asp.net pdf viewer component : Create thumbnail jpg from pdf software control dll winforms azure web page web forms RL317721-part1348

U.S. Trade and Investment Relations with sub-Saharan Africa 
Congressional Research Service 
Countries: Benin, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, the Gambia, Kenya, Madagascar, Mali, Mozambique, Niger, Rwanda, 
Sierra Leone, Tanzania, Uganda. Fragile Countries: Burundi, Central African Republic, Comoros, Democratic 
Republic of the Congo, Cote d’Ivoire, Eritrea, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Sao Tome and Principe, Togo, 
Zimbabwe. 
U.S.-Africa Trade and Investment Trends 
U.S. Trade with sub-Saharan Africa 
U.S. imports from SSA countries fell in 2008 and 2009, possibly due to the spillover effects of the 
global financial crisis and falling demand.
22
According to the IMF, however, the SSA region is 
currently showing solid macroeconomic performance, and economic activity had expanded 
strongly in 2010 through 2012 to date.
23
This is illustrated, in part, by an expansion in total U.S. 
trade (imports plus exports) with SSA countries in 2010 and 2011, which grew by 29.5% and 
17% respectively, after a decrease in total trade by 40% in the 2008-2009 time frame (see Table 
4), as well as a continuing large increase in trade with China. 
Comparing Chinese and U.S. Trade with Africa
24
The value of total trade between China and Africa stood at $8.9 billion in the year 2000. In 2009, Chinese-African 
trade, totaling $70.4 billion, surpassed that of U.S.-Africa trade ($62 billion), and reached $127.3 billion in 2011, an 
increase of 1,423% over the 2000 level.
25
Africa’s share of global Chinese trade also grew over the past decade, from 
1.9% of Chinese global trade in 2000 to 3.5% of China’s global trade in 2011. China is also Africa’s largest single 
source of imports, while the United States is its largest export destination. In 2011, about 62% of African exports to 
China consisted of crude oil (over $24.77 billion of which came from Angola, the source of over 9% of China’s oil 
imports in 2011). Another 34% was made up of raw materials, mostly metal commodities and wood. Oil also 
dominates Africa’s exports to the United States; crude oil made up about 75% of U.S. imports from Africa in 2011. 
Both China and the United States export a highly diverse, variable array of products to Africa, notably equipment, 
machinery, vehicles, and other technology.
U.S.-African trade has also grown over the past decade, but not as rapidly 
as Sino-African trade.
26
22
CRS Report R40778, The Global Economic Crisis: Impact on Sub-Saharan Africa and Global Policy Responses, by 
Alexis Arieff, Martin A. Weiss, and Vivian C. Jones. 
23 International Monetary Fund, Regional Economic Outlook, October 2012, http://www.imf.org. 
24 Contribution from Nicolas Cook, CRS African Affairs Specialist. 
25 Sino-African trade in 2011 also eclipsed the record $104.7 billion in U.S.-African trade attained in 2008.  
26
U.S.-African trade also stood at $29.4 billion in the year 2000 and $94.3 billion in 2011, having increased 221%. In 
the year 2000, trade with Africa made up 1.5% of total U.S global trade, and Africa’s share had grown to 2.6% by 
2011. U.S.-Africa trade peaked in 2008 at $104.7 billion.  
Create thumbnail jpg from pdf - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
can't see pdf thumbnails; can't view pdf thumbnails
Create thumbnail jpg from pdf - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
create thumbnails from pdf files; enable pdf thumbnails in
U.S. Trade and Investment Relations with sub-Saharan Africa 
Congressional Research Service 
Table 4. U.S. Goods Trade with SSA Countries 
(in $ billions) 
Trade Flow 
2008 
2009 
2010 
2011  
Percentage 
Change 2010 
and 2011 (%) 
Total U.S. 
Exports 
18.0 
14.6 
16.4 
20.3 
24% 
Total U.S. 
Imports  
86.1 
47.9 
64.4 
74.0 
15% 
Total Trade 
(Imports + 
Exports) 
104.1 
62.4 
80.8 
94.3 
17% 
Imports under 
AGOA (includes 
GSP) 
65.1 
33.5 
43.9 
53.8 
23% 
Source: U.S. International Trade Commission Trade Dataweb, http://dataweb.usitc.gov. 
Notes: Domestic Exports, FAS value; Imports for Consumption, Customs Value. Total Imports under AGOA is 
a subset of total U.S. imports from SSA countries. 
The United States conducts a small share of its total trade with SSA countries. In 2011, the United 
States imported $74 billion from SSA countries, or about 3.4% of total U.S. global imports of 
$2.2 trillion. The United States exported $20.3 billion to the region in 2011, or 1.5% of total U.S. 
exports of $1.3 trillion. Nevertheless, total trade (exports plus imports) between the United States 
and sub-Saharan Africa grew 51% between 2009 and 2011, up from $62.4 billion in 2009 to 
$94.3 billion in 2011 (see Table 4). Certain external factors, including increases in oil and other 
prices for natural resources, may also account, in part, for the dramatic growth (by value) in U.S.-
SSA trade. 
A significant portion of U.S. trade with sub-Saharan Africa is with a small number of countries. 
About 79% of U.S. imports from the region were from three SSA countries in 2011: Nigeria 
(47%), Angola (19%), and South Africa (13%). Exports were similarly concentrated, with three 
countries receiving 68%: South Africa (34%), Nigeria (22%), and Angola (12%). All other 
countries accounted for less than 6% each of U.S. imports from the region (see Figure 3). 
VB.NET Image: How to Draw .NET Graphics Using RasterEdge .NET
If True Then Dim LoadImage As New Bitmap("C:\1.jpg") Dim Ellipse We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff files
generate pdf thumbnails; pdf file thumbnail preview
VB.NET Image: Visual Basic .NET Guide to Draw Text on Image in .
Create a VB.NET imaging application in your Visual Dim LoadImage As New Bitmap("C:\1.jpg") Dim Text powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document,
create thumbnail from pdf c#; generate pdf thumbnail c#
U.S. Trade and Investment Relations with sub-Saharan Africa 
Congressional Research Service 
Figure 2. U.S. Imports from sub-Saharan Africa by Country, 2011 
Nigeria
Angola
South Africa
Gabon
All other
Congo (ROC)
Chad
Source: U.S. International Trade Commission Trade Dataweb, http://www.usitc.gov.  
Figure 3. U.S. Exports to sub-Saharan Africa by Country, 2011 
South Africa
Nigeria
Angola
Ghana
Ethiopia
Benin
Kenya
Mozambique
Eq Guinea
Senegal
Tanzania
All other
Source: U.S. International Trade Commission Trade Dataweb, http://dataweb.usitc.gov. 
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
PowerPoint: PPT, PPTX, PPS, PPSX; PDF: Portable Document Raster Image Files: BMP, GIF, JPG, PNG, JBIG2PDF fast speed with the help of thumbnail, page navigate
how to make a thumbnail from pdf; thumbnail view in for pdf files
C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to JPEG in C#.NET
Pages. Annotate PowerPoint. Text Search. Insert Image. Thumbnail Create. PDF in WPF, C#.NET PDF Create, C#.NET will name the converted JPEG image file Output.jpg.
how to create a thumbnail of a pdf document; print pdf thumbnails
U.S. Trade and Investment Relations with sub-Saharan Africa 
Congressional Research Service 
10 
Natural resources continue to dominate U.S. imports from SSA. The leading U.S. imports from 
SSA in 2011 were mineral fuels and mineral oils ($58.97 billion, see Table 5). Nigeria was the 
greatest source of U.S. oil imports and was the fifth-largest global supplier (by value) of U.S. oil 
imports (of a total of $454 billion worldwide).
27
In 2011, Nigeria supplied 56% of U.S. petroleum 
imports from SSA, which accounted for about 7.4% of global U.S. oil imports. Angola supplied 
another 23% of U.S. petroleum from the region, Chad supplied 5%, and Congo (ROC) supplied 
4%.
28
Table 5. Top Ten U.S. Imports from sub-Saharan Africa, 2010 and 2011 
(in $ billions) 
HTS Number 
2010 
2011 
Percent Change 
2010-2011 
27-Mineral fuels and oil 
51.38 
58.97 
14.80% 
71-Pearls, Precious Stones, Precious Metals, etc., Coin 
3.95 
4.33 
9.80% 
87-Vehicles, Except Railway Or Tramway, And Parts 
1.61 
2.16 
34.10% 
18-Cocoa and cocoa preparations 
1.04 
1.27 
22.60% 
29-Organic chemicals 
1.22 
1.16 
-4.70% 
72-Iron and steel 
0.76 
0.89 
16.70% 
26-Ores, slag, and ash 
0.67 
0.79 
17.70% 
62-Articles of apparel and clothing accessories, not 
knitted or crocheted 
0.40 
0.46 
14.70% 
84-Nuclear Reactors, Boilers, Machinery and Parts 
0.36 
0.46 
26.30% 
61-Articles of apparel and clothing accessories, knitted 
or crocheted 
0.39 
0.44 
14.30% 
Subtotal  
61.77 
70.94 
14.80% 
All Other 
2.58 
3.08 
19.40% 
Total 
64.35 
74.02 
15.00% 
Source: U.S. International Trade Commission Trade Dataweb, http://www.usitc.gov. 
Note: U.S. Imports for Consumption. 
Precious stones and metals were another major U.S. import from SSA in 2011.
29
South Africa led 
this category (imports included platinum, diamonds, other semi-precious stones, and coins) with 
about $4.2 billion in U.S. imports; followed by Botswana, Angola, and Namibia—all diamond 
27
Harmonized Tariff Schedule Chapter 27, Mineral Fuels, Mineral Oils and Products of their Distillation; Bituminous 
Substances; Mineral Waxes. The top five oil suppliers to the United States in 2011 were Canada ($101.9 billion), Saudi 
Arabia ($46.2 billion), Mexico ($44 billion), Venezuela ($42 billion), and Nigeria ($34 billion) according to U.S. trade 
statistics (U.S. imports for consumption using the Global Trade Atlas). 
28 CRS calculations based on trade statistics (U.S. imports for consumption) from the U.S. International Trade 
Commission Trade Dataweb (http://dataweb.usitc.gov) and the Global Trade Atlas trade database. 
29 Harmonized Tariff Schedule Chapter 71, Natural or Cultured Pearls, Precious or Semi-Precious Stones, Precious 
Metals; Precious Metal Clad Metals, Articles Thereof; Imitation Jewelry; Coin.  
C# Word - Convert Word to JPEG in C#.NET
Text Search. Insert Image. Thumbnail Create. Convert Word to JPEG. Annotate PDF in WPF, C#.NET PDF Create, C#.NET name the converted JPEG image file Output.jpg.
enable pdf thumbnails; how to make a thumbnail of a pdf
How to C#: Modify Image Bit Depth
Tiff Edit. Image Thumbnail. Image Save. Advanced Save Options. Save Create an image processor with ImageProcess object. the 24 bits per pixel image input.jpg to 8
pdf thumbnail; can't view pdf thumbnails
U.S. Trade and Investment Relations with sub-Saharan Africa 
Congressional Research Service 
11 
producers—at about $275 million, $169 million, and $100 million, respectively (see Table 5 and 
Figure 4).
30
Although natural resources are the major category of U.S. imports from SSA countries, there have 
also been marked increases in imports of other products, including textiles and apparel, vehicle 
parts and transportation equipment, and agricultural products. A 2009 report by the U.S. 
International Trade Commission (USITC) indicated that certain SSA countries have the potential 
to competitively produce certain textile and apparel inputs. Since cotton is the primary fiber 
currently used in the production of yarn and fabric in SSA countries, and is grown in large 
quantities in the region, the USITC found that cotton products seem to have the most competitive 
potential. The report also stated that certain niche apparel products manufactured in small 
quantities could also be successful in the U.S. market, including organic cotton products; yarn 
and knit fabric of modal and other specialty manmade fibers; hand-loomed fabric of cotton and 
silk for home furnishings and apparel; African print fabrics; and zippers and ornamental trim 
products.
31
Figure 4. U.S. Imports from sub-Saharan Africa by Product Category, 2011 
Mineral Fuels
Precious Stones 
and Metals
Vehicles and 
Parts
Organic 
Chemicals
All other
Apparel, knitted
Machinery
Apparel, 
not knitted
Ores, Slag, and 
Ash
Cocoa
Iron and Steel
Source: U.S. International Trade Commission Trade Dataweb, http://www.usitc.gov. 
U.S. exports to sub-Saharan Africa were more diverse. Machinery and parts was the leading 
export sector in 2011 (22% of U.S. exports to the region), followed by transportation equipment 
(17%), cereals (8%), mineral fuels (8%), aircraft and parts (7%), and electrical machinery (6%) 
(see Figure 5).  
30 CRS calculations based on trade statistics from the U.S. International Trade Commission Trade Dataweb 
(http://dataweb.usitc.gov). 
31 U.S. International Trade Commission, Sub-Saharan African Textile and Apparel Inputs: Potential for Competitive 
Production, Investigation No. 332-502, May 2009. 
VB.NET Image: PDF to Image Converter, Convert Batch PDF Pages to
and non-professional end users to convert PDF and PDF/A documents to many image formats that are used commonly in daily life (like tiff, jpg, png, bitmap, jpeg
how to create a thumbnail of a pdf document; pdf thumbnail html
C# Image: How to Add Customized Web Viewer Command in C#.NET
& file formats (PDF, Word, TIFF, PNG, JPG, GIF, BMP to control the width of the displaying thumbnail of the interested in starting to integrate and create a web
view pdf thumbnails in; view pdf thumbnails
U.S. Trade and Investment Relations with sub-Saharan Africa 
Congressional Research Service 
12 
Table 6. Top Ten U.S. Exports to sub-Saharan Africa 
(in $ billions) 
HTS Number 
2010 
2011 
Percent 
Change 
84-Nuclear Reactors, Boilers, Machinery and Parts 
3.43 
3.93 
14.30% 
87-Vehicles, Except Railway Or Tramway, And Parts 
2.40 
3.45 
43.60% 
27-Mineral Fuels and Oil 
1.41 
1.84 
30.30% 
10-Cereals 
1.36 
1.79 
31.60% 
88-Aircraft, Spacecraft, and Parts 
1.11 
1.51 
35.70% 
85-Electric Machinery; Sound and TV Equipment and Parts 
0.81 
0.75 
-7.70% 
98-Special Classification Provisions 
0.60 
0.72 
18.50% 
71-Pearls, Precious Stones, Precious Metals, etc., Coin 
0.42 
0.62 
44.90% 
90-Optical, Photography, Medical or Surgical Instruments 
0.60 
0.58 
-3.50% 
39-Plastics and Articles Thereof 
0.47 
0.56 
20.40% 
Subtotal  
12.63 
15.73 
24.60% 
All Other 
3.81 
4.57 
19.80% 
Total 
16.44 
20.30 
23.50% 
Source: U.S. International Trade Commission Trade Dataweb, http://www.usitc.gov 
Figure 5. U.S. Exports to sub-Saharan Africa by Product Category, 2011 
Machinery
Vehicles and parts
Mineral Fuels
Cereals
All other
Special Provisions
Electrical 
Machinery
Aircraft and parts
Precious Stones 
and Metals
Optical/Surgical 
Instruments
Plastics
Source: U.S. International Trade Commission Trade Dataweb, http://www.usitc.gov. 
VB.NET Image: Tutorial for Flipping Image Using Our .NET Image SDK
Image SDK, an image (including BMP, PNG, JPG, etc) can made correctly, users are able to create a VB powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
how to make a thumbnail from pdf; pdf thumbnail viewer
C# Image: How to Draw Text on Images within Rasteredge .NET Image
Then, you are supposed to create a project Bitmap LoadImage = new Bitmap("C:\\1.jpg"); Graphic Text powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
can't see pdf thumbnails; show pdf thumbnails
U.S. Trade and Investment Relations with sub-Saharan Africa 
Congressional Research Service 
13 
U.S. Investment in sub-Saharan Africa 
U.S. foreign direct investment (FDI) in Africa is characterized by the following: 
•  SSA countries are a relatively minor destination of U.S. FDI. Africa, as a whole, 
hosts about 1% of total U.S. FDI (see Figure 6).
32
•  U.S. FDI in Africa is largely concentrated in mining and extractive industries, 
which together comprise some $33 billion of the $57 billion total stock of U.S. 
FDI in Africa (see Figure 7).
33
•  U.S. FDI in African manufacturing industries has mostly been directed toward 
South Africa, which has received about 67% of total U.S. FDI in Africa’s 
manufacturing sector.
34
In 2011, the latest year for which annual investment data are available, outflows of U.S. FDI 
abroad to SSA ($3.4 billion) were only about one-third greater than inflows of FDI into the 
United States from SSA ($2.1 billion). The three countries in SSA with the largest stock of U.S. 
FDI in 2011 were Mauritius, South Africa, and Angola (stock column, Table 7). This stock of 
FDI represents an accumulation over time. In terms of one-year flows for 2011, the top recipients 
were South Africa, Angola, and Ghana (see flow column). 
Table 7. Major Destinations of U.S. Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) in SSA, 2011 
(in $ millions) 
Leading 
Countries 
Flow 
Stock 
Mauritius 
45 
7,330 
South Africa 
722 
6,546 
Angola 
707 
5,696 
Nigeria 
-35 
4,994 
Ghana 
250 
2,334 
Equatorial Guinea 
37 
2,076 
Liberia 
113 
964 
Kenya 
-40 
292 
Zambia 
-1 
138 
Source: Analysis by CRS based on data from the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA). 
32 Data from the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA). Analysis by CRS. BEA industry-specific data were not provided 
in sufficient detail to break out SSA countries from Africa as a whole. 
33 Ibid. 
34 Ibid. 
U.S. Trade and Investment Relations with sub-Saharan Africa 
Congressional Research Service 
14 
Figure 6. Stock of U.S. FDI Abroad, by Destination 
(share of total, 2011) 
Europe
55%
Latin 
America
20%
Asia and 
Pacific
15%
Canada
8%
Africa
1%
Middle 
East
1%
Source: Analysis by CRS based on data from the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA). 
Figure 7. Stock of U.S. FDI in Africa by Industry Sector, 2011 
(in $ millions) 
0
5,000
10,000
15,000
20,000
25,000
30,000
35,000
40,000
Information Professional,
Scientific, and
Technical
Services
Wholesale
Trade
Other
Industries
Depository
Institutions
Manufacturing Finance and
Insurance
Mining
Source: Analysis by CRS based on data from the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA). 
Note: Excludes U.S. stock of direct investment in holding companies. 
U.S. Trade and Investment Relations with sub-Saharan Africa 
Congressional Research Service 
15 
AGOA Legislation and Key Provisions 
The original AGOA legislation, the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA; Title I, Trade 
and Development Act of 2000; P.L. 106-200), was approved by Congress in 2000, to assist the 
economies of sub-Saharan Africa and to improve economic relations between the United States 
and the region. The following section of this report examines the major provisions of AGOA, 
developments since enactment, and AGOA related legislation in the 112
th
Congress. 
Beneficiary Countries 
Subtitle A of AGOA authorized the President to designate sub-Saharan African countries as 
beneficiary countries eligible to receive duty-free treatment for certain articles that are the 
growth, product, or manufacture of that country. It directed that in designating a beneficiary 
country, the President must determine that the country (1) has established, or is making continual 
progress toward establishing a market-based economy and is taking other designated actions; (2) 
does not engage in activities that undermine U.S. national security and foreign policy interests; 
and (3) does not engage in gross violations of internationally recognized human rights or provide 
support for international terrorism. 
Table 8. Beneficiary Countries under the African Growth and Opportunity Act 
(as of October 2012) 
Republic of Angola 
Republic of Ghana * * 
Democratic Republic of Sao Tome 
and Principe 
Republic of Benin * *
Republic of Guinea 
Republic of Senegal * * 
Republic of Botswana * *  
Republic of Guinea-Bissau 
Republic of Seychelles  
Burkina Faso * * 
Republic of Kenya * * 
Republic of Sierra Leone * * 
Republic of Burundi 
Kingdom of Lesotho * * 
Republic of South Africa 
Republic of Cameroon * * 
Republic of Liberia * * 
Kingdom of Swaziland * * 
Republic of Cape Verde * * 
Republic of Malawi * * 
United Republic of Tanzania * * 
Republic of Chad * * 
Republic of Mali * * 
Republic of Togo 
Union of the Comoros  
Islamic Republic of Mauritania 
Republic of Uganda * * 
Republic of Congo 
Republic of Mauritius * * 
Republic of Zambia * * 
Republic of Cote d’Ivoire 
Republic of Mozambique * * 
Republic of Djibouti 
Republic of Namibia* * 
Ethiopia * * 
Republic of Niger * * 
Gabonese Republic 
Federal Republic of Nigeria * * 
Republic of the Gambia * * 
Republic of Rwanda * * 
Source: Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States, Supplement 1, Revision 1, October 31, 2012. 
Notes: Eligible SSA countries, not currently AGOA-beneficiaries: Democratic Republic of Congo, Eritrea, 
Equatorial Guinea, Madagascar, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, and Zimbabwe. 
* * Beneficiary country is eligible for the lesser-developed country special rule for apparel (third-country fabric 
provision).  
U.S. Trade and Investment Relations with sub-Saharan Africa 
Congressional Research Service 
16 
AGOA requires that the President monitor and report annually on the progress of each country in 
meeting the terms for AGOA eligibility. Under this requirement, Presidents have made, at the end 
of each year, annual designations of the countries eligible for AGOA benefits for the following 
year. The last presidential proclamation made with respect to AGOA was Proclamation 8741 of 
October 25, 2011.
35
This proclamation, among other things, reinstated the AGOA eligibility of 
Cote d’Ivoire, Guinea, and Niger, and also designated them each “lesser developed beneficiary 
sub-Saharan African countries.” Thus, 40 SSA countries are now AGOA beneficiaries. 
Benefits 
Subtitle B of AGOA describes the trade-related benefits that are available to AGOA-eligible 
countries. Among these benefits is preferential duty-free treatment for certain articles under the 
U.S. Generalized System of Preferences (GSP). The GSP program is a unilateral trade preference 
regime that allows certain products from designated developing countries to enter the United 
States duty-free. In the AGOA Acceleration Act of 2004 (P.L. 108-274), GSP benefits were 
extended to AGOA countries until September 30, 2015.
36
Therefore, AGOA countries will 
continue to receive GSP benefits until that date, regardless of any expiration of the GSP program. 
AGOA beneficiaries are exempt from certain caps on allowable duty-free imports under the GSP 
program (“competitive need limitations”).
37
“Import-Sensitive” Articles Ineligible for GSP Preferences 
1. Textile and apparel articles which were not eligible articles for purposes of this subchapter on January 1, 1994, as 
this subchapter was in effect on such date. 
2. Watches, except those watches entered after June 30, 1989, that the President specifically determines, after public 
notice and comment, will not cause material injury to watch or watch band, strap, or bracelet manufacturing and 
assembly operations in the United States or the United States insular possessions. 
3. Import-sensitive electronic articles. 
4. Footwear, handbags, luggage, flat goods, work gloves, and leather wearing apparel which were not eligible articles 
for purposes of this subchapter on January 1, 1995, as this subchapter was in effect on such date. 
5. Import-sensitive semi-manufactured and manufactured glass products. 
6. Any other articles which the President determines to be import-sensitive in the context of the Generalized System 
of Preferences. 
Source: 19 U.S.C. 2463(b). 
AGOA-eligible countries may also receive duty-free treatment for certain “import sensitive” 
categories of products (see box above) that are identified as ineligible for duty-free treatment 
under GSP, provided that the President determines, after consultation with the International Trade 
Commission, that the product is not import-sensitive in the context of imports from AGOA 
35 76 Federal Register 67035. 
36
P.L. 106-200, as amended by §7 of P.L. 108-274.  
37 See CRS Report RL33663, Generalized System of Preferences: Background and Renewal Debate, by Vivian C. 
Jones. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested