asp.net pdf viewer control c# : Thumbnail view in for pdf files Library control component .net azure winforms mvc sibc_guide1-part1688

Federal Highway Administration 
Slide-In Bridge Construction Implementation Guide 
1-4 
The  Utah  Department  of  Transportation  (UDOT)  conducted  post-construction  surveys  of 
residents and businesses that confirmed a majority support of SIBC and other ABC construction 
efforts, even when short periods of full closure and higher construction costs were required.  
The transportation system is a tool that the public and economy expect to be accessible and 
maintained while minimizing impacts using innovative techniques such as SIBC.   
1.2.4
Project Costs 
SIBC  provides  a cost-effective means of bridge construction  when considering  total  project 
costs rather than merely bridge construction costs.  Owners, designers, and contractors can 
experience  significant  savings  in  maintenance-of-traffic  (MOT),  project  administration, 
environmental mitigation, railroad flagging costs, and inflation.  SIBC also dramatically reduces 
user costs associated with detours or extended work-zone traffic delays. 
The cost of the actual bridge slide is associated with the superstructure’s weight, width, and 
distance moved.  Because the required equipment is relatively simple and is readily available, 
the cost of the slide is low when compared with other bridge construction costs.  For additional 
information about the costs associated with SIBC, see Section 2.2. 
1.2.5
Quality 
Implementing  SIBC  can  improve  quality  by  eliminating  deck  construction  joints  and  girder 
camber  problems  associated  with  phased  construction.    This  production  environment  also 
reduces pressure to use faster concrete cure times.  In addition, obtaining a full wet cure and 
blanketing and heating  for cold  weather cure is typically  easier when  the  superstructure  is 
constructed off-line.  Finally, construction workers on SIBC projects face greatly reduced traffic 
risks, which may facilitate greater focus and attention to construction quality.   
1.2.6
Constructability 
With SIBC, the new superstructure is built adjacent to the existing superstructure.  All traffic 
remains  on  the  existing  superstructure  until  the  construction  of  the  new  superstructure  is 
completed.  This approach  provides for  not only a safer work environment for construction 
workers  but  also  greater  ease  in  construction.    Construction  work  is  not  required  to  be 
immediately adjacent to the traffic.  There is additional room for girder sets, deck concrete 
placement, and equipment access, and the entire bridge  is  constructed  at  once  instead  of 
connecting  phases  together.   However,  substructure  construction can  be  challenging.    For 
additional  information  on  various  techniques  that  address  the  challenge  of  constructing 
substructures under existing bridges, see Section 3.1. 
1.3
COMMON APPLICATIONS 
SIBC has been applied to bridge construction projects for more than a century.  For example, an 
article published in 1915 in Engineering News and the Railway Age Gazette chronicles the 
successful sliding of three truss spans, weighing a combined 3,500 tons.  This bridge slide took 
only 10 minutes and 17 seconds, completing the bridge closure between train passages.  SIBC 
is applicable to virtually any type of bridge with virtually any length, from large signature bridges 
to simple slab bridges (see Figure 1-3 and Figure 1-4).   
Thumbnail view in for pdf files - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
pdf thumbnail; disable pdf thumbnails
Thumbnail view in for pdf files - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
pdf no thumbnail; create thumbnail jpeg from pdf
Slide-In Bridge Construction Implementation Guide 
Federal Highway Administration 
1-5 
Figure 1-3  
SIBC for a Large Truss Bridge on the Milton-Madison Bridge Project, Indiana/Kentucky 
Figure 1-4 
SIBC for a Small Stream Crossing for the SR-66 over Weber River Bridge Project, Utah 
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
from other file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete using which VB.NET developers can redact, delete, view and save PDF Thumbnail Edit.
pdf file thumbnail preview; program to create thumbnail from pdf
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.PowerPoint
Tell C# users how to: create a new PowerPoint file and load PowerPoint; merge, append, and split PowerPoint files; insert, delete, move, rotate Create Thumbnail.
show pdf thumbnail in; how to make a thumbnail of a pdf
Federal Highway Administration 
Slide-In Bridge Construction Implementation Guide 
1-6 
While owners, designers, and contractors can use SIBC in many bridge applications, Table 1-1 
presents  the  most  common  applications  of  SIBC  that  are  particularly  beneficial  and  cost-
effective.   
Table 1-1 
Common Applications of Slide-In Bridge Construction 
Application 
Description 
Reason 
More traffic 
over the bridge 
than under the 
bridge 
SIBC typically has greater 
benefits for bridges where the 
roadway over the bridge has a 
lower annual average daily 
traffic (AADT) than the roadway 
under the bridge. 
If traffic volume on the bridge is a significant 
issue, SIBC reduces the mobility impacts and 
user costs.  However, for traffic under the 
bridge, SIBC still requires closures for beam 
and deck placement on the new bridge, and 
closure during the existing bridge demolition, 
new bridge slide, and for post-slide demolition 
removal and cleanup. 
High user cost 
location 
SIBC is generally applicable 
when user costs are a major 
consideration. 
With fewer detours and work-zone traffic 
delays, SIBC results in lower user costs than 
traditional construction. 
Elevated 
safety 
concerns 
SIBC is generally applicable for 
bridges with extended duration 
impacts, complex traffic shifts, 
or other safety concerns. 
SIBC increases safety by constructing the 
superstructure away from traffic, not reducing 
lane widths, and avoiding merges and 
potentially confusing lane configurations. 
Long detour or 
no available 
detour 
SIBC is generally applicable for 
bridge replacements that 
require a long detour or where 
no detour route is available due 
to geography or construction on 
adjacent routes. 
SIBC significantly reduces the duration that a 
detour is required for the traveling public.  If a 
short-term bridge closure can be sustained 
without the need for a detour, then SIBC 
provides a viable solution when no detour is 
available. 
Temporary 
bridge 
avoidance 
SIBC is generally applicable 
when a temporary bridge is 
either unfeasible or cost-
prohibitive. 
SIBC allows for a short closure period and 
avoids the need for a temporary bridge to 
maintain traffic during construction. 
No phased 
construction 
SIBC is generally applicable for 
bridge replacements where 
phased construction is not 
permitted or not desired. 
If phased construction is not an option due to 
structure type, constructability issues, or 
schedule, SIBC provides a viable solution. 
Limited on-site 
construction 
time 
SIBC is generally applicable 
when the on-site time during 
construction is limited. 
SIBC generally reduces the construction 
duration when compared to phased 
construction.  This streamlined construction 
timeframe provides an effective solution to 
sensitive environments, work required in 
railroad ROWs, and highly populated 
commerce, residential, or recreation areas.   
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.Word
Tell C# users how to: create a new Word file and load Word from pdf; merge, append, and split Word files; insert, delete, move, rotate Create Thumbnail.
.pdf printing in thumbnail size; how to make a thumbnail from pdf
Create Thumbnail in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
Web Image Viewer Installation; View and Display Images; Annotate & Redact Documents or Images; Create Thumbnail; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode & Decode
pdf thumbnail generator online; view pdf thumbnails in
Slide-In Bridge Construction Implementation Guide 
Federal Highway Administration 
1-7 
Application 
Description 
Reason 
Narrow bridge  SIBC is generally applicable for 
bridges with a limited width. 
A narrow bridge may make traffic control 
during phased construction unfeasible or 
unsafe.  SIBC precludes the need for 
extended periods of traffic control on the 
bridge. 
Railroad 
bridge 
SIBC is generally applicable for 
bridges that carry railroad 
traffic. 
Closure of a railroad bridge stops all related 
train traffic until the bridge is reopened, which 
greatly affects the transport of both people and 
products.  SIBC reduces the duration of the 
bridge closure for railroad bridges. 
Replacement 
bridge shorter 
than existing 
SIBC is generally applicable for 
replacement bridges that are 
shorter than the existing. 
SIBC facilitates the construction of new 
substructures under the existing bridge while it 
remains in service to minimize closure time. 
Site conditions 
and geometric 
constraints 
SIBC is generally applicable for 
bridges with site conditions or 
geometric constraints that 
preclude traffic shifts. 
SIBC does not require traffic shifts.  Therefore, 
it is a favorable alternative for bridges with site 
constraints that preclude traffic shifts. 
Figure  1-5  and  Figure  1-6  illustrate  examples  of  geometric  constraints  that  made  SIBC  a 
favorable alternative.  The Oregon Route 38 project, extending from Elk Creek to Hardscrabble 
Creek, had significant site constraints.  The project included the construction of two bridges, 
each on opposite ends of the same tunnel, with one bridge starting almost immediately after 
exiting the tunnel, as shown in Figure 1-5.   
Figure 1-5 
SIBC with Constraints Limiting Traffic Control Options at the OR-38 Bridge Project, Oregon 
Create Thumbnail Winforms | Online Tutorials
Winforms Image Viewer Installation; View and Display Create Thumbnail; Generate Barcodes on Your Documents; Processing; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode
pdf preview thumbnail; create pdf thumbnails
VB.NET Image: Image and Doc Windows, Web & Mobile Viewers of
for users to do image displaying, thumbnail creation and compatible mobile phone or tablet to view, navigate, zoom are JPEG, PNG, BMP, GIF, TIFF, PDF, Word and
can't see pdf thumbnails; cannot view pdf thumbnails in
Federal Highway Administration 
Slide-In Bridge Construction Implementation Guide 
1-8 
This geometric constraint made traffic shifts extremely difficult to complete, and SIBC provided a 
viable solution.  The lateral slide eliminated costly realignments, costly temporary bridges, and 
most of the single-lane restrictions.  The slides were completed within the  allowed 57-hour 
closure window for each bridge.  Additional case studies of actual applications of SIBC are 
presented in Appendix A.
1.4
LIMITATIONS 
In addition to the benefits and common applications presented in Sections  1.2 and 1.3, the 
project team must consider several limitations when selecting SIBC.  Some of the limitations are 
not as challenging as initially perceived by new users of the technology. 
For example, there is a concern that sliding the bridge may cause structural damage to the 
girders or deck.  However, forces from sliding bridges are similar to typical temperature loads 
due to the low friction systems and slow rate of load application used to move the bridge.  Other 
loads associated with the move, including vertical jacking for placement of slide elements and 
from deviations in slide path elevations are similar to forces from bearing replacement activities.  
Many owners view a short-term full bridge closure with a temporary traffic detour as prohibitive 
from the perspective of the traveling public.  However, post-construction surveys of residents 
and  businesses reveal  high levels  of  satisfaction  with SIBC  projects.   The  traveling  public 
generally prefers a few days of bridge closure over months of traffic delays or detours.   
Conversely, some limitations are very challenging including: 
Limited right-of-way (ROW) for staging  
Geometric constraints 
Lack of SIBC experience 
Profile changes 
Utility impacts 
These challenges must be evaluated during the planning phases of an SIBC project and are 
described in greater detail in the following sections. 
1.4.1
Right-of-way (ROW) / Staging Area 
A common limitation for the application of SIBC is lack of ROW.  SIBC involves the construction 
of a new superstructure adjacent to the existing bridge.  Thus, a larger staging area is required 
adjacent  to  the  existing  bridge  than  with  traditional  construction.    If  the  land  immediately 
adjacent to the existing bridge is not available, then SIBC may not be a viable construction 
alternative. 
1.4.2
Geometric Constraints 
In addition to limited ROW, geometric constraints adjacent to the existing bridge either preclude 
the use of SIBC or make it challenging.  For example, if existing structures or utility poles are 
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
Microsoft PowerPoint: PPT, PPTX, PPS, PPSX; PDF: Portable Document you to easily load and view web document fast speed with the help of thumbnail, page navigate
generate pdf thumbnails; pdf thumbnail creator
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
PDF Viewer provides C# users abilities to view, annotate, convert file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete C#.NET: Edit PDF Thumbnail.
enable thumbnail preview for pdf files; pdf thumbnail preview
Slide-In Bridge Construction Implementation Guide 
Federal Highway Administration 
1-9 
located  immediately  adjacent  to  the  existing  bridge,  there  may  not  be  sufficient  space  to 
construct the new superstructure.  
Another geometric constraint is poor geometry or unfavorable terrain immediately adjacent to 
the existing bridge.  If the terrain is steep, then the bridge is highly skewed with large cross-
slopes, or other non-conducive terrain constraints are present.  These conditions make SIBC 
more difficult.  Conversely, the geometric constraints may also be the reason SIBC is needed to 
provide a solution with minimal impacts to the public.  Figure 1-6 provides an example of a 
difficult terrain constraint where SIBC was implemented.  Significant shoring may be required for 
such cases in which the geometry or terrain makes SIBC particularly challenging. 
Figure 1-6 
Difficult Construction Conditions and Site Constraints along the OR-38 Bridge Project, Oregon 
1.4.3
Lack of SIBC Experience 
Another challenge to the use of SIBC is lack of experience with SIBC.  The first use of a new 
method typically increases bid prices due to risk and pricing of unfamiliar construction methods.  
However, SIBC is a relatively simple construction method, and after one or two applications, 
designers and contractors can accurately bid the SIBC projects. 
Careful planning before the bridge slide mitigates a lack of experience for the owner, designer, 
and  contractor.   Develop  specifications  that  outline  required  submittals  and  define  allowed 
parameters  to  deliver  a successful  SIBC project.   Moreover,  consulting  with other owners, 
designers, and contractors who have had successful SIBC experiences reduces potential errors 
during an owner’s first bridge slide. 
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You can generate thumbnail image(s) from PDF file for quick viewing and further This class provides APIs for converting PDF files to other file formats.
generate pdf thumbnail c#; html display pdf thumbnail
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.Excel
Tell C# users how to: create a new Excel file and load Excel; merge, append, and split Excel files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy and Create Thumbnail.
how to create a thumbnail of a pdf document; create pdf thumbnail
Federal Highway Administration 
Slide-In Bridge Construction Implementation Guide 
1-10 
1.4.4
Profile Changes 
SIBC is generally not as effective when the profile across the bridge is being raised since the 
approach roadway work typically controls the schedule.  However, SIBC can be applied when 
the profile under the bridge is changed.  SIBC can also be used when the new bridge must be 
constructed at a higher profile but is then lowered and slid into place at the existing profile.  An 
example  of  such  an  application  is  in  Figure  1-7.    As  illustrated,  the  new  bridge  must  be 
constructed  at  a  higher  elevation  than  the  existing  bridge  to  satisfy  the  required  vertical 
clearance in the temporary location.  After the superstructure and abutments construction are 
complete, the first step is to lower the new bridge to the required elevation.  The second step is 
then to slide the bridge into the final horizontal position. 
Figure 1-7 
SIBC with New Bridge Constructed Higher and then Lowered to the Existing Profile 
1.4.5
Utility Impacts 
The  presence  of  overhead  or  underground  utilities  creates  challenges  during  SIBC 
implementation.  When viewing the project site, survey the location of the utilities to determine 
potential constraints and/or required ROW.   
Utilities located on the bridge can increase the project closure times due to the complications of 
moving and reconnecting the utilities.  For example, if a large water line or a high-pressure gas 
line is present on the bridge and if closure of those utilities is required to facilitate the slide, it 
may be necessary to schedule the slide during non-peak hours to minimize impact to the public.  
This  interruption  in  utility  service  will  need  to  be  carefully  planned  and  communicated  to 
customers before the slide takes place. 
Slide-In Bridge Construction Implementation Guide 
Federal Highway Administration 
2-1 
Chapter 2
OWNER CONSIDERATIONS 
2.1
ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES 
The owner must analyze the project site to assess SIBC feasibility.  Verify if there is room either 
in the median or outside of the bridge to construct the new bridge without major impacts such as 
buildings,  major  utilities,  roadways,  or  ramps  that  cannot  be  temporarily  realigned.    Also, 
consider  site  environmental  constraints  such  as  wetlands,  cultural  resources,  or  other 
constraints that preclude construction activities  in the  areas adjacent to the existing bridge.  
Constraints such as these may make SIBC cost prohibitive.  Smaller constraints such as lack of 
ROW, minor utilities, difficult existing terrain, or ramp conflicts with room to temporarily realign 
may add cost to the project and require additional up-front planning to mitigate, but are not 
roadblocks to SIBC. 
The owner defines expectations for both full and partial closure times, including closure duration 
and specific days during which the bridge can or cannot be closed.  Reasonable closure times 
are  project  specific.   Activities  that  affect  closure  duration  include  the  demolition  time,  the 
number of bridge spans to move, required substructure work post-demolition, utility connections, 
and approach slab and roadway tie-in work.  In general, the actual sliding of a bridge span into 
place takes two to eight hours depending on experience, tolerances, and equipment operation.  
The additional time required is based on the other activities required. 
In addition, the owner must define expectations for impacts to the feature under the bridge, be it 
a roadway, waterway, railroad, or  other feature.  SIBC still requires the construction of  the 
bridge, including girder sets and deck  placement over the cross-street.   Closures for these 
activities along with preparation time for the slide, sliding the bridge into place, and cleanup of 
the demolition will require full or partial closures of the feature intersected.   
The  owner must define  incentives and disincentives  related to  the  closure time.   Establish 
disincentives for exceeding the allowed time carefully.   An extremely  high disincentive may 
entice the contractor to rush the slide and tie-in work potentially reducing the quality, or the risk 
of the disincentive may be bid into the job, increasing the cost.  Conversely, a low disincentive 
may increase the risk that the contractor will not prepare and plan enough to meet the deadline, 
or the penalties will be bid into the project permitting traditional construction.  One successful 
approach is an hourly graduated disincentive.  This approach still motivates the contractor to 
finish  on time, but  allows  for some contingency to complete the  project successfully for  all 
parties even if a little additional time is needed.   
The owner must focus greater attention on the specifications and submittals with SIBC than 
might be necessary when using traditional construction.  SIBC requires more submittals than 
with traditional construction, and the owner must ensure that all submittal requirements are well 
defined.  The owner must be prepared for the increased number of submittals to provide a 
thorough review. 
Federal Highway Administration 
Slide-In Bridge Construction Implementation Guide 
2-2 
The owner must have an understanding of what  is expected during  the slide, including the 
temporary supports and the components and materials used for the slide.  The owner must also 
provide or require the contractor to provide a strategic and comprehensive public involvement 
plan.  Since the bridge is fully closed for a short duration, it is critical that the scheduled times 
and duration of the closure be communicated effectively to the traveling public (see Section 
2.4).  
2.2
COST CONSIDERATIONS 
When considering the application of SIBC for a specific project, it is important to compare total 
project costs rather than strictly the bridge costs.  Using SIBC to eliminate temporary crossovers 
(Figure 2-1) or temporary bridges reduces the actual project bid price.  In addition, items such 
as project administrative costs and construction inspection and engineering costs are reduced 
when the project schedule is significantly reduced.  Soft costs, such as user costs, are savings 
that cannot be applied directly to the project, but are important benefits of SIBC.  The following 
sections present detailed cost considerations. 
Figure 2-1 
SIBC that Avoided Use of Temporary Crossovers on I-80; 2300 E. Bridge Project, Utah 
Slide-In Bridge Construction Implementation Guide 
Federal Highway Administration 
2-3 
2.2.1
Cost Considerations that May Decrease Total Cost 
Several cost considerations often result in savings when using SIBC.  These considerations 
reduce the total cost for SIBC when compared with other construction methods (see Table 2-1). 
Table 2-1 
Cost Considerations that May Decrease Total Cost with SIBC 
Cost Consideration 
Explanation 
MOT (Maintenance-of-traffic) 
(Hard Bid Cost) 
In most cases, SIBC significantly reduces traffic control costs.  
This includes reduction in temporary striping and barrier, lane 
shifts, and reducing MOT to only a small site-specific area during 
construction of the bridge.  The overall project schedule 
reduction also reduces MOT maintenance costs. 
Crossovers, Temporary 
Bridges, or Temporary 
Bypass 
(Hard Bid Cost) 
These items can add significant cost to a project.  If SIBC can 
eliminate these items from the project, these cost savings can 
offset the cost of SIBC.   
Mobilization and Project 
Overhead 
(Hard Bid Cost) 
Building the bridge in a single phase instead of multiple phases 
reduces mobilization costs.  Reduced project schedule duration 
reduces contractor administrative on-site costs. 
Project Construction 
Engineering and Inspection 
(Hard Project Cost) 
A reduction in overall project construction schedule similarly 
reduces the duration of construction engineering and inspection 
costs.   
DOT Administration and 
Management 
(Hard Project Cost) 
DOT administrative costs associated with the bridge construction 
are generally reduced due to the reduced schedule. 
User Costs 
(Soft Project Cost) 
SIBC can dramatically reduce user costs associated with 
extended detours or extended work-zone traffic delays.  Savings 
in user costs can be realized even with relatively short detours or 
low AADTs. 
2.2.2
Cost Considerations that May Increase Total Cost 
Similarly, there are also several cost considerations that result in additional expenses when 
using SIBC.  These considerations increase the total cost for SIBC, when compared with other 
construction methods.  Table 2-2 presents these cost considerations. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested