consists of dot-separated <table name> . <column name>. The name of the table, view or routine can be
a simple name. All names can be qualified with a schema name. If there is already a comment on the object, the new
comment will replace it.
The comments appear in the results returned by JDBC DatabaseMetaData methods, getTables() and getColumns(). The
INFORMATION_SCHEMA.SYSTEM_COMMENTS view contains the comments. You can query this view using
the schema, table, and column names to retrieve the comments.
Schema Creation
CREATE SCHEMA
schema definition
The CREATE_SCHEMA or DBA role is required in order to create a schema. A schema can be created with or without
schema objects. Schema objects can always be added after creating the schema, or existing ones can be dropped. Within
the <schema definition> statement, all schema object creation takes place inside the newly created schema.
Therefore, if a schema name is specified for the schema objects, the name must match that of the new schema. In
addition to statements for creating schema objects, the statement can include instances of <grant statement>
and <role definition>. This is a curious aspect of the SQL standard, as these elements do not really belong
to schema creation.
<schema definition> ::= CREATE SCHEMA <schema name clause> [ <schema character
set specification> ] [ <schema element>... ]
<schema name clause> ::= <schema name> | AUTHORIZATION <authorization identifier>
| <schema name> AUTHORIZATION <authorization identifier>
Schemas and Database Objects
55
If the name of the schema is specified simply as <schema name>, then the AUTHORIZATION is the current user.
Otherwise, the specified <authorization identifier> is used as the AUTHORIZATION for the schema.
If <schema  name> is omitted, then the name of the schema is the same as the specified <authorization
identifier>.
<schema element> ::= <table definition> | <view definition> | <domain definition>
|  <character  set  definition>  |  <collation  definition>  |  <transliteration
definition> | <assertion definition> | <trigger definition> | <user-defined
type  definition>  |  <user-defined  cast  definition>  |  <user-defined  ordering
definition> | <transform definition> | <schema routine> | <sequence generator
definition> | <grant statement> | <role definition>
An example of the command is given below. Note that a single semicolon appears at the end. There should be no
semicolon between the statements:
CREATE SCHEMA ACCOUNTS AUTHORIZATION DBA
CREATE TABLE AB(A INTEGER, ...)
CREATE TABLE CD(C CHAR(10), ...)
CREATE VIEW VI AS SELECT ...
GRANT SELECT ON AB TO PUBLIC
GRANT SELECT ON CD TO JOE;
It is not really necessary to create a schema and all its objects as one command. The schema can be created first, and
its objects can be created one by one.
DROP SCHEMA
drop schema statement
<drop schema statement> ::= DROP SCHEMA [ IF EXISTS ] <schema name> [ IF EXISTS ]
<drop behavior>
This command destroys an existing schema. If <drop  behavior> is RESTRICT, the schema must be empty,
otherwise an error is raised. If CASCADE is specified, then all the objects contained in the schema are destroyed with
a CASCADE option.
Table Creation
CREATE TABLE
table definition
<table definition> ::= CREATE [ { <table scope> | <table type> } ] TABLE <table
name> <table contents source> [ ON COMMIT { PRESERVE | DELETE } ROWS ]
<table scope> ::= { GLOBAL | LOCAL } TEMPORARY
<table type> :: = MEMORY | CACHED
<table contents source> ::= <table element list> | <as subquery clause>
<table  element  list>  ::=  <left  paren>  <table  element>  [  {  <comma>  <table
element> }... ] <right paren>
<table element> ::= <column definition> | <table constraint definition> | <like
clause>
like clause
Schemas and Database Objects
56
A <like clause> copies all column definitions from another table into the newly created table. Its three options
indicate if the <default clause>, <identity column specification> and <generation clause>
associated with the column definitions are copied or not. If an option is not specified, it defaults to EXCLUDING. The
<generation clause> refers to columns that are generated by an expression but not to identity columns. All
NOT NULL constraints are copied with the original columns, other constraints are not. The <like clause> can
be used multiple times, allowing the new table to have copies of the column definitions of one or more other tables.
CREATE TABLE t (id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, LIKE atable INCLUDING DEFAULTS EXCLUDING IDENTITY)
<like clause> ::= LIKE <table name> [ <like options> ]
<like options> ::= <like option>...
<like option> ::= <identity option> | <column default option> | <generation
option>
<identity option> ::= INCLUDING IDENTITY | EXCLUDING IDENTITY
<column default option> ::= INCLUDING DEFAULTS | EXCLUDING DEFAULTS
<generation option> ::= INCLUDING GENERATED | EXCLUDING GENERATED
as subquery clause
<as subquery clause> ::= [ <left paren> <column name list> <right paren> ] AS
<table subquery> { WITH NO DATA | WITH DATA }
An <as subquery clause> used in table definition creates a table based on a <table subquery>. This kind
of table definition is similar to a view definition. If WITH DATA is specified, then the new table will contain the rows
of data returned by the <table subquery>.
CREATE TABLE t (a, b, c) AS (SELECT * FROM atable) WITH DATA
column definition
A column definition consists of a <column name> and in most cases a <data type> or <domain name>
as minimum. The other elements of <column definition> are optional. Each <column name> in a table
is unique.
<column  definition>  ::=  <column  name>  [  <data  type  or  domain  name>  ]
[ <default clause> | <identity column specification> | <identity column sequence
specification> | <generation clause> ] [ <column constraint definition>... ]
[ <collate clause> ]
<data type or domain name> ::= <data type> | <domain name>
<column constraint definition> ::= [ <constraint name definition> ] <column
constraint> [ <constraint characteristics> ]
<column  constraint>  ::=  NOT  NULL  |  <unique  specification>  |  <references
specification> | <check constraint definition>
A <column  constraint definition> is a shortcut for a <table constraint definition>. A
constraint that is defined in this way is automatically turned into a table constraint. A name is automatically generated
for the constraint and assigned to it.
Schemas and Database Objects
57
If a <collate clause> is specified, then a UNIQUE or PRIMARY KEY constraint or an INDEX on the column
will use the specified collation. Otherwise the default collation for the database is used.
generated columns
The value of a column can be autogenerated in two ways.
One way is specific to columns of integral types (INTEGER, BIGINT, etc.) and associates a sequence generator with
the column. When a new row is inserted into the table, the value of the column is generated as the next available
value in the sequence.
The SQL Standard supports the use of unnamed sequences with the IDENTITY keyword. In addition, HyperSQL
supports the use of a named SEQUENCE object, which must be in the same schema as the table.
<identity column specification> ::= GENERATED { ALWAYS | BY DEFAULT } AS IDENTITY
[ <left paren> <common sequence generator options> <right paren> ]
<identity column sequence specification ::= GENERATED BY DEFAULT AS SEQUENCE
<sequence name>
The <identity column specification> or <identity column sequence specification> can
be specified for only a single column of the table.
The <identity column specification> is used for columns which represent values based on an unnamed
sequence generator. It is possible to insert a row into the table without specifying a value for the column. The value is
then generated by the sequence generators according to its rules. An identity column may or may not be the primary
key. Example below:
CREATE TABLE t (id INTEGER GENERATED ALWAYS AS IDENTITY(START WITH 100), name VARCHAR(20)
PRIMARY KEY)
The <identity column sequence specification> is used when the column values are based on a named
SEQUENCE object (which must already exist). Example below:
CREATE TABLE t (id INTEGER GENERATED BY DEFAULT AS SEQUENCE s, name VARCHAR(20) PRIMARY KEY)
Inserting rows is done in the same way for a named or unnamed sequence generator. In both cases, if no value is
specified to be inserted, or the DEFAULT keyword is used for the column, the value is generated by the sequence
generator. If a value is specified, this value is used if the column definition has the BY DEFAULT specification.
If the column definition has the ALWAYS specification, a value can be specified but the OVERRIDING SYSTEM
VALUES must be specified in the INSERT statement.
The other way in which the column value is autogenerated is by using the values of other columns in the same row.
This method is often used to create an index on a value that is derived from other column values.
<generation clause> ::= GENERATED ALWAYS AS <generation expression>
<generation expression> ::= <left paren> <value expression> <right paren>
The <generation clause> is used for special columns which represent values based on the values held in other
columns in the same row. The <value expression> must reference only other, non-generated, columns of the
table in the same row. Any function used in the expression must be deterministic and must not access SQL-data. No
<query expression> is allowed. When <generation clause> is used, <data type> must be specified.
A generated column can be part of a foreign key or unique constraints or a column of an index. This capability is the
main reason for using generated columns. A generated column may contain a formula that computes a value based
on the values of other columns. Fast searches of the computed value can be performed when an index is declared on
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested