asp.net pdf viewer control : Thumbnail view in for pdf files application Library tool html asp.net windows online RS208716-part1389

Iran Sanctions 
Congressional Research Service 
56 
after the EU sanctioned the head of the Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting (IRIB), Ezzatollah 
Zarghami. 
Economic Effects 
Sanctions have taken a toll on Iran’s economy, by all accounts, as indicated below. 
GDP Decline. Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew told a Washington, DC think tank 
on April 29, 2015, that Iran’s GDP shrank by 9% in the two years ending in 
March 2014, and is now 15%
-
20% smaller than it would have been had post
-
2010 sanctions not been imposed.
83
The sanctions relief of the JPA enabled Iran 
to achieve slight growth of about 2% 
-
3% in each of 2014 and 2015 – growth 
that might have been somewhat stronger had oil prices not deteriorated.
84
The 
number of nonperforming loans held by Iranian banks increased to about 15%
-
30%,
85
and many employees in the private sector have gone unpaid or have 
experienced significant payment delays. The unemployment rate is about 20%, 
according to a wide range of outside sources. In 2015, Iran’s GDP was $400 
billion at the official exchange rate, and $1.4 trillion if assessed on a “purchasing 
power parity (PPP) basis. 
Sanctions relief under the JCPOA might return Iran to nearly double
-
digit growth 
in the first year if Iran uses the sanctions relief mostly to try to rebuild its civilian 
economy. Iran has key inherent economic strengths, including an educated 
workforce—including the highest percentage of engineering graduates in the 
world—that is familiar with the use of the Internet and other modern 
technologies. However, recent press reports say that lingering international 
uncertainty about the extent of remaining sanctions regulations is holding back 
the reentry to the Iran market of major international banks and investors. As a 
result, Iran is expected to receive only a fraction of the $500 billion in new 
investment it needs to modernize its infrastructure.
86
In addition, many international investors that are returning to Iran are reportedly 
striking deals with state
-
backed conglomerates such as the Iranian Mines and 
Mining Industries Development and Renovation Organization and the state
-
owned car maker Khodro. Examples are a $2 billion deal between the Mines 
Development entity above and Italian steel producer Daneili in February 2016, 
and a $440 million deal between France’s Peugeot and Khodro that same 
month.
87
These conglomerates, and other state
-
affiliated companies such as the 
IRGC’s corporate affiliates and the clerical foundations (bonyads), have largely 
crowded out the traditional private sector in recent years. It is possible that 
sanctions relief will benefit primarily the state
-
backed portion of the economy 
and less so the traditional and emerging entrepreneurial sector. 
83
Department of the Treasury. Remarks of Secretary Jacob J. Lew at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy 30
th
Anniversary Gala. April 29, 2015.  
84
http://www.worldbank.org/en/country/iran/overview.  
85
“Iran’s Pivotal Moment.”
http://www.euromoney.com/Article/3380090/Irans-pivotal-moment.html, 2014.  
86
Golnar Motevalli. “Iran Still Makes Investors Think Twice.” Bloomberg News, March 20, 2016. 
87
Thomas Erdbrink. “Sanctions’ End Benefits State
-
Backed Iran Companies.” 
New York Times, February 6, 2016.  
Thumbnail view in for pdf files - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
create thumbnail jpg from pdf; create pdf thumbnail image
Thumbnail view in for pdf files - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
enable pdf thumbnails; show pdf thumbnail in
Iran Sanctions 
Congressional Research Service 
57 
Oil Exports and Availability for Export. As noted in Table 2, sanctions drove 
Iran’s crude oil sales down about 60% from the 2.5 mbd of sales in 2011. 
According to the comments by Treasury Secretary Lew, cited above, U.S. 
sanctions have cost Iran over $160 billion in oil revenues since 2012. Iran’s 
earned $100 billion from oil sales in 2011; about $35 billion in 2013; and, 
because of the fall in prices, even less in 2014 and 2015. The JPA capped Iran’s 
crude oil exports at about 1.1 mbd
88
but, as of Implementation Day, Iran is able to 
export oil freely again and will undoubtedly earn more oil revenues in 2016 than 
in 2015. 
In connection with Implementation Day, Iranian oil officials say that they made 
up to 500,000 barrels per day (bpd) of additional oil available for export, 
although a significant market oversupply and fallen prices appears to have 
limited that extra amount, for now, to about 200,000 bpd. With condensates, 
Iran’s oil exports as of March 2016 appear to be approximately 1.5 mbd. When 
JPA implementation began in early 2014, Iran’s oil production stood at about 2.6
-
2.8 mbd down from nearly 4.1 mbd at the end of 2011.
89
Iran avoided an even 
steeper fall in production by storing about 50 million barrels on tankers in the 
Persian Gulf or in tanks on shore.
Hard Currency Inaccessible. Not only have Iran’s oil exports fallen by volume, 
but Iran was not paid in hard currency for its oil, other than the $700 million per 
month agreed under the JPA. Nor could Iran access its hard currency held in 
accounts abroad until Implementation Day. The total Iranian hard currency 
reserves held in foreign banks are estimated to be about $115 billion,
90
and 
Iranian officials stated in February 2016 that they have gained access to the 
funds. Iran has regained access to the SWIFT electronic payments system, 
enabling Iran to move money internationally. Of Iran’s newly accessible reserves, 
about $60 billion is owed to creditors such as China ($20 billion) or to repay non
-
performing loans extended to Iranian energy companies working in the Caspian 
and other areas in Iran’s immediate neighborhood. And, Iran needs to – and says 
it is 
-
keeping some of its remaining available reserves held abroad for cash 
management purposes. 
Currency Decline. Sanctions caused the value of the rial on unofficial markets to 
decline about 56% from January 2012 until January 2014. The unofficial rate 
stabilized after the JPA began implementation at about 35,000 to the dollar. The 
government has repeatedly adjusted the official rate (currently about 27,000 to 
the dollar) to reduce the spread between it and the unofficial rate.
Inflation. The drop in value of the currency caused inflation to accelerate during 
2011
-
2013. The estimated actual inflation rate was between 50% and 70% (a 
higher figure than that acknowledged by Iran’s Central Bank). The sanctions 
relief of the JPA reduced the inflation rate to about 15%. No current figures post
-
JCPOA implementation is available because of the short time frame since then. 
Industrial Production. Iran’s economy is industrializing, but the growing light
-
medium manufacturing sector remains dependent on imported parts. The decline 
88
“Why Higher Iran Oil Exports Are Not Roiling Nuclear Deal,” 
Reuters, June 13, 2014.  
89
Rick Gladstone, “Data on Iran Dims Outlook for Economy,” 
New York Times, October 13, 2012.  
90
CRS conversation with Treasury Department officials. July 2015.  
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
from other file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete using which VB.NET developers can redact, delete, view and save PDF Thumbnail Edit.
pdf thumbnails; no pdf thumbnails in
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.PowerPoint
Tell C# users how to: create a new PowerPoint file and load PowerPoint; merge, append, and split PowerPoint files; insert, delete, move, rotate Create Thumbnail.
pdf files thumbnails; pdf preview thumbnail
Iran Sanctions 
Congressional Research Service 
58 
of the rial and financial sanctions that complicated obtaining trade credit have 
created difficulties for Iranian manufacturers, who have had to pre
-
pay for 
imported parts through time
-
consuming and circuitous mechanisms. This 
difficulty is particularly acute in the automotive sector; Iran’s production of 
automobiles fell by about 60% from 2011 to 2013. Press reports say that the auto 
sector, and manufacturing overall, has rebounded modestly since during the JPA 
and is likely to rebound significantly now that sanctions are lifted. 
Iran’s Economic Coping Strategies 
Iran had some success mitigating the economic effect of sanctions—steps that also position Iran 
to benefit significantly in the post
-
sanctions period. 
Promoting Non
-
Oil Exports. Iran has sought to substitute for crude oil sales by increasing sales of 
non
-
oil products. In recent years, Iran has increased exports of minerals, cement, urea fertilizer, 
and other agricultural and basic industrial goods, mainly to countries in the immediate 
neighborhood. Non
-
oil exports now generate about two
-
thirds of the revenue required to fund 
Iran’s imports of goods and services, reducing the proportion of funds that oil exports contribute 
to Iran’s government revenues to about 22%.
91
Oil Products/Condensate Sales. Iran has sought to increase sales of oil products such as 
petrochemicals and condensates to compensate for some lost crude oil export revenue. Iran 
exports the equivalent of about 200,000 barrels per day of crude oil in condensates,
92
producing 
about $4.7 billion in revenue beyond pure crude oil.
93
Reallocation of Investment Funds and Import Substitution. Iranian manufacturers increased 
domestic production of some goods as substitutes for imports. This trend is considered positive 
by Iranian economists and Iranian political leaders including Supreme Leader Khamene’i, who 
have long maintained that Iran should build a “resistance economy” – an economy that is self
-
sufficient and not dependent on imported goods. In addition, some private funds have gone into 
the Tehran stock exchange and hard assets, such as property. However, many of these trends 
generally benefit the urban elite. 
Partial Privatization. Some observers report that, over the past few years, portions of Iran’s state
-
owned enterprises have been transferred to the control of quasi
-
governmental or partially private 
entities. Some of them are apparently incorporated as holding companies, foundations, or 
investment groups. Observers, using data from the Iranian Privatization Organization, say there 
might be about 120 such entities and that they now control perhaps 50% of Iran’s GDP.
94
Subsidy Reductions. In 2007, Ahmadinejad’s government instituted a program to wean the 
population off of generous subsidies by compensating families with cash payments of about $40 
per month. Gasoline prices began to run on a tiered system that brought them closer to regional 
prices—and far above the subsidized price of 40 cents per gallon. However, as sanctions began to 
crimp government revenues, in late 2012 Ahmadinejad postponed “phase two” of the subsidy 
phase
-
out effort. In April 2014, Rouhani instituted phase two by raising gasoline prices further 
and limiting the cash payments to only those families who could claim financial hardship. On 
December 1, 2014, subsidies on bread were reduced and bread prices rose 30%. In August 2015, 
91
Testimony of Patrick Clawson before the Senate Banking Committee. January 21, 2015.  
92
Clifford Krauss, “With Gas Byproduct, Iran Sidesteps Sanctions,” 
New York Times, August 13, 2014.  
93
“Iran Reaps Less Cash from Eased Sanctions Than Predicted,” op. cit. 
94
Kevan Harris, “Iran’s Political Economy Under and After the Sanctions,” 
Washington Post blogs, April 23, 2015.  
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.Word
Tell C# users how to: create a new Word file and load Word from pdf; merge, append, and split Word files; insert, delete, move, rotate Create Thumbnail.
show pdf thumbnails; disable pdf thumbnails
Create Thumbnail in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
Web Image Viewer Installation; View and Display Images; Annotate & Redact Documents or Images; Create Thumbnail; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode & Decode
print pdf thumbnails; program to create thumbnail from pdf
Iran Sanctions 
Congressional Research Service 
59 
cash subsidies to all but the poorest Iranians were ended. Rouhani also has improved collections 
of taxes and of price increases for electricity and natural gas utilities.
95
Import Restrictions. To conserve hard currency, Iran reduced the supply of hard currency to 
importers of luxury goods, such as cars or cellphones, in order to maintain hard currency supplies 
to importers of essential goods. 
Effect on Energy Sector Long-Term Development 
ISA was enacted in large part to reduce Iran’s oil and gas production capacity over the longer 
term by denying Iran the outside technology and investment to maintain, let alone increase, 
production. U.S. officials estimated in 2011 that Iran had lost $60 billion in investment in the 
sector as numerous major firms have announced pullouts from some of their Iran projects, 
declined to make further investments, or resold their investments to other companies. Iran says it 
needs $130 billion
-
$145 billion in new investment by 2020 to keep oil production capacity from 
falling.
96
Further development of the large South Pars gas field alone requires $100 billion.
97
Even though some international firms remain invested in Iran’s energy sector, observers at key 
energy fields in Iran say there has been little evidence of foreign company development activity 
sighted at Iran’s various oil and gas development sites since 2010 as energy firms apparently have 
sought to avoid triggering U.S. sanctions (see Table 5). Some work abandoned by foreign 
investors has been assumed by domestic companies, particularly those controlled or linked to the 
Revolutionary Guard (IRGC). Foreign firms are reluctant to partner with IRGC firms because 
international sanctions target the IRGC and its corporate affiliates. The Iranian firms, in 
particular, are not as technically capable as the international firms that have withdrawn.
Now that sanctions on Iran’s energy sector are lifted, Iran is reportedly working actively to lure 
foreign investors back into the sector. Since the JCPOA was agreed, representatives of several 
international energy firms have visited Iran to discuss future investment opportunities. Iran has 
revised the terms of new investment, under a concept called the “Iran Petroleum Contract,” which 
makes investment more attractive by giving investing companies the rights to a set percentage of 
Iran’s oil reserves for 20
-
25 years.
98
However, the significant market oversupply might limit new 
investment in Iran’s energy sector at least in the short term. 
Implementation Day also opens opportunities for Iran to resume developing its gas sector. Iran 
has used its gas development primarily to reinject into its oil fields rather than to export. Iran 
exports about 3.6 trillion cubic feet of gas, primarily to Turkey and Armenia. Sanctions have 
rendered Iran unable to develop a liquefied natural gas (LNG) export business, and derailed 
several gas ventures, including BP
-
NIOC joint venture in the Rhum gas field (200 miles off the 
Scotland coast) and inclusion of Iran in planned gas pipeline projects to Europe. 
95
Patrick Clawson testimony, January 21, 2015, op. cit.  
96
Khajehpour presentation at CSIS, op. cit.  
97
“Iran Faces Steep Climb to Join Gas Superpowers by 2017,” 
International Oil Daily, April 29, 2014.  
98
Thomas Erdbrink. “New Iran Battle Brews over Foreign Oil Titans.” 
New York Times, February 1, 2016.  
Create Thumbnail Winforms | Online Tutorials
Winforms Image Viewer Installation; View and Display Create Thumbnail; Generate Barcodes on Your Documents; Processing; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode
create thumbnails from pdf files; enable pdf thumbnails in
VB.NET Image: Image and Doc Windows, Web & Mobile Viewers of
for users to do image displaying, thumbnail creation and compatible mobile phone or tablet to view, navigate, zoom are JPEG, PNG, BMP, GIF, TIFF, PDF, Word and
show pdf thumbnails in; pdf thumbnail creator
Iran Sanctions 
Congressional Research Service 
60 
Table 5. Post-1999 Major Investments/Major Development Projects 
in Iran’s Energy Sector 
Date 
Field/Project 
Company(ies)/Status 
(If Known) 
Value 
Output/Goal 
February 
1999 
Doroud (oil) 
(Energy Information Agency, Department of 
Energy, August 2006.) 
Total and ENI exempted from sanctions on 
September 30 because of pledge to exit Iran 
market  
Total (France)/ENI (Italy)  
$1 billion 
205,000 bpd 
April 
1999 
Balal (oil) 
(“Balal Field Development in Iran Completed,” 
World Market Research Centre, May 17, 2004.) 
Total/ Bow Valley 
(Canada)/ENI  
$300 million 
40,000 bpd 
Nov. 
1999 
Soroush and Nowruz (oil) 
(“News in Brief: Iran.” Middle East Economic Digest 
[MEED], January 24, 2003.) 
Royal Dutch exempted from sanctions on 9/30 
because of pledge to exit Iran market  
Royal Dutch Shell 
(Netherlands)/Japex (Japan)  
$800 million 
190,000 bpd 
April 
2000 
Anaran bloc (oil) 
(MEED Special Report, December 16, 2005, pp. 
48-50.)  
Norsk Hydro and Statoil 
(Norway) and Gazprom and 
Lukoil (Russia) 
No production to date; 
Statoil and Norsk exited.  
$105 million 
65,000  
July 2000  Phase 4 and 5, South Pars (gas) 
ENI exempted 9/30 based on pledge to exit Iran 
market  
ENI  
Gas onstream as of Dec. 
2004 
$1.9 billion 
2 billion cu. 
ft./day (cfd) 
March 
2001 
Caspian Sea oil exploration—construction of 
submersible drilling rig for Iranian partner 
(IPR Strategic Business Information Database, 
March 11, 2001.)  
GVA Consultants (Sweden) 
$225 million 
NA 
June 
2001 
Darkhovin (oil) 
(“Darkhovin Production Doubles.” Gulf Daily 
News, May 1, 2008.) ENI told CRS in April 2010 it 
would close out all Iran operations by 2013. 
ENI exempted from sanctions on 9/30, as 
discussed above  
ENI 
Field in production 
$1 billion 
100,000 bpd 
May 
2002 
Masjid-e-Soleyman (oil) 
(“CNPC Gains Upstream Foothold.” MEED, 
September 3, 2004.) 
Sheer Energy (Canada)/China 
National Petroleum 
Company (CNPC). Local 
partner is Naftgaran 
Engineering 
$80 million 
25,000 bpd 
Sept. 
2002 
Phase 9 + 10, South Pars (gas) 
(“OIEC Surpasses South Korean Company in 
South Pars.” IPR Strategic Business Information 
Database, November 15, 2004.) 
LG Engineering and 
Construction Corp. (now 
known as GS Engineering and 
Construction Corp., South 
Korea) 
On stream as of early 2009 
$1.6 billion 
2 billion cfd 
October 
2002 
Phase 6, 7, 8, South Pars (gas) 
(Source: Statoil, May 2011) 
Field began producing late 2008; operational 
Statoil (Norway) 
$750 million 
3 billion cfd 
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
Microsoft PowerPoint: PPT, PPTX, PPS, PPSX; PDF: Portable Document you to easily load and view web document fast speed with the help of thumbnail, page navigate
generate thumbnail from pdf; how to view pdf thumbnails in
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
PDF Viewer provides C# users abilities to view, annotate, convert file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete C#.NET: Edit PDF Thumbnail.
cannot view pdf thumbnails in; create pdf thumbnails
Iran Sanctions 
Congressional Research Service 
61 
Date 
Field/Project 
Company(ies)/Status 
(If Known) 
Value 
Output/Goal 
control handed to NIOC in 2009. Statoil 
exempted from sanctions on 9/30/2010 after 
pledge to exit Iran market. 
January 
2004 
Azadegan (oil)—South and North 
October 15, 2010: Inpex announced it would exit 
the Azadegan project entirely by selling its 10% 
stake; “special rule” exempting it from ISA 
investigation invoked November 17, 2010.  
China National Petroleum Corp. took a majority 
stake in South and North Azadegan fields in 
January 2009. However, on April 29, 2014, Iran 
cancelled the South Azadegan contract citing 
CNPC for performing “no effective work” since 
taking the stake in 2009. Industry sources say 
CNPC likely to also lose North Azadegan project 
also. (Iran-CNPC Breakup: Tehran Eyes the West, 
Christian Science Monitor, May 5, 2014.  
Inpex (Japan) and CNPC 
(China)  
$200 million 
(Inpex stake); 
China $2.5 
billion 
260,000 bpd  
August 
2004 
Tusan Block 
Oil found in block in Feb. 2009, but not in 
commercial quantity, according to the firm. (“Iran-
Petrobras Operations.” APS Review Gas Market 
Trends, April 6, 2009; “Brazil’s Petrobras Sees Few 
Prospects for Iran Oil,” http://www.reuters.com/
article/idUSN0317110720090703. 
Petrobras (Brazil) 
$178 million 
No production 
October 
2004 
Yadavaran (oil) 
Christian Science Monitor reports May 5, 2014 
(op. cit.), that Iran says Sinopec has “experienced 
problems with regards to progress” on the field, 
which also extends into Iraq. But International Oil 
Daily quotes company on May 7, 2014, as saying 
project is on course to produce an initial 85,000 
bpd by the end of 2014.  
Sinopec (China), deal 
finalized Dec. 9, 2007 
$2 billion  
300,000 bpd  
2005  
Saveh bloc (oil) 
GAO report, cited below 
PTT (Thailand) 
June 
2006 
Garmsar bloc (oil) 
Deal finalized in June 2009 
(“China’s Sinopec signs a deal to develop oil block 
in Iran—report,” Forbes, 20 June 2009, 
http://www.forbes.com/feeds/afx/2006/06/20/
afx2829188.html.) 
Sinopec (China) 
$20 million 
July 2006   Arak Refinery expansion 
(GAO reports; Fimco FZE Machinery website; 
http://www.fimco.org/index.php?option=
com_content&task=view&id=70&Itemid=78.)  
Sinopec (China); JGC (Japan). 
Work may have been taken 
over or continued by 
Hyundai Heavy Industries (S. 
Korea) 
$959 million 
(major initial 
expansion; 
extent of 
Hyundai work 
unknown) 
Expansion to 
produce 
250,000 bpd 
Sept. 
2006 
Khorramabad block (oil) 
Seismic data gathered, but no production is 
planned. (Statoil factsheet, May 2011)  
Norsk Hydro and Statoil 
(Norway). 
$49 million 
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You can generate thumbnail image(s) from PDF file for quick viewing and further This class provides APIs for converting PDF files to other file formats.
create thumbnail from pdf c#; thumbnail pdf preview
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.Excel
Tell C# users how to: create a new Excel file and load Excel; merge, append, and split Excel files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy and Create Thumbnail.
.pdf printing in thumbnail size; view pdf image thumbnail
Iran Sanctions 
Congressional Research Service 
62 
Date 
Field/Project 
Company(ies)/Status 
(If Known) 
Value 
Output/Goal 
Dec 
2006 
North Pars Gas Field (offshore gas). Includes 
gas purchases  
Work crews reportedly pulled from the project in 
early-mid 2011. (“China Curbs Iran Energy Work” 
Reuters, September 2, 2011) 
China National Offshore 
Oil Co.  
$16 billion  
3.6 billion cfd 
February 
2007 
LNG Tanks at Tombak Port 
Contract to build three LNG tanks at Tombak, 30 
miles north of Assaluyeh Port.  
(May not constitute “investment” as defined in 
pre-2010 version of ISA, because that definition 
did not specify LNG as “petroleum resource” of 
Iran.)  
“Central Bank Approves $900 Million for Iran 
LNG Project.” Tehran Times, June 13, 2009.  
Daelim (S. Korea)  
$320 million 
200,000 ton 
capacity 
Feb. 
2007 
Phase 13, 14—South Pars (gas)  
Deadline to finalize as May 20, 2009, apparently 
not met; firms submitted revised proposals to Iran 
in June 2009. (http://www.rigzone.com/news/
article.asp?a_id=77040&hmpn=1.) State 
Department said on September 30, 2010, that 
Royal Dutch Shell and Repsol will not pursue this 
project any further. 
Royal Dutch Shell, Repsol 
(Spain) 
$4.3 billion 
March 
2007 
Esfahan refinery upgrade 
(“Daelim, Others to Upgrade Iran’s Esfahan 
Refinery.” Chemical News and Intelligence, March 19, 
2007.) 
Daelim (S. Korea) 
NA 
July 2007  Phase 22, 23, 24—South Pars (gas) 
Pipeline to transport Iranian gas to Turkey, and on 
to Europe and building three power plants in Iran. 
Contract not finalized to date.  
Turkish Petroleum Company 
(TPAO)  
$12. billion 
2 billion cfd 
Dec. 
2007 
Golshan and Ferdowsi onshore and offshore 
gas and oil fields and LNG plant 
Contract modified but reaffirmed December 2008 
(GAO reports; Oil Daily, January 14, 2008.) 
Petrofield Subsidiary of SKS 
Ventures (Malaysia) 
$15 billion 
3.4 billion cfd 
of gas/250,000 
bpd of oil 
2007 
(unspec.) 
Jofeir Field (oil) 
GAO report cited below. Belarusneft, a subsidiary 
of Belneftekhim, sanctioned under ISA on March 
29, 2011. Naftiran sanctioned on September 29, 
2010, for this and other activities.  
Belarusneft (Belarus) under 
contract to Naftiran.  
No production to date 
$500 million 
40,000 bpd 
2008 
Dayyer Bloc (Persian Gulf, offshore, oil) 
GAO reports 
Edison (Italy) 
$44 million 
February 
2008 
Lavan field (offshore natural gas) 
GAO report cited below invested. PGNiG 
invested, but delays caused Iran to void PGNiG 
contract in December 2011. Project to be 
implemented by Iranian firms. (Fars News, 
December 20, 2011) 
PGNiG (Polish Oil and Gas 
Company, Poland)  
$2 billion 
Iran Sanctions 
Congressional Research Service 
63 
Date 
Field/Project 
Company(ies)/Status 
(If Known) 
Value 
Output/Goal 
March 
2008 
Danan Field (on-shore oil) 
“PVEP Wins Bid to Develop Danan Field.” Iran 
Press TV, March 11, 2008 
Petro Vietnam Exploration 
and Production Co. 
(Vietnam) 
April 
2008 
Iran’s Kish gas field  
Includes pipeline from Iran to Oman 
Oman (co-financing of 
project) 
$7 billion  
1 billion cfd 
April 
2008 
Moghan 2 (onshore oil and gas, Ardebil 
province) 
January 7, 2014, GAO report says INA has 
withdrawn from Iran. 
INA (Croatia) 
$40-$140 
million 
(dispute over 
size) 
2008 
Kermanshah petrochemical plant (new 
construction) 
GAO reports 
Uhde (Germany) 
300,000 metric 
tons/yr 
June 
2008 
Resalat Oilfield 
Status of work unclear 
Amona (Malaysia). Joined in 
June 2009 by CNOOC and 
another China firm, COSL. 
$1.5 billion 
47,000 bpd 
January 
2009 
Bushehr Polymer Plants 
Production of polyethelene at two polymer plants 
in Bushehr Province. 
GAO January 7, 2014, report says Sasol has 
withdrawn from Iran.  
Sasol (South Africa) 
Capacity is 1 
million tons 
per year. 
Products are 
exported from 
Iran. 
March 
2009 
Phase 12 South Pars (gas)—Incl. LNG terminal 
construction and Farsi Block gas field/Farzad-B 
bloc.  
Taken over by Indian firms 
(Oil and Natural Gas Corp. 
of India, Oil India Ltd., India 
Oil Corp. Ltd. in 2007); may 
also include minor stakes by 
Sonanagol (Angola) and 
PDVSA (Venezuela).  
$8 billion 
from Indian 
firms/$1.5 
billion 
Sonangol/$780 
million 
PDVSA 
20 million 
tonnes of LNG 
annually by 
2012 
August 
2009 
Abadan refinery  
Upgrade and expansion; building a new refinery at 
Hormuz on the Persian Gulf coast  
Sinopec  
up to $6 
billion if new 
refinery is 
built 
Oct. 
2009 
South Pars Gas Field—Phases 6-8, Gas 
Sweetening Plant 
CRS conversation with Embassy of S. Korea in 
Washington, DC, July 2010 
Contract signed but then abrogated by S. Korean 
firm 
G and S Engineering and 
Construction (South Korea)  
$1.4 billion 
Nov. 
2009 
South Pars: Phase 12—Part 2 and Part 3 
(“Italy, South Korea To Develop South Pars Phase 
12.” Press TV [Iran], November 3, 2009, 
http://www.presstv.com/pop/Print/?id=110308.)  
Daelim (S. Korea)—Part 2; 
Tecnimont (Italy)—Part 3 
$4 billion ($2 
bn each part) 
Feb. 
2010 
South Pars: Phase 11 
Drilling was to begin in March 2010, but CNPC 
pulled out in October 2012. (Economist 
Intelligence Unit “Oil Sanctions on Iran: Cracking 
Under Pressure.” 2012.)  
CNPC (China) 
$4.7 billion 
Iran Sanctions 
Congressional Research Service 
64 
Date 
Field/Project 
Company(ies)/Status 
(If Known) 
Value 
Output/Goal 
2011 
Azar Gas Field 
Gazprom contract voided in late 2011 by Iran due 
to Gazprom’s unspecified failure to fulfill its 
commitments.  
Gazprom (Russia) 
Dec. 
2011 
Zagheh Oil Field 
Preliminary deal signed December 18, 
2011(Associated Press, December 18, 2011)  
Tatneft (Russia) 
$1 billion 
55,000 barrels 
per day within 
five years 
Sources: As noted in table, as well as CRS conversations with officials of the State Department Bureau of 
Economics, and officials of embassies of the parent government of some of the listed companies. Some 
information comes from various GAO reports, the latest of which was January 13, 2015 (GAO-15-258R). 
Note: CRS has neither the mandate, the authority, nor the means to determine which of these projects, if any, 
might constitute a violation of the Iran Sanctions Act. CRS has no way to confirm the precise status of any of the 
announced investments; some investments may have been resold to other firms or terms altered since 
agreement. In virtually all cases, such investments and contracts represent private agreements between Iran and 
its instruments and the investing firms, and firms are not necessarily required to confirm or publicly release the 
terms of their arrangements with Iran. Reported $20 million+ investments in oil and gas fields, refinery upgrades, 
and major project leadership are included in this table. Responsibility for a project to develop Iran’s energy 
sector is part of ISA investment definition.  
Effect on Gasoline Availability and Importation 
As the enactment of U.S. sanctions on the sale of gasoline to Iran became increasingly likely in 
2010, several suppliers apparently stopped selling gasoline to Iran.
99
Others ceased after the 
enactment of CISADA. Gasoline deliveries to Iran fell from about 120,000 barrels per day before 
CISADA to about 30,000 barrels per day immediately thereafter, although importation later 
increased to about 50,000 barrels per day. 
99
Information in this section derived from Javier Blas, “Traders Cut Iran Petrol Line,” 
Financial Times, March 8, 2010. 
Iran Sanctions 
Congressional Research Service 
65 
Table 6. Firms That Sold Gasoline to Iran 
Vitol of Switzerland notified GAO it stopped selling to Iran in early 2010) 
Trafigura of Switzerland notified GAO it stopped selling to Iran in November 2009) 
Glencore of Switzerland notified GAO it stopped selling in September 2009) 
Total of France notified GAO it stopped sales to Iran in May 2010) 
Reliance Industries of India notified GAO it stopped sales to Iran in May 2009) 
Petronas of Malaysia said on April 15, 2010, it had stopped sales to Iran)
100
Lukoil of Russia was reported to have ended sales to Iran in April 2010,
101
although some reports say that Lukoil 
affiliates continued supplying Iran. 
Royal Dutch Shell of the Netherlands notified GAO it stopped sales in October 2009) 
Kuwait’s Independent Petroleum Group told U.S. officials it stopped selling gasoline to Iran as of September 2010
102
Tupras of Turkey stopped selling gasoline to Iran as of May 2011, according to the State Department 
British Petroleum of United Kingdom, Shell, Q8, Total, and OMV stopped selling aviation fuel to Iran Air, according to 
U.S. State Department officials on May 24, 2011.  
A UAE firm, Golden Crown Petroleum FZE, told the author in April 2011 that, as of June 29, 2010, it had stopped 
leasing vessels for the purpose of shipping petroleum products from or through Iran.  
Munich Re, Allianz, Hannover Re (Germany) were providing insurance and reinsurance for gasoline shipments to Iran. 
However, they reportedly have exited the market for insuring gasoline shipments for Iran
103
Lloyd’s (Britain). The major insurer had been the main company insuring Iranian gas (and other) shipping, but 
reportedly ended that business in July 2010.  
According to the State Department on May 24, 2011, Linde of Germany said it had stopped supplying gas liquefaction 
technology to Iran, contributing to Iran’s decision to suspend its LNG program. 
Several firms were sanctioned by the Administration under ISA on May 24, 2011, including PCCI (Jersey/Iran); 
Associated Shipbroking (Monaco); and Petroleos de Venezuela (Venezuela). Tanker Pacific representatives told the 
author in January 2013 that the firm had stopped dealing with Iran in April 2010 but may have been deceived by IRISL 
into a transaction with Iran after that time. ISA sanctions were removed on these firms as of Implementation Day.  
Zhuhai Zhenrong, Unipec, ZhenHua Oil, and China Oil of China. Zhuhai Zhenrong is no longer selling Iran gasoline, 
according to the January 7, 2014, GAO report (GAO-14-281R). ZhenHua, a subsidiary of arms manufacturer 
Norinco, supplied one third of Iran’s gasoline in March 2010, but there is little information on supplies since. (Zhuhai 
Zhenrong was “de-listed” from ISA sanctions as of Implementation Day.) 
Emirates National Oil Company of UAE has been reported by GAO to still be selling to Iran, as have three other 
UAE energy traders, FAL, Royal Oyster Group, and Speedy Ship (UAE/Iran). The latter three were sanctioned under 
ISA, but the sanctions were removed on Implementation Day.  
Hin Leong Trading of Singapore has asserted that it ceased selling gasoline to Iran. There is no current available 
information on whether Kuo Oil of Singapore has or has not stopped selling gasoline to Iran. Kuo has been “de-listed 
from ISA sanctions as of Implementation Day.  
Source: CRS conversations with various firms, various GAO reports, various press reports. 
100
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/009370f0-486e-11df-9a5d-00144feab49a.html. 
101
http://www.defenddemocracy.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=11788115&Itemid=105. 
102
http://www.defenddemocracy.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=11788115&Itemid=105. 
103
http://www.defenddemocracy.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=11788115&Itemid=105. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested