asp.net pdf viewer control : Generate pdf thumbnails application Library utility azure .net web page visual studio SchoolUpdate15-online1-part1498

acer.edu.au   
@acereduau
9
20% DISCOUNT OFF PAT 
RESOURCES CENTRE FOR 
EXISTING PAT CUSTOMERS
Visit http://acer.ac/patrcdiscount 
and quote promo code Schools15.
www.acer.edu.au/pat-rc 
sales@acer.edu.au 
1800 338 402
Or see the back cover for your state Education Consultant
Amanda Coleiro
Project Director,  
ACER Press
Patrick O’Duffy 
Publisher,  
ACER Press 
Prue Anderson 
Senior Research 
Fellow, Assessment  
and Reporting
MO RE  IN FO R MAT I ON ?
Teaching activities and concept builders scaffold skill 
development. Annotated test items explain the skills 
needed to answer a question correctly, and analyse 
common misunderstandings that may lead to incorrect 
answers. 
Resources are sorted by skill area 
(for example, reflecting on the text 
or using fractions and decimals) and 
by skill level (against PAT scale score 
bands).
Introduction video:
http://vimeo/87826181
Generate pdf thumbnails - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
how to make a thumbnail of a pdf; view pdf image thumbnail
Generate pdf thumbnails - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
how to make a thumbnail from pdf; cannot view pdf thumbnails in
www.acer.edu.au   
C# PDF - Read Barcode on PDF in C#.NET
File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF void ReadBarcodeFromPDF( string filename, int pageIndex) { // generate PDF document PDFDocument doc
enable pdf thumbnails in; html display pdf thumbnail
C# PDF - Create Barcode on PDF in C#.NET
File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing PDF Generate over 20 linear and 2d barcodes on PDF document page
create thumbnail from pdf; how to show pdf thumbnails in
www.teachermagazine.com.au
T1
Evidence + Insight + Action
It’s a pleasure to be able to introduce you to a new chapter in the life of 
Teacher
.
We know that, as school educators, you’ve got lots of demands on your time.
The aim of 
Teacher
is to make things easier, by bringing you relevant, high-
quality, research- and evidence-based content. Content that you can use and 
apply to suit your students’ needs; content that will improve your own skills and 
practices and, ultimately, lead to improved learning outcomes.
So, the strapline we’ve chosen is Evidence + Insight + Action.
Some of you will remember that 
Teacher
, published by the Australian Council 
for Educational Research, existed as an award-winning monthly print magazine 
until 2011.
The new online-only platform means that you can now access and share our 
daily articles from any device, and exciting new content formats include podcasts, 
videos and infographics.
The 
Teacher
editorial team is constantly  scouring the  education sector to 
bring you relevant  research  and share effective,  evidence-based approaches 
happening in schools across Australia, and further afield.
We drill down from the big picture to the small, practical steps that all school 
staff can take to improve student outcomes.
Research shows that high quality teaching and leadership teams learn from 
each other – that’s why your input is important. There are lots of ways that you 
can join the 
Teacher
community.
We’re keen to hear your feedback on individual articles and the topic areas 
we’re covering, and your suggestions for future content.
You  can  also  join  the  discussion  on  our  www.teachermagazine.com.au 
platform, and through our social media channels (see p. T8 for more details). 
We encourage you to use our articles as a professional learning resource, 
individually, with colleagues and with your wider networks.
Last, and by no means least, we want to share success stories from schools. 
We welcome contributions from educators, whatever your role, location or sector. 
So, feel free to get in touch with the editorial team.
The next seven pages feature some of our article highlights so far. We hope 
you  enjoy 
Teacher
and  invite  you  to  be  a  part  of  our  professional  learning 
community.
Join our School Learning Community
A new program to support schools to engage with, share and adopt high impact, 
evidence-based teaching practices. Visit http://acer.ac/teachercommunity or 
turn to page T8 for more information.
J
o Earp
Teacher
Editor
We encourage you to 
use our articles as a 
professional learning 
resource
C# Image: Tutorial for Document Viewing & Displaying in ASP.NET
To connect the Viewer with the Thumbnails, type WebAnnotationViewer1 into the dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
pdf thumbnail generator; generate pdf thumbnail c#
Process Images in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
Also can change the order of images & file pages by dragging & dropping thumbnails; Commonly used document types are supported, including PDF, multi-page TIFF
program to create thumbnail from pdf; create thumbnail jpg from pdf
T2
www.teachermagazine.com.au
Building a professional portfolio
Whatever  your  role  in  school  and  whatever  stage 
you’re  at  in  your  career,  building  a  professional 
portfolio  can  be  a  valuable  tool  to  reflect  on 
achievements and set future goals. 
Keren Caple, general manager of the Australian Institute 
for  Teaching  and  School  Leadership,  says  a  growing 
number of educators are asking for advice in this area. 
‘What is really pleasing is that this isn’t just for accountability, 
or those really high stakes processes,’ Caple tells 
Teacher
.
She  says  evidence  is  increasingly  being  used  by 
educators to  prompt conversations  about  their work  and 
professional practices, and how this supports their growth 
and development.
Deciding what to include in a professional portfolio can 
be tricky – but before you dive in and start sifting through a 
mountain of documents, it’s worth going back a few steps.
Elizabeth  Hartnell-Young  is  Director  of  the  ACER 
Institute and co-author of 
Digital Portfolios: Powerful Tools 
for Professional Growth and Reflection
.
As  the  book points  out, there  are  lots  of reasons  for 
compiling  an  individual  portfolio,  including  recording  or 
planning  professional  development,  applying  for  a  job, 
celebrating  your  lifelong  learning  journey,  or  meeting 
certification and registration requirements.
Hartnell-Young  advises  whatever  the  purpose  and 
whatever your role, the general ‘rules’ of how to go about 
building a portfolio are the same.
‘[First of all] you need a repository. It could be on your 
hard drive, in the cloud, or wherever, but you’ve got to have 
somewhere to keep your evidence. You’ve got to have a file 
management system of some sort, and metatagging.’ 
Deciding on the portfolio purpose is the next step. ‘If the 
purpose is to present material against [teacher] standards 
you would pull some items in as the best evidence for a 
particular standard, but if it’s going for a job ... you might 
pull some slightly different items to meet selection criteria,’ 
she explains.
‘Then you have to select [which artefacts to use] – you 
don’t put everything forward. Once you’ve selected, you’d 
really be annotating and reflecting.
‘Maybe you’d put some reasoning about why you chose 
it ... a  reflection  of how  well  it went, what  would  you do 
differently.’
Compiling a digital rather than a paper-based portfolio 
opens up opportunities to include audio clips, videos and 
photos alongside electronic documents and scanned text. 
If  you  are including  audio  and video, don’t forget to add 
information for easy access in the future.
Figuring  out  how to present your portfolio is  the next 
step, and that means checking laws on privacy, copyright, 
fair use and intellectual property before you publish.
References
Hartnell-Young, E. & Morriss, M. (2007). 
Digital portfolios: 
powerful tools for promoting professional growth and 
reflection
(2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
To access the full article visit: 
acer.ac/portfolio  
Compiling a digital 
rather than a paper-
based portfolio  
opens up additional 
opportunities.
Image credit: © Cienpies Design/Shutterstock
C# Image: Create C#.NET Windows Document Image Viewer | Online
Support displaying and viewing multiple document & image formats (PDF, MS Word, Tiff Easy to create high-quality image thumbnails & automatic navigation from
pdf first page thumbnail; how to create a thumbnail of a pdf document
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
See this VB.NET guide to learn how to use RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET to perform quick file navigation. You may easily generate thumbnail image from PDF.
create thumbnail from pdf c#; can't view pdf thumbnails
www.teachermagazine.com.au
T3
Early intervention
Using iPads to collect and track data in real time has helped educators in 
western  Sydney  develop  an  early  intervention  program  for youngsters 
entering Kindergarten.
Holy Family Primary School, Granville East, is home to students representing 
more than 30 nationalities. Assistant Principal Ben Munday says four years of 
Smarter Schools National  Partnerships (SSNP) funding has  seen the school 
make  ‘great  gains’  in  the  areas  of  community  engagement,  pedagogy  for 
teaching  English  as  an  additional  language,  and  use  of  information  and 
communication technologies.
In  2013  (the  final  year  of  SSNP  funding)  staff  worked  with  a  speech 
pathologist  to  better  understand  language  and  learning  delays  in  students. 
When enrolment interviews for 2014 again raised concerns that many children 
entering Kindergarten may be ‘at risk’, Munday started to think about an action 
research project to break the cycle.
He teamed up with K–2 Coordinator Natalie Bratby to plan and lead a project 
drawing on data collected by class teachers and learning support teachers during 
three Kindergarten orientation sessions in mid-Term 4, 2013.
With around 60 children attending each session and six staff carrying out 
observations, a system was developed whereby data could be recorded, updated 
and viewed simultaneously.
‘It was a simple job for me to set up a spreadsheet with conditional formatting 
that colour coded the cells when a numerical value was entered: 1 is green, all 
ok; 4 is red, red alert, and so on,’ Munday explains. ‘It allowed us to track in real 
time, during sessions, which students had been observed 
and who still needed to be seen.
‘Most importantly, it enabled us to debrief and discuss 
immediately  after  each  session  with  everyone’s  data 
already  populating  the  spreadsheet  and  the  qualitative 
observations fresh in mind. It also enabled us to see which 
students we needed to target in the next session.’
Educators  accessed  one  spreadsheet  on  iPads  using 
Google  Drive.  ‘During  the  [data]  analysis  we  found  that 
applying  simple filters to  the spreadsheet  enabled  us  to 
identify trends and prioritise needs.’
Students needing further support were invited to three 
‘Jump Up’ orientation sessions featuring reading response 
and pre-school English and maths activities. Lead Teacher 
ICT Tim Butt also worked with the Assistant Principal to 
create a ‘Get Your Child Ready  for School’ fridge poster 
summarising  information  from  the  Royal  Children’s  Hospital,  Melbourne  on 
evidence-based approaches.
The project has had several benefits – including no tears on the first day of 
Kindergarten. 
‘The children who were socially and emotionally vulnerable at orientation had 
already developed a relationship with  at  least one of their  teachers  and  me,’ 
Munday says.
Teachers have also reported that their knowledge of students is better than 
ever before, enabling them to plan appropriate Term 1 activities.
To access the full article visit:
acer.ac/kinder 
Image credit: © Andrey_Popov/Shutterstock
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
See this C# guide to learn how to use RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET to perform quick file navigation. You may easily generate thumbnail image from PDF.
pdf thumbnail creator; pdf thumbnail preview
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
Thumbnail. You can generate thumbnail image(s) from PDF file for quick viewing and further manipulating. Class: PDFDocument. How to C#: XDoc.PDF Classes Usage.
pdf thumbnail fix; enable thumbnail preview for pdf files
T4
www.teachermagazine.com.au
ARTICLES
Behaviour management
Dr Bill Rogers on following up with 
disruptive students beyond the 
classroom.
acer.ac/behaviour
Distributed leadership
Dr Alma Harris discusses distributed 
leadership, and if it could work for 
your school.
acer.ac/distributed
Indigenous student retention
What can educators and school 
leaders do to continue to improve 
student retention rates?
acer.ac/retention
VIDEOS
Project-based learning
Greg Whitby speaks to Rosei 
Espedido about collaborative bridges.
acer.ac/project
Books for reluctant readers
Engaging titles for secondary school 
students.
acer.ac/books
Inspiring teachers
Teacher
contributors celebrate their 
educational influences.
acer.ac/inspiring
PODCASTS
Research Files: Teacher retention 
and attrition
Associate Professor John Buchanan 
on why teachers leave the profession.
acer.ac/attrition
Teaching Methods: Flipped 
learning
Andrew Douch on automating in the 
classroom.
acer.ac/flipped
Teaching Methods: Explicit 
instruction
John Fleming on why system and 
strategy work when it comes to 
pedagogy.
acer.ac/instruction
Never miss a 
Teacher
podcast, subscribe for free
https://soundcloud.com/teacher-acer   
http://acer.ac/teacheritunes
Image credits: top left © Antonio Diaz, top centre © Monkey Business Images, both via Shutterstock
www.teachermagazine.com.au
T5
Visit www.teachermagazine.com.au  
to access all our infographics
T6
www.teachermagazine.com.au
Does A to E grading show individual 
growth and progress?
‘A student who gets  
the same grade year 
after year can appear  
to be making no 
progress at all.’
‘The most advanced 
students are 
sometimes five or six 
years ahead of the least 
advanced students.’ 
JO EARP:
You’ve spoken about the limitations of A to E grading. Can you talk 
our readers through the alternative?
GEOFF MASTERS:
A  to  E grades traditionally have  been used to judge and 
report how well students have learnt what they have been taught. But grades 
don’t do a very good job of describing what individuals know, understand and 
can do – in other words, the points they have reached in their learning. Grades 
also are not very helpful for monitoring the progress that students make over 
time. A student  who  gets  the same  grade  year  after  year can appear  to be 
making no progress at all.
The alternative is to find ways of showing where students are in their long-
term progress through an area of learning. What point have they reached, what 
progress have they made, and what are they ready to learn next? Questions of 
these kinds require an understanding of what progress looks like. To establish 
where somebody is on a journey and to evaluate the progress they are making, 
you need a map of the territory [the learning domain] through which they are 
travelling. A map is an alternative to A to E grades.
Monitoring  progress  against  a  map  is important  because  students of  the 
same age and year level can be at very different stages in their learning. The 
most advanced students are  sometimes  five or  six years  ahead of  the least 
advanced students. The kind of map I am talking about is sometimes called a 
developmental  continuum, a proficiency  scale  or a learning  progression.  It is 
often divided into described levels or proficiency ‘bands’. 
JE:
What does the evidence say about this approach?
GM:
We  know from  research  that  the way  to  maximise the  probability  of a 
person learning successfully is to provide them with learning opportunities at an 
appropriate level  of challenge.  People don’t learn if  they’re given things they 
already know.  They also  don’t learn if they’re given material that is much too 
difficult. The ideal is to provide challenges in what Vygotsky called the Zone of 
Proximal  Development  –  stretch  challenges  that  are  just beyond  a learner’s 
comfort zone and at which they can succeed, but often only with assistance.
JE: 
So, it’s not about letting every student ‘pass’?
GM:
No, it’s certainly not about lowering our expectations so that all students 
‘pass’.  It’s  about  changing  the  way  we  think  about  what  it  means  to  learn 
successfully.  Rather  than  defining  success  only  in  terms  of  age-based 
expectations,  I’m  arguing  for  defining  successful  learning  in  terms  of  the 
progress that individuals make, regardless of their starting points. Failure, from 
this perspective is failure to make progress. If a child is not making progress in 
their learning, then that needs to be recognised and reported.
To access the full article visit:  
acer.ac/grades
Professor Geoff Masters, CEO of the Australian Council for Educational Research, says A to E grading doesn’t 
tell the whole story when it comes to student achievement. 
Teacher
editor Jo Earp sat down with him to discuss 
possible alternatives.
Image credit: © Gulay Telliler
Professor Geoff Masters considers 
assessment and reporting.
www.teachermagazine.com.au
T7
Encouraging STEM success
Research has estimated 75 per cent of the fastest growing occupations require a strong background in the 
Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics fields – yet, Australian students are lagging behind the rest 
of the world when it comes to STEM learning.
Now academics in Tasmania hope to help change that trend 
with  the launch  of  a  new framework  designed  to  build the 
capacity  of  STEM  teachers  and  support  them  in  selecting 
resources that will bring the subjects to life and inspire students.
Associate Professor Sharon Fraser is one of  the lead 
researchers on  the University  of Tasmania’s STEMCrAfT 
Project. It is specifically aimed at regional, rural and remote 
STEM teachers and those teaching outside of their subject 
area.
An  Australian  Industry  Group report  (2013)  suggests 
skills learned through each STEM discipline are critical for 
national productivity and global competitiveness, but warns 
‘Australia’s rates of participation in STEM skills at secondary 
school and university are unacceptably low’.
Fraser says there is a shortage of students graduating 
from STEM subjects in schools and going on to study those 
skills in university. ‘[Then] they’re not coming out wanting to 
teach in those areas. We’re now getting teachers teaching 
out  of  field  –  we’re  getting  drama  teachers  teaching 
science, for example,’ she explains.
‘They may well have very little lead-in time in order to get 
their heads around the  curriculum for one  thing, but  the 
content knowledge, that’s  at the heart of  the curriculum 
and what it means to think like a scientist – which is part of 
the whole scientific literacy, and to be able to understand 
evidence-based practice in that domain.’
The academic adds that teachers in rural,  remote and 
isolated areas  also  need support. ‘Often,  in  those areas, 
you might  have fairly new graduates teaching science or 
maths with no-one else at the school who can work with 
them and mentor them. So, that in itself is difficult.’
The  step-by-step  framework  is  designed  to  help 
educators  think  about  their  own  practice  and  decide 
whether or not a particular resource will help them in their 
teaching. ‘It is a distillation of what expert STEM teachers 
do  from  the  moment  they’re  thinking  about  teaching  a 
particular area,’ Fraser explains.
The framework was developed by expert STEM teachers 
in Tasmania and tested over the course of a year through a 
series of workshops. ‘We felt that we could contribute to a 
solution  better  if we  work  together  than  we  could  if we 
work separately, and that the answer lies with all of us, and 
that’s definitely what’s happened.’
References
Australian  Industry  Group  (2013). 
Lifting our science, 
technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) skills
Retrieved from the reports section at www.aigroup.com.au
To find out more about the STEMCrAfT Project and access 
the framework, visit  http://stemcraft.weebly.com
To access the full article visit:  
acer.ac/stem
‘Australia’s rates of 
participation in STEM 
skills at secondary 
school and university 
are unacceptably low.’
Image credit: © kurhan/Shutterstock
T8
www.teachermagazine.com.au
How to get involved
Join our School Learning Community
Research shows that high quality teaching and leadership teams learn from each other – that’s why partnering 
with schools and helping them partner with each other is so important to us.
The 
Teacher
School  Learning  Community  is  a  new 
program  to  support  schools  to  engage  with,  share  and 
adopt  high  impact,  evidence-based  teaching  practices. 
There are two ways to get involved.
School  Partnership  (Free).  Each  staff  member  will 
receive:
•  A free weekly bulletin, featuring 
Teacher
highlights
•  Unlimited access to live content on 
Teacher
•  Unlimited access to archived content on 
Teacher
•  The opportunity to network and engage with leading 
educators and peers
Education Leadership Partnership ($149). Gain access 
to a targeted  set  of resources focusing on whole-school 
engagement that can be used by educators and parents.
•  Individual staff access to the weekly digest featuring 
Teacher
highlights
•  Quarterly PDF professional  learning  pack, including 
the term’s Top 10 
Teacher
articles
•  Exclusive 
Teacher
content, fast-tracked to your school
•  Five resource sheets for use in school newsletters 
and parent communications
•  Your  choice  of  one  of  the  following  PD  books 
published by ACER Press:
• 
Collaboration in Learning
, Mal Lee and Lorrae Ward
• 
Keys to School Leadership
, Phil Ridden and John 
De Nobile
• 
What Teachers Need to Know About Assessment 
and Reporting
, Phil Ridden and Sandy Heldsinger
•  One listing on 
Teacher
with your school name, website 
link and school logo.
For further information, or to register your interest, contact 
Supriya Bakshi (details below).
Contact us
Editorial
Editor, Jo Earp
Editorial assistant, Danielle Meloney
teachereditor@acer.edu.au
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested