asp.net pdf viewer control : Create thumbnail jpg from pdf Library application class asp.net html web page ajax RS208710-part1383

Iran Sanctions 
Kenneth Katzman 
Specialist in Middle Eastern Affairs 
March 23, 2016 
Congressional Research Service 
7-5700 
www.crs.gov 
RS20871 
Create thumbnail jpg from pdf - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
how to make a thumbnail from pdf; pdf files thumbnail preview
Create thumbnail jpg from pdf - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
pdf thumbnail; create thumbnail jpeg from pdf
Iran Sanctions 
Congressional Research Service 
Summary 
Broad international sanctions imposed on Iran during 2010
-
2013 harmed Iran’s economy and 
contributed to Iran’s acceptance of agreements that exchange constraints on its nuclear program 
for sanctions relief. The sanctions and related diplomatic pressure, at least in part, caused or 
contributed to the following: 
Iran’s crude oil exports fell from about 2.5 million barrels per day (mbd) in 2011 
to about 1.1 mbd by mid
-
2013. The effect of that export volume reduction was 
further compounded by a fall in oil prices since mid
-
2014. Sanctions also made 
inaccessible about $120 billion in Iranian reserves held in banks abroad. 
Iran’s economy shrank by 9% in the two years that ended in March 2014, before 
stabilized in 2015 as a result of modest sanctions relief under an interim nuclear 
agreement that went into effect on January 20, 2014. 
Iran’s ability to procure equipment for its nuclear and missile programs and to 
import advanced conventional weaponry was constricted. However, Iran was still 
able to develop its missile programs and to assist pro
-
Iranian movements and 
governments in the region. 
Sanctions might have contributed to the June 2013 election as president of 
Hassan Rouhani, who articulated a priority of obtaining relief from international 
sanctions and isolation. 
The comprehensive nuclear accord (Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, or JCPOA), finalized on 
July 14, 2015, provides broad sanctions relief from U.S., U.N., and multilateral sanctions on 
Iran’s energy, financial, shipping, automotive, and other sectors. Sanctions were suspended or 
lifted upon the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) certification on January 16, 2016, 
that Iran had complied with the stipulated nuclear dismantlement commitments under the 
agreement (“Implementation Day”). Iran is now able to freely export crude oil and to access its 
foreign exchange reserves held in foreign banks 
-
a net amount (gross amount minus what is 
committed to creditors) of nearly $60 billion. On Implementation Day, Administration waivers of 
relevant sanctions laws went into effect and relevant Executive Orders were revoked through a 
new Executive Order 13716. 
Remaining in place are those secondary sanctions (sanctions on foreign firms) that have been 
imposed because of Iran’s support for terrorism, its human rights abuses, its interference in 
specified countries in the region, and its missile and advanced conventional weapons programs. 
Most sanctions that apply to U.S. companies remain in place. Under U.N. Security Council 
Resolution 2231 of July 20, 2015, U.N. sanctions terminated as of Implementation Day, but U.N. 
restrictions on Iran’s development of nuclear
-
capable ballistic missiles and its importation or 
exportation of arms remain in place for limited periods of time. 
The Administration asserts that Iran will likely use sanctions relief primarily to resurrect its 
economy rather than try to expand its regional influence. However, the JCPOA contains no 
formal requirements or restrictions on how Iran should spend its national funds. Some in 
Congress have proposed legislation to sanction Iran’s continued missile development and Iran’s 
Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC), which supports pro
-
Iranian movements and 
governments as well as helps secure the regime. See also: CRS Report R43333, Iran Nuclear 
Agreement, by Kenneth Katzman and Paul K. Kerr; CRS Report R43311, Iran: U.S. Economic 
Sanctions and the Authority to Lift Restrictions, by Dianne E. Rennack; and CRS Report 
RL32048, Iran: Politics, Gulf Security, and U.S. Policy, by Kenneth Katzman.
VB.NET Image: How to Draw .NET Graphics Using RasterEdge .NET
If True Then Dim LoadImage As New Bitmap("C:\1.jpg") Dim Ellipse We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff files
pdf no thumbnail; pdf files thumbnails
VB.NET Image: Visual Basic .NET Guide to Draw Text on Image in .
Create a VB.NET imaging application in your Visual Dim LoadImage As New Bitmap("C:\1.jpg") Dim Text powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document,
no pdf thumbnails in; disable pdf thumbnails
Iran Sanctions 
Congressional Research Service 
Contents 
Overview and Objectives
................................................................................................................ 
Blocked Iranian Property and Assets
............................................................................................... 
Executive Order 13599 Impounding Iran
-
Owned Assets
.......................................................... 
Sanctions for Iran’s Support for Terrorism and Destabilizing Regional Activities
......................... 
Sanctions Triggered by Terrorism List Designation: Ban on U.S. Aid, Arms Sales, 
Dual
-
Use Exports, and Certain Programs for Iran
................................................................. 
Exception for U.S. Humanitarian Aid
................................................................................. 
Executive Order 13224 Sanctioning Terrorism
-
Supporting Entities
......................................... 
Executive Orders Sanctioning Iran’s Involvement in Iraq and Syria
........................................ 
Ban on U.S. Trade and Investment with Iran
.................................................................................. 
What U.S.
-
Iran Trade Is Allowed or Prohibited?
................................................................ 
Application to Foreign Subsidiaries of U.S. Firms
............................................................. 
Sanctions on Iran’s Energy Sector
................................................................................................... 
The Iran Sanctions Act, Amendments, and Its Applications
..................................................... 
Key Sanctions “Triggers” Under ISA
................................................................................. 
Mandate and Timeframe to Investigate ISA Violations
.................................................... 
14 
Interpretations and Administration of ISA and Related Laws
.......................................... 
17 
Oil Export Sanctions: Section 1245 of the FY2012 NDAA Sanctioning Transactions 
with Iran’s Central Bank
...................................................................................................... 
21 
Implementation: Exemptions Issued
................................................................................. 
22 
Foreign Exchange Reserves “Lock Up” Provision of ITRSHRA
..................................... 
22 
Weapons of Mass Destruction, Missile, and Conventional Arms Sanctions
................................. 
23 
Iran
-
Iraq Arms Nonproliferation Act and Iraq Sanctions Act
................................................. 
24 
Anti
-
Terrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act of 1996
....................................................... 
24 
Provision of the Iran Sanctions Act
......................................................................................... 
25 
Iran
-
North Korea
-
Syria Nonproliferation Act
......................................................................... 
25 
Executive Order 13382 on Proliferation
-
Supporting Entities
................................................. 
26 
Foreign Aid Restrictions for Suppliers of Iran
........................................................................ 
27 
Sanctions on “Countries of Diversion Concern”
..................................................................... 
28 
Financial/Banking Sanctions
......................................................................................................... 
28 
Targeted Financial Measures
................................................................................................... 
28 
CISADA: Sanctioning Foreign Banks That Conduct Transactions with Sanctioned 
Iranian Banks
....................................................................................................................... 
29 
Implementation of Section 104: Sanctions Imposed
......................................................... 
30 
Iran Designated a Money
-
Laundering Jurisdiction
................................................................. 
31 
Laws That Promote Divestment
.................................................................................................... 
31 
Sanctions and Sanctions Exemptions to Support Democratic Change/Civil Society in Iran
........ 
31 
Expanding Internet and Communications Freedoms
.............................................................. 
32 
Sanctions and Actions to Counter Iranian Censorship of the Internet: 
CISADA,
E.O. 13606 and E.O. 13628
.......................................................................... 
32 
Laws and Administration Actions to Promote Internet Communications 
by
Iranians
..................................................................................................................... 
32 
Measures to Sanction Human Rights Abuses and Promote
the
Opposition
............................ 
33 
U.N. Sanctions
............................................................................................................................... 
34 
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
PowerPoint: PPT, PPTX, PPS, PPSX; PDF: Portable Document Raster Image Files: BMP, GIF, JPG, PNG, JBIG2PDF fast speed with the help of thumbnail, page navigate
pdf thumbnails; pdf file thumbnail preview
C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to JPEG in C#.NET
Pages. Annotate PowerPoint. Text Search. Insert Image. Thumbnail Create. PDF in WPF, C#.NET PDF Create, C#.NET will name the converted JPEG image file Output.jpg.
show pdf thumbnails in; can't view pdf thumbnails
Iran Sanctions 
Congressional Research Service 
Summary of Sanctions Easing Under the JPA and JCPOA
..................................................... 
36 
Sanctions Eased by the JPA
.............................................................................................. 
36 
Sanctions Easing Under the JCPOA
................................................................................. 
37 
International Implementation and Compliance
............................................................................. 
40 
Europe
..................................................................................................................................... 
40 
China and Russia
..................................................................................................................... 
42 
Russia
................................................................................................................................ 
42 
China
................................................................................................................................. 
43 
Japan/Korean Peninsula
.......................................................................................................... 
43 
South Asia: India, Pakistan, and Afghanistan
......................................................................... 
44 
India
.................................................................................................................................. 
44 
Pakistan
............................................................................................................................. 
44 
Afghanistan
....................................................................................................................... 
45 
Turkey/South Caucasus
........................................................................................................... 
45 
Turkey
............................................................................................................................... 
45 
Caucasus: Azerbaijan, Armenia, and Georgia
................................................................... 
46 
Persian Gulf and Iraq
.............................................................................................................. 
46 
Iraq
.................................................................................................................................... 
47 
Africa and Latin America
........................................................................................................ 
48 
World Bank Loans
................................................................................................................... 
48 
Private
-
Sector Cooperation and Compliance
.......................................................................... 
52 
Effects of Sanctions and of Post
-
JCPOA Relief
............................................................................ 
54 
Effect on Iran’s Nuclear Program and Strategic Capabilities
.................................................. 
54 
Effects on Iran’s Regional Influence
....................................................................................... 
54 
General Political Effects
.......................................................................................................... 
55 
Human Rights
-
Related Effects
................................................................................................ 
55 
Economic Effects
.................................................................................................................... 
56 
Iran’s Economic Coping Strategies
................................................................................... 
58 
Effect on Energy Sector Long
-
Term Development
................................................................. 
59 
Effect on Gasoline Availability and Importation
............................................................... 
64 
Humanitarian Effects/Air Safety
............................................................................................. 
66 
Legislative Issues
.......................................................................................................................... 
66 
Iran Nuclear Agreement Review Act P.L. 114
-
17)
.................................................................. 
66 
Pending Iran Sanctions Legislation
......................................................................................... 
67 
Other Possible U.S. and International Sanctions
..................................................................... 
69 
Tables 
Table 1. ISA Sanctions Determinations
......................................................................................... 
20 
Table 2. Top Oil Buyers From Iran and Reductions
...................................................................... 
23 
Table 3. Summary of Provisions of U.N. Resolutions on Iran Nuclear Program (1737, 
1747, 1803, 1929, and 2231)
...................................................................................................... 
35 
Table 4. Comparison Between U.S., U.N., and EU and Allied Country Sanctions (Prior to 
Implementation Day)
.................................................................................................................. 
49 
Table 5. Post
-
1999 Major Investments/Major Development Projects 
in
Iran’s
Energy
Sector
............................................................................................................... 
60 
Table 6. Firms That Sold Gasoline to Iran
..................................................................................... 
65 
C# Word - Convert Word to JPEG in C#.NET
Text Search. Insert Image. Thumbnail Create. Convert Word to JPEG. Annotate PDF in WPF, C#.NET PDF Create, C#.NET name the converted JPEG image file Output.jpg.
thumbnail view in for pdf files; cannot view pdf thumbnails in
How to C#: Modify Image Bit Depth
Tiff Edit. Image Thumbnail. Image Save. Advanced Save Options. Save Create an image processor with ImageProcess object. the 24 bits per pixel image input.jpg to 8
view pdf thumbnails; generate pdf thumbnails
Iran Sanctions 
Congressional Research Service 
Table 7. Entities Sanctioned Under U.N. Resolutions and 
U.S.
Laws
and
Executive
Orders
................................................................................................ 
71 
Contacts 
Author Contact Information
.......................................................................................................... 
80 
VB.NET Image: PDF to Image Converter, Convert Batch PDF Pages to
and non-professional end users to convert PDF and PDF/A documents to many image formats that are used commonly in daily life (like tiff, jpg, png, bitmap, jpeg
pdf first page thumbnail; enable pdf thumbnail preview
C# Image: How to Add Customized Web Viewer Command in C#.NET
& file formats (PDF, Word, TIFF, PNG, JPG, GIF, BMP to control the width of the displaying thumbnail of the interested in starting to integrate and create a web
create pdf thumbnails; generate pdf thumbnail c#
Iran Sanctions 
Congressional Research Service 
Overview and Objectives 
U.S. sanctions have been a major feature of U.S. Iran policy since Iran’s 1979 Islamic revolution, 
but the imposition of U.N. and worldwide bilateral sanctions on Iran that began in 2006 and 
increased dramatically as of 2010 is recent by comparison. The objectives of U.S. sanctions have 
evolved over time. In the 1980s and 1990s, U.S. sanctions were intended to try to compel Iran to 
cease supporting acts of terrorism and to limit Iran’s strategic power in the Middle East more 
generally. Since the mid
-
2000s, U.S. sanctions have focused on compelling Iran to ensuring that 
Iran’s nuclear program is for purely civilian uses and, since 2010, the international community 
has cooperated with a U.S.
-
led and U.N.
-
authorized sanctions regime in pursuit of that goal. Still, 
sanctions against Iran have multiple objectives and address multiple perceived threats from Iran 
simultaneously. 
This report analyzes U.S. and international sanctions against Iran and provides some examples, 
based on open sources, of companies and countries that conduct business with Iran. CRS has no 
way to independently corroborate any of the reporting on which these examples are based and no 
mandate to assess whether any firm or other entity is complying with U.S. or international 
sanctions against Iran. The sections below are grouped according to functional theme, in the 
chronological order in which these themes have emerged in U.S. policy toward Iran. 
Implementation of some of the sanctions is subject to interpretation. On November 13, 2012, the 
Administration published in the Federal Register (Volume 77, Number 219) “Policy Guidance” 
explaining how it implements many of the sanctions,
1
and in particular defining what products 
and chemicals constitute “petroleum,” “petroleum products,” and “petrochemical products” that 
are used in the laws and executive orders discussed below. 
Blocked Iranian Property and Assets 
Post-JCPOA Status: Most Iranian Assets Still Frozen — Some Issues Resolved. 
U.S. sanctions on Iran were first imposed during the U.S.
-
Iran hostage crisis of 1979
-
1981, in the 
form of executive orders issued by President Jimmy Carter blocking Iranian assets held in the 
United States. The assets were unblocked by subsequent orders when the crisis was resolved in 
early 1981 in accordance with the “Algiers Accords.” 
U.S.
-
Iran Claims Tribunal. The Accords established a “U.S.
-
Iran Claims Tribunal” at The Hague 
continues to arbitrate cases resulting from the 1980 break in relations and freezing of some of 
Iran’s assets. All of the 4,700 private U.S. claims against Iran were resolved in the first 20 years 
of the Tribunal, resulting in $2.5 billion in awards to U.S. nationals and firms. One major 
unresolved case was an Iranian claim for compensation for hundreds of foreign military sales 
(FMS) cases—mainly arms bought by the Shah’s government or arms undergoing repair in the 
United States 
-
which the Shah’s government had paid for but were halted (and the equipment not 
delivered to Iran) after he fell to the Islamic revolution. A reported $400 million in proceeds from 
the U.S. resale of the equipment was placed in a DOD FMS escrow account. On January 17, 
2016, the day after Implementation Day of the JCPOA, the United States announced it had settled 
the case and will send to Iran the $400 million balance in the DOD escrow account plus $1.3 
billion in accrued interest, which will come from the Treasury Department’s “Judgment Fund.” 
1
http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-11-13/pdf/2012-27642.pdf. 
VB.NET Image: Tutorial for Flipping Image Using Our .NET Image SDK
Image SDK, an image (including BMP, PNG, JPG, etc) can made correctly, users are able to create a VB powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
pdf thumbnail viewer; pdf reader thumbnails
C# Image: How to Draw Text on Images within Rasteredge .NET Image
Then, you are supposed to create a project Bitmap LoadImage = new Bitmap("C:\\1.jpg"); Graphic Text powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
create pdf thumbnail; create thumbnail from pdf c#
Iran Sanctions 
Congressional Research Service 
Other Frozen Assets. Some additional Iranian assets have been frozen by the United States. 
Including Iranian assets blocked under Executive Order 13599 of February 2010, discussed 
below, about $1.97 billion in U.S.
-
based Iranian assets are blocked, according to the 2014 
“Terrorist Assets Report.” The United States is not committed to unblock any of these funds 
under the JCPOA. Of the total, about $50 million is Iranian diplomatic property and accounts, 
including proceeds from rents received on the former Iranian embassy in Washington, DC, and 10 
other properties in several states, along with related bank accounts.
2
The total does not include 
Iran
-
related real estate holdings that the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York 
seized in 2009. These were assets of the Assa Company, a UK
-
chartered entity, which allegedly 
was maintaining the interests of Bank Melli in an office building in New York City. An Iranian 
foundation, the Alavi Foundation, allegedly is an investor in the building. The Treasury 
Department report states that the Office of Foreign Assets Control does not place a valuation on 
such real estate holdings, but public sources assess these assets at a value of about $500 million. 
There have been initiatives to use at least some of Iran’s frozen assets to pay the approximately 
$46 billion in court awards to victims of Iranian terrorism. These include the families of the 241 
U.S. soldiers killed in the October 23, 1983, bombing of the U.S. Marine barracks in Beirut. In 
recent years, U.S. funds equivalent to the balance in the DOD account have been used to pay a 
small portion 
The Algiers Accords apparently precluded compensation for the 52 U.S. diplomats held hostage 
by Iran from November 1979 until January 1981. A provision of the FY2016 Consolidated 
Appropriation (Section 404 of P.L. 114
-
113) sets up a mechanism for paying damages to the U.S. 
embassy hostages and other victims of Iran
-
sponsored terrorism (and terrorist acts by other state 
sponsors of terrorism) using settlement payments paid by various banks for concealing Iran
-
related transactions (see “Financial/Banking Sanctions” section below) and possibly proceeds 
from the New York property assets discussed above. See CRS Report RL31258, Suits Against 
Terrorist States by
Victims
of
Terrorism, by Jennifer K. Elsea 
Other past financial disputes include the mistaken U.S. shoot
-
down on July 3, 1988, of an Iranian 
Airbus passenger jet (Iran Air flight 655), for which the United States paid Iran $61.8 million in 
compensation ($300,000 per wage
-
earning victim, $150,000 per nonwage earner) for the 248 
Iranians killed. The United States did not compensate Iran for the airplane itself, although 
officials involved in the negotiations told CRS in November 2012 that the United States later 
arranged to provide a substitute, used aircraft to Iran. 
Executive Order 13599 Impounding Iran-Owned Assets 
Post-JCPOA Status: Still in Effect— Some Entities ȃDe-listed.Ȅ 
Executive Order 13599, issued February 5, 2012, directs the blocking of U.S.
-
based assets of 
entities determined to be “owned or controlled by the Iranian government.” The order requires 
that any U.S.
-
based assets of the Central Bank of Iran, or of any Iranian government
-
controlled 
entity, be impounded by U.S. financial institutions. U.S. persons are prohibited from any dealings 
with such entities. U.S. financial institutions previously were required to merely refuse such 
transactions with the Central Bank, or return funds to it. Several designations have been made 
under order, as shown in Table 5, such as the June 4, 2013, naming of 38 entities—mostly 
including oil, petrochemical, and investment companies—that are under the umbrella of an 
2
http://www.treasury.gov/resource-center/sanctions/Documents/tar2010.pdf. 
Iran Sanctions 
Congressional Research Service 
Iranian entity called the “Execution of Imam Khomeini’s Order” (EIKO).”
3
EIKO is 
characterized by the Treasury Department as an Iranian leadership entity that controls “massive 
off
-
the
-
books investments, shielded from the view of the Iranian entities and international 
regulators.” In accordance with the JCPOA, EIKO
-
controlled companies were “de
-
listed” from 
sanctions imposed by the order. 
Upon implementation of the JCPOA, many entities “de
-
listed” as sanctioned entities were re
-
categorized by the Treasury Department as subject to sanctions enforcement under E.O. 13599. 
Therefore, U.S. persons (firms and individuals) cannot do business with such de
-
listed Iranian 
entities, but foreign companies are able to resume trade with them without risk of U.S. sanction. 
Sanctions for Iran’s Support for Terrorism and 
Destabilizing Regional Activities 
Most of the hostage crisis
-
related sanctions were lifted upon resolution of the hostage crisis in 
1981. The United States began imposing sanctions again Iran again in the mid
-
1980s as its 
support for regional groups committing acts of international terrorism increased. The Secretary of 
State designated Iran a “state sponsor of terrorism” on January 23, 1984, following the October 
1983 bombing of the U.S. Marine barracks in Lebanon perpetrated by elements that later became 
Hezbollah. This designation triggers substantial sanctions on any nation so designated. 
Sanctions Triggered by Terrorism List Designation: Ban on U.S. 
Aid, Arms Sales, Dual-Use Exports, and Certain Programs for Iran 
Post-JCPOA Status: All Sanctions in This Section Still in Effect/Not Waived 
The U.S. naming of Iran as a “state sponsor of terrorism”— commonly referred to as Iran’s 
inclusion on the U.S. “terrorism list”—triggers several sanctions. The designation is made under 
the authority of Section 6(j) of the Export Administration Act of 1979 (P.L. 96
-
72, as amended), 
sanctioning countries determined to have provided repeated support for acts of international 
terrorism. The sanctions triggered by Iran’s state sponsor of terrorism designation are: 
Restrictions on sales of U.S. dual use items. The restriction—a presumption of 
denial of any license applications to sell dual use items to Iran—is required by 
the Export Administration Act, as continued by executive orders issued under the 
presidential authority of the International Emergency Economic Powers Act, 
IEEPA. 
Ban on direct U.S. financial assistance and arms sales to Iran. Section 620A of 
the Foreign Assistance Act, FAA (P.L. 87
-
95) and Section 40 of the Arms Export 
Control Act (P.L. 95
-
92, as amended), respectively, bar any U.S. foreign 
assistance to terrorism list countries. Foreign assistance is defined as not only 
economic assistance but also U.S. government loans, credits, credit insurance, 
and Ex
-
Im Bank credits. In addition, successive foreign aid appropriations laws 
since the late 1980s have banned direct assistance to Iran (no waiver provision).
3
http://global.factiva.com/hp/printsavews.aspx?pp=Print&hc=Publication; and Department of Treasury announcement 
of June 4, 2013.  
Iran Sanctions 
Congressional Research Service 
Requirement that the United States vote to oppose multilateral lending. U.S. 
officials are required to vote against multilateral lending to any terrorism list 
country by Section 1621 of the International Financial Institutions Act (P.L. 95
-
118, as amended [added by Section 327 of the Anti
-
Terrorism and Effective 
Death Penalty Act of 1996 (P.L. 104
-
132)]). Waiver authority is provided. 
Withholding of U.S. foreign assistance to Countries that Assist or Sell Arms to 
Terrorism List Countries. Under Sections 620G and 620H of the Foreign 
Assistance Act, as added by the Anti
-
Terrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act 
(Sections 325 and 326 of P.L. 104
-
132), the President is required to withhold 
foreign aid from any country that provides to a terrorism list country financial 
assistance or arms. Waiver authority is provided. Section 321 of that act also 
makes it a criminal offense for U.S. persons to conduct financial transactions 
with terrorism list governments. 
Withholding of U.S. Aid to Organizations That Assist Iran. Section 307 of the 
FAA (added in 1985) names Iran as unable to benefit from U.S. contributions to 
international organizations, and require proportionate cuts if these institutions 
work in Iran. For example, if an international organization spends 3% of its 
budget for programs in Iran, then the United States is required to withhold 3% of 
its contribution to that international organization. No waiver is provided for.
Exception for U.S. Humanitarian Aid 
The terrorism list designation, and other U.S. sanctions laws, does not bar disaster aid. The 
United States donated $125,000, through relief agencies, to help victims of two earthquakes in 
Iran (February and May 1997); $350,000 worth of aid to the victims of a June 22, 2002, 
earthquake; and $5.7 million in assistance (out of total governmental pledges of about $32 
million) for the victims of the December 2003 earthquake in Bam, Iran, which killed as many as 
40,000 people. The U.S. military flew in 68,000 kilograms of supplies to Bam.
Requirements for Removal from Terrorism List 
Terminating the sanctions triggered by Iran’s terrorism list designation would require Iran’s removal from the 
terrorism list. The Arms Export Control Act spells out two different requirements for a President to remove a 
country from the list, depending on whether the country’s regime has changed.  
If the regime has changed, the President can remove a country from the list immediately by certifying that change in a 
report to Congress.  
If the regime has not changed, the President must report to Congress 45 days in advance of the effective date of 
removal. The President must certify that (1) the country has not supported international terrorism within the 
preceding six months, and (2) the country has provided assurances it will not do so in the future. In this latter 
circumstance, Congress has the opportunity to block the removal by enacting a joint resolution to that effect. The 
President has the option of vetoing the joint resolution, in which case blocking the removal would require a 
congressional veto override vote.  
Executive Order 13224 Sanctioning Terrorism-Supporting Entities 
Post-JCPOA Status: Still in Effect and No Designated Entities ȃDe-listedȄ  
Executive Order 13324 (September 23, 2001) mandates the freezing of the U.S.
-
based assets of 
and a ban on U.S. transactions with entities determined by the Administration to be supporting 
international terrorism. This order was issued two weeks after the September 11, 2001, attacks on 
the United States, under the authority of the IEEPA, the National Emergencies Act, the U.N. 
Iran Sanctions 
Congressional Research Service 
Participation Act of 1945, and Section 301 of the U.S. Code, and initially targeted Al Qaeda
-
related entities. The order is not specific to Iran. 
Implementation: The several hundred Iranian or Iran issue
-
related entities designated under the 
Order, to date, are listed in the table at the end of this report. 
Executive Orders Sanctioning Iran’s Involvement in Iraq and Syria 
Current Status: Still in Effect, No Entities ȃDe-ListedȄ  
Some sanctions have been imposed to try to curtail Iran’s destabilizing influence in the region. 
Executive Order 13438. Issued on July 7, 2007, the order sanctions persons who 
are determined by the Administration to be posing a threat to Iraqi stability, 
presumably by providing arms or funds to Shiite militias there. Persons 
sanctioned under the order include IRGC
-
Qods Force officers, Iraqi Shiite 
militia
-
linked figures, and other entities. The executive order remains in effect 
even though many of the entities sanctioned thus far have been working, as of 
2014, to defeat the Islamic State organization in Iraq.
Executive Order 13572. Issued on April 29, 2011, the order sanctions those 
individuals determined to be responsible for human rights abuses and repression 
of the Syrian people. The IRGC
-
Qods Force (IRGC
-
QF), IRGC
-
QF commanders 
including overall commander Qasem Soleimani, and others are sanctioned under 
this and related orders. 
Implementation: Several Iran
-
related entities have been designated under these orders, as listed in 
the tables at the end of this report. 
Ban on U.S. Trade and Investment with Iran 
Current Status: Minor Relaxations in Accordance with the JCPOA  
In 1995, the Clinton Administration significantly expanded U.S. sanctions with Executive Order 
12959 (May 6, 1995), banning U.S. trade with and investment in Iran. The order was issued under 
the authority primarily of the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (IEEPA, 50 U.S.C. 
1701 et seq.),
4
which gives the President wide powers to regulate commerce with a foreign 
country when a ”state of emergency” is declared in relations with that country. Executive Order 
12959 superseded an earlier Executive Order (12957 of March 15, 1995) barring U.S. investment 
in Iran’s energy sector, which accompanied President Clinton’s declaration of a “state of 
emergency” with respect to Iran. A subsequent Executive Order, 13059 (August 19, 1997), added 
a prohibition on U.S. companies’ knowingly exporting goods to a third country for incorporation 
into products destined for Iran. Each March since 1995, the U.S. Administration has renewed the 
Iran state of emergency declaration. IEEPA allows the President, through licensing authority, to 
make modifications to the trade ban, despite its being codified (discussed below). The trade 
regulations are stipulated in Section 560 of the Code of Federal Regulations (Iranian Transactions 
Regulations, ITRs). 
4
The executive order was issued not only under the authority of IEEPA but also: the National Emergencies Act (50 
U.S.C. 1601 et seq.; §505 of the International Security and Development Cooperation Act of 1985 (22 U.S.C. 2349aa-
9) and §301 of Title 3, United States Code.  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested