asp.net pdf viewer control : Thumbnail view in for pdf files application SDK utility html wpf azure visual studio S2009797_en2-part1421

CEPAL – Colección Documentos de proyectos 
A Sub-Nat ional Public-Private Strategic Alliance for Innovation and Export… …  
21 
affordable for a diversity of smaller oil companies. That is where they concentrated their efforts. 
Nonetheless, they knew that patience was needed, as widespread commercial applications would be 
unlikely for two to three decades. In 1977, Clem Bowman suggested to the attendees of the tenth 
World Energy Conference in Istanbul, Turkey that: 
Development of Alberta’s oil sands will occur at a modest  but sustained pace 
for the next 10-15 years with two or three 17,000
39
or so TPCD [tons per 
calendar day] plants going on stream after Syncrude but before about 1990; 
and, in the longer term, say from 1995 on, improved technology and reduced 
world supply of conventional crude oil relative to total world requirements, 
will likely lead to the development, literally at the maximum rate Alberta is 
prepared to authorize; this could result in new production of 7000 to 14,000 
TPCD  each  year;  it  will  not  be  large  in  a  world  perspective  but  it  will 
represent  much  of  the  growth  in  Canada’s  requirements.  (B owman  and 
Govier, 1977). 
Over the course of 18 years AOSTRA spent Can$448 million (almost Can$1 billion in 2006 
dollars) on public-private projects and institutional research (see chart), making AOSTRA one of the 
largest research and development programs ever launched in Canada
40
FIGURE 4 
AOSTRA ANNUAL INVESTMENTS – 1976 TO 1993 
Source: AOSTRA, 1993. 
As the AOSTRA Act specified, the institution’s primary fo cus was the development of one 
commercial  in  situ  method  for  each  of  the  oil  sands’  four  dis tinct  areas.  The  legislation  also 
39
Approximately 100,000 barrels per day.   
40
AOSTRA 5 year report. 
0
20 000 000
40 000 000
60 000 000
80 000 000
100 000 000
120 000 000
140 000 000
160 000 000
1976
1977
1978
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
Canadian Dollars  
Annual Expenditures Nominal Dollars
Annual Expenditures 2006 Dollars
Thumbnail view in for pdf files - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
create pdf thumbnails; pdf thumbnail creator
Thumbnail view in for pdf files - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
pdf thumbnails; view pdf thumbnails in
CEPAL – Colección Documentos de proyectos 
A Sub-Nat ional Public-Private Strategic Alliance for Innovation and Export… …  
22 
envisioned the development of more effective and environmentally acceptable upgrading technology, 
improvements  or  an  alternative  to  the  current  surface  mining  technology  and  better  means  of 
converting bitumen into valued petroleum and mineral products
41
B. Governance 
The organization’s chairman was not the only board member wi th industry experience; almost all 
board members had either lengthy industry experience or had recognized scientific and/or academic 
expertise. In addition, it was mandated that at least one board member was a sitting member of the 
Alberta legislature. According to Clem Bowman, the presence of a politician served a most important 
function. This individual was expected to intervene in all discussions in the Alberta legislature where 
AOSTRA was mentioned, always correcting misconceptions when necessary and ensuring that his/her 
colleagues were always fully briefed on the organization’s ongoin g projects. 
Although  the  organization  was  given  initial  funding  for  five  years,  as  with  all  other 
government institutions, AOSTRA was subject to annual audits by the provincial Auditor General. 
Moreover, an annual report was presented to the legislature through the Minister of Energy. 
For most of the early years, the organization was run with minimal staff. The Chairman was the 
only member of the Board to be employed on a full time basis, with technical positions being filled 
primarily by consultants, and later, by experts seconded from the Alberta Research Council, which was a 
long established provincial institution with much expertise in oil sands development. Other AOSTRA 
positions were embedded in companies on special units related to specific projects. The embedded staff 
were on contract to AOSTRA but paid out of the joint venture. They had defined duties re oversight of 
the project. Most of the staff also took on specific tasks under the direction of the project manager, in 
addition  to  their  oversight  duties.  According  to  Mr.  Bowman’s  recollection,  “they  all  rose  to  the 
challenge of a complex job. There was only one common interest
42
” The staff grew to approximately 30 
individuals, mostly embedded as employees, although some were on contract. 
The first year, Bowman and his staff proceeded cautiously, meeting with stakeholders from 
the universities and oil companies to gather their input on the greatest technology needs. “Once the 
original $100 million in funding was approved by legislation
43
and my appointment was announced, 
there was a steady stream of people coming to our door. We also initiated meetings with the university 
presidents and representatives from oil and gas companies,” said  Bowman. “Out of these discussions, 
we distilled a plan with detailed objectives.” In other words,  a medium/long term strategy emerged 
from this public-private alliance. 
In the end, AOSTRA’s board of directors settled on two maj or objectives for its first five 
years of operation:  to work with oil companies to field-test the most advanced technologies developed 
in their laboratories over the past 20 years; and to harness the university and institutional research 
capabilities of Canada in the search for new concepts for the recovery and upgrading of bitumen and 
heavy oils
44
In late 1975, AOSTRA issued a request for proposals. Twenty one proposals were received 
and five —requiring Can$235 million in funding— were sho
rt-listed. “We discovered $100 million 
wasn’t enough money,” said Bowman. “So before really launching,  we went back to government and 
cabinet  to  ask for an additional $135  million in funding.”  The government agreed and AOSTRA 
began negotiating in earnest with industry. 
41
AOSTRA Act, 1974 and Bowman, 1977. 
42
Bowman, Clement —email communication— June 2008. 
43
Note that Premier Lougheed had a majority government, consequently, approving budgets and legislation was not 
extremely difficult. 
44
AOSTRA, 1980.
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
from other file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete using which VB.NET developers can redact, delete, view and save PDF Thumbnail Edit.
can't see pdf thumbnails; enable pdf thumbnail preview
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.PowerPoint
Tell C# users how to: create a new PowerPoint file and load PowerPoint; merge, append, and split PowerPoint files; insert, delete, move, rotate Create Thumbnail.
pdf thumbnail; enable pdf thumbnails
CEPAL – Colección Documentos de proyectos 
A Sub-Nat ional Public-Private Strategic Alliance for Innovation and Export… …  
23 
“This is when the tough part started,” said Bowman. As he not ed, “the Alberta government 
required that AOSTRA  own any new technologies developed, a condition that, in the beginning, 
companies weren’t comfortable with.” The industry participants  let Amoco Canadian Oil Company 
Ltd. take the lead in the negotiations with AOSTRA.  “This  wasn’t a planned thing,” said Bowman. 
‘The other companies just decided to back off until Amoco cut  a deal.” And, in the end, industry 
agreed to the government’s demands. “Amoco was really the first  company to understand that they 
didn’t need ownership rights, they just needed use rights.” ”  
With the Amoco agreement concluded, other companies followed and AOSTRA’s projects 
transitioned quickly from concepts on paper to action in the field. Five projects quickly expanded to 
ten (see chart) and progress towards Lougheed’s grand vision o f an energy breakthrough project was 
underway. 
Finally, it should be noted that AOSTRA’s only regular eval uation was the annual report to 
the Legislature, which was highly technical and detailed. In  addition, the  Chairman of AOSTRA 
presented annual accomplishment reports to the Executive Council. Nonetheless, although there was 
no formal independent evaluation by an outside organization, occasional surveys of stakeholders were 
conducted from time to time. AOSTRA’s work also was constant ly in the public arena and subject to 
much public scrutiny. Still, there was much trust as the Board Members of AOSTRA were seen as 
highly credible and ethical and were constantly involved in self-appraisal. 
C. Joint AOSTRA/Industry funded projects 
1. In situ projects, the UTF and the evolution of SAGD 
From 1976 to 1980, AOSTRA joined forces with industry to fund ten in situ pilot projects. The 
technology applications were diverse, ranging from fracturing to cyclic steam stimulation (CCS) and 
combustion processes. Six of the projects focused on the bitumen deposits in the Athabasca, Peace 
River and Cold Lake regions. The others explored opportunities in the carbonate triangle and heavy 
oil regions in southern Alberta (see table). For most projects, industry was expected to pay 50 percent 
of the total project costs, essentially sharing the risk equally with the government. 
TABLE 1 
AOSTRA FUNDED IN SITU PROJECTS (1976-1980) 
Location 
Participants 
Commitment 
Project Share 
Process 
Investigated 
Total Project Cost 
(Can$ millions) 
Oil Sands 
Athabasca 
Gregoire Lake 
AOSTRA 
Amoco Canadian Petroleum Company Ltd. 
Petro-Canada Exploration Inc. 
Shell Canada Resources Ltd. – Shell 
Explorer Ltd. 
Suncor Resources 
50% 
12.5% 
12.5% 
12.5% 
12.5% 
Combustion 
46.0 
Athabasca 
Surmont 
AOSTRA 
Gulf Canada Resources Inc. 
50% 
50% 
Horizontal 
wells  
7.8 
Athabasca 
Surmont 
AOSTRA 
Gulf Canada Resources Inc. 
Numac Oil & Gas Ltd. 
50% 
25% 
25% 
Fracturing 
2.2 
Athabasca 
AOSTRA 
Hudson’s Bay Oil & Gas Company Ltd. 
50% 
50% 
Shallow sand 
process 
0.2 
Peace River 
AOSTRA 
Shell Canada Resources Ltd. 
Shell Explorer Ltd. 
Amoco Canadian Petroleum Company Ltd. 
50% 
18.75% 
18.75% 
12.5% 
Steam 
123.7 
(continues) 
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.Word
Tell C# users how to: create a new Word file and load Word from pdf; merge, append, and split Word files; insert, delete, move, rotate Create Thumbnail.
pdf no thumbnail; pdf file thumbnail preview
Create Thumbnail in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
Web Image Viewer Installation; View and Display Images; Annotate & Redact Documents or Images; Create Thumbnail; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode & Decode
can't see pdf thumbnails; create pdf thumbnails
CEPAL – Colección Documentos de proyectos 
A Sub-Nat ional Public-Private Strategic Alliance for Innovation and Export… …  
24 
TABLE 1 (concluded) 
Cold Lake 
AOSTRA 
BP Exploration Canada Limited 
Hudson’s Bay Oil & Gas Company Ltd. 
Pan Canadian Petroleum Limited 
50% 
20% 
17.5% 
12.5% 
Steam and 
combustion 
19.2 
Carbonates 
Buffalo Creek  AOSTRA 
Union Oil Company of Canada Limited 
Canadian Superior Oil Ltd. 
50% 
25% 
25% 
Steam and 
combustion 
13.9 
Heavy Oil 
Suffield 
AOSTRA 
Alberta Energy Company Ltd. 
Musketeer Energy Ltd. 
Westcoast Petroleum Ltd. 
50% 
25% 
12.5% 
12.5% 
Combustion 
9.0 
Viking 
Kinsella 
AOSTRA 
Petro-Canada Exploration, Inc. 
50% 
50% 
Combustion 
and steam 
17.7 
Other 
AOSTRA 
Pengalta Research & Development Ltd. 
Nine industry participants 
10%  
90% 
Test facility to 
test well heavy 
oil lifting 
technology – 
note industry 
had already 
developed the 
site and only 
needed a small 
amount of 
funding.  
0.18 
Source: AOSTRA, 1980. 
In terms of new technologies, it  is important to note that a technology is not considered 
developed until it has gone from the initial theoretical formulation, through the commercial testing 
phase —where the rule of thumb is fifteen to twenty commercial  tests (site specific) for every single 
technology—  to  the  final  “acceptance”  and  usage.  This  renders  invest
ment  in  research  and 
development a risky proposition. While there are never guarantees that a new idea will actually work, 
the laboratory phase is perhaps the easiest to fund because the criteria for failure or success are not 
defined. However, the field tests,  which inherently offer no promises of commercially applicable 
results, are risky and hard to finance.  In fact, it is likely that a series of “failures” will precede any 
eventual “breakthrough” and this, predictably, was the experience of  AOSTRA. 
Most governments have a hard time facing the political fallout of massive investments that 
yield no results. However, unlike most governments, the Alberta government of the time appears to 
have  understood  and  been  comfortable  with the  inherent challenges and  long timelines faced by 
AOSTRA.  “Although this program has been in existence onl y five years, a considerable bank of new 
technology has been accumulated. However, a full assessment of many of the projects will require 
several more years of operation and data collection. As in all research, the task is difficult, and new 
problems are  identified as work progresses,” wrote Merv  Leitch,  Minister of Energy  and Natural 
Resources, in 1980
45
  
As  time  passed,  and  pilot  results  started  rolling  in,  it  became  apparent  that  while  the 
combination of vertical wells and steam stimulation methods worked in some reservoirs, it did not 
work  in  the  massive  deposits  in  the  Athabasca  region
46
 As  AOSTRA  approached  its  tenth 
45
Ibid. 
46
Cyclic Steam Stimulation (CCS), an extraction process that had been tested in California and Venezuela seemed to 
work  best  in  reservoirs with good  horizontal permeability, like the  ones in the Cold Lake region  of Alberta. 
However, they were unsuitable for the Athabasca reservoir characteristics.   
Create Thumbnail Winforms | Online Tutorials
Winforms Image Viewer Installation; View and Display Create Thumbnail; Generate Barcodes on Your Documents; Processing; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode
can't view pdf thumbnails; pdf thumbnail fix
VB.NET Image: Image and Doc Windows, Web & Mobile Viewers of
for users to do image displaying, thumbnail creation and compatible mobile phone or tablet to view, navigate, zoom are JPEG, PNG, BMP, GIF, TIFF, PDF, Word and
pdf thumbnail html; pdf thumbnail preview
CEPAL – Colección Documentos de proyectos 
A Sub-Nat ional Public-Private Strategic Alliance for Innovation and Export… …  
25 
anniversary, the only full-scale commercial oil sands operations remained the surface mines.  The goal 
of delivering a commercially viable in situ technology remained elusive. 
Focus began to shift towards combining horizontal well and steam technologies.  In 1976, 
AOSTRA and several companies had conducted an economic evaluation of developing oil sands with 
horizontal wells drilled either from tunnels or by deviation from the surface.  While several companies 
were experimenting with surface drilling, the “horizontal  wells”  was new, having  been piloted in 
Russia and by ESSO Resources Canada Ltd. (now Imperial Oil) at Cold Lake and perhaps by Mobil 
before them
47
From  1979  to  1982,  AOSTRA  and  Gulf  Canada  Resources  Inc.  conducted  an  in-depth 
feasibility study and engineering design for a shaft and tunnel field pilot.  Gulf’s Surmont lease, in the 
Athabasca region, was chosen as a pilot site.  Then the bottom dropped out of the oil market, with oil 
prices suffering significant declines beginning in early 1982, which, combined with the effects of the 
NEP, resulted in the project stalling. Ultimately, Gulf decided to not to proceed with the field pilot. 
Over the next several years, AOSTRA set up a project team, led by Maurice Carrigy, vice-
chairman  of  the board,  and hired  Norwest  Resource Consultants Ltd. to  hone  the concept of  an 
Underground Test Facility (UTF). This time industry could not be convinced to invest, agreeing only 
to act as “advisors” to AOSTRA if it decided to proceed. 
Bowman believes that industry’s reluctance to participate in the U TF was due to global oil 
market  conditions  and  because  technical  staff  were  unfamiliar  with  the  technology.  “Gerry 
Stephenson, president of Norwest and lead  researcher on the feasibility study, argued that the oil 
industry didn’t have experience in mining techniques like hor izontal drilling and so didn’t have the 
necessary experience to evaluate the potential of the UTF project.” 
In 1984, AOSTRA decided to go it alone.  It announced it would spend Can$ 42 million (later 
increased  to  Can$80  million)  to  build  the  UTF  without  industry  participation
48
 The  Alberta 
government gave the Authority lease rights to a tract of land 60 kilometres north of Fort McMurray.  
The UTF was officially opened in 1987 and six years later, AOSTRA announced it was on the verge 
of a commercial breakthrough with Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD)
49
. In fact, SAGD tests 
were able to recover almost 70 percent of bitumen, an unheard of recovery rate for an in situ project.   
The development of in situ bitumen production is a testament to the challenges of moving 
new  technologies  along  the  commercial  productive  chain.  Figure  5  shows  all  current  oil  sands 
production by company, project, and production method. A careful examination shows that, twenty 
years later, SAGD is still responsible for very little production. However, several facilities are ready to 
start production in the next few years and the numbers are expected to increase dramatically by the 
end of 2008. Note that a lag period of 20 to 30 years is not uncommon in technology development and 
commercialization. These are complex industrial processes with challenges that take time to master.  
This technology still earns the province licensing fees (an estimated $1.2 million per company 
acquiring a SAGD license) but more important than money, it has translated into much data which is 
shared among industry players. It is important to note that this amount is not enough to cover the 
province’s investment. 
47
The  surface  approach  utilized  slant  or  vertical  wells  drilled  from  the  surface.  The  “shaft  and  tunnel   access 
approach” employed mining techniques to place perso nnel and equipment in tunnels burrowed close to, or even 
within, the bitumen reservoir.  Horizontal wells were drilled and completed from these tunnels.  In both cases, the 
reservoir is heated by injecting steam in vertical wells drilled into the pay zone, thereby reducing the viscosity of 
the bitumen and allowing the oil to flow into the horizontal production wells. 
48
Oilweek, “AOSTRA concentrating on small oil sands  projects,” Oilweek, January 23, 1984. 
49
Oil and Gas Journal, “Payout Approaches in Alberta ’s Joint Oil Sands Research,” June 8, 1992.
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
Microsoft PowerPoint: PPT, PPTX, PPS, PPSX; PDF: Portable Document you to easily load and view web document fast speed with the help of thumbnail, page navigate
pdf first page thumbnail; create thumbnail from pdf
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
PDF Viewer provides C# users abilities to view, annotate, convert file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete C#.NET: Edit PDF Thumbnail.
generate pdf thumbnails; pdf thumbnail
CEPAL – Colección Documentos de proyectos 
A Sub-Nat ional Public-Private Strategic Alliance for Innovation and Export… …  
26 
2. Mining, upgrading and enhanced oil recovery 
While in situ technology was AOSTRA’s principal focus, it s mandate also included the development 
of  more  effective  and  environmentally  acceptable  upgrading  technology,  improvements  or  an 
alternative to the current surface mining  technology and  better  means of converting bitumen into 
valued petroleum and mineral products. 
An oil sands surface mine lays a heavy footprint on the environment. Tonnes of overburden —
topsoil, muskeg, sand, clay and gravel— must be stripped  from the ground to expose the underlying oil 
sands, a process that is both costly and environmentally damaging due to the disruption of vast tracts of 
land displaced and the sulphurous nature of bitumen. In the early days of AOSTRA, the only commercial 
mining extraction process —the Clark Hot Water Extra ction Process— produced large quantities of 
waste solids and water that had to be processed in tailings ponds
50
. Moreover, the Clark process was not 
amenable to the processing of low-grade oil sands containing low concentrations of bitumen
51
AOSTRA  focused  its  research  efforts  on  two  projects:  the  Oleophilic  Sieve  process  (in 
partnership  with Suncor) and the  Taciuk  process.  The Oleophilic Sieve  process  is  a  method  for 
extracting  bitumen  from tailings.  The  Taciuk  process is  a  method  for  retorting  (heating  to  high 
temperatures) oil sand that combines recovery and primary upgrading in one vessel. Both of these 
projects were focused on increasing the efficiency with which bitumen could be extracted from low-
grade oil sands. While these projects did have industry participation, they were funded principally by 
AOSTRA through for-profit research organizations
52
 
3. AOSTRA/Industry agreements and technology ownership 
AOSTRA owned the rights to all technology developed as part of the programs it funded.  Industry 
partners had the right to use new inventions at their own facilities on a non-exclusive license on a free-
fee basis. The license included affiliates (at least 50% owner or owned) and was world-wide. In some 
cases, the intellectual property could be kept confidential from other companies for up to 35 years
53
but AOSTRA had the right to license them either exclusively in Canada or globally depending on the 
patent, for a “fair market-value” license fee.  Fair market value was  deemed to be commensurate with 
what it would have cost the licensee to participate in the development of the technology from the start.  
Thus, said Dr. Bowman, “…sitting on the sidelines will reap
no rewards
54
.” While industry was, and 
remained
55
, uncomfortable with the technology ownership rules, the Alberta government saw this as 
the only way to ensure the public benefited from AOSTRA’s  investments
56
  
Given the results, it seems that the model worked. Prior to 1974, the intellectual property 
associated  with  oil  sands  development  was  owned  predominantly  by  foreign  multinationals,  in 
particular Sun Oil  which owned 44 of the 69 oil sands technologies and processes that  had been 
patented in Canada at that time
57
. Eighteen years later, AOSTRA estimated it had produced 15,000 
reports and about  116  patents/patent  applications/invention  disclosures  from some  200 projects
58
Nonetheless, there are some that claim that this IP model was costly, administratively heavy, and 
hindered development. It is true that many of the patents were abandoned. 
50
Today, tailings ponds at the Suncor and Syncrude mines can be seen in satellite photos taken from space. 
51
AOSTRA, 1980. 
52
AOSTRA, 1986. 
53
Note that these confidentiality agreements have yet to expire. 
54
Bowman, C.W. Guest Editorial for Oil Sand Issue of Journal of Canadian Petroleum Technology, March 8, 1977. 
55
Luhning, 1994. 
56
Hansard, 1974. 
57
Chastko, Paul (2004), Developing Alberta’s oil san ds: from Karl Clark to Kyoto, Calgary, University of Calgary 
Press 155. 
58
AOSTRA, 1999.
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You can generate thumbnail image(s) from PDF file for quick viewing and further This class provides APIs for converting PDF files to other file formats.
generate thumbnail from pdf; disable pdf thumbnails
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.Excel
Tell C# users how to: create a new Excel file and load Excel; merge, append, and split Excel files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy and Create Thumbnail.
view pdf thumbnails in; no pdf thumbnails in
CEPAL – Colección Documentos de proyectos 
A Sub-Nat ional Public-Private Strategic Alliance for Innovation and Export… …  
27 
Moreover, in later years, successor governments saw technology licensing fees as a means of 
self-financing  for  AOSTRA
59
but  this  was  never  the  early  intent.  “There  was  never  a  thought 
[AOSTRA] would be self funding in the time I was there,” say s Bowman. “The concept of getting 
licensing money was a means to allow companies to come in after projects were initiated.” Although 
there are  many views on the exact  shape of technology ownership, there is some consensus that 
government management (as opposed to outright ownership) of these licenses is an efficient system. 
D. Institutional research and inventors assistance program
AOSTRA facilitated research and development by harnessing the intellectual capital of industry, universities 
and inventors. It did this through the AOSTRA/industry jointly-funded projects mentioned above, but also 
through the funding of universities and other research organizations and the funding of inventors. 
1. Institutional Research 
AOSTRA  committed  Can$116  million  over  18  years  to  basic  research  at universities  and  other 
research organizations. This investment significantly raised the level of basic and applied research 
being conducted at the Alberta Research Council
60
and at Canadian universities. 
The projects undertaken by the Alberta Research Council included: 
•  Oil Sands Research Centre —funding for a variety of  basic research on heavy oil and bitumen 
characteristics, recovery mechanisms and piloting of recovery and upgrading processes.  
•  Sample Bank —funding to operate a sample bank of several grades  of fresh oil sands and 
bitumen samples. 
•  Oil Sands Information Centre —funding for a service organizati on that collected and 
disseminated information about oil sands and heavy oils. 
•  Geology  Project  —funding  to  conduct  regional  geological  stud ies  in  the  oil  sands, 
carbonate and heavy oil areas. 
In addition  to  the  research  undertaken  by  the  Alberta  Research  Council,  AOSTRA  also 
funded  many  basic  research  projects  at  various  Canadian  universities.  It  also  funded  numerous 
professorships, post doctoral fellowships and scholarships, mainly at universities in Alberta.   
AOSTRA’s relationship with the federal government was a bit m ore complex. Although there 
are  many  examples  of  collaboration,  such  as  joint  programs  with  Natural  Resource  Canada’s 
CANMET (Canada Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology) laboratories, particularly in the field 
of upgrading technologies, information on  those  programs is  scarce.  It appears  that the  intensely 
acrimonious relationship between the two levels of government made open institutional collaboration 
difficult. Thus, it is not surprising that scientists and mid-level managers found it more expeditious to 
collaborate quietly. Unfortunately, while this served their purpose well, it made the work of future 
researchers  extremely  difficult,  because  there  were  no  detailed  records  of  their  collaboration. 
Moreover, there is reason to believe that these conflicting relations curtail positive spillover effects 
and negatively impacted the pace of technological development.  
59
Coopers & Lybrand, 1994. 
60
The ARC was established in 1921 as the Scientific and Industrial Research Council of Alberta (SIRCA) with a 
mandate to carry out research into the potential of the province's natural resources for industrial development. 
Nowadays,  ARC defines itself as “an applied researc h and development (R&D) corporation that develops  and 
commercializes technology to grow innovative enterprises.” http://www.arc.ab.ca.
CEPAL – Colección Documentos de proyectos 
A Sub-Nat ional Public-Private Strategic Alliance for Innovation and Export… …  
28 
2. Inventors assistance program 
AOSTRA's Inventors Grant Assistance Program provided several hundred thousand dollars a year to 
inventors with limited means but good ideas. The money was for helping inventors to obtain patent 
protection for their inventions or to undertake sufficient evaluation work to secure funds for further 
development from private funding agencies. 
E. Eighteen years of AOSTRA investment 
Most agree that AOSTRA was a success particularly that its investments accelerated the development 
of oil sands technology and made Alberta a world centre of oil sands research and technology. Over 
its eighteen years of operation, Can$219 million was invested in situ development, Can$116 million 
was spent on institutional research and Can$80 million on the Underground Test Facility. Although 
investments in research in areas other than in situ production technology —which include some 200 
projects, 116 patents/patent applications/invention disclosures and thousands of papers— did not yield 
the same stellar outcomes, success should be measured using results less tangible than patents. For 
instance, not only did AOSTRA foster an unprecedented collaboration between researchers, industry 
and government, it also helped educate an entire generation of scientists. And in the age where human 
capital is as valuable as now, this could be judged as one of AOSTRA's key successes. 
Nonetheless, AOSTRA’s structure, leadership, and focus changed  with times. After ten years 
at the helm, Clem Bowman felt he had accomplished his objectives and decided it was time for a 
change. Not a year later, Peter Lougheed was succeeded in office by Don Getty (1985-1992) and then 
by Ralph Klein who took over in 1992. Although the AOSTRA leadership that followed Dr. Bowman 
did continue to pursue the main programs that were in place, it seems that it lacked vision on where to 
go next. Perhaps, more than anything, this was a reflection of the new government single minded 
concern with streamlining the bureaucracy, cutting the budget, and balancing the books. A comparison 
of AOSTRA’s investment by project/sector over its first ten  years and second eight years of operation 
—figures 5 and 6— illustrates this point. 
In the first ten years, the organization’s focus on joint A OSTRA/industry in situ projects is 
clear whereas in the last eight years, there was more of an emphasis on institutional research and the 
Underground Test Facility. In fact the organization’s leadershi p had also shifted, from a primarily and 
singular technical focus on oil sands development, to one that answered to much broader objectives 
including  international  partnerships,  education,  and  others.  After  Clem  Bowman  left,  AOSTRA 
chairmen were chosen without engaging the services of an international recruiting firm and seemed to 
have  a  political  agenda.  As  such  AOSTRA  had  many  constituencies  to  answer  to.  This  was  a 
particular issue given the organization’s quasi-independent legal  status combined with its access to 
substantial funds. In fairness, however, it is worth remembering that the mid-1980s were times of 
financial hardship for governments. Consequently, pressure for AOSTRA to become self-sufficient 
increased,  something  easily  noticed  by  the  substantive  jump  in  funding  for  technology 
commercialization and handling (see figures 5 and 6). 
CEPAL – Colección Documentos de proyectos 
A Sub-Nat ional Public-Private Strategic Alliance for Innovation and Export… …  
29 
FIGURE 5 
DISTRIBUTION OF AOSTRA INVESTMENTS (1976 TO 1985) 
Source: AOSTRA, 1990. 
FIGURE 6 
DISTRIBUTION OF AOSTRA INVESTMENTS (1986 TO 1993) 
Source: AOSTRA, 1990. 
Carbonate Trend
8%
In-Situ Oil Sands 
47%
Training Activities
0%
International Activities
0%
Authority Costs
0%
Environmental Research 
0%
Technology Transfer & 
Commercialization 
0%
Institutional Research
18%
Mining and Extraction
5%
Enhanced Recovery
4%
Underground Access
9%
Bitumen Upgrading
2%
Technology Handling 
1%
Heavy Oil
6%
In-Situ Oil Sands 
26%
Carbonate Trend
2%
Heavy Oil
2%
Technology Handling 
3%
Bitumen Upgrading
8%
Underground Access
17%
Enhanced Recovery
4%
Mining and Extraction
9%
Institutional Research
21%
Technology Transfer & 
Commercialization 
3%
Environmental Research 
1%
Authority Costs
1%
International Activities
1%
Training Activities
2%
CEPAL – Colección Documentos de proyectos 
A Sub-Nat ional Public-Private Strategic Alliance for Innovation and Export… …  
30 
By  the  time Premier  Klein  came  to office  in  1992, the  entire thrust  of government  had 
switched  from  forward  vision  and  economy  building  to  deficit  reduction,  cuts,  and  smaller 
governments.  This  was  not  an  auspicious  time  for  investments  in  research  and  technology 
development  in  general, and  for AOSTRA  in particular.  There  was political pressure to trim  the 
budget, and more to the point, competition between a politically appointed AOSTRA chairman and 
the provincial minister of energy. 
In 1993, the Alberta Ministry of Energy invited the Coopers & Lybrand Consulting Group to 
propose  a  review  of  its  organizational  structure.  This  proposal  was  presented  in  November.  On 
February  11,  1994,  Patricia  Black,  Alberta’s  energy  minister,  announced  a  major  departmental 
reorganization aimed at “creating a leaner, more tightly integrated or ganization that would be better 
positioned to work with industry while protecting the interests of the people of Alberta, the owners of 
our  energy  resources
61
.”  A  new  Oil  Sands  and  Research  Division  as  part  of  Alberta  En ergy 
department was created. Not surprisingly, integration between AOSTRA and the new division meant 
that increasingly funding decisions shifted to the Ministry. By 2000, the entire structure pertaining to 
research in Alberta had changed. The Alberta Energy Research Institute (AERI) was established on 
August 1, 2000, by the Alberta Science and Research Authority Act and given the responsibility for 
all energy-related research for the province. AERI assumed responsibility for the oil and gas research 
programs previously administered by AOSTRA. It is not our intent to judge the success or failures of 
AERI —as we did not conduct the research that would allow us t o make these assertions. However, 
we would like to note that although AERI’s mandate included  working closely with industry, gone 
was the independence, and more importantly, the long-term funding. As an institute under a ministry, 
AERI’s budget follows the yearly provincial budget fundin g provisions. Once AERI was establish, its 
legislation superseded that of AOSTRA, and the organization ceased to exist. 
In sum, this is the story of Peter Lougheed’s efforts to  springboard Alberta resources into a 
true economic asset for the province. It is a tale of vision, determination, and imperfections. There are 
many successes, and many elements that worked brilliantly, while others serve as lessons on what not 
to do. However, before drawing up a list of first principles, there is one issue that deserves special 
attention:  the  environment.  This  is  the  single  element  where  both  Premier  Lougheed  and  Clem 
Bowman united though their vision was on this issue, were unable to make a difference.  
F. The environment 
In  early  1973,  only  one  study  had  been  conducted  on  the  environmental  impact  of  oil  sands 
development. Although this issue was not in the public mind, both federal and provincial governments 
—separately— recommended the creation of research programs. In Februar
y 1975, the two levels of 
government  joined  forces  creating  the  Alberta  Oil  Sands  Environmental  Research  Program 
(AOSERP), with a budget of Cad$4.5 million for one year (Cad$2.5 million from Alberta and Cad$2 
million from Ottawa). The main objective of the organization was to examine the impact of oil sands 
development on the environment of Northern Alberta. Unfortunately, little was accomplished. Three 
years later, in the midst of the provincial-federal disputes over the price of domestic oil and exports to 
the US the federal government announced the withdrawal of funds to AOSERP by March 1979
62
Concurrently, despite a clear legislative emphasis on the environment and awareness by Clem 
Bowman of the precise environmental challenges that oil sands presented
63
, AOSTRA spent less than 
Can$2 million, or one percent of total funds, on environmental research over the entire 18 years of its 
operations. In fact, according to the financial accounts, not one dollar was spent on this subject in the 
61
Alberta Energy, The New Structure, May 31, 1995. 
62
Chastko, Paul (2004), Developing Alberta’s oil san ds: from Karl Clark to Kyoto, Calgary, University of Calgary 
Press 155. 
63
Bowman, C.W. and G.W. Govier, Status and Challenges in the Recovery of Hydrocarbons from the Oil Sands of 
Alberta Canada, Contribution to Tenth World Energy Conference, Istanbul, Turkey, September 19-24, 1977.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested