asp.net pdf viewer control c# : Thumbnail view in for pdf files SDK software API wpf windows .net sharepoint Service-Sector0-part1611

THE SERVICES SECTOR
IN CARICOM
Critical Issues For Business
"
CAR
I
COM
co
un
t
r
ie
s
mus
t
e
xp
lo
r
e
t
h
e
p
o
ss
i
b
ilitie
s
f
o
r
d
i
v
e
rs
i
fy
i
ng
t
h
ei
r
eco
n
o
m
ie
s
"
TRADE
W
I
NS
is designed with
Caribbean business in mind.   The series is
intended to bring issues of trade policy to the
private sector and other interested parties.
T
rade in services (outside of tourism) has not
traditionally received priority attention in CARI-
COM countries.  An emphasis on manufactur-
ing and agriculture has meant that no consis-
tent policy, incentive programme or institutional
structure has been put in place for the devel-
opment of services and its expansion into the
export market.  
Liberalisation of trade in services is the corner-
stone of much negotiation in international trade
in the sector.  CARICOM is actively involved in
negotiations at the World Trade Organization
(WTO) and at the preparatory sessions for the
Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) which
is scheduled to come on stream in 2005.
Industrialised countries will be prepared to
pursue their interests with close collaboration
between governments and private sector bod-
ies.  CARICOM countries are not yet prepared
for this level of collaboration and negotiation.
Heightened competition in the global market
also means that CARICOM countries must
explore the possibilities for diversifying their
economies - and services will be particularly
important in this regard. 
In order to examine these issues, the
Caribbean Regional Program of the United
Nations Development Program (UNDP)
commissioned a review of research on the
services sector within CARICOM. The report
provided an overview of the state of policy and
research in areas such as financial services,
professional services, health services and
entertainment.  In 1999, Caribbean Export
commissioned a report on the possibilities of
forming a Caribbean Coalition of Service
Industries (CCSI) to address the ways in
which services could be developed by the
private sector.  
This issue of TRADE
W
I
NS
brings together
selected findings of these two reports in an
attempt to outline the state of the services
sector, the obstacles faced and possible solu-
tions for its continued development
and expansion.
2
What do the Studies say?
5
What About the
Trade Agreements?
6
What’s Still to be Done?
9
How can the Private Sector
get Organised?
Thumbnail view in for pdf files - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
disable pdf thumbnails; pdf files thumbnails
Thumbnail view in for pdf files - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
create thumbnail from pdf c#; enable pdf thumbnails
N
ote
prepared to make meaningful contributions to
trade negotiations at the regional, hemispheric
and international levels.  In order to do this,
several elements must be in place.  Territories
must conduct research into the services sector.
In this way, they can make assessments of the
state of the sector, the range of subsectors
which it covers, the contribution of the sector to
the national economy and the areas which
need improvement.  Further research can indi-
cate service needs in the export market and
provide members of the private sector with
information on how they can develop their ser-
vices to address those needs.
This research must be systematic and analyti-
cal.  It must point the way to policy develop-
ment for the expansion of the sector.  Such
policy development should result in local and
regional strategies for providing incentives and
support structures to service providers (the pri-
vate sector) and consolidating a position for
negotiation. 
What Have we
Done so far?
So far, the region has not taken the business
of services sector development very seriously.
It has not followed through on several of its
commitments to the General Agreement on
Trade in Services (GATS) which is an integral
part of the WTO and at a regional level it has
not yet implemented recommendations for lib-
eralisation which could act as a precursor to its
international negotiations. However, CARICOM
and several regional and international organi-
sations have recognised the need for research
in the area and have commissioned a small
number of studies.  At the level of policy,
CARICOM’s Protocol II amending the Treaty of
Chaguaramas and the CARICOM-Dominican
Republic Free Trade Agreement both address
the issue of free trade in services.  
What do the
Studies say?
The studies on the services sector in the
region provide an overview of several subsec-
tors and offer general recommendations for
development.  While they do not provide in-
depth analysis or strategies for the expansion
of domestic and export potential, they do pro-
vide some understanding of the wide range of
areas which could be covered by the sector.
The studies examined cover the following:
financial services (domestic and offshore);
insurance; informatics; professional services;
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
from other file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete using which VB.NET developers can redact, delete, view and save PDF Thumbnail Edit.
create pdf thumbnail image; pdf thumbnail viewer
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.PowerPoint
Tell C# users how to: create a new PowerPoint file and load PowerPoint; merge, append, and split PowerPoint files; insert, delete, move, rotate Create Thumbnail.
pdf first page thumbnail; generate pdf thumbnails
TRADE
W
I
NS
is a publication of the Caribbean Export Development Agency (Caribbean Export).  © 2000  TRADE
W
I
NS
is made possible through the kind support of  the European Union.
3
educational services; medical and health ser-
vices; culture and entertainment; and invest-
ment.  One study also focusses specifically on
services within the OECS.  (Studies on tourism
and transportation were not selected for review
since they have been well-researched else-
where.  Telecommunications, though a signifi-
cant part of the services sector, was omitted
due to a lack of critical research.)
Financial Services
Financial services are generally provided by
banks, insurance and trust companies, mort-
gage and finance houses, savings and loan
associations, stock exchanges and unit trusts.
Much of the research in this area has been
focussed on capital markets and international
trade - examining developments, exports (par-
ticularly in the offshore financial services sec-
tor) and liberalisation.  
Several studies have attempted to identify the
elements necessary for the development of
capital markets and financial services in inter-
national trade.  An integrated capital market
(through a regional stock exchange), improved
regulations and increased linkages to interna-
tional markets have been highlighted as key
elements.  
Increased harmonisation (of legislation, regula-
tions, company laws and accounting stan-
dards), export credit facilities and the creation
of a CARICOM Investment Code were also
identified and researchers found that taxation
and restrictions on land and property owner-
ship were obstacles to development of the sec-
tor in general.  Banking, equipment financing
and leasing, trading in securities and commodi-
ties, portfolio management and insurance were
seen as areas for potential export develop-
ment.
Offshore Financial
Services
The Caribbean is an important location for off-
shore financial services but researchers have
found that it does not seem to have a clear com-
petitive advantage.  If foreign investment in the
sector is to be increased, it seems that CARI-
COM territories will need to upgrade their
domestic financial systems, liberalise restrictions
on the movement of capital and harmonise tax
regimes and regulatory frameworks.  It has also
been suggested that the creation of an OECS
offshore mutual fund industry could generate
substantial foreign exchange earnings.
Reports by the Organisation for Economic
Tra
i
n
i
ng
??
Co-operation and Development (OECD) and the
Financial Action Task Force (FATF) - on unfair
tax havens and money-laundering respectively -
have identified several Caribbean jurisdictions
as having inadequate regulatory frameworks.
These claims are being actively contested by
governments in the region.
Insurance
There has been very little analysis of the insur-
ance industry as a services sector.  Much of
the research has focussed on legal aspects of
the industry and captive insurance has gener-
ated some interest among researchers. Export
possibilities for industry may lie in insurance
educational services to other developing coun-
tries.   It has been suggested, however, that
export possibilities for CARICOM may be limit-
ed in scope because the territories lack the
necessary infrastructure, funds and research to
develop products which can compete in devel-
oped countries. With regard to non-life insur-
ance, it was felt that the region did not have
the technological expertise to cover complex
industrial or liability risks.
Informatics
Although information processing is a relatively
small industry in the Caribbean, there seems to
be great opportunity in the processing of
claims and records in areas such as the
health, insurance, transportation and legal
industries.  Studies point out, however, that the
demand appears to be greater than the
region’s ability to supply.
Although labour costs in CARICOM territories
are comparatively low, there are several fac-
tors which would seem to make the region
uncompetitive in the industry.  The first is the
shortage of informatics professionals with skills
in such areas as software development, net-
work systems, data entry and other technical
capabilities.  (The shortage is particularly acute
in the higher value-added services.)  The sec-
ond major obstacle is the comparatively high
cost of  telecommunications. Finally, the busi-
ness environment - which includes work permit
restrictions, aliens landholding restrictions, a
lack of specific incentives and inconsistent
practices with regard to foreign and local
investors - is thought to be an obstacle to
development of the sector. 
Professional Services
Professional services cover a wide range of
specialisations. The areas covered by existing
studies include management consulting and
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.Word
Tell C# users how to: create a new Word file and load Word from pdf; merge, append, and split Word files; insert, delete, move, rotate Create Thumbnail.
create thumbnail jpg from pdf; view pdf image thumbnail
Create Thumbnail in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
Web Image Viewer Installation; View and Display Images; Annotate & Redact Documents or Images; Create Thumbnail; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode & Decode
pdf thumbnail preview; show pdf thumbnails in
TRADE
W
I
NS
is a publication of the Caribbean Export Development Agency (Caribbean Export).  © 2000  TRADE
W
I
NS
is made possible through the kind support of  the European Union.
4
technical and consulting services such as engi-
neering and construction, accounting, legal and
tax advisory services, marketing, design,
advertising, agricultural development and envi-
ronmental development.  The professional ser-
vices industry is made up mainly of small firms
operating domestically or regionally and offer-
ing generalised services.  Larger companies
are limited principally to construction-related
industries in the larger economies and work
primarily on programmes directed by interna-
tional donors, public investment and special
private sector projects. Many are local offices
of international firms which are not allowed to
market their services abroad.  Indigenous
firms, therefore, will be the ones to lead the
export drive.
The studies suggested that Caribbean firms
are generally perceived to be outside of the
mainstream with little hands-on experience of
new or emerging techniques or technologies.
(Consulting engineering firms seem to have
some advantage over international firms with
regard to fee structure but the sector still has
not developed as a significant contributor to
economic growth in the region.)  Despite the
virtual elimination of foreign exchange controls
in the region there is a lack of transparency in
public procurement and service professionals
are still unable to move freely throughout the
region.  It has been suggested that govern-
ments need to devise and implement a strate-
gy which will address the questions of profes-
sional accreditation, the free movement of
accredited professionals, access to investment
and working capital and export marketing
incentives. The establishment of regional pro-
fessional associations such as a Caribbean
Accredited Professional Services Institute has
also been suggested.
Educational Services
Though education has not traditionally been
considered an export service in the region, the
emphasis on  education and training for human
resource development means that the sector
must be considered a producer service.  The
main study examined focusses on three
aspects of education: i) levels, (primary, sec-
ondary, tertiary - community and technical col-
leges as well as professional schools, universi-
ty and offshore schools - and adult education);
ii) specialisations (e.g. curriculum, planning and
guidance and counselling); and iii) supports
(such as buildings, equipment, technology and
financing).  The suggested export possibilities
for the sector include expertise in the various
levels and specialisations of education, basic
training of educational staff, and models of
alternative education strategies, integrated
schooling and multi-cultural education.
Medical and Health
Services
Several studies pointed to shortcomings in
domestic health services as a major obstacle
to the development of the sector as an export
earner. It was felt, however, that the region
could exploit its natural resources and develop
specialties peculiar to its location.  It was also
felt that greater use could be made of the
University of the West Indies (UWI) as a
research and training institution offering these
services to foreign students.  Researchers
have made several suggestions for the devel-
opment of health and medical services for
export, including: offshore professional health
training, tropical medicine, research into indige-
nous plants and traditional practices, tourist
health and specialised services, the manufac-
ture of pharmaceuticals and natural health care
products, cosmetic surgery, spas, retirement
communities and alternative health services.
The high cost of travel and accommodation,
the absence of insurance coverage for out-of-
country care (for visitors) and the lack of refer-
ral networks are cited as obstacles to develop-
ing the industry for export. Studies suggested
that the private sector in the region would have
to focus on a relatively affluent and discrete
market and provide high quality services in
areas not normally covered by insurance.
They would also need to explore joint ventures.
The public sector would need to strengthen
domestic health care systems and develop
transparent regulatory frameworks and encour-
age foreign investment and ownership.
Culture and
Entertainment
Many researchers have suggested that culture
and entertainment are industries with great
export potential.  The rich cultural heritage of
the region is seen as a key to the development
of the sector.  Studies have paid particular
attention to the music industry since it gener-
ates employment in a number of areas outside
of performance including marketing, produc-
tion, sound engineering and legal services.
The full contribution of the industry to national
income, however, is not known.  Researchers
have indicated that effective intellectual proper-
ty laws, a legal and economic framework for
facilitating the movement of goods and ser-
vices across borders, adequate infrastructure
and technology, international distribution and
N
ic
h
e
mark
eti
ng
Maj
o
r
co
n
ce
rn
Create Thumbnail Winforms | Online Tutorials
Winforms Image Viewer Installation; View and Display Create Thumbnail; Generate Barcodes on Your Documents; Processing; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode
show pdf thumbnails; enable thumbnail preview for pdf files
VB.NET Image: Image and Doc Windows, Web & Mobile Viewers of
for users to do image displaying, thumbnail creation and compatible mobile phone or tablet to view, navigate, zoom are JPEG, PNG, BMP, GIF, TIFF, PDF, Word and
enable pdf thumbnail preview; generate pdf thumbnails
TRADE
W
I
NS
is a publication of the Caribbean Export Development Agency (Caribbean Export).  © 2000  TRADE
W
I
NS
is made possible through the kind support of  the European Union.
5
marketing relationships, training programmes
and service institutions will be needed to facili-
tate development of this particular industry.
Other areas explored in the research include
audiovisual media, publishing and support ser-
vices for cultural artefacts.  Researchers have
pointed to the relationship between culture and
tourism as an area to be developed further.  It
was felt that, with regard to the industry as a
whole, regional governments needed to put
certain measures in place to facilitate the
expansion of trade.  Restrictions on the move-
ment of cultural products and personnel within
the region would have to be removed and gov-
ernments would need to re-examine their
Rules of Origin as they relate to cultural prod-
ucts.  It was felt that protection legislation
should be enacted and markets explored in the
Caribbean diaspora and beyond.
Investment
Studies in the area of investment have exam-
ined intra-CARICOMtrade and foreign invest-
ment flows.  Researchers have pointed to several
obstacles to the development of investment as
a services sector both withinCARICOM as a
whole and within the OECS specifically.  The
main issues of concern are restrictions on the
movement of capital and personnel, restric-
tions on foreign ownership of land and compa-
nies and discretionary Ministerial powers in the
granting of licences and work permits (the lat-
ter two being particularly relevant in the case
of the OECS).
Several suggestions have been made for the
development of the sector.  These include: the
automatic granting of work permits to techni-
cal, professional and managerial personnel of
CARICOM owned or controlled enterprises
which operate in any Member State; the
removal of controls on the movement of capital
and payments; the extension of foreign
exchange privileges similar to those received
by nationals to all CARICOM citizens; the
phasing out of foreign exchange controls for
nationals and foreigners; and the adoption of
the CARICOM Double Taxation Agreement.  It
has also been suggested that a CARICOM
Enterprise Regime be put in place and that an
integrated CARICOM financial system be
developed.  (Attempts have been made at
establishing an Enterprise Regime but these
efforts have not been sustained.) Researchers
felt that procedures for the granting of licences
should be made transparent (and dispensed
with in the case of companies controlled by
OECS and CARICOM citizens) and that com-
pany legislation should be simplified and mod-
ernised.  Clear policies on investment should
also be developed.
OECS and Services
Special mention has been made of the devel-
opment of the services sector in the OECS ter-
ritories.  Services account for over 80% of
GDP in the OECS countries with construction,
information, professional, educational, health
care and shipping and related services in the
lead.  Regional free zone shopping, construc-
tion and financial services appear to have the
highest levels of earning potential.  
Despite the importance of the sector to the
economies of the OECS territories, one
researcher has found that there are several
factors which place the OECS at a competitive
disadvantage for trade in services: worker pro-
ductivity and education are relatively low;
financial service providers prefer risk-taking on
tangible products; and entrepreneurs seem to
lack the interest or technical and managerial
knowledge for operating in the sector.  
In addition (as described above) there are
licensing, registration and immigration barriers
to free movement of labour and access to
resources.  Double taxation is also a major
impediment.  Foreign suppliers are often grant-
ed exemptions which place them at an advan-
tage over local suppliers.  Institutional support
services and incentives are lacking and gov-
ernment procurement procedures are not
transparent.  It is also predicted that environ-
mental degradation may in the future affect
success in areas such as hospitality and real
estate if corrective measures are not taken.
What About the
Trade
Agreements?
Although services policy is yet to be fully developed
in the region, steps have been taken to
remove restrictions on trade in the sector.
CARICOM’s Protocol II and the Free Trade
Agreement (FTA) negotiated between
CARICOM and the Dominican Republic
provide initial frameworks for policy direction
and address some of the obstacles to trade
discussed earlier.
CARICOM’s Protocol II
Protocol II which deals with establishment,
services and capital is intended to amend
the Treaty of Chaguaramas by increasing
liberalisation in the sector.   Protocol II is now
Env
i
r
o
m
e
n
t!
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
Microsoft PowerPoint: PPT, PPTX, PPS, PPSX; PDF: Portable Document you to easily load and view web document fast speed with the help of thumbnail, page navigate
how to show pdf thumbnails in; generate pdf thumbnail c#
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
PDF Viewer provides C# users abilities to view, annotate, convert file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete C#.NET: Edit PDF Thumbnail.
disable pdf thumbnails; create thumbnail jpg from pdf
TRADE
W
I
NS
is a publication of the Caribbean Export Development Agency (Caribbean Export).  © 2000  TRADE
W
I
NS
is made possible through the kind support of  the European Union.
6
in effect and it makes provisions for several of
the changes suggested in the research.
Restrictions on the right of establishment will be
removed and no new ones will be added.  This
will make it easier for self-employed persons to
offer their services across the region.  The
Protocol also allows for the establishment of
common standards and measures for accredita-
tion and recognition of educational qualifica-
tions.  Restrictions on the provision of services
will be removed and no new ones shall be
added.  Restrictions on banking, insurance,
other financial services and the movement of
capital and current transactions will also be
eliminated.  Existing obstacles to trade in ser-
vices must be identified to CARICOM’s Council
for Trade and Economic Development
(COTED).  The special needs of the Less
Developed Countries (LDCs) of CARICOM are
also taken into account.
The CARICOM-Dominican
Republic Free Trade
Agreement 
The Free Trade Agreement (FTA) between
CARICOM and the Dominican Republic
includes special sections on trade in services
and investment.  Essentially, the countries have
agreed to remove restrictions to trade in both
areas.  Any obstacles shall be listed and no
new ones will be added.  The requirement of
establishing a local presence in a territory in
order to supply a service will be removed.  In
terms of investment, certain initiatives will be
put into place to guarantee access to work per-
mits and licences and to facilitate the transfer of
payments.  The two parties have also agreed to
establish a Business Forum to facilitate the
activities of the private sector.  They have also
agreed to work to prevent double taxation and
facilitate government procurement.  The
Agreement seeks to make licensing procedures
more transparent and to protect cultural heritage.
It is important to note that any delays in
consolidating free trade in services at the CARICOM
level can impede the adoption of a CARICOM
position in the continuing FTA negotiations.
What’s Still to be
Done?
Research and policy, however, have not gone
far enough.  The region is still ill-prepared to
meet the challenges of negotiations in services
and to develop and expand the sector in order
to be truly competitive and to derive maximum
benefit from trade liberalisation.  Research
must inform the private sector of opportunities
for development and provide direction for gov-
ernments to formulate policy.  Policy, in turn,
must insist on continued research support.
Below are some of the key areas suggested
for improvement.
 Research
National Studies on Services
National studies on services are essential to a
meaningful analysis of the strengths, weak-
nesses and possibilities of the sector. A focus
on services and its subsectors can provide the
basis for policy formulation at the national and
regional levels. CARICOM countries are the
only ones in the hemisphere which have not
completed preliminary national studies on ser-
vices.  Although the need for such studies was
considered and even initiated by some coun-
tries when the Uruguay Round negotiating
process (part of the General Agreement on
Trade in Services) got underway, it appears
that there has since been little attention paid
to this issue.  (It is significant to note that the
situation is somewhat different in the
Dominican Republic.)
Recommendation
CARICOM countries should urgently address
the need for national studies on services and
devise strategies for disseminating results and
recommendations arising from the research to
the national community.  Such an exercise
could sensitise governments, the private sec-
tor and the public at large to the subject of
services and its domestic and export potential.
It could also help to redress the disproportion-
ate emphasis on the goods sector.
More Detailed Studies by
Subsector
The studies which are currently available pro-
vide a useful broad understanding of particular
subsectors.  However, there is a need for the
data to be further disaggregated - broken
down - in order to make meaningful policy
decisions possible.  Areas such as information
services and professional services, for exam-
ple, include a wide range of activities which
are often not addressed in the current
research.  Such a breakdown will be critical in
assessing the economic contribution and
export potential of the subsectors.  (Since the
time of writing, a small number of studies on
entertainment, financial services and telecom-
munications in CARICOM have been pro-
N
ote
CAR
I
COM
S
ec
t
.
d
oi
ng
t
h
i
s
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You can generate thumbnail image(s) from PDF file for quick viewing and further This class provides APIs for converting PDF files to other file formats.
create thumbnail from pdf; pdf thumbnail generator
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.Excel
Tell C# users how to: create a new Excel file and load Excel; merge, append, and split Excel files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy and Create Thumbnail.
view pdf image thumbnail; pdf file thumbnail preview
TRADE
W
I
NS
is a publication of the Caribbean Export Development Agency (Caribbean Export).  © 2000  TRADE
W
I
NS
is made possible through the kind support of  the European Union.
7
duced.  There is still a need for a far more
detailed and concentrated body of research.)
Recommendations
The range of services subsectors analysed by
researchers should be deepened and broad-
ened with particular emphasis on their evolu-
tion, performance and possibilities.  This
should help to establish a set of priorities for
policy development which could direct invest-
ment and other incentives for improved export
capacity.  The linkages between subsectors
and between services and goods should also
be explored, together with the possibilities for
regional cooperation.
Statistical Data
Accurate and extensive statistical data on the
services sector is key to the successful com-
pletion of national studies, the assessment of
overall competitiveness (by sector and subsec-
tor) and preparation for negotiations. . There is
a marked absence of such data within
CARICOM. The direction of service imports
and exports, service investment flows and
stock, service consumption expenditure,
employment and labour productivity and price
are some of the areas in which information is
unavailable.  Within the OECS, where tourism
is vitally important, there is insufficient data to
properly ascertain the number of workers
employed in the sector and its related services.
The lack of data means that economic analy-
ses often focus on the primary and industrial
sectors, paying scant attention to services or
dealing with only one subsector (usually
tourism) in detail.  Assessments of intra-CARI-
COM trade and investment in services and
CARICOM’s services trade balance with exter-
nal partners are therefore difficult to produce.
Recommendation
Statistical offices and central banks within
CARICOM should tackle this problem immedi-
ately.  They should be provided with the nec-
essary resources for this process (and much of
this should be sought from international agen-
cies) and CARICOM should work towards
developing agreed methodologies for compil-
ing the necessary data.
B
Policy
Commitment to the Uruguay
Round on Services
The General Agreement on Trade in Services
(GATS) is an integral part of the Agreement
Establishing the World Trade Organization
(WTO) and the Uruguay Round is the most
recent part of the negotiation process for
GATS. All CARICOM Member States are mem-
bers of the WTO and have made certain com-
mitments to trade liberalisation at the Uruguay
Round.  Unfortunately, these commitments
have been minimal and uneven - some countries
have committed in more areas than others.
CARICOM as a unit should consider the possi-
bility of harmonising its commitments. 
Fact-o-file
The decision allowing CARICOM nationals who
are university graduates to live and work in any
CARICOM state is one which potentially
enables a certain level of regional integration
through the free movement of skills and facili-
tates the supply of services.  However, a care-
ful reading of GATS suggests that the exclusion
of non-university graduates from the arrange-
ment might in fact constitute a barrier to a par-
ticular “mode of supply” - a practice which is
not encouraged by the WTO. CARICOM deci-
sions regarding trade in services should be
examined more closely to ensure that they con-
form to WTO recommendations.
Fact-o-file
CARICOM countries made several commit-
ments within the context of GATS which
entered into force on January 1, 1995.  The
commitments included: a) a framework of rules
for government regulation of trade and invest-
ment in services; b) a set of national schedules
governing the application of the rules to specific
industries (with clearly defined exceptions); and
c) a series of annexes and ministerial decisions
augmenting the framework rules and providing
for follow-up activities or additional negotia-
tions.
Recommendations
Commitments made by CARICOM countries in
the area of services should be examined.  The
legal and institutional development reforms
required to support the commitments to the
Uruguay Round should also be evaluated.  The
schedules of trading partners should be made
available in accessible form so that export
opportunities and constraints may be identified.
Full use should also be made of the enquiry
points established by GATS.
Preparations for Hemispheric
and International Negotiations
In order to prepare for negotiations at the hemi-
spheric (FTAA) and international (WTO) levels,
CARICOM territories must complete work at the
national level which can ensure that their
I
n
te
r
e
s
ti
ng
Gr
e
a
t!
Fr
ee
Trad
e
Ar
e
o
t
h
e
Am
e
r
ic
as
TRADE
W
I
NS
is a publication of the Caribbean Export Development Agency (Caribbean Export).  © 2000  TRADE
W
I
NS
is made possible through the kind support of  the European Union.
8
legislation, administration, practices and proce-
dures are consistent with GATS.  Territories
must identify the gaps in their existing frame-
works and work towards compatibility with the
trends in the liberalisation of trade in services.
Recommendations
Countries should pay close attention to the ser-
vices regime of the North American Free Trade
Agreement (NAFTA). NAFTA’s services regime
is further advanced than the current proposals
of the Uruguay Round and provides an indica-
tion of the negotiating position which is likely to
be advocated by NAFTA partners in hemi-
spheric negotiations. Countries should also
examine the treatment of services in agree-
ments negotiated since NAFTA such as the
Chile-MERCOSUR and Chile-Canada agree-
ments.
Inventory of Obstacles to Intra-
CARICOM Trade and Investment
in Services
A CARICOM-specific inventory of obstacles to
trade in services is crucial for positioning the
region as a viable trading partner. The identifi-
cation and elimination of barriers to trade will
be a necessary step in the preparation for
negotiations. There appear to be five broad
categories of obstacles to trade in services:
quotas (restricting volume or value of transac-
tions); price-based measures (imposing taxes
on foreign suppliers or price controls); local
presence measures (requiring physical or cor-
porate presence in a market); technical mea-
sures (relating to standards, certification or
industry-specific regulations); and government
contract restrictions (measures relating to gov-
ernment procurement and subsidisation). 
Fact-o-file
NAFTA has adopted a negative list approach to
services which means that all services except
those which are explicitly excluded will be tar-
getted for liberalisation.  NAFTA requires all
parties to list all non-conforming measures at
national and sub-national levels within pre-
scribed time limits.  Failure to list these mea-
sures within this period will result in full and
automatic liberalisation of the sector.  Further
negotiations on services in the hemisphere
(notably the FTAA) are likely to follow this trend
towards greater transparency.
Recommendation
CARICOM should compile an inventory of
obstacles to intra-CARICOM trade and invest-
ment in services as a first step towards intra-
regional liberalisation of the sector.  This would
serve to identify particular subsectors and
measures requiring special policy attention and
would provide the basis for programming the
removal of such obstacles.
A CARICOM Services Regime
The implementation of a regional services
regime, consistent with GATS, is necessary to
facilitate the development of export-oriented
trade and increase the competitiveness of ser-
vice enterprises.  Such a regime would allow
firms to secure capital and human resources
more efficiently, from a wider geographical
pool. It would provide greater uniformity in
national regulations and professional standards
and would facilitate greater transparency in the
liberalisation effort.  It would also serve as a
basis for negotiating with third countries and
facilitate the establishment of the CARICOM
Single Market and Economy (CSME). Protocol
II amending the Treaty of Chaguaramas is
intended to be such a regime. However, gov-
ernments must commit to giving more sub-
stance to the Protocol and broadening its
scope.
Recommendations
CARICOM should move immediately to
strengthen and implement Protocol II in effect!
with a view to speeding up the process of
regional integration in the sector and providing
a platform from which territories can enter into
negotiations with other partners.
Information Technology Policies
Information technology (IT) is the infrastructure
which increasingly drives production, invest-
ment and trade in both goods and services and
CARICOM territories are ill-prepared to take
full advantage of its potential. IT is essential to
several aspects of development including
areas of culture, education and training. Its
linkages to issues such as intellectual property,
data security and job creation should make it a
necessary item on national and regional agen-
das.  A comprehensive policy on IT will also
greatly facilitate the development of competi-
tion in the area of telecommunications which is
currently so keenly contested in the region.
Recommendations
Information technology and its infrastructure
should be at the core of national planning
efforts for the short, medium and long term
B
ei
ng
d
o
n
e
n
o
w
Where do we go
negotiating positions which will further their
objectives.  In the case of the Caribbean, the
first priority needs to be domestic sector devel-
opment and diversification and an appropriate
TRADE
W
I
NS
is a publication of the Caribbean Export Development Agency (Caribbean Export).  © 2000  TRADE
W
I
NS
is made possible through the kind support of  the European Union.
10
Below are recommendations for the establish-
ment of such a coalition with particular atten-
tion to aims and objectives and institutional
aspects.
Geographical coverage
The CCSI should be CARIFORUM-based.
Business and political linkages have gradually
increased between CARICOM and the
Dominican Republic and two significant
regional bodies supportive of the private sec-
tor (the Caribbean Association of Industry and
Commerce and Caribbean Export) are
already CARIFORUM in scope.  Extending
the coalition beyond CARICOM should also
increase membership, resources and potential
impact.  Such a broad coalition would also be
able to provide useful input into the CRNM
which exercises CARIFORUM representation
for trade negotiations with Europe and close
consultation with theDominican Republic on
FTAA issues.  
Aims and Objectives
There would be two main aims: to promote the
development of the sector in the Caribbean
and to perform an advocacy function.  The
objectives would be: 
Awareness Building
This would involve building awareness of the
importance of the services sector (along with
its possibilities and challenges) among the pri-
vate sector, government, labour and acade-
mics. Activities could include seminars, media
briefings and research.
Institution Building
The CCSI should broaden the services move-
ment by encouraging and assisting in the for-
mation of subsector associations (e.g. associa-
tions of architects, engineers, informatics pro-
fessionals, etc.)
Sector Development and
Policy Action
At the national and regional levels, the CCSI
should work to improve legislative frameworks
and encourage harmonisation; ensure equality
of government treatment of the services sector
with those of manufacturing and agriculture
and incentives for the sector; eliminate barriers
to the efficient operation of the sector; raise
standards; and promote regional cooperation
and integration with particular attention to
removing intra-regional access barriers.
Investment and Export
Promotion
The CCSI should formulate joint strategies for
promoting the export of services within the
Caribbean and externally.  Special attention
should be paid to professional issues in terms
of proposing mutual recognition of qualifica-
tions and standards and proposing the free
movement of professionals within the
Caribbean.  Strategies will also have to pro-
mote the Caribbean as a service-friendly envi-
ronment in order to encourage foreign invest-
ment, joint ventures and other alliances with
extra-regional partners.
International Negotiations
This will be one of the core functions of the
CCSI: to enhance the region’s negotiating
capacity for the very complex deliberations (in
particular, with the WTO and the FTAA) in
which the region will be engaged over the next
several years.  The CCSI should aim to involve
the private sector in a more meaningful
partnership with governments for the purpose
of formulating negotiating positions and strate-
gies.  Preparation for this process could
include the collection of information from the
private sector on obstacles faced and opportu-
nities sought; policy advocacy on negotiating
subjects, agenda proposals and the specific
needs of smaller economies; and dialogue with
private sector counterparts during services
trade negotiations.
Research and Information
Dissemination
This objective will be crucial to the develop-
ment of awareness building, policy action and
international negotiations.  The CCSI should
give special consideration to setting up a
research and publications unit to support this
process.
Membership
The CCSI should aim for a broadly-based
mixed or inclusive membership body which
would include: Caribbean regional business
and professional umbrella bodies; national
umbrella bodies; individual firms and conglom-
erates; relevant regional academic and
research institutions; and other bodies which
are deemed suitable.  The CCSI should be
established only when a sufficient number of
bodies deemed eligible makes it feasible for an
umbrella body to be created.  This should min-
imise the risks associated with 
burdening an
existing body with additional responsibilities. The
main source of funding for the CCSI would come
CAR
I
FORUM
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested