asp.net pdf viewer control c# : Show pdf thumbnail in html software Library cloud windows .net html class sibc_guide4-part1697

Slide-In Bridge Construction Implementation Guide 
Federal Highway Administration 
3-15 
hoses to bring the fill directly up against the bottom of the approach slabs.  Even with this 
approach, gaps may remain.  In addition, shrinkage of flowfill or settlement may leave gaps.  
The potential lack of support requires the approach slab to span from the abutment to the end 
approach slab support.   
3.4.2
Sleeper Slab 
State DOTs determine if sleeper slabs are required.  The sleeper slab is a either a beam or 
inverted “T” shape that supports the end of the approach slab
(see Figure 3-13).  The stem wall, 
or inverted “T,” provides a concrete
-to-concrete interface for joint installation between the stem 
wall and approach slab and allows asphalt pavement installation up to the backside of the stem 
wall.  When using the method of sliding the approach slab in with the bridge, the sleeper slab 
provides a level surface for the approach slab to slide on when it is moved with the bridge. 
Figure 3-13 
Inverted “T” Precast Sleeper Slab
on the I-80 Echo Road Bridge Project, Utah 
Once the roadway is closed, the area for the sleeper slab must be prepared.  If the new sleeper 
slab is behind the existing bridge abutment, demolition of the existing approach slab and/or 
excavation of the existing roadway will be required to install the sleeper slab.  If the new sleeper 
slab is in front of the existing abutment in the slope fill area, installation and compaction of fill 
material may be required to set the sleeper slab.   
Sliding the approach slab on a sleeper slab with the bridge is most often used when a very short 
(one to three days) closure time is required.  In these cases, the sleeper slabs are precast to 
allow quick installation after the roadway closure.  Design precast sleeper slabs with lengths 
that can be lifted and installed with a backhoe or rubber tire crane.  Recent SIBC projects have 
limited the length to 20 to 30 feet and approximately 15 to 20 tons.  The section lengths must 
also accommodate the partial bridge slide  distances if a phased slide approach is used as 
Show pdf thumbnail in html - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
pdf thumbnail; create thumbnail from pdf c#
Show pdf thumbnail in html - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
create pdf thumbnails; pdf file thumbnail preview
Federal Highway Administration 
Slide-In Bridge Construction Implementation Guide 
3-16 
discussed in Section 4.2.1.  Connecting the sections of sleeper slabs has potential advantages 
and disadvantages.  Some perceive that connecting them with rebar and grout after installation 
will help prevent differential settlement and gaps or elevation differences forming at the joints.  
The other view is that the gaps and elevation differences will be minimal.  The internal forces 
that would cause these gaps would not be resisted by grout and rebar and would essentially fail 
the concrete and ‘pop’ the bar out, causing maintenance issues.  
Provide a minimum of ½-inch extra top clear cover to reinforcement on the approach slab and 
sleeper slab stem.  This extra clearance allows for concrete grinding to smooth the approach 
slab to sleeper slab stem transition if the elevations do not match as designed.  Also, provide a 
slope on top of the sleeper slab stem to match the roadway slope.  
Using  the  inverted  “T”  sleep
er  slab  vs.  a  flat  beam  provides  both  advantages  and 
disadvantages.  The inverted “T” allows roadway backfill to be placed and compacted while the 
bridge is being moved into place, providing a shorter closure period.  However, the stem also 
creates  constraints  on  both  ends  of  the  approach  slabs.    This  method  makes  accurate 
installation of the sleeper slabs very important since installing them too close would result in the 
approach slabs running into the stems.  Recent SIBC projects have designed for a minimum 2-
inch to 2.5-inch  gap between the approach  slab  and  sleeper slab stem  to provide  enough 
tolerance to slide the bridge into place.   
3.4.3
Joints 
Minimizing the duration of bridge closure is a primary goal for SIBC projects.  The required 
speed of the joint installation depends on the bridge closure requirements established for the 
project.  When the method of sliding the approach slab with the bridge on a precast sleeper slab 
is used, the gap between the end of approach slab and stem of the sleeper slab will most likely 
vary slightly in width.  Specify a joint that accommodates a variable opening width.   
One example of a joint that accommodates variable widths is the traditional foam backer rod 
with silicone joint.  This joint facilitates quick installation and accommodates a variable gap 
width.  Installation must be done on properly cleaned and prepared surfaces using the correct 
thickness of silicone to maximize the service life of this joint.  If the roadway is closed for a 
longer period of time, joint options such as compression seals and strip seals could be used. 
3.4.4
Backfill 
Proper  backfill  and  compaction  of  soils  under  and  near  the  sleeper  slab  is  essential  to a 
successful  SIBC  project.    If  backfill  or  compaction  is  not  completed  properly,  localized 
settlement can occur, which will create a bump at the roadway to approach slab resulting in 
poor ride quality.   
3.4.5
Roadway Tie-in Design 
Pavement  overlays,  camber  left  in the bridge,  and  deflections  that  were  over-estimated  or 
under-estimated will cause bridge site-specific anomalies in the profile.  It is important that the 
How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB Thumbnail item. Make the ToolBox view show.
can't view pdf thumbnails; create thumbnail from pdf
C# Word - Header & Footer Processing in C#.NET
using RasterEdge.XDoc.Word; Create Footer & Header. The following C# sample code will show you how to create a header and footer in section.
pdf files thumbnails; how to show pdf thumbnails in
Slide-In Bridge Construction Implementation Guide 
Federal Highway Administration 
3-17 
bridge profile and the roadway tie-in be designed based on accurate survey data of the roadway 
and bridge rather than the as-built drawings. 
Design  the  roadway  tie-in  geometry  considering  the  length  of  roadway  reconstruction  or 
grinding.  For example, trying to fit a large idealized vertical curve over the bridge area may not 
provide  elevations that tie-in  well  at  specific  locations  of approach  slab  or abutment ends.  
Consider how  much adjustment  the  contractor  must  make in the roadway, and  tie  profiles 
directly into fixed elevations at the end of the grinding or reconstruction limits.  
3.4.6
Parapet Barrier Connections 
After  the  slide  is  completed,  connect  the  parapet  on  the  bridge  with  the  guardrail  on  the 
adjoining roadways.  The engineer must plan this detail to be as simple as possible so it can be 
completed quickly.  Precast transition pieces can be used to connect the bridge parapet with the 
roadway guardrail after the bridge is in place. 
If a permanent guardrail connection cannot be completed quickly, a temporary barrier protection 
can be provided so the bridge can be opened to traffic before all final guardrail  tie-ins are 
completed.  A temporary barrier can be set in front of the transition, such that traffic can be 
opened with a reduced shoulder.   
3.5
TOLERANCES 
The engineer must work with the owner to define acceptable tolerances.  Restrictive, unrealistic 
requirements drive up the project costs.  However, if the tolerances are not restrictive enough, 
the final product may not meet expectations.   
3.5.1
Construction Tolerances 
An important component to a successful SIBC project is for the contractor to perform frequent, 
routine  quality  control  (QC)  survey  checks  before  proceeding  to  the  next  stage.    Include 
scheduled QC  checks and reporting  requirements  in  the  project specifications.   Suggested 
survey requirements include the top of temporary supports prior to end diaphragm and girder 
construction, the top of girders prior to deck placement, the top of the deck prior to finalizing the 
approach slab forming and end elevation, and the approach slab end elevation and final precast 
sleeper slab dimensions prior to setting the bottom of the sleeper slab grade.  At each of these 
stages, adjustments can be made to the next stage to counteract errors or accumulations of 
field tolerances.   
Horizontal control and tolerances are also very important.  Final survey of the centerline of 
bearing is important prior to the slide to set the precast sleeper slab at the proper bearing (if 
used).  Projecting these as-built conditions and comparing them to the bearings and skews in 
the plans is important in identifying potential issues that require additional research prior to 
roadway shutdown and sliding.  Items such as a minimum gap between the approach slab and 
sleeper slab stem (as suggested in Section 3.4.2) provide additional tolerance during the move. 
How to C#: File Format Support
PowerPoint Pages. Annotate PowerPoint. Text Search. Insert Image. Thumbnail Create. VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB Microsoft Office 2003 PowerPoint Show
show pdf thumbnails; how to make a thumbnail from pdf
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
How to Process Image Using VB.NET. In this section, we will show you all VB.NET Image Cropping Assembly to Crop Image, VB.NET Image Thumbnail Creator Control SDK
pdf thumbnail preview; thumbnail view in for pdf files
Federal Highway Administration 
Slide-In Bridge Construction Implementation Guide 
3-18 
3.5.2
Final Tolerances 
The final tolerances for an SIBC project should not be more restrictive than the final tolerances 
for a traditional construction project.  Establishing tighter final tolerances for an SIBC project is 
not necessary, and it can be counter-productive.  Unnecessarily restrictive final tolerances can 
increase the bid price and increase the duration of a bridge closure, both of which are not in the 
interest of the owner or the traveling public.  As a general principle, there is not much difference 
between the tolerances needed for an SIBC project and the tolerances required for traditional 
construction. 
3.6
SPECIFICATION DEVELOPMENT 
The specifications must clearly define the goals, limitations, and requirements of the SIBC.  The 
engineer must clearly define in the project specifications what is expected of the contractor 
during the construction process in terms of design, submittals, and project execution. 
The specifications should answer the following questions: 
Is  SIBC  required  on  this  project?    Can  the  contractor  use  any  method  to  meet  a 
performance specification or is SIBC required per a prescriptive specification? 
What  are  the  requirements  for  calculations  and  drawings  associated  with  the  slide 
details and temporary supports? 
What are the shop drawing submittal requirements? 
How much flexibility does the contractor have in developing the slide details? 
How much flexibility does the contractor have in developing the details for the temporary 
supports? 
What are the tolerance requirements for the contractor? 
What are the bridge closure duration requirements?  Are there any specific days or times 
that are permitted or not permitted?   
Are there any incentives or disincentives?   
What limitations are being placed on the contractor?  What is the contractor not allowed 
to change? 
Define  a  process  allowing  the  contractor  to  request  revisions  to  any  of  the  above 
questions. 
The specifications provide guidelines and limitations for how far the contractor can deviate from 
the project documents.  Specific owner requirements must be defined.  Additional information 
about special provisions and submittal requirements is provided in Section 4.3. 
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
By clicking a thumbnail, you are redirect to a to search text-based documents, like PDF, Microsoft Office Word In addition, you may customize to show or hide
pdf thumbnail html; view pdf thumbnails
VB.NET Image: Sharpen Images with DocImage SDK for .NET
This guiding page will show you how to sharpen an image in a Visual Basic .NET image processing application. Besides, we would like
show pdf thumbnail in; view pdf thumbnails in
Slide-In Bridge Construction Implementation Guide 
Federal Highway Administration 
4-1 
Chapter 4
CONSTRUCTION CONSIDERATIONS 
4.1
TYPES OF SLIDE SYSTEMS 
This section discusses methods that have been used historically and recently for SIBC projects.  
Example plan sets  and  shop  drawings  of some of these methods  are also  included  in the 
Appendix C.   
There is not always an “appropriate” or “better” system for each SIBC 
bridge move.  Geometry, 
weight,  tolerances,  and  ultimately  contractor  experience  and  preference  contribute  to  the 
decision.  Each of the following examples of SIBC  slide systems presents advantages and 
challenges. 
4.1.1
Industrial Rollers 
Industrial  rollers  are  simple  in  concept.    Construct  the  bridge  on  temporary  supports  and 
prepare the new or rehabilitated permanent substructure, then place industrial rollers under the 
girders or end diaphragm of the new bridge.  Roll the new bridge into place using a push/pull 
system.  Figure 4-1 demonstrates the SIBC system using industrial rollers. 
Figure 4-1 
Industrial Rollers Used during SIBC 
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Code to Create Watermark on Images in .NET
Add Watermark to Image. In the code tab below we will show you the We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff files
pdf no thumbnail; html display pdf thumbnail
VB.NET Image: VB.NET DLL for Image Basic Transforming in .NET
VB.NET demo code below will show you how to crop a local image by We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff files
pdf thumbnails; generate thumbnail from pdf
Federal Highway Administration 
Slide-In Bridge Construction Implementation Guide 
4-2 
Advantages: 
Concept is simple and system is inexpensive   
Industrial rollers are readily available to purchase or rent 
Rollers move with the new bridge and can be used with or without a continuous end 
diaphragm 
Challenges:   
Large point load occurs under each roller 
Roller path must be clean and clear 
Binding or jamming of rollers may occur if not aligned properly   
Transitions from temporary supports to permanent substructures must be smooth  
Sliding system needs the ability to start and stop the bridge from rolling since rollers 
have a low dynamic coefficient of friction  
Rollers typically allow for movement in only one  direction and do  not allow for final 
adjustments perpendicular to the movement of the bridge 
Solutions:   
Apply elastomeric pads between  the rollers and girders or end diaphragm to act as 
“shocks,” which distribute the load to the rollers over uneven surfaces
Carefully survey and construct rolling surfaces to confirm roller path is free from debris 
and inconsistencies 
Build  strong,  smooth,  and  flush  connections  between  temporary  supports  and 
permanent substructures to avoid drops/bumps and assist longitudinal movement 
4.1.2
Teflon Pads 
The Teflon pad method uses elastomeric or cotton duck bearing pads topped with Teflon to 
slide the bridge into place (see Figure 4-2, Figure 4-3, and Figure 4-4).  There are multiple ways 
to employ Teflon pads.  One is to line the pads along the temporary supports and permanent 
substructures.  The pads remain stationary, and the bottom of the bridge diaphragm becomes 
the sliding surface.  Slide shoes or sliding blocks can be cast into the end diaphragm and 
wrapped with a sliding surface such as stainless steel.  Then slide the bridge along these pads, 
distributing loads from the shoe to multiple pads at any time.  With this method, the final sliding 
pads on which the bridge stops can be left in place to act as the final bearings for a semi-
integral abutment design (see Section 3.1.1 for abutment types).   
The  Teflon  pads  can  also  be  part  of  a  prefabricated  slide  system.    Several  heavy  lifter 
contractors have prefabricated systems that use a track and an integrated hydraulic cylinder 
system (see Section 4.1.3) that pushes the bridge on the Teflon pads in the track system from 
the temporary supports to its final location.  The track system can push the bridge on its end 
diaphragm (Figure 4-2) or on sliding shoes with jacks (Figure 4-3) to allow vertical lifting and 
lowering of the bridge also.   
C# Word - Run Processing in C#.NET
The following demo code will show you how to create a run in current paragraph. The following demo code will show you how to operate this work.
how to create a thumbnail of a pdf document; create thumbnails from pdf files
C# Word - Table Cell Processing in C#.NET
using RasterEdge.XDoc.Word; Create and Add Cells in Table. The following demo code will show how to create a table cell and add to table.
enable pdf thumbnails in; create thumbnail jpg from pdf
Slide-In Bridge Construction Implementation Guide 
Federal Highway Administration 
4-3 
Figure 4-2 
Concrete End Diaphragm on Teflon Pads in Sliding Track System 
Figure 4-3 
Slide Shoes Used with Vertical Jacks 
Federal Highway Administration 
Slide-In Bridge Construction Implementation Guide 
4-4 
Figure 4-4 
Teflon Pads with Stainless Steel Wrapped Shoes on End Diaphragm 
Advantages:   
System is relatively inexpensive 
Contractor can slide the bridge with the right equipment for Teflon pads or subcontract to 
a heavy lifter with a prefabricated system 
Teflon pads allow for transverse and longitudinal movement providing some ability to 
“steer” the bridge to its final location  
Challenges:   
Pads can bind at the slide interface either tearing/damaging the pad or causing the pad 
to slide along with the bridge 
Bridge can drift in the transverse direction if forces are loaded unevenly or if abutments 
have a downhill slope 
Solutions:   
Lubricate the top side of the pad surface with dish soap or similar substance 
Provide a roughened surface on the bottom side to resist movement of the pads 
Keep additional Teflon pads on-site 
Provide guides for the bridge to resist drifting (see Figure 4-2) 
4.1.3
Hydraulic Jack 
The hydraulic jack system consists of a hydraulic jack that pushes the bridge into place (see 
Figure 4-5).  There is usually one jack per abutment or bent.  Jacks are usually instituted along 
Slide-In Bridge Construction Implementation Guide 
Federal Highway Administration 
4-5 
with Teflon pads and a sliding track system to provide an anchor to push against and guide the 
bridge to its final alignment.  To execute the slide, the jacks extend to full stroke to push the 
bridge forward while anchoring against the slide tracks or temporary supports.  Then the jacks 
retract and pull back towards the bridge, reset the anchoring, and  push the bridge forward 
again. 
Advantages:   
Bridge moves smoothly 
Ability to sync jacks together while pushing evenly, or run jacks independently to adjust 
the bridge position 
Some jacks can pull the bridge backwards (with the correct anchoring) to make location 
adjustments 
Ability to measure/observe hydraulic pressures to know if jacks are exceeding expected 
force to determine obstructions or impedances 
Challenges:   
Bridge movement is slower/non-continuous with the jack resetting each time  
Risk of  slide  system  malfunction  is  possible  with  multiple  hydraulic  pumps,  motors, 
hoses, and controls 
Coordination of separate mechanical systems is required at each push location 
Solutions:   
Create equipment checks, contingency plans, and communication protocol between both 
abutments and the jack operator 
Figure 4-5 
Hydraulic Jack System Produces Smooth Bridge Movement 
Federal Highway Administration 
Slide-In Bridge Construction Implementation Guide 
4-6 
4.1.4
Winches / Mechanical Pulling Devices 
Using a mechanical pulling device such as a winch or crane can pull the bridge along rollers or 
Teflon pads to its final position (see Figure 4-6).  Separate pulling devices can be used at each 
pulling  location  (i.e.,  each  abutment),  or  a  system  of  pulleys  can  be  used  to  allow  one 
mechanical pulling device to pull simultaneously on multiple points.   
Figure 4-6 
Winch System Used to Slide a Bridge over a River 
Advantages:   
Contractor  can  implement  this  simple  device  without  the  cost  of  a  proprietary 
prefabricated slide system 
If using one pulling device with a pulley system, the bridge is uniformly moved on all pull 
points 
Challenges:   
No ability to “back up” the bridge without a separate pull system set up on the opposite 
side of the structure 
Limited ability to control forward motion as cables only work with tension 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested