SCIENCE @RISK
Alexander Graham Bell's sketch of a radiophonic interruptor, May 27, 1893. box 205, "Subject File: 
Drawings by Alexander Graham Bell, 1881-1911." Alexander Graham Bell Family Papers, Manuscript 
Division, Library of Congress.
November, 
2012 
Toward a National Strategy for 
Preserving Online Science 
A report of the National Digital Information Infrastructure 
and Preservation Program focused on identifying valuable 
and at-risk science content on the open web. Topics include, 
science blogging, open notebook science, citizen science and 
ideas for approaches to ensuring long-term access to this 
content. 
Pdf no thumbnail - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
how to view pdf thumbnails in; show pdf thumbnails
Pdf no thumbnail - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
show pdf thumbnail in html; show pdf thumbnails in
Science @Risk 
Page 
1
Contents 
Science @ Risk: Toward a National Strategy for Preserving Online Science,  
by NDIIPP Staff and Abby Smith Rumsey....………………………………....2 
The Historical Value of Ephemeral Discussion of Science on the Web,                 
by Fred Gibbs……………...……………………………………………….9 
Ten Years of Science Blogs: A Definition, and a History,  
by Bora Zivkovic ………………………………………………………....18 
Case Study: Developing a “Health and Medicine Blogs” Collection at the U.S. 
National Library of Medicine,        
by Christie Moffatt and Jennifer Marill.……………………………...……31 
Appendix: Eleven Brief Ideas for Web Archives of Online Science Discourse...34 
VB.NET Image: Program for Creating Thumbnail from Documents and
as PDF, TIFF, GIF, BMP, etc. It is easy to use this VB.NET thumbnail creation control to create thumbnail through simple VB.NET programming and no additional
pdf reader thumbnails; pdf files thumbnails
C# Raster - Image Save Options in C#.NET
Tiff Edit. Image Thumbnail. Image Save. Advanced Save Options. Save VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET standard ColorProfile to images if there's no ColorProfile in
create thumbnails from pdf files; pdf thumbnail
Science @Risk 
Page 
2
Science @ Risk
TOWARD A NATIONAL STRATEGY FOR PRESERVING 
ONLINE SCIENCE 
Fifty years from now, what currently accessible web content will be invaluable for 
understanding science in our era? What kinds of uses do you imagine this science 
content serving? Where are the natural curatorial homes for this online content and 
how can we work together to collect, preserve, and provide access to science on the 
web? These were the three principal questions up for discussion at Science at Risk: 
Toward a National Strategy for Preserving Online Science, a recent National Digital 
Information Infrastructure and Preservation digital content summit.  
The Blue Ribbon Task Force on Sustainable Digital Preservation and Access 
recommended that “leading stewardship organizations should convene stakeholders 
and experts to address the selection and preservation needs of collectively 
produced web content.”
1
Thanks to generous support from the Alfred P. Sloan 
Foundation, The Library of Congress was able to invite a small but diverse set of 
science bloggers, representatives from citizen science projects, and individuals 
working on innovative online science publications to talk about and share their work 
with archivists, librarians, curators, and historians from a diverse array of cultural 
heritage organizations to work through and explore these questions. 
This report summarizes the discussions and findings from the meeting, suggests a 
number of calls to action for stewardship organizations, and includes two 
perspective papers and a brief case study from different participants to represent 
the view of creators and future users of online science.
2
The first perspective essay 
comes from Fred Gibbs, Assistant Professor of History at George Mason University 
and Director of Digital Scholarship at the Center for History and New Media. 
Gibbs provides a perspective on the diversity of web content that historians of 
science are likely to be interested in and why. The second essay—from Bora 
Zivkovic, Blogs Editor at Scientific American, visiting Scholar at NYU School of 
Journalism, and organizer of the ScienceOnline conference—provides the 
perspective of a content creator on the development of science blogging. This is 
followed by a case study of the U.S. National Library of Medicine History of 
Medicine Division’s Health and Medicine Blogs collection pilot. This collection 
exemplifies how cultural heritage organizations’ existing collecting goals can 
translate into a targeted web archive collection development strategy. The report 
closes with an appendix briefly listing examples of similar ideas for web archive 
collections that cultural heritage organizations could create based on the priorities 
identified by meeting participants.  
1
Blue Ribbon Task Force on Sustainable Digital Preservation. (2010). Sustainable Economics for a Digital 
Planet: Ensuring Long-term Access to Digital Information, http://brtf.sdsc.edu/biblio/BRTF_Final_Report.pdf
p. 68
2
This report was compiled by Library of Congress staff with Abby Smith Rumsey.
C# Raster - Image Compression in C#.NET
Undefined. The value is 0. It is not support compression. No. The value is 1. It represents no compression. Image Compression In C#.NET.
html display pdf thumbnail; pdf thumbnail creator
C# Image: Create Web Image Viewer in C#.NET Application
installed on Windows compatible server, no additional add document file navigation with thumbnail preview support; High fidelity viewing of TIFF, PDF, Word, Excel
pdf reader thumbnails; create thumbnail from pdf c#
Science @Risk 
Page 
3
WHY FOCUS ON ONLINE SCIENCE?
For the purposes of the meeting, participants defined online science as the products 
or results of scientific activities—as well as the community of discourse among 
scientists, policymakers, funders, citizens, and future scholars, historians, and 
scientists—shared on the web. To capture online science would be to capture the 
informal and largely non-peer-reviewed network of blogs, projects, forums, and 
innovative publications that connect scientists, science journalists, and the interested 
larger public.  
The digital versions of traditional peer reviewed journals are also of high interest 
and importance. However, because the ownership and distribution structure are 
known and relationships are in place with libraries and other stewardship 
organizations, this group of content is not as immediately at risk. Setting digital 
journals aside, the primary focus of the meeting was on science discourse outside of 
the traditional publishing model whether analog or online.  
To date, issues around the preservation of scientific data have been the primary 
focus of born digital preservation efforts. The Blue Ribbon Task Force on 
Sustainable Digital Preservation made noteworthy suggestions for the preservation 
of research data.
3
Projects like DataONE and the Data Conservancy have made 
significant headway to ensuring ongoing access to research data.
4
In this space, 
NDIIPP has been particularly involved in supporting work related to the 
preservation of social science data through the Data Preservation Alliance for the 
Social Sciences (Data-PASS).
5
The four-year project developed and maintains a 
collaborative infrastructure for preservation and access to social science data. In 
contrast to concerted efforts for scientific data, the preservation of new modes of 
scientific discourse occurring on the web has yet to be substantially addressed. 
STAGES OF ARCHIVING 
Archiving science on the web presents many challenges: the distributed nature of 
web-based content; the fact that in blog comments, forums, and citizen engagement 
projects authorship/ownership is often unclear; and affiliation between online 
science projects and organizations are loose and changing. Three stages in the life 
cycle of stewardship and archiving were identified to help frame discussion about 
types of action that could be taken to preserve scientific discourse online.  
1.
Self-archiving. This involves taking steps to keep data in order and saved 
during the process of creation and use. 
2.
Near-term archiving. These are steps done by hosting sites or repositories, 
personal Web sites, publishers’ sites, or those that share products and data 
to keep content preserved while organizational affiliations are in place.  
3
Sustainable Economics for a Digital Planet: Ensuring Long-term Access to Digital Information
4
For information on DataONE see https://www.dataone.org/
for information on the Data Conservancy 
see http://dataconservancy.org/about
5
For information on Data-PASS see http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/DATAPASS/
VB.NET Image: Image and Doc Windows, Web & Mobile Viewers of
for users to do image displaying, thumbnail creation and viewer, image Windows viewer needs no irrelevant application JPEG, PNG, BMP, GIF, TIFF, PDF, Word and
show pdf thumbnails; how to view pdf thumbnails in
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Create Online TIFF Document Viewer
We still demonstrate how to create more web viewers on PDF and Word documents There's no need to add other dependencies to your web project, because they will
create thumbnail jpg from pdf; no pdf thumbnails in
Science @Risk 
Page 
4
3.
Long-term archiving. It is the responsibility of libraries, archives and 
museums to provide stewardship that endures over hardware and software 
upgrades, organizational changes, and generations. 
WHY IS ONLINE SCIENTIFIC DISCOURSE AT RISK? 
Scholarly discourse and interaction among scientists and the public is rapidly 
changing. The ephemeral nature of this online discussion leaves it at substantial risk 
of being lost. Science blogging has become a major mode of scientific discourse. 
The last ten years have seen significant growth in large science-focused blogging 
communities and platforms. In this space, sites like ScienceBlogs, PLOSBlogs, and 
Scientific American’s Blog Network are playing an important role in science 
communication and may be prime targets for partnerships with digital preservation 
organizations and other stakeholders. At the same time, many scientists are running 
their own individual blogs, either through generic blogging platforms like 
Wordpress.com and Google’s Blogger service, or through their own content 
management systems. These individual blogs present more complicated issues for 
selection and preservation.  
A range of other novel online modes of publication have emerged, and are 
continuing to emerge, which require attention. Various projects for sharing pre-
prints of articles, like SSRN, RePEc, and ArXive.org, are already developing new 
preservation approaches.
6
However, new models of publications, like the video 
Journal of Visualized Experiments (JoVE), and science podcasts present non-textual 
information. These digital objects present particular risks for loss because they are 
not published through traditional library acquisition channels.  
Citizen Science initiatives are engaging members of the public to participate in 
data collection and interpretation. Much of the work of citizen science is evident in 
the collected data and reported in scholarly literature. However, a considerable 
amount of important work occurs in online forums and discussion spaces. That 
information will likely be an important set of source material for understanding the 
role that these systems have played in the history of science. For example, much of 
the work involved in the discovery of a new kind of galaxy in the Galaxy Zoo 
project resulted from discussions in the project’s web forums
7
.  
Much of the content that participants in the preserving online science summit thought 
most valuable are also most at risk of loss because they do not clearly fall into the 
existing collecting practices of libraries, museums and archives. Discussion forums 
and a range of rather ephemeral websites offer considerable value as historical 
records. As noted in Bora Zivkovic’s essay on science blogging, an outage on a 
popular science blogging network last year underscores just how easy it would be 
for a single point of failure to result in the loss of content documenting changes in 
6
For example, see ArXive.org’s digital preservation plans with Cornel University’s Library 
http://arxiv.org/help/support/whitepaper
7
Cardamone, C., Schawinski, K., Sarzi, M., Bamford, S. P., Bennert, N., Urry, C. M., Lintott, C., et al. (2009). 
Galaxy Zoo Green Peas: discovery of a class of compact extremely star‐forming galaxies. Monthly 
Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 39 9(3), 1191-1205. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2009.15383.x
VB.NET Image: RasterEdge JBIG2 Codec Image Control for VB.NET
Even when you are using lossy image compression solution, no significant information will lose. "Do you have any add-on i can use to print PDF files with JBIG2
pdf thumbnail generator; how to show pdf thumbnails in
C# Image: Create C#.NET Windows Document Image Viewer | Online
C# Windows Document Image Viewer Features. No need for and viewing multiple document & image formats (PDF, MS Word If you right-click on the thumbnail, there is
thumbnail view in for pdf files; pdf files thumbnails
Science @Risk 
Page 
5
science communication, and a diverse collection of responses and reactions to 
scientific research. 
WHY IS ONLINE SCIENTIFIC DISCOURSE VALUABLE? 
Below are three kinds of value the participants identified in this content. These are 
not meant to be exhaustive, but instead as a starting point for explaining why this 
web content is important.  
The Record of Scientific Knowledge, Discovery, and Innovation:  
Much of the history of science, technology, medicine, and mathematics is built from 
primary records of scientific publication and unpublished materials of scientists. 
Traditionally, material has been preserved through a combination of collecting the 
personal papers of scientists and their published work in books and journal articles. 
With the emergence of practices like open notebook science, science blogging, and 
science discussion forums a considerable amount of this content is being produced 
and presented on the web. If we do not act to collect this contemporary material, 
we may end up with more complete records of scientists’ unpublished notes and 
personal communication from previous eras than we do from our own.  
Related, the emergence of citizen science projects has resulted in some discoveries 
and advances in science happening on the open web. For example, the discovery 
of the green pea galaxies occurred entirely on the discussion forums that 
accompany the Galaxy Zoo website. The forums, where these kinds of discussions 
occur, document the process and contributions of individuals in scientific discoveries.  
Changes in Scientific and Scholarly Communication: 
Aside from documenting the record of science and discovery, the new media of 
blogs, websites, and forums are themselves documentation of significant changes 
occurring in scholarly communication. Much as work on the history of the book 
documents an array of changes in culture, the history of online communication media 
are themselves of considerable value in understanding science and scholarship in 
contemporary society. In this respect, these sites are going to be of interest as 
valuable primary sources in the history of technology, communications, and media.  
Public Understanding and Perception of Science and Science Policy:  
Conversations and reactions to science from members of the general public 
represent one of the most exciting prospects for historians of the future to 
understand science in our times. In particular, various controversies around topics 
like evolution, vaccines, and climate change have stirred up an enormous amount of 
online discussion. Records of these discussions will be invaluable for historians and 
policy analysts for understanding and exploring public reactions and perspectives 
on science. Furthermore, various pop-cultural developments that touch on science 
topics (for example, videogames like Spore) are similarly likely to generate 
substantive online discussion and offer potentially unique perspectives on science in 
our times. 
C# Image: Tutorial for Document Viewing & Displaying in ASP.NET
in the viewer with a click on a thumbnail. Add No-Postback Navigation Controls to Viewer. Add two powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
pdf thumbnails; create pdf thumbnail image
VB.NET Image: VB.NET DLL for Image Basic Transforming in .NET
NET imaging toolkit is extremely easy to use with no special configuration are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
view pdf image thumbnail; create thumbnails from pdf files
Science @Risk 
Page 
6
USE AND REUSABILITY IN COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT 
Because the purpose of preservation is reuse, participants urged that data be as 
well documented and standardized as possible. What those terms mean depends 
very much upon the data and potential uses. Raw data, for example, should be in 
standard formats to ease processing for pattern recognition, mining, simulation, 
longitudinal studies, and so forth.  
Participants also suggested there be some measure of collecting samples of records 
of online scientific discourse just in case, specifically, gathering data at scale and 
keeping in relatively low levels of curation to reduce costs required for cataloging 
and description. This is recommended for data that seem relevant but may have no 
short-term demand. For example, embracing an all-hands-on-deck approach to 
documenting significant events, such as tsunamis, earthquakes, and hurricanes could 
include lots of data in an archive for later analysis. It would be impossible to 
predict exactly what future researchers will want access to. The Blue Ribbon Task 
Force on Sustainable Digital Preservation and Access recommended the capture of 
such data at a very low level of curation so that they may be discovered and 
processed in the future if deemed desirable.
8
Simultaneously, there was consensus around the need to collect small, highly-curated 
topical collections of web content focused on ensuring long-term access to small 
representative sets of material in which scientists and historians of science see long-
term value. The idea here would be to ensure high levels of quality assurance for 
collected content and a strong curatorial role in organizing and arranging 
collections as a point of entry into the much broader swath of content.  
CALLS TO ACTION 
As a result of the discussion at the summit, and the following essays, we suggest four 
calls to action for cultural heritage organizations. 
Call for Engaging, Assisting, and Supporting Content Creators: 
The scientists and science communicators who participated in the summit were eager 
to learn more about how they could help to manage and steward their content. 
Eventually, the personal documents of scientists often make up special collections at 
libraries and archives. There is considerable value in the cultural heritage 
community creating guidance materials for managing personal digital information. 
Specifically, reaching out to scientists and science communicators to help them 
better steward their own content can help creators self archive. The Library of 
Congress provides personal archiving guidance to the general public that can be 
customized and redistributed to a specific audience.
9
Call for Developing Relationships with Online Science Communities: 
8
Sustainable Economics for a Digital Planet: Ensuring Long-term Access to Digital Information, p 68
9
htpp://digitalpreservation.gov/personalarchiving/
Science @Risk 
Page 
7
The organizations or communities that host or contribute to online science projects or 
discourse must care for their assets in the near term. Cultural heritage institutions 
have the mission and expertise to serve as long-term stewards. Relationships at the 
institutional level can be built to give guidance on preservation practices during the 
life of a project and advise on future curatorial homes for data when 
organizational affiliations change.  
Call for Targeted Web Archive Collections: 
To meet the challenge of stewarding this content, we suggest cultural heritage 
organizations begin to develop focused web archive collections related to their 
particular institutional goals and needs. For example, a focused special collection 
on open notebook science, or a collection focused on controversies around vaccines, 
or the web presence of its scientists and science centers. Cultural heritage 
organizations are uniquely positioned to, based on their own particular focuses, 
identify and collect around particular themes and topics that can collectively serve 
as part of a distributed national and international online science collection. The case 
study of U.S. National Library of Medicine’s Health and Medicine Blogs collection 
provided in this report can serve as an exemplar.  Also included are examples of a 
series of different kinds of special collections we could see different cultural 
heritage organizations developing as an appendix. 
Call for Outreach to Historians and Other Researchers: 
Stewardship organizations must establish a user community which values the content 
they are preserving. There is not yet substantive interest from historians of science 
and other researchers in online scientific discourse. While researchers and scholars 
of literature and the arts have been engaged in helping develop practices around 
the collection and preservation of born digital artwork and literature, there has not 
been a similar reaction in the history of science community. Archivists, librarians, and 
curators ought to reach out to historians of science and make them aware of the 
born-digital primary resources that can be collected. Simply put, without 
intervention, much of this online discourse is likely to disappear before historians of 
science take an interest. Engaging professional organizations and associations for 
these researchers will be a critical component in developing sound collection 
approaches and policies. 
Science @Risk 
Page 
8
The Historical Value of 
Ephemeral Discussion of 
Science 
FRED GIBBS, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF HISTORY AT 
GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY AND DIRECTOR OF 
DIGITAL SCHOLARSHIP AT THE CENTER FOR HISTORY 
AND NEW MEDIA  
As librarians, curators, and archivists think more about archiving online science 
content for future use, they are challenged to strike a practical balance between 
the wealth of savable data on one hand, and the work required to make it into a 
meaningful and accessible collection on the other. After all, content needs to be not 
only gathered and stored, but also made useful and visible, a process that takes 
substantial human work, even if heavy automation can aid in the process. This 
challenge is often framed in terms of properly identifying what to collect, or 
perhaps as a challenge in filtering the great mass of content from which one must 
carefully select.  
Needless to say, selection processes remain important. Even if one believes that 
storage space is cheap, and simple file formats are likely to be available many 
decades from now (as many already have been), content needs not only to be 
collected and stored, but also to be made visible. The work of collecting, 
organizing, as well as making visible and available is simply impossible given the 
magnitude of digital material and increasingly limited resources to conduct these 
complex processes.  
This essay argues, from the point of view of a historian of science (and to some 
extent of a digital historian), that librarians, curators, and archivists must address 
the difficult value question of what content to save with three important but often 
neglected considerations in mind: the varied audience for science content (e.g., 
scientists versus historians); the importance of collecting science content that departs 
form what might be considered good or mainstream science, and; the changing 
nature of archival use.  
VARIED AUDIANCES 
Science at Risk summit participants agreed that it is helpful to think of three stages 
of archival life: creation, near-term, and long-term. This tripartite scheme nicely 
encompasses the varied challenges of: 1) collecting from diverse sources that 
employ diverse technologies; 2) making such content immediately available for 
immediate research needs, and; 3) preserving it for posterity and future reference.  
Science @Risk 
Page 
9
In addition to this scheme, we also must consider the different audiences that will 
benefit at those various stages. In the near term, other scientists and perhaps policy 
makers will likely be the primary audience—and thus dictate near-term strategies 
both in terms of what to collect and how it should be made visible and available. In 
the long term, however, historians—especially historians of science—will benefit 
most. Collection development should be made with both audiences in mind. While 
there is substantial overlap in the kinds of materials that each group will be 
interested in, there are significant differences that must factor into collection 
strategies. 
The disciplinarily diverse audience and presenters attending the Science at Risk 
summit showed how many participants are actively creating and curating online 
science content according to their varied needs and interests. Summit presenters 
associated with science blogging or citizen science projects, for example, 
demonstrated their distinct interest in preserving discussions about current science 
issues—whether from professional scientists or science enthusiasts—with their 
content ranging widely across natural philosophical discussions, methodological 
questions, historical essays, or arguments about what species of bird appears in a 
particular photo. Open notebook enthusiasts demonstrated their interest in 
preserving a narrow but deep view of science in action. There is no doubt that all 
of these constitute sources are worth saving. Such sources will be of use to scientists 
(or civic scientists) struggling with similar problems; parts will be useful for historians 
who want deeper insight into the messy processes of science that do not emerge 
from official and polished publications.  
Yet for these generators of online science content—as seemed true for many 
participants at the summit—the emphasis of what was at risk leaned heavily 
toward what the creators and managers of these resources, as well as those tasked 
with archiving such sources, considered to be good science. There is no question that, 
when considering the near term use of scientists or future historical uses to learn 
about mainstream science, archives of content from publications like science blogs 
and open notebooks will prove to be fantastic and largely unprecedented 
resources.  
Longer-term archival materials, however, are useful to a rather different audience 
that does not share the same agenda as many creators of online science content. 
From a historian’s perspective, it would be deeply problematic for future research 
if content selectors focused on preserving a narrow—and to some extent 
arbitrary—selection of content that a particular set of insiders thought was good. 
Of course it is true that historians' ability to understand and interpret the past will 
continue to be mediated by the stewards of our cultural artifacts: librarians, 
curators and archivists who, laboring under various practical constraints, must often 
save what is or will be of obvious value. This value is often determined by the 
context in which it is collected. Science content, then, is likely to be collected 
because it reflects upon the activities of a recognized scientific community, and is 
said to constitute good science.  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested