asp.net pdf viewer control : How to view pdf thumbnails in SDK control project winforms web page wpf UWP RS208715-part1388

Iran Sanctions 
Congressional Research Service 
46 
Turkey is not paying for its gas imports from Iran with gold, but that the gold going from Turkey 
to Iran consists mainly of Iranian private citizens’ purchases of Turkish gold to hedge against the 
value of the rial. 
On January 6, 2014, the Commerce Department issued an emergency order blocking a Turkey
-
based firm (3K Aviation Consulting and Logistics) from reexporting two U.S.
-
made jet engines to 
Iran’s Pouya Airline.
57
That and other firms reportedly involved denied planning to do so. 
Caucasus: Azerbaijan, Armenia, and Georgia 
The Clinton and George W. Bush Administrations used the threat of ISA sanctions to deter oil 
pipeline routes involving Iran and thereby successfully promoted an alternate route from 
Azerbaijan (Baku) to Turkey (Ceyhan). The route became operational in 2005. Section 6 of 
Executive Order 13622 exempts from sanctions any pipelines that bring gas from Azerbaijan to 
Europe and Turkey. 
In part because Iran and Azerbaijan are often at odds, Iran and Armenia—Azerbaijan’s 
adversary—enjoy extensive economic relations. Armenia is Iran’s largest direct gas customer, 
after Turkey. In May 2009, Iran and Armenia inaugurated a natural gas pipeline between the two, 
built by Gazprom of Russia. No determination of ISA sanctions has been issued. Armenia has 
said its banking controls are strong and that Iran is unable to process transactions illicitly through 
Armenia’s banks.
58
However, observers in the South Caucasus assert that Iran is using Armenian 
banks operating in the Armenia
-
occupied Nagorno
-
Karabakh territory to circumvent international 
financial sanctions. These institutions could include Artsakhbank and Ameriabank.
59
Some press reports say that Iran might have used another Caucasian state, Georgia, to circumvent 
sanctions. IRGC companies reportedly established over a hundred front companies in Georgia for 
the purpose of importing dual
-
use items and to boost Iran’s non
-
oil exports. However, observers 
assert that after substantial Iran
-
Georgia economic ties were extensively publicized in mid
-
2013, 
Georgian businessmen reportedly have reduced transactions with Iran. 
Persian Gulf and Iraq
60
The Persian Gulf countries (Gulf Cooperation Council countries: Saudi Arabia, UAE, Qatar, 
Kuwait, Bahrain, and Oman) are oil exporters and close allies of the United States. As Iranian oil 
exports decreased 2012 and 2013, the Gulf states supplied the global oil market with additional 
oil. The Gulf states have generally sought to prevent the reexportation to Iran of U.S. technology, 
and have curtailed banking relationships with Iran. On the other hand, in order not to antagonize 
Iran, the Gulf countries always maintained relatively normal trade with Iran. Gulf
-
based shipping 
companies such as United Arab Shipping Company reportedly continued to pay port loading fees 
to such sanctioned IRGC
-
controlled port operators as Tidewater, despite the imposition of 
sanctions on that company.
61
57
“US Acts to Block Turkish Firm from Sending GE Engines to Iran,” 
Reuters, January 6, 2014.  
58
Louis Charbonneau, “Iran Looks to Armenia to Skirt Banking Sanctions,” 
Reuters, August 21, 2012.  
59
Information provided to the author by regional observers. October 2013.  
60
The CRS Report RL32048, Iran: Politics, Gulf Security, and U.S. Policy, by Kenneth Katzman, discusses the 
relations between Iran and other Middle Eastern states. 
61
Mark Wallace, “Closing U.
S. Ports to Iran-Tainted Shipping. Op-
ed,” 
Wall Street Journal, March 15, 2013. 
How to view pdf thumbnails in - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
generate pdf thumbnail c#; view pdf thumbnails in
How to view pdf thumbnails in - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
pdf thumbnail generator online; pdf thumbnail viewer
Iran Sanctions 
Congressional Research Service 
47 
The UAE is particularly closely watched by U.S. officials because of the large presence of Iranian 
firms there. Several UAE
-
based firms have been sanctioned for efforts to evade sanctions, as 
noted in the tables at the end of the report. U.S. officials praised the UAE’s March 1, 2012, ban 
on transactions with Iran by Dubai
-
based Noor Islamic Bank; Iran reportedly used it to process a 
substantial portion of its oil payments. Some Iranian gas condensates (120,000 barrels per day) 
reportedly are imported by Emirates National Oil Company (ENOC) and refined into jet fuel, 
gasoline, and other products. 
Iran and several of the Gulf states have had discussions on various energy transportation projects, 
but virtually none has come to fruition to date, probably at least in part because of broad regional 
disputes between Iran and the Gulf states. Iran
-
GCC disputes accelerated after Iranian protesters 
attacked Saudi Arabia’s embassy in Tehran in January 2016 in response to the Saudi execution of 
Shiite oppositionist cleric Shaykh Nimr al
-
Baqr Al Nimr. Saudi Arabia and Bahrain broke 
relations with Iran, and three of the other GCC states Qatar, UAE, and Kuwait recalled their 
ambassadors from Tehran. Kuwait and Iran have held talks on the construction of a 350
-
mile 
pipeline that would bring Iranian gas to Kuwait. Bahrain has discussed purchasing Iranian gas as 
well.
62
Qatar and Iran both appear to be successfully sharing the large gas field in the Gulf waters 
between them. Oman and Iran have reportedly discussed a gas pipeline linkage, and the two 
countries recommitted to the project in September 2015—making this the only Iran
-
GCC energy 
transportation project appearing to move forward. Iran has been a major investor in Oman’s 
efforts to develop its Duqm port as a major trading hub. 
Iraq  
Iran has sought to use its close relations with Iraq’s Shiite
-
dominated government to evade some 
sanctions. As noted above, the United States sanctioned an Iraqi bank that has cooperated with 
Iran’s efforts, but lifted those sanctions when the bank reduced that business. Iraq presented the 
United States with a significant sanctions
-
related dilemma on July 23, 2013, when it signed an 
agreement with Iran to buy 850 million cubic feet per day of natural gas through a joint pipeline 
that enters Iraq at Diyala province and will supply several power plants. The two countries signed 
a contract for the pipeline construction, estimated at $365 million, in July 2011, and it reportedly 
has been completed on both sides of the border.
63
No sanctions were imposed on the project, to 
date. In May 2015, Iraq’s Al Naser Airlines reportedly helped Iran’s sanctioned Mahan Air 
acquire nine previously
-
owned aircraft.
64
On May 21, 2015, the Department of the Treasury 
sanctioned Al Naser and other parties allegedly involved in the transfer. 
Iran is supplying advisers and weapons to help Iraq try to defeat Islamic State forces, an 
organization the United States has said needs to be degraded and ultimately defeated. The Iranian 
support to the Iraqi government has not been sanctioned, even though Iranian arms exports were 
prohibited by U.N. Security Council Resolution 1747 (a provision continued in Resolution 2231). 
The United States cited Resolution 1747 in pressing Iraq to halt military resupply flights from 
Iran to Syria. Iran supports the Assad government of Syria, whereas the United States has called 
for Assad to step down.
65
62
http://www.kuwaittimes.net/read_news.php?newsid=NDQ0OTY1NTU4; http://english.farsnews.com/newstext.php?
nn=8901181055. 
63
Ben Lando, “Iraq Inks Gas Supply Deal with Iran,” 
Iraq Oil Report, July 23, 2013.  
64
Eli Lak, “Iran Sanctions Collapsing Already,” 
Bloomberg News, May 11, 2015.  
65
Michael Gordon and Eric Schmitt, “Iran Secretly Sending Drones and Supplies to Iraq, U.S. Officials Say,” 
New 
York Times, June 25, 2014.  
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Ability to show PDF page thumbnails for quick navigation. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. C# HTML5 PDF Viewer: View PDF Online.
show pdf thumbnail in html; create pdf thumbnail
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Ability to show PDF page thumbnails for quick navigation. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: View PDF Online.
view pdf thumbnails; enable pdf thumbnail preview
Iran Sanctions 
Congressional Research Service 
48 
Africa and Latin America 
During the presidency of Ahmadinejad, Iran looked to several Latin American countries, 
particularly Venezuela, to try to circumvent international sanctions. For the most part, however, 
Iran’s trade and other business dealings with Latin America have remained too modest to weaken 
the effect of international sanctions significantly. As noted elsewhere in this report, several 
Venezuelan firms have been sanctioned for dealings with Iran. 
Also during the term of Ahmadinejad, Iran sought to cultivate relations with some African 
countries to try to circumvent sanctions. However, African countries have tended to avoid 
dealings with Iran in order to avoid pressure from the United States. South Africa ended its buys 
of Iranian oil in 2012
-
13. In June 2012, Kenya contracted to buy about 30 million barrels of 
Iranian oil, but cancelled the contract the following month after the United States warned that 
going ahead with the purchase could hurt U.S.
-
Kenya relations. 
World Bank Loans 
The July 27, 2010, EU measures narrowed substantially the prior differences between the EU and 
the United States over international lending to Iran. The United States representative to 
international financial institutions is required to vote against international lending, but that vote, 
although weighted, is not sufficient to block international lending. No new loans have been 
approved to Iran since 2005, including several environmental projects under the Bank’s “Global 
Environmental Facility” (GEF). The initiative slated more than $7.5 million in loans for Iran to 
dispose of harmful chemicals.
66
However, the lifting of sanctions is likely to increase 
international support for new international lending to Iran. 
Earlier, in 1993, the United States voted its 16.5% share of the World Bank against loans to Iran 
of $460 million for electricity, health, and irrigation projects, but the loans were approved. To 
block that lending, the FY1994
-
FY1996 foreign aid appropriations (P.L. 103
-
87, P.L. 103
-
306, 
and P.L. 104
-
107) cut the amount appropriated for the U.S. contribution to the bank by the 
amount of those loans. The legislation contributed to a temporary halt in new bank lending to 
Iran. 
During 1999
-
2005, Iran’s moderating image had led the World Bank to consider new loans over 
U.S. opposition. In May 2000, the United States’ allies outvoted the United States to approve 
$232 million in loans for health and sewage projects. During April 2003
-
May 2005, a total of 
$725 million in loans were approved for environmental management, housing reform, water and 
sanitation projects, and land management projects, in addition to $400 million in loans for 
earthquake relief.
66
Barbara Slavin, “Obama Administration Holds Up Environmental Grants to Iran,” 
Al Monitor, June 23, 2014.  
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document in VB.NET WPF program. PDF thumbnails for navigation in .NET project. VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer: View PDF Document.
.pdf printing in thumbnail size; pdf files thumbnail preview
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
Users can view any page by using view page button. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. PDF thumbnails for navigation in .NET WPF Console application.
enable thumbnail preview for pdf files; generate pdf thumbnails
Iran Sanctions 
Congressional Research Service 
49 
Table 4. Comparison Between U.S., U.N., and EU and Allied Country Sanctions 
(Prior to Implementation Day)  
U.S. Sanctions 
U.N. Sanctions 
Implementation by EU and 
Some Allied Countries 
General Observation: Most 
sweeping sanctions on Iran of 
virtually any country in the world  
As of 2010, U.N. sanctions were 
intended to give countries 
justification to cooperate with U.S. 
secondary sanctions.  
EU closely aligned its sanctions 
tightening with that of the United 
States. Most EU sanctions lifted in 
accordance with the JCPOA, 
although some sanctions on arms, 
dual-use items, and human rights 
remain.  
Japan, South Korean, and China 
sanctions also became extensive but 
were almost entirely lifted in 
concert with the JCPOA.  
Ban on U.S. Trade with, 
Investment in, and Financing for 
Iran: Executive Order 12959 bans 
(with limited exceptions) U.S. firms 
from exporting to Iran, importing 
from Iran, or investing in Iran.  
U.N. sanctions did not at any time 
ban civilian trade with Iran or general 
civilian sector investment in Iran.  
No comprehensive EU ban on trade 
in civilian goods with Iran was 
imposed at any time.  
Japan and South Korea did not ban 
normal civilian trade with Iran.  
Sanctions on Foreign Firms that 
Do Business with Iran’s Energy 
Sector: The Iran Sanctions Act, P.L. 
104-172, and subsequent laws and 
executive orders, discussed 
throughout the report, mandate 
sanctions on virtually any type of 
transaction with/in Iran’s energy 
sector.  
No U.N. equivalent exists. However, 
preambular language in Resolution 
1929 “not[es] the potential 
connection between Iran’s revenues 
derived from its energy sector and 
the funding of Iran’s proliferation-
sensitive nuclear activities.” This 
wording was interpreted as providing 
U.N. support for countries to ban 
their companies from dealing with 
Iran’s energy sector.  
With certain exceptions, the EU 
banned almost all dealings with 
Iran’s energy sector after 2011. 
These sanctions now lifted..  
Japanese and South Korean 
measures banned new energy 
projects in Iran and called for 
restraint on ongoing projects. South 
Korea in December 2011 cautioned 
its firms not to sell energy or 
petrochemical equipment to Iran. 
Both cut oil purchases from Iran 
sharply. These sanctions now lifted.  
Ban on Foreign Assistance: 
U.S. foreign assistance to Iran—
other than purely humanitarian aid—
is banned under §620A of the 
Foreign Assistance Act, which bans 
U.S. assistance to countries on the 
U.S. list of “state sponsors of 
terrorism.” Iran is also routinely 
denied direct U.S. foreign aid under 
the annual foreign operations 
appropriations acts (most recently in 
§7007 of division H of P.L. 111-8).  
No U.N. equivalent 
EU measures of July 27, 2010, 
banned grants, aid, and concessional 
loans to Iran. Also prohibited 
financing of enterprises involved in 
Iran’s energy sector. These 
sanctions now lifted. 
Japan and South Korea measures do 
not specifically ban aid or lending to 
Iran, but no such lending by these 
countries is under way.  
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Support of converting from any single one PDF page and multiple pages. Thumbnails can be created from PDF pages. Support for customizing image size.
can't view pdf thumbnails; pdf thumbnail preview
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Embedded page thumbnails.
pdf no thumbnail; pdf thumbnails in
Iran Sanctions 
Congressional Research Service 
50 
U.S. Sanctions 
U.N. Sanctions 
Implementation by EU and 
Some Allied Countries 
Ban on Arms Exports to Iran: 
Iran is ineligible for U.S. arms 
exports under several laws, as 
discussed in the report.  
Resolution 1929 (paragraph 8), 
superseded now by Resolution 2231, 
requires U.N. Security Council 
approval to sell or supply to Iran 
major weapons systems, including 
tanks, armored vehicles, combat 
aircraft, warships, and most missile 
systems, or related spare parts or 
advisory services for such weapons 
systems.  
EU sanctions include a 
comprehensive ban on sale to Iran 
of all types of military equipment, 
not just major combat systems. 
Arms embargo remains post-
JCPOA. 
No similar Japan and South Korean 
measures announced, but neither 
has exported arms to Iran.  
Restriction on Exports to Iran of 
´Dual Use Itemsµ: 
Primarily under §6(j) of the Export 
Administration Act (P.L. 96-72) and 
§38 of the Arms Export Control Act, 
there is a denial of license 
applications to sell Iran goods that 
could have military applications.  
The U.N. resolutions on Iran, 
cumulatively, ban the export of 
almost all dual-use items to Iran.  
EU banned the sales of dual use 
items to Iran, including ballistic 
missile technology, in line with U.N. 
resolutions. These restrictions 
generally remain post-JCPOA.  
Japan and S. Korea have announced 
full adherence to strict export 
control regimes when evaluating 
sales to Iran. These restrictions 
generally remain post-JCPOA.  
Sanctions Against Lending to 
Iran: 
Under §1621 of the International 
Financial Institutions Act (P.L. 95-
118), U.S. representatives to 
international financial institutions, 
such as the World Bank, are 
required to vote against loans to Iran 
by those institutions.  
Resolution 1747 (oper. paragraph 7) 
requests, but does not mandate, that 
countries and international financial 
institutions refrain from making 
grants or loans to Iran, except for 
development and humanitarian 
purposes.  
The July 27, 2010, measures 
prohibited EU members from 
providing grants, aid, and 
concessional loans to Iran, including 
through international financial 
institutions. Sanctions lifted post-
JCPOA.  
Japan and South Korea banned 
medium- and long-term trade 
financing and financing guarantees. 
Short-term credit was still allowed. 
These sanctions now lifted.  
Sanctions Against the Sale of 
Weapons of Mass Destruction-
Related Technology to Iran: 
Several laws and regulations provide 
for sanctions against entities, Iranian 
or otherwise, that are determined to 
be involved in or supplying Iran’s 
WMD programs (asset freezing, ban 
on transaction with the entity).  
Resolution 1737 (oper. paragraph 12) 
imposes a worldwide freeze on the 
assets and property of Iranian WMD-
related entities named in an Annex to 
the Resolution. Each subsequent 
resolution has expanded the list of 
Iranian entities subject to these 
sanctions.  
The EU measures imposed July 27, 
2010, commit the EU to freezing 
the assets of WMD-related entities 
named in the U.N. resolutions, as 
well as numerous other named 
Iranian entities. Most of these 
restrictions remain.  
Japan and South Korea froze assets 
of U.N.-sanctioned entities. Most of 
these restrictions remain.  
Ban on Transactions with 
Terrorism Supporting Entities: 
Executive Order 13224 bans 
transactions with entities determined 
by the Administration to be 
supporting international terrorism. 
Numerous entities, including some of 
Iranian origin, have been so 
designated.  
No direct equivalent, but Resolution 
1747 (oper. paragraph 5) bans Iran 
from exporting any arms—a 
provision widely interpreted as trying 
to reduce Iran’s material support to 
groups such as Lebanese Hezbollah, 
Hamas, Shiite militias in Iraq, and 
insurgents in Afghanistan. Resolution 
2231 continues that restriction for a 
maximum of five years.  
No direct equivalent, but many of 
the Iranian entities named as 
blocked by the EU, Japan, and South 
Korea overlap or complement 
Iranian entities named as terrorism 
supporting by the United States.  
Japan and S. Korea did not impose 
specific terrorism sanctions on Iran.  
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
by large enterprises and organizations to distribute and view documents. size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size Embedded page thumbnails.
pdf file thumbnail preview; pdf thumbnail generator
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Converter control easy to create thumbnails from PDF pages. Selection for compressing to multiple image formats. Cut and paste any areas in PDF pages to images.
thumbnail view in for pdf files; how to create a thumbnail of a pdf document
Iran Sanctions 
Congressional Research Service 
51 
U.S. Sanctions 
U.N. Sanctions 
Implementation by EU and 
Some Allied Countries 
Human Rights Sanctions:  
CISADA provides for a prohibition 
on travel to the U.S., blocking of 
U.S.-based property, and ban on 
transactions with Iranians 
determined to be involved in serious 
human rights abuses against Iranians 
since the June 12, 2009, presidential 
election there, or with persons 
selling Iran equipment to commit 
such abuses.  
Resolution 1803 imposed a binding 
ban on international travel by several 
Iranians named in an Annex to the 
Resolution. Resolution 1929 
extended that ban to additional 
Iranians, and forty Iranians involved in 
WMD programs were included. No 
U.N. sanctions were imposed on Iran 
for terrorism or human rights abuses. 
.  
The EU sanctions announced July 
27, 2010, contains an Annex of 
named Iranians subject to a ban on 
travel to the EU countries. An 
additional 60+ Iranians involved in 
human rights abuses were subjected 
to EU sanctions since. These 
sanctions remain. EU retains a ban 
on providing equipment that can be 
used for internal repression.  
Japan and South Korea have 
announced bans on named Iranians, 
but primarily for WMD and not for 
human rights or terrorism.  
Restrictions on Iranian Shipping:  
Under Executive Order 13382, the 
U.S. Department of the Treasury has 
named Islamic Republic of Iran 
Shipping Lines and several affiliated 
entities as entities whose U.S.-based 
property is to be frozen.  
Resolution 1803 and 1929 authorize 
countries to inspect cargoes carried 
by Iran Air and Islamic Republic of 
Iran Shipping Lines (IRISL)—or any 
ships in national or international 
waters—if there is an indication that 
the shipments include goods whose 
export to Iran is banned.  
The EU measures announced July 
27, 2010, bans Iran Air Cargo from 
access to EU airports. The 
measures also freeze the EU-based 
assets of IRISL and its affiliates. 
Insurance and reinsurance for 
Iranian firms is banned. These 
sanctions now lifted.  
Japan and South Korean measures 
took similar actions against IRISL 
and Iran Air. These sanctions now 
lifted.  
Banking Sanctions: 
During 2006-2011, several Iranian 
banks have been named as 
proliferation or terrorism supporting 
entities under Executive Orders 
13382 and 13224, respectively (see 
Table 5 at end of report).  
CISADA prohibits banking 
relationships with U.S. banks for any 
foreign bank that conducts 
transactions with Iran’s 
Revolutionary Guard or with Iranian 
entities sanctioned under the various 
U.N. resolutions.  
FY2012 Defense Authorization (P.L. 
112-81) prevents U.S. accounts with 
foreign banks that process 
transactions with Iran’s Central Bank 
(with specified exemptions).  
No direct equivalent 
However, two Iranian banks were 
named as sanctioned entities under 
the U.N. Security Council 
resolutions. U.N. restrictions on 
Iranian banking now lifted.  
The EU froze Iran Central Bank 
assets January 23, 2012, and banned 
all transactions with Iranian banks 
unless authorized on October 15, 
2012.  
Brussels-based SWIFT expelled 
sanctioned Iranian banks from the 
electronic payment transfer system.  
Sanctions on Iran Central Bank and 
exclusion from SWIFT now lifted.  
Japan and South Korea took similar 
measures South Korea imposed the 
40,000 Euro threshhold requiring 
authorization. Japan and S. Korea 
froze the assets of 15 Iranian banks; 
South Korea targeted Bank Mellat 
for freeze. These sanctions now 
lifted.  
Ballistic Missiles: U.S. 
proliferations laws provide for 
sanctions against foreign entities that 
help Iran with its nuclear and ballistic 
missile programs.  
Resolution 1929 (paragraph 9) 
prohibited Iran from undertaking 
“any activity” related to ballistic 
missiles capable of delivering a 
nuclear weapon. Resolution 2231 
calls on Iran not to develop or launch 
ballistic missiles designed to be 
capable of carrying a nuclear weapon. 
EU measures on July 27, 2010, 
required adherence to this 
provision of Resolution 1929. EU 
has retained ban on providing 
ballistic missile technology to Iran.  
Iran Sanctions 
Congressional Research Service 
52 
Private-Sector Cooperation and Compliance 
The imposition of sanctions on Iran by many governments has caused Iran to be viewed by many 
worldwide corporations as a “controversial market”—a market that carries political and 
reputational risks. On the other hand, travelers to Iran say many foreign products, including U.S. 
products, have been readily available in Iran even at the height of the effectiveness of 
international sanctions. Several major non
-
U.S. companies discontinued business with Iran after 
2010, but all of them are likely to resume transactions with Iran in light of the lifting of sanctions. 
ABB of Switzerland, a major plant and equipment firm, said in January 2010 it 
would cease doing business with Iran. Siemens of Germany; Finemeccanica, a 
defense and transportation conglomerate of Italy; Thyssen
-
Krupp, a German 
steelmaker; and Indian conglomerate Tata subsequently followed suit. 
Even though selling finished cars to Iran is not subject to any sanctions, 
Germany’s Daimler (Mercedes
-
Benz) and Porsche; Toyota (Japan); Fiat (Italy); 
and South Korea’s Hyundai and Kia Motors suspended direct auto sales to Iran.
As of 2007, BNP Paribas of France ceased pursuing new business in Iran, 
according to attorneys for the financial firm. 
The State Department reported on September 30, 2010, that Hong Kong 
company NYK Line Ltd. had ended shipping business with Iran on any goods. In 
June 2011, the Danish shipping giant Maersk ceased operating out of Iran’s three 
largest ports—decision based on the U.S. announcement on June 23, 2011, of 
sanctions on port operator Tidewater Middle East Co. under E.O. 13382. 
Well before Executive Order 13590 was issued (see above), one large oil services 
firm, Schlumberger, incorporated in the Netherlands Antilles, ended its business 
with Iran.
67
As of mid
-
2010, almost all energy sector
-
related sales to Iran became 
subject to sanctions and subsidiaries of U.S. energy equipment and energy
-
related shipping firms that were in the Iranian market have apparently exited. 
These firms include Natco Group,
68
Overseas Shipholding Group,
69
UOP (United 
Oil Products, a Honeywell subsidiary based in Britain),
70
Itron,
71
Fluor,
72
Parker 
Drilling, Vantage Energy Services,
73
PMFG, Ceradyne, Colfax, Fuel Systems 
Solutions, General Maritime Company, Ameron International Corporation, and 
World Fuel Services Corp. 
67
Farah Stockman, “Oil Firm Says It Will Withdraw From Iran,” 
Boston Globe, November 12, 2010. 
68
Form 10-K filed for fiscal year ended December 31, 2008. 
69
Paulo Prada and Betsy McKay, 
Trading Outcry Intensifies
,”
Wall Street Journal, March 27, 2007; Michael Brush, 
Are You Investing in Terrorism?
MSN Money, July 9, 2007. 
70
New York Times, March 7, 2010, cited previously. 
71
“Subsidiaries of the Registrant at December 31, 2009,” 
http://www.sec.gov/Archives/edgar/data/780571/
000078057110000007/ex_21-1.htm. 
72
“Exhibit to 10
-
K Filed February 25, 2009.” Officials of Fluor claim that their only dealings with Iran involve 
property in Iran owned by a Fluor subsidiary, which the subsidiary has been unable to dispose of. CRS conversation 
with Fluor, December 2009. 
73
Form 10-K for fiscal year ended December 31, 2007. 
Iran Sanctions 
Congressional Research Service 
53 
Foreign Subsidiaries of U.S. Firms That Have Exited the Iran Market 
Many foreign subsidiaries of U.S. firms exited the Iran market voluntarily, before any of their 
business activities with Iran became subject to sanctions. The JCPOA commits the United States 
to licensing commerce with Iran by subsidiaries of U.S. companies, in cases where the ownership 
structure of the subsidiary might require a U.S. license to engage in Iran
-
related business. 
Chemical manufacturer Huntsman announced in January 2010 its subsidiaries 
would halt sales to Iran.
In January 2005, Iran said it had contracted with U.S. company Halliburton and 
an Iranian company, Oriental Kish, to drill for gas in Phases 9 and 10 of South 
Pars. Halliburton reportedly had been providing$30 million to $35 million worth 
of services per year through Oriental Kish.
74
In April 2007, Halliburton 
announced that its subsidiaries were no longer operating in Iran.
As of early 2005, General Electric (GE) ceased pursuing new business in Iran, 
and it reportedly wound down preexisting contracts by July 2008. GE was selling 
Iran equipment and services for hydroelectric, oil, and gas services. However, GE 
subsidiary sales of medical diagnostic products such as MRI machines, marketed 
through Italian, Canadian, and French subsidiaries, are not generally subject to 
sanctions and are believed to be continuing. 
On March 1, 2010, Caterpillar Corp. said it had altered its policies to prevent 
foreign subsidiaries from selling equipment to independent dealers that have been 
reselling the equipment to Iran.
75
Ingersoll Rand, maker of air compressors and 
cooling systems, followed suit.
76
In April 2010, it was reported that foreign partners of several U.S. or other 
multinational accounting firms had cut their ties with Iran, including KPMG of 
the Netherlands, and local affiliates of U.S. firms PricewaterhouseCoopers and 
Ernst and Young.
77
Oilfield services firm Smith International stopped sales to Iran by its subsidiaries 
in March 2010. Another oil services firm, Flowserve, said its subsidiaries had 
voluntarily ceased new business with Iran in 2006.
78
Subsidiaries of FMC 
Technologies took similar action in 2009, as did those of Weatherford
79
in 2008. 
However, in November 2013, Weatherford was fined by the Department of the 
Treasury for violating sanctions against Iran and other countries. 
74
“Iran Says Halliburton Won Drilling Contract
,
” 
Washington Times, January 11, 2005. 
75
“Caterpillar Says Tightens ‘No
-
Iran’ Business Policy,” 
Reuters, March 1, 2010. 
76
Ron Nixon, “2 Corporations Say Business With Tehran Will Be Curbed,” 
New York Times, March 11, 2010. 
77
Peter Baker, “U.S. and Foreign Companies Feeling Pressure to Sever Ties With Iran,” 
New York Times, April 24, 
2010. 
78
In September 2011, the Commerce Department fined Flowserve $2.5 million to settle 288 charges of unlicensed 
exports and reexports of oil industry equipment to Iran, Syria, and other countries. 
79
Form 10-K for fiscal year ended December 31, 2008, claims firm directed its subsidiaries to cease new business in 
Iran and Cuba, Syria, and Sudan as of September 2007. 
Iran Sanctions 
Congressional Research Service 
54 
Effects of Sanctions and of Post-JCPOA Relief  
The following sections examine the effectiveness of sanctions on a variety of criteria and goals, 
and the effects of post
-
JCPOA sanctions relief. 
Effect on Iran’s Nuclear Program and Strategic Capabilities  
Iran’s acceptance of the JCPOA is widely considered evidence that sanctions shifted Iran’s 
nuclear policies. The JPA interim nuclear deal was agreed shortly after the June 14, 2013, election 
of mid
-
ranking cleric Hassan Rouhani as President; he ran on a platform of achieving an easing of 
sanctions and ending Iran’s international isolation. Still, Director of National Intelligence James 
Clapper has testified in recent annual “Worldwide Threat Assessment” briefings to Congress that 
the intelligence community does not know whether Iran plans to eventually develop a nuclear 
weapon. 
A related question is whether sanctions slowed Iran’s nuclear program or other WMD programs. 
Iran’s nuclear program advanced despite sanctions. And, Director of National Intelligence James 
Clapper has testified that Iran continues to expand the scale, reach, and sophistication of its 
ballistic missile arsenal. Iran has continued to conduct short and medium
-
range ballistic missile 
tests even after the JCPOA was finalized and entered into implementation. Still, some argue that 
Iran’s programs might have advanced faster in the absence of sanctions.
80
Sanctions might have eroded those aspects of Iran’s conventional military capabilities that are 
most dependent on foreign supplies. Iran has not been able to buy large amounts of conventional 
arms since the early 1990s, although its indigenous arms industry has grown over the past two 
decades, partly mitigating the effects of the U.N. ban. Iran also might have acquired some 
systems, such as small ships and mini
-
submarines, from foreign suppliers such as North Korea 
that do not abide by U.N. restrictions.
81
A failure to modernize likely reduces Iran’s ability to project power. In December 2014, Iran used 
40 year
-
old aircraft (U.S.
-
supplied F
-
4 jets) to strike Islamic State targets in Iraq, near the Iranian 
border. However, Russia’s apparent decision in April 2015 to proceed with delivery of the S
-
300 
air defense system—which is not technically banned by Resolution 1929—could help modernize 
Iran’s air defense system to the point where these systems pose new threats to aircraft flown by 
the U.S. or other air forces. And, as noted above, Russia and Iran are negotiating the sale of Su
-
30 
combat aircraft and T
-
90 tanks, which would require U.N. Security Council approval – an 
approval that the United States, which has Security Council veto power, is unlikely to grant. 
Effects on Iran’s Regional Influence  
Another question is whether sanctions weakened Iran’s ability to accomplish its foreign policy 
objectives. Neither sanctions nor the significant fall in oil prices since mid
-
2014 has materially 
reduced Iran’s ability to arm militant movements in the Middle East or to support friendly 
governments such as that of President Bashar Al Assad of Syria and the Shiite
-
dominated 
government of Iraq. Some regional governments express concern that the lifting of sanctions 
provides Iran with greater resources with which it could pursue its regional objectives. The 
Administration has stated that Iran might utilize some of its new revenues for those objectives, 
80
Speech by National Security Adviser Tom Donilon at the Brookings Institution, November 22, 2011.  
81
Department of Defense, Annual Report of Military Power of Iran, April 2012.  
Iran Sanctions 
Congressional Research Service 
55 
but the Administration has argued that Iran needs to use additional funds to rebuild its civilian 
economy. Iranian economic officials have said publicly that Iran will likely use foreign exchange 
reserves that it will be able to access primarily to finance domestic investments, and some of the 
approximately $115 billion in foreign exchange that Iran is now able to access will be kept abroad 
for financial management purposes.
82
A provision of the FY2016 Consolidated Appropriation 
(P.L. 114
-
113) requires an Administration report to Congress on how Iran has used the financial 
benefits of sanctions relief. Iran’s use of additional funds available from JCPOA
-
related sanctions 
relief is analyzed in greater detail in: CRS Report R44017, Iran’s Foreign Policy, by Kenneth 
Katzman.
General Political Effects 
Sanctions appear to have produced some political change in Iran. The support of Iranians seeking 
reintegration with the international community and sanctions relief helped power Rouhani—the 
most moderate of the candidates permitted to run—to a first round victory in the June 2013 
presidential election. Many Iranians cheered the finalization of the JCPOA on July 15, 2015, 
undoubtedly contributing to Supreme Leader Khamene’i’s tacit acceptance of the deal. The 
sanctions relief that went into effect on January 16 apparently propelled pro
-
Rouhani candidates 
to very strong showing in the February 26, 2016, elections for the Majles (parliament) and a key 
clerical body (Assembly of Experts) that is mandated to select a new Supreme Leader when 
Khamene’i leaves the scene. Hardliners lost seats in both bodies, although a runoff election on 
April 29 will determine more precisely the balance of power in the Majles. The economic benefits 
of sanctions relief could also propel Rouhani to reelection in 2017. 
No U.S. Administration has stated that sanctions on Iran were intended to bring about the change 
of Iran’s regime, although some have asserted that that outcome should have been the goal of the 
sanctions. Since 2012 there has been labor and other public unrest over escalating food prices and 
the fall of the value of Iran’s currency, but the unrest has not been large or sustained.
Human Rights-Related Effects 
Recent human rights reports by the State Department and the U.N. Special Rapporteur on Iran’s 
human rights practices assess that there has not been measurable overall improvement in Iran’s s 
practices in recent years, particular on the issue of allowing freedom of expression. President 
Rouhani has achieved the release of a few political prisoners and press reports say media 
freedoms have increased slightly since he took office, but executions have become more frequent. 
On the other hand, Iran released four U.S.
-
Iran nationals and one American national on 
Implementation Day, suggesting that Rouhani might have prevailed on the hardline
-
dominated 
judiciary on this issue to ensure that sanctions relief was finalized. 
Sanctions have apparently not reduced the regime’s ability to monitor and censor use of the 
Internet. A Government Accountability Office (GAO) report stated on January 13, 2015 (GAO
-
15
-
258R) that no foreign firms were reported to have exported technologies to the Iranian 
government for blocking telecommunications during 2014. This GAO analysis suggests that at 
least several firms had fulfilled their pledges to stop selling the Iranian government such 
equipment, including German telecommunications firm Siemens, Chinese Internet infrastructure 
firm Huawei, and South African firm, MTN Group. In October 2012, Eutelsat, a significant 
provider of satellite service to Iran’s state broadcasting establishment, ended that relationship 
82
“Iran to Use Frozen Funds to Fund Investments: Central Bank,” 
Reuters, July 23, 2015.  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested