WT/TPR/S/310 • Japan 
- 91 - 
Chart 4.6 Electricity regions, peak demand and interconnections, 2012 
Chugoku
10.85 GW
Kyushu
16.34 GW
Kansai
28.16 GW
Shikoku
5.49 GW
Hokuriku
5.26 GW
Chubu
26.23 GW
Hokkaido
5.40 GW
Tohoku
13.95 GW
Tokyo
50.93 GW
0.6 GW DC Tie line
12.62 GW
1.2 GW 
frequency converter
0.3 GW 
5.56 GW 
5.56 GW 
1.4 GW DC 
Tie line
2.4 GW
16.66 GW
5.56 GW 
60 Hz 100 V
50 Hz 100 V
Note:  Font, circle and line sizes are illustrative and not proportional. 
Source: METI. 
4.88.  Each regional  electricity  utility has  a  monopoly  on  the retail  of  electricity  to  general 
consumers of less than 50 kW in its region. For other consumers, there are three other types of 
retailers: (i) general electric utilities; (ii) Power Producer and Suppliers (PPS) that may provide 
supply to consumers with contracts for more than 50kW; and (iii) specified electricity utilities may 
supply electricity to specified customers. In addition, wholesale electric utilities supply electricity to 
the  general  electric  utilities.  In  most  cases,  the  regional  utilities  are  required  to  allow 
interconnections  and provide  a wheeling service  for  their networks.  Since  the reforms  were 
introduced, the proportion of electricity generated by the general electric utilities has declined, 
from about 75% in 1994 to about 68% (Table 4.20). 
Table 4.20 Power production in Japan in FY1994 and FY2012 
(million kWh) 
FY1994 
FY2012 
General electric utilities 
727,102 
742,288 
Wholesale electric utilities 
122,158 
68,256 
Specified electric utilities 
.. 
1,347 
Power producers and suppliers  
.. 
10,063 
Private generation  
115,071 
271,996 
Total 
964,330 
1,093,950 
.. 
Not available. 
Source: The Survey of Electric Power Statistics of Japan. 
Pdf thumbnail generator - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
no pdf thumbnails in; disable pdf thumbnails
Pdf thumbnail generator - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
pdf thumbnail fix; can't see pdf thumbnails
WT/TPR/S/310 • Japan 
- 92 - 
4.3.2.2  Policy and legislation 
4.89.  The Agency for Natural Resources and Energy and its Advisory Committee for Natural 
Resources and Energy in METI are responsible for energy policy, planning, and legislation as well 
as regulation of the industry. The Nuclear Regulation Authority in the Ministry of the Environment 
is responsible for supervision of nuclear power plants. METI has the authority to issue licences to 
electricity utilities, and to approve power sales' tariffs for the general electricity utilities and the 
specified electricity utilities. It may also issue service-related orders to electricity companies, 
including orders: 
to the general electric utilities and specified electricity utilities to improve operations; 
to a general electric utility to supply another utility in the case of emergencies, and to 
provide a wheeling service;  
to determine the price and contract period for electricity from renewable sources; and 
to a utility to  enter a purchase or interconnection  agreement with a producer of 
electricity from renewable sources.
59
4.90.  The Electric Power System Council of Japan (ESCJ) is the neutral transmission organization. 
The Council is made up of representatives of electric utilities, PPS, wholesale electricity suppliers, 
"auto-producers" (private generators), and "neutral members" (appointed based on nominations 
by the Board of Directors of the ESCJ). The ESCJ is responsible for: developing rules for the 
development of the electricity system including access to power, and the operation of power 
systems; dispute resolution; coordination of load-dispatching operations; and data collection and 
dissemination.
60
4.91.  Japan Electric Power Exchange (JEPX) is a non-profit private entity which was established 
in 2003 and composed of members from the electricity companies to operate the power exchange 
system. About 10,446 GWh was traded by JEPX in 2013. 
4.92.  The  principal legislation regulating  the electricity sector is the Electricity  Business  Act 
of 1964 since when it has been amended a number of times in line with the policy of partial 
liberalization of the sector: 
In 1995 the Act was amended: 
o
 To abolish the approval system for entering the wholesale business and to provide 
the legal bases for the establishment of the auction system for power purchasing; 
o
 To  allow  the  establishment  of  Specified  Electricity  Utilities  to  use  their  own 
generation, distribution, and transmission systems for direct delivery to customers 
in some areas; and 
o
 To introduce 'Optional Supply Provisions' into the tariff system; 
In 1999, the Act was revised again:  
o
 To  allow  partial  liberalization for  extra  high  voltage  power  for  industrial  and 
commercial users (between 20 kV and 2 MW) in the retail sector; and 
o
 To provide for a transition from an approval system to a notification system for 
some cases such as decreasing the electricity price;  
The 2003 reforms:  
o
 Expanded  liberalization  gradually  to  reach  customers  contracted  for  50  kW 
by 2008; 
o
 Enhanced regulation to ensure transparency in transmission and distribution and 
introduced accounting unbundling for the general electricity utilities to separate 
accounting of generation, transmission and distribution activities; 
59
Sato N., Matsudaira S. (2013), p. 102. 
60
ESJ online information. Viewed at: http://www.escj.or.jp/english/ [December 2014]. 
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Word
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel NET Twain, VB.NET Barcode Read, VB.NET Barcode Generator, view less. How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Word.
pdf files thumbnails; pdf thumbnails in
How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel NET Twain, VB.NET Barcode Read, VB.NET Barcode Generator, view less. How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET
how to show pdf thumbnails in; enable pdf thumbnails in
WT/TPR/S/310 • Japan 
- 93 - 
o
 Established the Electric Power System Council of Japan; and 
o
 Established the Japan Electric Power Exchange; 
The 2008 reforms focused on further regulatory changes such as activation of JEPX, and 
reforming the competitive conditions for accessing transmission lines;  
The 2013 amendment provided for the establishment of the Organization for Cross-
regional Coordination of Transmission Operators (OCCTO), which is to be established 
in 2015; and  
In June 2014, the Act was amended again to allow for full retail competition planned for 
introduction in 2016. 
4.93.  Despite the gradual reform of the electricity sector from 1995 to 2008, it was reported 
in 2012 that the regional utility companies (or general electric utilities in Chart 4.6) continued to 
generate over 70% of total electricity and most transactions by independent power producers were 
bilateral long-run contracts, with the regional utilities and JEPX transactions accounting for less 
than 1% of total electricity generated. Similarly, PPS had a market share of only about 2% of the 
retail market.
61
4.94.  The  2013  and  2014  amended  acts  to  the  Electricity  Business  Act  have  followed the 
government's Electricity System Reform agreed in April 2013 with the objectives of securing a 
stable supply of electricity, suppressing electricity rates to the maximum extent possible, and 
expanding consumer choice and business opportunities. 
4.95.  The first step of the Electricity System Reform was provided for in the 2013 amendment to 
the Electricity Business Act and the subsequent Cabinet Order of June 2014 to establish the 
OCCTO in April 2015. OCCTO is to be a government authorized organization with the authority to 
aggregate and analyse supply and demand, the grid plans of the electric power companies. It will 
also have the authority to order changes to these plans, including ordering companies to reinforce 
generation and power interchanges under tight supply-demand situations. The second step of the 
reform, full retail competition,  will  begin around 2016 under  the 2014 amendment  and the 
government will decide whether to abolish the regulations for the retail tariff around 2018-20 or 
later depending on the competition status at that time. The third step will be the legal unbundling 
of the transmission and distribution sectors from the generation and retail sectors, the intention 
being to secure the neutrality of the transmission and distribution sectors.
62
4.4  Finance 
4.4.1  Features 
4.96.  The finance and insurance sector contributed ¥22,854 billion, or 4.9%, to GDP in 2011. This 
represented a decline in both absolute and relative terms compared to 2005 when the sector 
contributed ¥30,789 billion, or 6.1%m to GDP. Just over 1.5 million people are employed in the 
sector. However, although the contribution to employment and GDP may appear to be modest, the 
sector is very important to the economy as total savings continue to increase with banking and 
insurance companies' assets combined equal to 272% of GDP at end-March 2013 (Box 4.1). 
4.97.  The financial sector is relatively concentrated: the top three banks have a market share of 
over 41%, the top three life insurance companies with nearly 52%, and the top three non-life 
insurance with 65% of their respective markets.  
4.98.  Although not listed among the top banks in Box 4.1, Japan Post Bank is one of the largest in 
Japan in terms of deposits (about ¥176 trillion) and Japan Post Insurance one of the largest in 
terms of non-banking assets (about ¥90 trillion). Both the Japan Post Bank and Japan Post 
Insurance are wholly-owned subsidiaries of the state-owned Japan Post Holdings Co. Ltd.
63
As 
noted  in the last TPR  report,  the  Postal  Service Privatization Act of 2012 provides  for the 
privatisation of Japan Post Holdings but does not set a specific deadline.
64
According to the 
61
Ito K. (2012), p. 11. 
62
METI (2013a). 
63
Japan Post Group (2013). 
64
WTO document WT/TPR/S/276/Rev.1 of 18 June 2013, Chapter 4, paragraphs 46-50. 
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for PowerPoint
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET NET Twain, VB.NET Barcode Read, VB.NET Barcode Generator, view less. How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for PowerPoint.
pdf no thumbnail; generate pdf thumbnails
VB.NET Image: Program for Creating Thumbnail from Documents and
language. It empowers VB developers to create thumbnail from multiple document and image formats, such as PDF, TIFF, GIF, BMP, etc. It
create pdf thumbnail; program to create thumbnail from pdf
WT/TPR/S/310 • Japan 
- 94 - 
authorities, the government of Japan is required to hold more than one-third of the shares of 
Japan Post Holdings Co. Ltd and will dispose of the shares over this threshold at the earliest 
possible time. The timing and extent of the sale of these shares has not yet been scheduled and 
will be determined taking into account various factors, such as stock market trends, opinions of 
specialists and consultations with Japan Post Holdings Co. Ltd. 
Box 4.1 Market and regulatory regime for financial services, general overview 
Number of financial services providers (end-December 2013): banks: 196, of which 106 regional banks; 
insurance companies: 96, of which 43 life insurance, and 55 non-life; securities companies: 252 
Significant players (cooperatives, mutual institutions, and the postal system): JP Bank and JP Insurance in 
the Japan Post Group and mutual institutions (with mostly a regional and an SME focus) 
Total bank and insurance companies assets, end-March 2013: 
 as % of the whole financial sector: banking companies: 51.4%, insurance companies: 21.1% 
 as % of nominal GDP: banking companies: 193.0%; insurance companies: 79.1% 
 as % of real GDP: banking companies: 176.2%; insurance companies: 72.2% 
Major consolidations since January 2013:  
Banks: Merger between Mizuho Bank Ltd and Mizuho Corporate Bank Ltd (July 2013); merger between Kiyo Holdings 
Inc. and Kiyo Bank Ltd (October 2013) 
Securities: none 
Life insurance: none 
Non-life insurance: none 
Market share held by the top 5 largest firms, end-March 2013: 
Banks (based on data for all banks across the country): top 3: 41.5%; top 5: 53.9% (Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ 
Ltd – 18.6%; Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation – 13.8%; Mizuho Corporate Bank Ltd – 9.1%; Mizuho Bank Ltd – 
8.5%; Sumitomo Mitsui Trust Bank Ltd – 3.9%) 
Life insurance: top 3: 51.7%; top 5: 69.0% (JP Insurance – 26.2%; Nippon Life Insurance Company – 15.9%; The 
Dai-ichi Life Insurance  Company – 9.6%; Meiji Yasuda Insurance Company – 9.6%; Sumitomo Life Insurance 
Company – 7.7%)  
Non-life insurance: top 3: 65.2%; top 5: 84.3% (Tokio Marine and Nichido Fire Insurance Co. Ltd – 28.6%; Mitsui 
Sumitomo Insurance Company Ltd – 20.3%; Sompo Japan Insurance Inc. – 16.3%; Aioi Nissay Dowa Insurance Co. 
Ltd – 11.1%; Nipponkoa Insurance Co. Ltd – 7.9%) 
Employees pensions funds (by the financial statements for fiscal year 2012): top 3: 13.9%; top 5: 17.7% 
Mutual funds: top 3: 35.1%; top 5: 47.0% (Nomura Asset Management Co. Ltd – 16.6%; Daiwa Asset Management 
Co. Ltd – 10.3%; Nikko Asset Management Co. Ltd – 8.2%; Mitsubishi UFJ Asset Management Co. Ltd – 7.0%; 
Kokusai Asset Management Co. Ltd – 4.9%) 
Securities companies: top 3: 33.3%; top 5: 48.2% (Mitsubishi UFJ Morgan Stanley Securities Co. Ltd – 12.4%; 
Mizuho Securities Co. Ltd – 10.7%; Daiwa Securities Capital Markets Co Ltd – 10.1%; Nomura Securities Co. Ltd – 
9.0%; SMBC Nikko Securities Inc. – 5.9%  
Credit rating agencies (end-December 2013 – based on number of rating analysts): top 3: 76.5%; top 5: 93.9% 
(Rating and Investment Information Inc. – 34.7%; Japan Credit Rating Agency Ltd. – 27.2%; Standard & Poor's 
Ratings Japan K.K: – 14.6%; Moody's Japan K.K. – 12.7%; Standard & Poor's Japan K.K. – 4.7%) 
Ownership by type of activity: 
Banks (excluding foreign bank branches and locally incorporated foreign banks): Fully state-owned: 0  
Government  Financial  Institutions:  fully  state-owned: 4 (Development Bank of Japan, Japan Bank for 
International Co-operation, Japan Finance Corporation and Okinawa Development Finance Corporation) 
Life insurance: fully state-owned: none; fully domestically-owned, private: 17; foreign minority-owned: 3; majority 
foreign-owned: 15; mutual companies: 5; branches of foreign companies: 3 
Non-life insurance: fully state-owned: none; fully domestically-owned, private: 24, minority foreign-owned: 1; 
majority foreign-owned: 6; branches of foreign companies: 23; licensed specified juridical persons: 1 
Mutual funds: domestic shareholders: 52; foreign shareholders: 32 (based on business reports of each fund 
submitted in FY2013 and on the nationality of the largest shareholder) 
Securities companies: domestic shareholders: 215; foreign shareholders: 67 (as at March 2013, based on the 
nationality of the largest shareholder) 
Credit rating agencies: domestic shareholders: 5; foreign shareholders: 2 (end December 2013, based on the 
nationality of the largest shareholder) 
Specific taxes on financial transactions: No financial transaction tax (FTT); incomes from financial transactions are 
subject to tax; – tax on individuals differs by type of income. 
Source: Information provided by the Japanese authorities. 
4.99.  The Financial Services Agency (FSA), which reports to the Cabinet Office, is the main 
regulator for financial institutions in Japan although it shares some prudential supervision with the 
Bank of Japan while the Japan Fair Trade Commission is responsible for competition policy issues. 
Within the FSA, the Securities Exchange Surveillance Commission (SESC) is responsible for the 
regulation of capital markets.  
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Raster
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel NET Twain, VB.NET Barcode Read, VB.NET Barcode Generator, view less. How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Raster
how to view pdf thumbnails in; how to make a thumbnail from pdf
Create Thumbnail in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
PDF Generator. PDF Reader. Twain Scanning. DICOM Reading. Here are some functions for image and documents thumbnail creating in HTML Document Image Viewers:
can't view pdf thumbnails; view pdf image thumbnail
WT/TPR/S/310 • Japan 
- 95 - 
4.100.  The Ministry of Finance is responsible for general financial policy while the FSA handles 
planning  and  policy-making  for  the  financial  system,  inspection  and  supervision,  rules  and 
regulations, accounting standards, supervision of certified public accountants and auditing firms, 
and represents Japan in international and regional discussions. 
4.4.2  Banking 
4.101.  Excluding  the Japan Post Bank, the total assets of banks were ¥926,375 billion  and 
deposits  of  ¥653,856  billion  at  end  March  2014,  with  foreign  banks  in  Japan  holding 
¥39,520 billion in assets and ¥8,324 billion in deposits. 
4.102.  The result of the decade-long process of mergers and alliances among city banks, long 
term credit banks, and trust banks has been the creation of a relatively small number of "mega 
banking groups."
65
The structure of the banking and financial services sector during FY2013-14 
has been stable relative to previous years: the two mergers (Mizuho Bank and Mizuho Corporate 
Bank, and Kiyo Bank and Kiyo Holdings) were essentially corporate restructurings and no other 
mergers or acquisitions were reported (Box 4.2).  
4.103.  Since 2011, the FSA has amended the rules on large exposures in line with international 
standards, with effect from December 2014. Through supervisory guidelines and related measures, 
the FSA revised the minimum capital requirements for internationally-active banks and, according 
to the authorities, intends to introduce liquidity standards (Liquidity Coverage Ratio (LCR) and Net 
Stable Funding Ratio (NSFR)), and capital buffers in accordance with Basel III (Box 4.2). 
Box 4.2 Market and regulatory regime for banking 
Economic indicators 
Non-performing loans as a percentage of total bank assets: 2.3% (end-March 2013) 
Net operating profits per employee: ¥16.9million 
Net income per employee: ¥10.3 million 
Regulatory framework 
Supervisory authorities: 
Ministry/agency responsible for defining banking sector policy: Financial Services Agency (FSA) 
Sector supervisor (monitoring bank liquidity, overseeing payment and settlement systems, etc.): FSA and the Bank 
of Japan 
Responsibility for competition policy issues: the Japan Fair Trade Commission 
Preferential and bilateral policies: 
Preferential arrangements affecting banking services: none 
Bilateral agreements and MOUs (notably concerning prudential regulation and supervision): 7 
Recognition of prudential measures of other countries through international agreements or unilaterally: none 
Licensing: 
General criteria: 1. The person who has filed an application for a banking licence shall have the financial basis to 
conduct the business of a bank soundly and efficiently, and shall have good prospects for income and expenditure 
pertaining to the business. 2. In light of such matters as its personnel structure, the applicant shall have the 
knowledge and experience to be able to carry out the business of a bank appropriately, fairly and efficiently, and shall 
have sufficient social credibility (Banking Act, Article 4.2). 
Additional criteria for foreign banks: reciprocity test – Where a person whose entire or partial body of shareholders is a 
foreign bank, etc. files an application for a banking licence, if the foreign bank, etc. lawfully holds a number of voting 
rights in the person filing the application for a banking licence exceeding the number calculated by multiplying the 
voting rights of all of that person's shareholders by 50%, the Prime Minister shall examine whether it can be found 
that banks are given substantially the same treatment as under the Banking Act in the state where the principal 
business office of the foreign bank, etc. is located, in addition to the requirements prescribed in the preceding 
paragraph (Banking Act, Article 4.3). Where  a foreign bank intends to receive a  business licence, and where 
establishment of a branch office of the foreign bank requires permission from a foreign government agency or must go 
through any other procedures, the bank must present a written document to prove that the permission has been 
obtained (Ordinance for Enforcement of the Banking Act, Article 28). 
Licencing organ: the FSA 
Validity of a licence: a licence has no validity period 
Restrictions on banks selling or disposing of licences: allocated licences may not be sold; the abolition of banking and 
the  dissolution  of  a  bank  shall  not  take  effect  without  the  authorization  of  the  Prime  Minister 
(Banking Act, Article 37.1). 
65
Japanese Bankers' Association online information. Viewed at: 
http://www.zenginkyo.or.jp/en/banks/changing/index.html [December 2014]. 
Create Thumbnail Winforms | Online Tutorials
PDF Generator. PDF Reader. Twain Scanning. It is easy to integrate robust thumbnail creating & viewing capabilities into your Windows Forms applications.
print pdf thumbnails; enable thumbnail preview for pdf files
How to C#: Overview of Using XImage.Raster
Empower to navigate image(s) content quickly via thumbnail. Able to support text extract with OCR. You may edit the tiff document easily. Create Thumbnail.
pdf thumbnail generator; enable pdf thumbnails
WT/TPR/S/310 • Japan 
- 96 - 
Minimum capital requirements to obtain a licence (domestic and foreign banks): ¥2 billion 
Recognition of home-country supervision: Where a foreign bank intends to receive a business licence, and where 
establishment of a branch office of the foreign bank requires permission from a foreign government agency or must go 
through any other procedures, the bank must present a written document to prove that the permission has been 
obtained (Ordinance for Enforcement of the Banking Act, Article 28). 
Other authorizations required: 
- A person who wishes to become a holder of voting rights in a single bank which amount to 20% or greater shall 
obtain authorization from the Prime Minister in advance (Banking Act, Article 52(9)). 
- When a branch office of a foreign bank wishes to establish a secondary office, it shall obtain authorization therefore 
from the Prime Minister (Banking Act, Article 47(3)). 
Prudential regulations: 
Administrative allocation of financial resources: financial resources are not allocated administratively 
Determination of interest rates and fees: banks may determine interest rates and fees freely. 
Measures  to  ensure  compliance  with  the  Basel  Committee's  Core  Principles  for  Effective  Banking 
Supervision: 
The FSA states in supervisory guidelines: "the FSA tries to reflect principles and guidelines, with regard to bank 
supervision, which the Basel Committee, etc. develops on their supervision". The FSA has revised the Banking Act, 
supervisory guidelines, and inspection manuals, based on the Basel Committee's Core Principles (BCP). When the BCP 
itself is revised, the FSA will review the parts of the guidelines that relate to the revised parts of the BCP, as 
necessary. To ensure compliance with the BCP, the FSA implements inspections and supervision while taking into 
consideration the scale and complexity of financial institutions. 
Specific provisions against money laundering: 
Specified business operators including financial institutions are working on customer identification, preparation and 
preservation of transaction records etc., and reporting of suspicious transactions, which are obligations under "the Act 
on Prevention of Transfer of Criminal Proceeds". The FSA is encouraging efforts in financial institutions, through 
examination and supervision.  
Bank deposit insurance scheme: 
The government introduced the deposit insurance system to protect depositors in failed financial institutions and to 
contribute to the smooth settlement of funds. Non-interest-bearing deposits, such as current deposits are protected 
in full. The status of other deposits, such as time deposits and ordinary deposits: no more than ¥10 million and 
interest / person / financial institution; protection, in excess of that amount: depends on the asset status of the failing 
financial institution. The Deposit Insurance Corporation of Japan (DICJ) is responsible for deposit insurance operation, 
and failure resolution, as well as the purchase of non-performing loans, and capital injection programmes. 
Source: Information provided by the Japanese authorities. 
4.4.3  Insurance 
4.104.  The insurance subsector in Japan has been characterised as having four distinct kinds of 
institutions: 
Given  its  size,  number  of  outlets,  and  range  of  insurance  products,  Japan  Post 
Insurance could be considered as a category in itself with ¥6,481.7 billion in premiums, 
etc. in 2012; 
The insurance cooperatives (kyosai kumiai), the largest of which is the agricultural 
cooperative JA Kyosai with a reported US$71 billion in premiums in 2010 while the next 
four had US$15 billion; 
Private domestic general insurance companies, with ¥28,957.2 billion in premiums, etc. 
in 2012 make up the largest group and are dominated by the traditional companies with 
the top three having over half the total life insurance market (JP Insurance, Nippon Life 
Insurance Company, and Meiji Yasuda Life Insurance Company) (Box 4.1); and 
Foreign general insurers, which were reported to have had about 16% of the insurance 
market in 2010.
66
There are 15 majority foreign-owned, 4 minority foreign-owned, 
and 4 branches of foreign life insurance companies, while there are 23 minority foreign-
owned and 1 majority foreign-owned, and 4 branches of foreign non-life insurance 
companies.
67
66
Binder S., Luc Ngai J. (2012), p. 109. 
67
WTO document WT/TPR/S/276/Rev.1 of 18 June 2013, Chapter 4, paragraph 51. 
WT/TPR/S/310 • Japan 
- 97 - 
4.105.  The 6,619 kyosai or cooperative insurance societies represent a significant part of the 
insurance market with 13.4% of total life and non-life markets. Kyosai are exempt from the 
Insurance Business Act. Some – the regulated kyosai – are  regulated by various ministries 
depending on the specific legislation governing their activities. For example, JA Kyosai is regulated 
by the MAFF under the Agricultural Cooperative Act. Others are essentially unregulated, provided 
they target specific groups of people. A bill to amend the Insurance Business Act to allow for the 
regulation of unregulated kyosai took effect from April 2006.  
4.106.  Box 4.3 provides details on the regulatory regime for the insurance sector. 
4.4.4  Securities 
4.107.  At the end of 2013, the total market capitalization of companies listed on the first section 
of the Tokyo Stock Exchange was equivalent to 365% of GDP and bond market capitalization was 
939% of GDP (Box 4.4). 
4.108.  The regulatory regime (Box 4.4)  for  financial services has  continued to  evolve.  The 
prohibition on naked short selling, first introduced for six months following the 2008 financial 
crises and renewed several times, was made permanent and revised rules on short selling in 
general were introduced with effect from 5 November 2013. Since December 2012, Japan has 
required mandatory clearing of over-the-counter derivative transactions and, since April 2013, it 
has  also  required  mandatory  reporting.  Mandatory  trading  on  electronic  platforms  will  be 
introduced by September 2015. 
Box 4.3 Market and regulatory regime for insurance 
Penetration (premiums as share of GDP): Life insurance: 7.2%; non-life insurance: 1.7%  
Regulatory framework 
Supervisory authorities:  
Ministry/agency responsible for defining insurance sector policy, and for supervision of the sector: the FSA, ministries 
specified in law for regulated kyosai 
Responsibility for competition policy issues: the Japan Fair Trade Commission 
Preferential and bilateral policies: 
Preferential arrangements affecting insurance services: none 
Bilateral agreements and MOUs: 2 
Licensing: 
Criteria for assessing applications for insurance  licence: sufficient financial and organizational  base to conduct 
insurance underwriting; and whether the underwritten insurance products are appropriate 
Incompatibility of  life and/or non-life insurance licences: insurance companies may conduct only one  of these 
businesses 
Differential treatment for foreigners in the licensing process: no distinction under the Act 
Prior approval of home-country supervisor: compatible home-country regulation and other criteria applied exclusively 
to foreigners: a foreign insurer requires a certificate from an organization whose jurisdiction includes the home 
country, proving that the insurer is lawfully conducting insurance business in its home country that is similar to the 
insurance business it intends to conduct in Japan 
Limitation on number of providers: none 
Licencing authority: the FSA, which is the single administrative organ for the consideration of licence applications 
Maximum processing time for applications: there is no provision under the Act for a maximum but the standard "to be 
attempted" is within 120 days 
Period of validity of a licence: without special conditions, a licence has no specified period of validity 
Restrictions on selling or disposing of licences: allocated licences may not be sold; where insurance companies 
abandon their insurance business, their licences become void 
Other authorization required: approval from the Prime Minister is required for the acquisition of over 20% of the 
shares of an insurance company. This measure is non-discriminatory. 
Prudential regulations: 
Differences of treatment between state-owned firms, other domestically owned firms, foreign-owned branches, and 
foreign-owned subsidiaries: foreign-owned subsidiaries are required to hold in Japan the necessary assets in order to 
secure an insurance policy that provides for the company's potential collapse (Insurance Business Act, Article 197) 
Also, foreign-owned subsidiaries are exempt from a consolidated solvency margin standard 
Recognition of home-country supervision of foreign insurance companies: To obtain a licence, a foreign insurance 
company must be "carrying on Insurance Business in a foreign state in accordance with the Acts and regulations of the 
foreign state": home-country supervision of the foreign insurance company is recognized (Insurance Business Act, 
Article 2(6), 185(1)) 
WT/TPR/S/310 • Japan 
- 98 - 
Minimum capital requirements to obtain a licence: ¥1 billion. Foreign insurance companies are required to deposit 
¥200 million with the deposit office in Japan (Insurance Business Act, Article 6: 190) 
Other  prudential  tests  for  licence  applicants:  ¥1  billion  minimum  capital  requirement.  In  processing  licence 
applications, consideration is given to ensuring equity capital in accordance with the contents and scale of the business 
anticipated, and a sufficient financial base to conduct the business of an insurance company soundly and efficiently, as 
well as to having good prospects for income and expenditures pertaining to the business (Insurance Business Act, 
Article 5(1)(i)). In addition, the solvency margin ratio of each insurance company must always be no less than 200% 
Administrative allocation of insurance services: insurance services are allocated administratively 
Approval required for life and non-life premiums and products: the contents of insurance products, premium rates, 
etc., are subject to review at the time of application for a licence. Also, approval is required from the FSA to revise the 
contents of insurance products, insurance premiums, etc., (Insurance Business Act, Article 5(1)(iii)(iv), 123(1), 
187(5), (207)). 
Note:  The FSA is the supervisory authority for both activities, assisted by the Minister for Health, Labour and 
Welfare for pension funds. For management and sales of investment trust, licensing takes the form of 
a registration procedure. Criteria taken into account are historical records of applicants, financial and 
organizational soundness, and minimum capital (¥50 million at least). Foreign companies intending to 
exercise these activities must be exercising the same activity in their home country under appropriate 
supervision and must have a branch or office in Japan. Licences have no fixed duration and are not 
transferable. There is no limitation on the number of providers. Box 4.5 details the main economic 
indicators and the general regulatory framework of mutual funds and pensions fund services in Japan. 
Source: Information provided by the Japanese authorities. 
Box 4.4 Market and regulatory regime for securities 
Economic indicators 
Total market capitalization of companies listed on the first section of the Tokyo Stock Exchange (end of 
each quarter 2013): 
¥ million: 359,766,497 (March); 393,957,453 (June); 417,303,078 (September); 458,484,253 (December) 
% of nominal GDP: 307.38% (March); 332.64% (June); 355.39% (September); December 365.40% (December) 
% of real GDP: 275.34% (March); 307.00% (June); 318.38% (September); 338.78% (December) 
Bond market capitalization (total outstanding amount of bond issues, end of each quarter 2013): including 
Government Bonds, Fiscal Investment and Loan Program Bonds, Local Government Bonds, Government-backed 
Bonds, FILP Agency Bonds, etc. , Bank Debenture Bond, and Corporate Bonds 
¥100 million: 11,476,488 (March); 11,663,887 (June); 11,705,899 (September); 11,783,802 (December) 
% of nominal GDP: 980.54% (March); 984.86% (June); 996.92% (September); 939.15% (December) 
% of real GDP: 878.33% (March); 908.94% (June); 893.11% (September); 870.72% (December) 
Regulatory framework 
Supervisory authority and licensing organ:  
The FSA 
Additional criteria for foreign firms: for sales of investment trusts (Type I Financial Instruments Business), registration 
requires a corporation to be an entity that is carrying out business of the same sort in its home country in accordance 
with laws and regulations of the corresponding foreign country. 
Period of validity of a licence: none 
Transferability of licences: not transferable 
Limitation of the number of providers: none 
Restrictions on foreigners buying and selling on the stock market: A member of the Financial Instruments Exchange 
Market is limited to either (1) a Financial Instruments Business Operator (request for registration by the Prime 
Minister), (2) Authorized Transaction-at-Exchange Operator (request for authorization by the Prime Minister), or 
(3) Registered Financial Institutions (request for registration by the Prime Minister) 
Other authorization required: obligation to register branch offices for brokers. This measure is non-discriminatory 
Operating conditions: 
Requirements to use international accounting and disclosure standards: In October 2013, relevant Cabinet Office 
Ordinances were amended to eliminate the two requirements: "Being a listed company in Japan" and "Conducting 
financial or  business activities internationally".  As a  result, a  company may prepare  its consolidated financial 
statements  in  accordance  with  the  International  Financial  Reporting  Standards  (IFRS)  if:  all  of  the  following 
requirements are met:  
(1) The Annual Securities Report contains a description of the special approach taken to ensure the appropriateness of 
the consolidated financial statements  
(2)  Board members  and employees  who  have  sufficient  knowledge about  designated international accounting 
standards are assigned, and the system in which the consolidated financial statements can be prepared, based on the 
designated international accounting standard, is maintained 
On 12 December 2008, in agreement with the European Union, the Japanese GAAPs (Generally Accepted Accounting 
Principles) were evaluated to be equivalent to International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) as adopted by the 
European Union (EU). (Since January 2009, Japanese companies that are listed on markets within the EU have been 
able to use the Japanese GAAPs when making disclosures in Europe.) 
WT/TPR/S/310 • Japan 
- 99 - 
Provisions on shareholders' rights in companies listed on stock exchanges: 
The Financial Instruments and Exchange Act does not provide any special regulations on shareholders' rights for 
companies listed on the financial instruments exchange.  
Provisions on companies' disclosure obligations:  
- for companies listed on financial instruments exchange: disclosure of company information in accordance with 
securities listing regulations; to protecting shareholders' rights, rules are described in the "Corporate Code of 
Conduct" 
- for general companies: (a) Offering disclosure: among public offerings or secondary distributions of securities of 
which the total issue price or total distribution price is 100 million yen or more, the issuer must submit a securities 
registration statement to the Prime Minister before a public offering or secondary distribution (Financial Instruments 
and Exchange Act, Article 4(1)); also, the issuer must prepare and deliver a prospectus to investors before (or at 
the same time as) delivering the securities (Article 15(2)); (b) Ongoing disclosure: an issuer of listed securities on 
the financial instruments exchange or of a public offering or secondary distribution of securities, is obligated to 
submit its security report after the end of each business year (within 3 months) to the Prime Minister (Financial 
Instruments and Exchange Act, Article 24(1)); a quarterly securities report must be submitted to the Prime Minister 
within 45 days of the end of every fiscal quarter (Article24-7(1)); and when making a public offering or secondary 
distribution of securities in a foreign state, these issuers must submit an extraordinary report to the Prime Minister 
without delay (Article 24-5(4)). 
Source: Information provided by the Japanese authorities. 
4.109.  The 2014 amendments of the Financial Instruments and Exchange Act introduced several 
changes to the legislation regulating securities to take account of new developments in securities 
offers and trades and improve the overall attractiveness of Japan's financial and capital markets. 
The amendments include the introduction of measures to promote the use of security-based 
crowdfunding, the introduction of a new trading system for non-listed shares, removal of the 
obligation on financial instruments business operators to have business years ending 31 March, 
exempting  treasury  stock  from  large  shareholding  reporting  rules,  and  establishment  of 
procedures for confiscation of electronic share certificates.
68
4.4.5  Pension and mutual funds 
4.110.  There were changes to regulations for pension mutual funds over the past few years. The 
FSA is the supervisory authority, assisted by the Minister for Health, Labour and Welfare for 
pension funds. For management and sales of investment trust, licensing takes the form of a 
registration procedure. Criteria taken into account are historical records of applicants, financial and 
organizational soundness, and minimum capital (¥50 million at least). Foreign companies that 
want to operate pension or mutual funds in Japan must have a branch or office in Japan and 
operate the same activity in their home country under appropriate regulation and supervision. 
Licences have no fixed duration and are not transferable. There is no limitation on the number of 
providers. Box 4.1 details the main economic indicators and Box 4.5 the general regulatory 
framework of mutual funds and pensions fund services in Japan. 
Box 4.5 Market and regulatory regime for pension funds and mutual funds 
Recent changes: 
Some revisions including revision of the consolidation procedures and improvement of investment reports are going to 
be made from the viewpoint of making the regulation flexible to suit trends in international rules and changes in social 
and economic circumstances, and ensuring the supply of appropriate products in consideration of ordinary investors. 
Supervisory authorities: 
FSA registration required to carry out management and sales for investment trust. 
Responsibility for pension fund regulation and supervision:  
Minister for Health Labour and Welfare. 
Licensing criteria: 
Registration with the FSA. Conditions to be considered are: historical records of violations, appropriateness, and 
sufficiency of human resources organization; a board of directors, corporate auditors or a committee must be 
established; and capital must be more than ¥50 million. 
68
FSA (2014). 
WT/TPR/S/310 • Japan 
- 100 - 
Additional licensing conditions for foreign companies: 
The corporation must be handling the same sort of business in its home country in accordance with law and 
regulations of that country, and must have a branch or office in Japan. 
Period of validity of a licence: none 
Transferability of licences: licences are not transferable 
Limitation on the number of providers: none 
Source: Information provided by the Japanese authorities. 
4.5  Telecommunications 
4.5.1  Features 
4.111.  Japan has a highly-developed and technologically-advanced telecommunications sector 
characterised by high investment, rapid adoption of new technologies, and readiness to switch off 
legacy systems: in 2011, Japan had more fibre-to-the-home subscriptions than the European 
Union; in June 2012 the last 2G network was switched off by KDDI; and NTT intends to switch to 
optical FTTH and cease copper based telephone and ISDN networks.
69
According to the Ministry of 
Internal Affairs and Communications (MIC), the information, communication technology (ICT) 
market was worth ¥82.7 trillion in 2011, accounting for 9% of all industries, and employed 
3.897 million people, or 6.9% of total employment.
70
4.112.  The telecommunications market in Japan has evolved considerably from the time when it 
was  dominated  by  NTT  and  KDDI  (which  had  monopolies  on  national  and  international 
telecommunications respectively). NTT East and NTT West combined now have slightly more than 
half the fixed-line market, and, although NTT DoCoMo remains the biggest supplier of mobile 
services, its net income has been relatively static for several years while SoftBank mobile and 
KDDI  have  expanded.  NTT  Corporation  owns  100%  of  NTT  East,  NTT  West,  and  NTT 
Communications, about 63.3% of NTT DoCoMo, about 54.2% of NTT Data, and owns or has 
holdings in many other companies both within and outside Japan.
71
The NTT Corporation, which is 
the largest telecommunications company in the world, is 35.7% owned by the government and 
other public bodies (as at March 2014). 
4.113.  NTT East and NTT West are officially designated as the dominant suppliers for subscriber 
lines, and NTT DoCoMo for mobile telephony. As stated in the last review, NTT East and NTT West 
are designated as universal service providers and are required to provide wired telephone services 
in all areas (i.e. analogue or, since April 2011, optical IP telephone equivalent in addition to public 
telephone services and emergency calls). Contributors to the universal service fund are carriers 
with annual sales greater than ¥1 billion which are interconnected with facilities installed by NTT 
East or NTT West to provide universal service. Calculation of the amount of compensation varies 
with the type of service. Funds are collected by the Telecommunications Carriers Association, 
which  has  been  designated  as  the  universal  service  support  institution.
72
The  amount  of 
expenditure approved for this fund in 2013 was ¥6.9 billion.  
4.5.2  Policy and legislation 
4.114.  The  Strategic  Headquarters  for  the  Promotion  of  an  Advanced  Information  and 
Telecommunications Network Society (IT Strategic Headquarters) in the Cabinet is responsible for 
general  strategy  on  information  and  telecommunications  technology.  In  June  2014  the 
Headquarters revised the Declaration to be the World's Most Advanced IT Nation. The Declaration 
noted: that a lot of progress had been made in installing advanced infrastructure and emphasised 
the need to use this infrastructure to its full potential; that eGovernment development could more 
efficient and better  coordinated among  public  agencies; and  that IT was critical  in disaster 
management and played an important role in areas like rural development and agriculture.
73
69
Fasol G. (2014) and authorities. 
70
MIC (2013), pp. 48-49. 
71
NTT Corporation online information. Viewed at: http://www.ntt.co.jp/ir/fin_e/index.html 
[December 2014]. 
72
WTO document WT/TPR/S/276/Rev.1 of 18 June 2013, paragraphs 4.71-72. 
73
IT Strategic Headquarters (2014). 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested