asp.net pdf viewer component : How to view pdf thumbnails in SDK Library service wpf .net winforms dnn RiegelTips1-part1345

PDFs
(Portable Document Format) are cross platform files that can be opened on either a PC or a 
MAC. This print-ready file format preserves all fonts, formatting, graphics and colors of any source 
document, independent of the application and platform used to create it and can also be viewed on 
multiple platforms without loss of quality. However PDFs embed data making last minutes changes 
to content and color difficult and in some cases impossible. Print ready PDFs should be submitted 
exactly as you want them to print.   
When Creating a Press Ready PDF: 
Graphics files must be linked to high resolution art and should not be downsampled
Colors must be setup properly; i.e. Spot vs Process and all images must be CMYK not RGB
Embed the fonts
Include the bleeds and crop marks
Collecting Files for Print Using QuarkXPress
®
& InDesign
®
 
QuarkXPress
®
’ “Collect 
for Output” and InDesign
®
’s “Package” features will do all of the work for you when it comes to 
getting your files ready for submission. The programs will collect all necessary elements of your 
files (fonts and images) with the exception of fonts used in placed graphics. Remember if you use 
a vector image that contains text, you will need to manually locate that font and include it with your 
file submission. 
Creating a PDF and Collecting Files for Print: 
Wrapping It Up
9
How to view pdf thumbnails in - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
create pdf thumbnail image; can't see pdf thumbnails
How to view pdf thumbnails in - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
create pdf thumbnails; pdf thumbnail fix
Compression
is a process used to reduce the size of files without losing any information and is 
typically applied to a single file.   
Archiving 
allows a hierarchy of files and folders to be grouped together for compression. This is 
ideal when dealing with files for print as they include multiple components; i.e. font folders, image 
folders, PDF and the document for print. Examples of Archive Formats are StuffIt (.sit), StuffIt X 
(.sitx) and Zip.  
Mediums for Submitting Files: 
CD, DVD, CD-R/RW are all acceptable
File Transmission Methods: 
Riegel FTP:
You can access our Company FTP site by going to our web page at www.
riegelprintinginc.com. Once you click on the FTP link you will be prompted to enter your user name 
and password, which will have been provided to you by your Account Executive or Customer Service 
Representative. You then follow the simple on screen instructions to safely transmit your file to us. 
This is our preferred method for receiving files. 
Email:
In some instances files will be small enough to transmit via Email, in which case you can 
submit your files directly to your Account Executive or Customer Service Representative.
File Compression and Transmission 
10
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Ability to show PDF page thumbnails for quick navigation. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. C# HTML5 PDF Viewer: View PDF Online.
pdf thumbnail generator online; view pdf image thumbnail
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Ability to show PDF page thumbnails for quick navigation. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: View PDF Online.
how to show pdf thumbnails in; generate pdf thumbnail c#
Did You Include?: 
Page Layout Documents
(QuarkXPress
®
/InDesign
®
file)
PDF and/or Hard Copy Proof of Each Creative Submitted
All Fonts Used in Your Page Layout Documents  
AND Graphics Files 
All Linked Graphics
(Photoshop
®
/Illustrator
®
/Freehand/CorelDRAW
®
)
Be sure to convert any RGB images to CMYK. If you change your  
graphic file names after they have been collected for submission,  
be sure to go back and relink them in your page layout file.
Completed Purchase Order or Approved Estimate
detailing  
the final finished size, color configuration, paper stock, quantity,  
finishing instructions, shipping information and due date
Special Instructions
File Submission Checklist 
For questions or  
further assistance 
please do not  
hesitate to contact 
us at  
609-771-0555
11
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document in VB.NET WPF program. PDF thumbnails for navigation in .NET project. VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer: View PDF Document.
create thumbnails from pdf files; no pdf thumbnails in
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
Users can view any page by using view page button. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. PDF thumbnails for navigation in .NET WPF Console application.
thumbnail pdf preview; pdf files thumbnail preview
AA 
Abbreviation for author’s alterations.
Absorption
In paper, the property which 
causes it to take up liquids or vapors in contact 
with in. In optics, the partial suppression of 
light through a transparent or translucent 
material. 
Accordion Fold 
In binding, a term used for 
two or more parallel folds which open like an 
accordion.
Acrobat 
Adobe
®
software that embodies the 
PDF format.
Against the Grain
Folding or feeding paper 
at right angles to the grain direction of the 
paper. Also known as crossgrain.
Aqueous Coating 
A clear coating that is 
used to protect printed pieces. It provides 
a protective surface that deters dirt and 
fingerprints.
Backing Up
Printing the reverse side of a 
sheet that is already printed on one side.
Basic Size
In inches, 25 x 38 for book papers, 
20 x 26 for cover papers, 22½ x 28½ or 22½ x 
35 for bristols, 25½ x 30½ for index.
Basis Weight 
The weight in pounds of a 
ream (500 sheets) of a specific paper grade 
that has been cut to its basic size.
Binding
The fastening of papers to create a 
brochure or book. The most common binding 
styles are saddle-stitch, perfect- bound, side-
stitched, case or edition, and mechanical.
Blanket
In offset printing, a rubber-surfaced 
fabric which is clamped around a cylinder, to 
which the image is transferred from the plate, 
and from which it is transferred to the paper. 
Bleed
A printed color or image that extends 
past the trimmed edges of a page, usually an 
1/8
th
inch.
Blind Embossing
A design which is 
stamped which is stamped without metallic 
leaf or ink, giving a bas-relief effect.
Caliper
The thickness of paper, usually 
expressed in thousandths of an inch (mils). In 
board it is expressed as “points”.
Clipping path
A vector-based outline used 
to “clip” or silhouette an image from its 
surroundings so only the desired part will print.
CMYK
Acronym for the subtractive process 
colors used in four-color process printing. The 
letters stand for cyan, magenta, yellow and key 
(black). Black is added to enhance color and 
contrast. Also called process colors. 
Coated Paper
Paper having a surface 
coating which produces a smooth finish. 
Surfaces vary from eggshell to glossy.
Collate
In binding, the gathering of sheets 
and signatures.
Color Balance
The correct combination of 
cyan, magenta and yellow to (1) reproduce a 
photograph without a color cast, (2) produce a 
neutral gray, or (3) reproduce the colors in the 
original scene or object.
Color Correction
Any method such as 
masking, dot-etching, re-etching and scanning, 
used to improve color.
Color Separation
A laser scanning 
method used to separate full-color artwork or 
transparencies into the four primary printing ink 
colors of cyan, magenta, yellow and black.
Glossary of Graphic Arts Terms: 
12
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Support of converting from any single one PDF page and multiple pages. Thumbnails can be created from PDF pages. Support for customizing image size.
html display pdf thumbnail; pdf no thumbnail
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Embedded page thumbnails.
how to view pdf thumbnails in; generate pdf thumbnails
Continuous Tone
An image which contains 
gradient tones from black to white.
Contrast
The tonal gradation between the 
highlights, middle tones and shadows in an 
original or reproduction.
Creep
Sometimes called “push out” it is the 
distance margins shift when paper is folder 
and/or inserted during finishing. The amount of 
creep will vary depending on both the number 
and thickness of the sheets and must be 
compensated for during layout and imposition. 
Crop
To eliminate portions of the copy, usually 
on a photographs or plate, indicated on the 
original by cropmarks
Cross Direction
In paper, the direction 
across the grain. Paper is weaker and more 
sensitive to changes in relative humidity in the 
cross direction than the grain direction.
Crossover
An image or type that continues 
across a spread of a brochure, book or 
magazine to another page.
Cutscore
In diecutting, a sharp-edged knife, 
several thousandths of an inch lower than the 
cutting rules in a die, made to cut part way into 
the paper or board for folding purposes.
Density
The degree of darkness (light 
absorption or opacity) of a photographic image. 
Descender
The part of a lowercase letter 
which extends below the main body, as in “p”.
Desktop Publishing
Process of composing 
pages using a standard computer, off-the-
shelf software, a device independent page 
description language like PostScript and 
outputting them on a printer or imagesetter.
Diecutting
The finishing process of using 
sharp steel rules to cut special shapes from 
printed sheets, for example labels, boxes and 
containers. Diecutting can be done on either 
flatbed or rotary presses.
Digital Printing
Printing by plateless 
imaging systems that are imaged by digital data 
from prepress systems.
Digital Blueline
A digital blueline is prepared 
from supplied electronic files output to a color 
laser or ink-jet printer. The paper is then cut, 
folded, and bound to represent the finished 
product. The digital blueline is used to be 
sure that all images and type are present and 
positioned according to job requirements. Then 
the digital blueline is used by the pressmen and 
the bindery department to be certain the job is 
being produced as designed.
On multiple color jobs, the colors and color 
breaks are shown as they will appear. Note 
that the colors are approximations only. The 
accurate colors - especially PMS colors - will be 
seen on press.
A digital blueline should be viewed in person, 
as more complex documents may be difficult 
to visualize online. The digital blueline is also 
used as an approval means allowing the job to 
continue to press.
Dot Gain
In printing, the amount a dot grows 
when printed, caused by the ink spreading as 
it is absorbed by the paper. Dot gain causes 
darker tones and stronger colors.
DPI (Dots-per-inch)
In offset printing, 
the number of dots that fit horizontally and 
vertically into a one-inch measure. Generally, 
the higher the dpi, the sharper the printed 
image.
Glossary of Graphic Arts Terms: 
13
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
by large enterprises and organizations to distribute and view documents. size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size Embedded page thumbnails.
show pdf thumbnails in; create thumbnail from pdf c#
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Converter control easy to create thumbnails from PDF pages. Selection for compressing to multiple image formats. Cut and paste any areas in PDF pages to images.
show pdf thumbnail in html; create pdf thumbnail
Drawdown
A test of the ink color on the 
actual paper stock that will be used to evaluate 
how it looks.
Dry trap
Printing over dry ink, which, unlike a 
wet trap, requires a separate pass through the 
press.
Dummy
A preliminary layout showing the 
position of illustrations and text as they are 
to appear in the final reproduction. A set of 
blank pages made up in advance to show size, 
shape, form and general style of a piece of 
printing.
Duotone
A term for a two-color halftone 
reproduction from a one-color photograph.
Duplex Paper
Paper with a different color or 
finish on each side.
Embossed Finish
Paper with a raised or 
depressed surface resembling wood, cloth, 
leather or other pattern. 
Embossing
Impressing an image in relief to 
achieve a raised surface; either overprinting or 
on blank paper (called blind embossing).
EPS (Encapsulated PostScript)
File 
format for images or graphics.
Fanout
Distortion of paper on the press due 
to waviness in the paper caused by absorption 
of moisture at the edges of the paper, 
particularly across the grain.
Felt Side
The smoother side of the paper 
for printing. The top side of a sheet in paper 
manufacturing. 
Finish
The surface characteristics of paper  
– such as gloss, matte, silk, velvet, satin,  
and dull.
Finishing
Post-press operations, including 
trimming, scoring, folding and binding.
Font
A typeface family that includes all letters 
and numbers in the same style.
Form
Pages of a book or brochure that are 
printed on the same sheet of paper as it passes 
through the press. Once the sheet is folded 
and trimmed, the form becomes a “signature.”
Four-color process
Method of printing 
using cyan, magenta, yellow and black (CMYK) 
inks to simulate full-color images. Also called 
full-color printing and process printing.
FPO (For position only)
Usually a low-
resolution image (72 or 100 dpi) file used only 
to indicate placement and size. It is meant to 
be replaced by a high-resolution image before 
printing.
Generation
Each succeeding stage in 
reproduction from the original copy.
Grain
In papermaking, the direction in which 
most fibers lie which corresponds with the 
direction in which the paper is made on a paper 
machine.
Grindoff
The 1/8th inch along the spine that 
is ground off of gathered signatures before 
perfect binding.
Gripper Edge
The leading edge of paper as it 
passes through a printing press. 
Gripper Margin
Unprintable blank edge of 
paper on which grippers bear, usually ½“ or 
less.
Grippers
Metal fingers that clamp on paper 
and control its flow as it passes through the 
press.
Glossary of Graphic Arts Terms: 
14
Gutter
The blank space or inner margin from 
printing area to binding.
Halftone
The reproduction of continuous-
tone images, through a screening process, 
which converts the image into dots of various 
sizes and equal spacing between centers (AM 
screening) or dots of equal size with variable 
spacing between them (FM screening).
Hard copy
A paper printout at 100% size of 
digital files. It is usually output on a desktop 
laser or inkjet printer.
Hard Dot
Halftone dot with little or no 
fringe and prints with little or no dot gain or 
sharpening.
Hard Proof
A proof on paper or other 
substrate as distinguished from a soft proof, 
which is an image on a computer or other video 
display screen. 
Highlight
The lightest or whitest parts 
in a photograph represented in a halftone 
reproduction by the smallest dots or the 
absence of dots. 
Hi-res
High-resolution image, usually 300 to 
350 dpi.
HTML (HyperText Markup Language)
The coding language that is used to create 
Hypertext documents for use on the World 
Wide Web.
Hue
The main attribute of a color which 
distinguishes it from other colors.
Imposition
The positioning of pages on a 
signature so that after printing, folding and 
cutting all pages appear in proper sequence.
Impression Cylinder
The cylinder on a 
printing press against which the paper picks 
up the impression from the blanket in offset 
printing (or from the plate in direct printing). 
JPEG
The Joint Photographic Experts Group 
was formed to create a standard for color and 
gray scale image compression. JPEG describes 
a variety of algorithms (rules), each of which is 
targeting for a type of image application. JPEG 
is the default formats for most digital cameras.
Kerning
In typesetting, subtracting space 
between two characters, making them closer 
together. 
Knockout
An area of background color 
that has been masked out (knocked out) by a 
foreground object and therefore does not print.
Lamination
A plastic film bonded by heat 
and pressure to a printed sheet for protection 
and appearance.
Layout
The drawing or sketch of a proposed 
printed piece.
Leading
(pronounced ledding) The distance 
between two lines of type, measured in points.
Letterspacing
The placing of additional 
space between each letter of a word.
Loose color
Proof of a halftone or color 
separation that is not assembled with other 
elements on a page. Also, known as loose or 
scatter proof.
Low-res
Low-resolution image, such as 72 or 
100 dpi.
Makeready
All work done to set up a press 
for printing.
Glossary of Graphic Arts Terms: 
15
Mark-up
Instructions written on a hard-copy 
printout.
Match color
A custom-blended ink color that 
matches a specified color in a color system 
such as Pantone
®
, Toyo
®
or TruMatch
®
. It is not 
built from a combination of CMYK.
Matte Finish
Dull paper finish without gloss 
or lustre.
Middletones
The tonal range between 
highlights and shadows of a photograph or 
reproduction.
Moiré
The undesirable screen pattern cause 
by incorrect screen angles of overprinting 
halftones.
Offset
The process of using an intermediate 
blanket cylinder to transfer an image from the 
image carrier to the substrate. 
Opacity 
That property of paper which 
minimizes the show-through of printing from 
the back side or next sheet.
Overprint
Printing one ink over another, such 
as printing type over a screen tint.
Overrun
Copies printed in excess of the 
specified quantity.
PDF (Portable Document Format)
Adobe
®®
Systems file format to facilitate 
cross-platform viewing of documents in their 
original form. PDF is a universal electronic file 
format, modeled after the PostScript language 
and is device- and resolution-independent. 
Documents in the PDF format can be viewed, 
navigated and printed from any computer 
regardless of the fonts or software programs 
used to create the original. 
Perfecting Press
A printing press that prints 
both sides of the paper in one pass.
Pixel
Short for “picture element.” A pixel is the 
smallest resolvable point of a raster image. It is 
the basic unit of digital imaging.
Plate Cylinder
The cylinder of a press on 
which the plate is mounted.
Platesetter
An image recorder which images 
directly on plate material.
PMS (Pantone
®
Matching System)
Color charts that have over 700 preprinted 
color patches of blended inks, used to identify, 
display or define special colors. 
Porosity
The property of paper that allows 
the permeation of air, an important factor in ink 
penetration.
PostScript
®
A page description language 
developed by Adobe
®®
Systems, Inc. to 
describe an image for printing. It handles both 
text and graphics. A PostScript file is a purely 
textbased description of a page.
Preflighting
The test used to evaluate or 
analyze every component needed to produce 
a printing job. Preflight confirms the type of 
disk being submitted, the color gamut, color 
breaks, and any art required (illustrations, 
transparencies, reflective photos, etc.) plus 
layout files, screen fonts, printer fonts, EPS or 
TIFF files, laser proofs, page sizes, print driver, 
cropmarks, etc.
Prepress
RIPing files, platemaking, and other 
work performed by the printer, separator or 
service bureau in preparation for printing.
Glossary of Graphic Arts Terms: 
16
Press Proof
A proof of a color subject 
made on a printing press, in advance of the 
production run. 
Pressure-sensitive Paper
Material with an 
adhesive coating, protected by a backing sheet 
until used. 
Process Colors
See CMYK.
Process Printing
The printing from a series 
of two or more halftone plates to produce 
intermediate colors and shade.
Proof
Print made from negatives or plates to 
check for errors and flaws, predict results on 
press and record how a printing job is intended 
to appear when finished.
Raster graphics
Computer image made up 
of pixels. Photoshop
®®
is the most common 
raster program.
Ream
Five hundred sheets of paper.
Register
Fitting of two or more printing 
image in exact alignment with each other.
Resolution
Ability of an input device to 
record, or an output device to reproduce the 
fine detail of an image.
RGB
Red, green and blue – the additive 
primaries used in monitors. They are not 
printing colors.
RIP (Raster Image Processor)
This 
device is designed to interpret PostScript files 
and create a document suitable for printing.
Saddle Stitch
To fasten to a booklet by 
wiring it through the middle fold of the sheets.
Score
To impress or indent a mark in the 
paper to make folding easier.
Self Cover
A cover of the same paper as the 
inside text pages. 
Serif
The short coss-lines at the ends of 
the main strokes of many letters in some 
typefaces.
Set-off
When the ink of a printed sheet 
rubs off or marks the next sheet as it is being 
delivered. Also called offset.
Shadow 
The darkest parts in a photograph, 
represented in a halftone by the largest dot.
Sharpen
To decrease in color strength, as 
when halftone dots become smaller; opposite 
of dot gain or dot spread.
Sheetwise
To print one side of a sheet with 
one plate, then turn the sheet over and print 
the other side with another plate using the 
same gripper and opposite side guide. 
Show-through
The undesirable condition 
in which the printing on the reverse side of a 
sheet can be seen through the sheet under 
normal lighting conditions. 
Signature 
The name given to a printed sheet 
after it has been folded.
Soft Dot
Halftone dot with considerable 
fringe which causes dot gain or sharpening.
Source File 
The original graphic file.
Spiral Binding
A book bound with wires 
in spiral form inserted through holes punched 
along the binding side.
Spot Color or Varnish
Specific color or 
varnish that is applied only to portions of a 
sheet.
Glossary of Graphic Arts Terms: 
17
Stet
A proofreader’s mark signifying that copy 
marked for correction should remain as it was.
Stock
Paper or other material being printed.
Substrate
Any material that can be printed 
on, such as paper, plastic and fabric.
TIF or TIFF (Tagged Image File format)
Raster file format used for image placement in 
page layout programs. TIFs can sometimes be 
tinted and modified in a page layout program 
where EPS images cannot.
Tints
Various even tone areas (strengths) of a 
solid color.
Tolerances
The specification of acceptable 
variations in register, density, dot size, plate or 
paper thickness, concentration of chemicals 
and other printing parameters.
Tooth
A characteristic of paper, a slightly 
rough finish, which permits it to take ink readily. 
Trapping
In prepress, refers to how much 
overprinting colors overlap to eliminate the 
white lines between colors in printing.
Trim Marks
Marks placed on the copy to 
indicate the edge of the page.
Trim Size
The size of the printed piece in its 
finished form.
Two-sidedness
The property in paper 
denoting the difference in appearance and 
printability between its top (felt) and bottom 
(wire) sides.
UV Coating
Liquid applied to a coated sheet, 
then bonded and cured with ultraviolet light. 
Varnish
A thin, protective coating applied to a 
printed sheet for protection and appearance.
Vellum Finish
A toothy finish which is 
relatively absorbent for fast ink penetration.
Vector Graphics
Graphics that use 
mathematical calculations to describe lines and 
curves. Illustrator
®®
is the most common vector 
program.
Vignette
An illustration in which the 
background fades gradually away until it blends 
into the unprinted paper.
Viscosity
A broad term encompassing the 
properties of tack and flow in printing inks.
Wire-o Binding
A continuous double series 
of wire looks run through punched slots along 
the binding side of a booklet. 
Work-and-tumble
To print one side of a 
sheet, then turn it over from gripper to back 
using the same side guide and plate to print.
Work-and-turn
To print one side of a sheet, 
then turn it over from left to right and print the 
second side using the same gripper and plate 
but opposite side guide.
Glossary of Graphic Arts Terms: 
18
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested