asp.net pdf viewer control c# : Enable pdf thumbnail preview control SDK platform web page winforms html web browser SIPRIBP11010-part1712

SOUTH AFRICAN ARMS 
SUPPLIES TO SUB-SAHARAN 
AFRICA
pieter d. wezeman*
SUMMARY
w Despite efforts by South 
Africa’s well-developed arms 
industry and its government to 
position the country as a key 
supplier of arms to African 
countries, exports to sub-
Saharan African destinations 
do not account for a significant 
share of South African arms 
exports. The driving force of 
South African arms exports to 
sub-Saharan destinations 
appears to be maximizing 
turnover for the industry and 
earnings from the sale of 
surplus equipment.
Since the end of apartheid in 
1994 South Africa has 
developed export policies, 
regulations and guidelines 
aimed at preventing arms 
exports that could fuel conflict 
or support human rights 
abuses. However, doubts persist 
about the functioning of this 
system. Like other countries, 
South Africa still allows 
questionable arms transfers to 
zones of conflict and to 
countries where arms are used 
in human rights violations. In 
general, South Africa’s export 
policy seems to be mainly a 
matter of abiding by United 
Nations arms embargoes with 
few other restrictions.
A positive development in 
2010 is that, after several years 
of not publishing arms export 
reports, South Africa has 
returned to a level of public 
transparency about its arms 
export policy, which provides 
some opportunities for 
parliamentary and public 
accountability. Hopefully, 
recent changes in the legislation 
will not mean a return to 
opacity in reporting.
SIPRI Background Paper
January 2011
I. Introduction
South Africa aspires to be a major player in the shaping of peace and security 
in Africa. It is also the only African country with an industrial capability to 
produce a wide range of military products. 
This SIPRI Background Paper aims to describe the extent to which South 
Africa has succeeded in becoming a major supplier of arms to sub-Saharan 
Africa and why those exports could be of concern.1 Section II describes the 
role of South Africa as a supplier of arms to Africa. Section III explains the 
motives for and restraints on South African arms exports. Section IV dis-
cusses examples of how weapons supplied by South Africa have been used in 
Africa. Section V offers brief conclusions. 
II. South African arms exports to sub-Saharan Africa
In general, arms imports by sub-Saharan Africa are small in comparison to 
arms imports by other regions. The only sub-Saharan country with signifi-
cant arms import volumes is South Africa itself, which ranked globally as 
the 19th largest importer of major arms for the period 2005–2009.2 As an 
exporter, South Africa offers both newly produced arms and military equip-
ment as well as South African National Defence Force (SANDF) surplus 
equipment. Both SIPRI arms transfer trend indicators and South African 
Government data indicate that South Africa’s arms exports to sub-Saharan 
Africa account for only a small percentage of the country’s total arms exports. 
The volume of exports of major conventional arms
According to SIPRI estimates, in the period 2000–2009 South Africa 
exported major conventional weapons to 14 countries in sub-Saharan 
1Sub-Saharan Africa is taken to be all the states of Africa other than Algeria, Libya, Morocco, 
Tunisia and Egypt.
2
SIPRI Arms Transfers Programme, ‘The suppliers and recipients of major conventional 
weapons, 2005–2009’, SIPRI Yearbook 2010: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security 
(Oxford University Press: Oxford, 2010), table 7A.1.
* This paper is one of a series produced for the SIPRI Project on Monitoring Arms Flows to Africa 
and Assessing the Practical Regional and National Challenges and Possibilities for a Relevant and 
Functioning Arms Trade Treaty. The project is funded by the Swedish Ministry for Foreign Affairs. 
The other papers in this series look at arms supplies from Israel and Ukraine and to Somalia and 
Zimbabwe. 
Enable pdf thumbnail preview - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
thumbnail view in for pdf files; enable pdf thumbnails in
Enable pdf thumbnail preview - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
generate thumbnail from pdf; pdf thumbnail creator
2
sipri background paper
Africa and to the African Union (AU) (see table 1). In the same period the 
region accounted for 14 per cent of South Africa’s total major arms exports 
the same period, while sub-Saharan African countries (excluding South 
Africa) imported only 0.2 per cent of their arms from South Africa.3 Thus, 
South African exports to sub-Saharan Africa account for only a fraction of 
the region’s total arms imports. By far the largest importer of South African 
3
 These percentages are based on SIPRI data on arms transfers which refers to actual deliveries 
of major conventional weapons. SIPRI uses a trend-indicator value (TIV) to compare the data on 
deliveries of different weapons and to identify general trends. TIVs give an indication only of the
Table 1. Transfers of major conventional weapons by South Africa to sub-Saharan Africa, 2000 to 2009
The columns ‘Year(s) of deliveries’ and ‘No. delivered/produced’ refer to all deliveries since the beginning of the contract. Deals in 
which the recipient was involved in the production of the weapon system are listed separately. The ‘Comments’ column includes 
publicly reported information on the value of the deal. Information on the sources and methods used in the collection of the data, 
and explanations of the conventions, abbreviations and acronyms, can be found at <http://www.sipri.org/databases/armstransfers>. 
The SIPRI Arms Transfers Database is continuously updated as new information becomes available.
Recipient
No. 
ordered
Weapon 
designation
Weapon 
description
Year of 
order/
licence
Year(s) 
of deliveries
No. 
delivered/
produced
Comments
African Union n (60)
Mamba
APC/ISV
(2005)
2006
60
For AU/AMIS 
peacekeepers in Darfur; 
Mamba-3 version
African Union (68)
Casspir
APC/ISV
(2007)
2008
68
Ex-South African; 
modernized 
before delivery; for 
peacekeepers in Sudan
Burkina Faso
6
GILA
APC/ISV
(2009)
2009
6
For police; financed by 
Canada; for Burkina Faso 
peacekeepers in Darfur
Cameroon
(1)
MB- 
326K/L
Ground attack 
aircraft
(2001)
2002
1
Ex-South African; 
Impala-2 (MB-326K) 
version
Djibouti
9
Casspir
APC/ISV
2000
2000
(9)
Ex-South African; 
modernized before 
delivery
Gabon
(6)
Mirage  
F-1A
FGA aircraft
2006
2006-2008
(6)
Ex-South African; 
modernized before 
delivery; Mirage F-1AZ 
version
Ghana
(39)
Ratel-20
IFV
(2003)
2003-2004
39
Ex-South African; incl 24 
Ratel-90 version
Ghana
4
Casspir
APC/ISV
(2005)
2005
4
Ex-South African; 
Rinkhals ambulance 
version
Guinea
(10)
Mamba
APC/ISV
(2003)
2003
10
Mali
(5)
RG-31 Nyala
APC/ISV
(2002)
2002
5
Mozambique
5
Casspir
APC/ISV
2000
2000
5
Ex-South African; for 
police; aid
DocImage SDK for .NET: Document Imaging Features
Flexible document file navigation with thumbnail preview support High TIFF and Dicom, to TIFF and PDF file formats PNG, JPEG, BMP, and GIF Enable to render and
cannot view pdf thumbnails in; create thumbnail jpg from pdf
C# TIFF: TIFF Editor SDK to Read & Manipulate TIFF File Using C#.
Easy to generate image thumbnail or preview for Tiff document to Tiff, like Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF, and images. Enable to add XImage.OCR for .NET into C#
pdf reader thumbnails; show pdf thumbnail in
south african arms supplies to sub-saharan africa 
3
major arms is the United States, which accounted for 40 per cent of South 
African arms exports during 2000–2009.
The financial value of exports of arms
The South African Government publishes annual reports about national 
exports of military equipment and services which include figures for their 
volume of international arms transfers and not of the actual financial values of such transfers. For a 
description of the TIV and its calculation see SIPRI Arms Transfers Programme website at <http://
www.sipri.org/databases/armstransfers/background>.
Table 1 continued.
Recipient
No. 
ordered
Weapon 
designation
Weapon 
description
Year of 
order/
licence
Year(s) 
of deliveries
No. 
delivered/
produced
Comments
Mozambique (16)
Casspir
APC/ISV
(2003)
2003
16
Ex-South African, incl 5 
for police
Rwanda
(20)
RG-31  
Nyala
APC/ISV
(2005)
2006
20
Rwanda
(35)
Ratel-90
IFV/AFSV
(2007)
2007
35
Ex-South African; incl 20 
Ratel-60 version
Senegal
(8)
Casspir
APC/ISV
(2004)
2005-2006
8
Ex-South African
Senegal
(47)
AML-60/90
Armoured car (2005)
2006
47
Ex-South African; 
AML-90 (Eland-90) 
version
Senegal
12
GILA
APC/ISV
(2009)
2009
12
For police; financed by 
Canada; for peacekeepers 
in Darfur
Swaziland
7
RG-31  
Nyala
APC/ISV
(1999)
2001
7
For police
Swaziland
3
SA-316B 
Alouette-3
Light 
helicopter
2000
2000
3
Ex-South African; aid; 
possibly modernized 
before delivery
Tanzania
(5)
Casspir
APC/ISV
(2008)
2009
(5)
Second-hand; supplier 
uncertain; financed by 
USA for peacekeeping
Uganda
15
RG-31  
Nyala
APC/ISV
1998
2002
15
Uganda
(5)
Mamba
APC/ISV
(2003)
2004
5
Uganda
31
Buffel
APC/ISV
(2004)
2005
31
Ex-South African
Uganda
6
GILA
APC/ISV
(2009)
2009
6
For police; financed by 
Canada; for peacekeepers 
in Darfur
Zambia
1
Rhino
APC/ISV
(2004)
2005
1
Ex-South African
( ) = uncertain data or SIPRI estimate; AFSV = armoured fire support vehicle; APC = armoured personnel carrier; FGA = fighter/
ground attack; IFV = infantry fighting vehicle; ISV = internal security vehicle; Ex-South African = South African National Defence 
Force (SANDF) surplus equipment.
Source: SIPRI Arms Transfers Database, <http://www.sipri.org/databases/armstransfers/>.
C# Word - Paragraph Processing in C#.NET
C#.NET Word document paragraph processing Interface control (XDoc.Word).//More TODO is a tool which enable users to process paragraph on a new document by
pdf thumbnail; view pdf image thumbnail
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
In addition to Conversion of Word to PDF, RasterEdge XDoc.Word conversion control enable users to convert PDF to Word with C# sample code.
how to make a thumbnail from pdf; create pdf thumbnail
4
sipri background paper
financial value.4 Although the reports provide further insights into the 
recipients of the arms, the data compilation process lacks transparency, and 
4
 These figures include all categories of goods and services controlled under South African arms 
export regulations, including demining equipment and riot control products. For a more detailed 
description of these goods and services see South African National Conventional Arms Control 
Committee, ‘South African export statistics for conventional arms 2000–2002’, <http://www.
sipri.org/research/armaments/transfers/transparency/national_reports>. A list of the published 
reports is maintained on the SIPRI website at <http://www.sipri.org/research/armaments/trans-
fers/transparency/national_reports>.
Table 2. The financial value of South African arms exports according to the South African Government, 2000–2009
Figures are in thousands of South African rands at current prices. The data are aggregates of values for deliveries of items in cate-
gories A, B, C, G (related to military equipment) in the South African Government’s arms export reporting system. Values related to 
category D (non-lethal equipment) are excluded.
Country
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
Angola
620
756
25 000
14 948
4 997
450
Benin
9 297
765
771
Botswana
10 266
367
1 125
66
229
547
586
20
12 508
30 051
Burkina faso
6 168
4 656
34 579
Burundi
15 179
22 439
Cameroon
3 757
871
2 529
3 646
1 068
1 068
Chad
15 234
2 000
DRC
912
3 371
Congo
1 501
Djibouti
9 180
2 877
405
Gabon
17 458
16 314
5 220
721
Ghana
29 120
17 922
400
811
45
25 036
Guinea
12 516
Côte d’Ivoire
5 639
2 866
Kenya
141
8 005
8 284
1 184
630
13 298
358
55 739
Lesotho
281
143
236
58
744
3 661
345
3 330
1 578
Madagascar
600
Malawi
14 530
Mali
13 377
Mauritania
64
Mozambique
59
3 300
15 399
185
240
375
57
230
Namibia
768
64
9 538
5 264
Niger
7 600
Nigeria
20 790
1 647
33 129
11 183
126 021
51 029
12 526
Rwanda
6 095
873
873
40 094
40 547
4 694
2 435
Senegal
2 666
20 673
32 690
84 579
Somalia
793
4 577
Sudan
2 065
64 025
Swaziland
254
21 654
237
2 070
12 461
Tanzania
416
1 408
6 296
11 246
9 394
Uganda
16 202
5 480
4 719
10 878
3 150
2 150 169 015
Zambia
24 089
60 335
6 435
36 350
11 036
18 920
32 141
Sources: National Conventional Arms Control Committee annual reports for the years 2002–2009, available at the SIPRI website 
<http://www.sipri.org/research/armaments/transfers/transparency/national_reports>.
C# Excel - Excel Page Processing Overview
applications using C# language. Enable you to merge two or more Excel documents to form a combined one in C#.NET application. Easy to split
html display pdf thumbnail; show pdf thumbnails in
south african arms supplies to sub-saharan africa 
5
therefore the reliability of the data is uncertain. According to the South Afri-
can Government figures, during the period 2000–2009 a total of 34.5billion 
rand ($5 billion) worth of military equipment was exported. Of the total, 
1.7billion rand ($241 million) or 4.9 per cent was accounted for by exports 
to sub-Saharan African countries. Table 2 provides ocial data on South 
African arms exports to sub-Saharan African countries.
South African arms production
Built up during the apartheid regime, the South African arms industry 
peaked in the 1980s when it employed over 80000 people.5 Major cutbacks 
in the South African military budget have led to the industry’s rapid down-
sizing, and according to the South African Defence Industry Association, 
13646 people were employed in the South African arms industry in 2007.6 
Nevertheless, the South African arms industry is by far the largest and most 
technologically advanced arms industry in Africa. It produces a wide range 
of military equipment, including ammunition for small arms and light weap-
ons (SALW) and artillery; components for or complete small arms; anti-tank, 
anti-aircraft and air-to-ground missiles; unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs); 
radar and other electronic equipment; and upgrade packages for armoured 
vehicles and armed helicopters.7 A particular area of South African expert-
ise is the production of wheeled armoured vehicles that offer a high level 
of protection against landmines and have been sold to a range countries 
worldwide.8 
The South African industry is increasingly integrated into the global arms 
industry. It produces arms under licence and components for military equip-
ment produced elsewhere, and a growing number of companies have become 
subsidiaries of foreign companies.9 For example, a partnership between 
the South African company Denel and the Swedish company SAAB pro-
duces A-109LUH helicopters in South Africa under licence from the Italian 
company AgustaWestland for delivery to the Nigerian armed forces.10 Fur-
thermore, South African military products contain many foreign-sourced 
components or technology. For example, South African armoured vehicles 
often use German engines and Swedish steel.11 South African companies are 
also involved in maintaining and repairing military products that are pro-
duced elsewhere. For example, Denel is involved in the maintenance, repair 
and overhaul of Ukrainian-produced Antonov and US-produced Lockheed 
transport aircraft.12
5
Batchelor, P. and Willett, S., SIPRI, Disarmament and Defence Industrial Adjustment in South 
Africa (Oxford University Press: Oxford, 1998), pp. 128–30; and Heitman, H. R., ‘Building up 
strength’, Jane’s Defence Weekly, 5 Dec. 2007, pp. 22–29
6
This is the most recent year for which a figure is available. Heitman (note 5); and South African 
Aerospace, Maritime and Defence Industries Association (AMD), South African Defence Industry 
Directory 2009–10, 11th edn (AMD: Centurion, 2009).
7
South African Aerospace, Maritime and Defence Industries Association (note 5).
8
SIPRI Arms Transfers Database, <http://www.sipri.org/databases/armstransfers/>.
9
Heitman (note 5)
10
Jackson, P. (ed.), Jane’s All the World Aircraft 2010–2011 (Jane’s Information Group: Bracknell, 
2010), p. 286; and Mueller, H., ‘Back in business!’, AirForces Monthly, Dec. 2010, p. 95.  
11
Campbell, K., ‘Black-owned defence firm wins its first order’, Engineering News, 6 Apr. 2007.
12
Cowan, G., ‘Antonov and Denel join forces in push for African MRO market’, IHS Jane’s, 
Farnborough International Airshow, Show news, 21 July 2010, <http://www.janes.com/events/
6
sipri background paper
The limited size of the South African armed forces means that exports are 
essential for sustaining the arms industry. In the period 2005–2007 exports 
reportedly accounted for roughly 40–50percent of the total turnover of the 
South African arms industry.13 The industry has marketed itself by stressing 
that it is well placed to pursue smaller export orders and is ‘often able to offer 
solutions to non-aligned and non-NATO markets’, that its products have 
been ‘purpose-built for the rugged and challenging environment of Africa’ 
and that South African companies are willing to offer complete packages 
including weapons, training service and spare parts (see box 1).14 Despite 
such promotional efforts, during the period 2007–2009 the share of the 
total turnover that the South African arms industry derived from exports to 
African destinations was below 9percent.15 The most important market for 
the industry has been the USA, which procured large numbers of wheeled 
armoured personnel carriers.16 Denel, the largest arms-producing company 
in South Africa, reported that during 2009 only 50 million rand ($6.7 mil-
lion) of its total export revenue of 1.23 billion rand ($165.8 million) came from 
sales to sub-Saharan Africa.17
Exports of surplus arms
The combination of downsizing, restructuring and modernizing of the 
South African armed forces in the past 20 years has resulted in a consid-
erable number of weapons becoming surplus and being sold to export cus-
tomers.18 Table 1 indicates the major conventional weapons exported from 
exhibitions/farnborough2010/sections/daily/day3/antonov-and-denel-join-fo.shtml>. 
13
South African Aerospace, Maritime and Defence Industries Association (note 6).
14
South African Aerospace, Maritime and Defence Industries Association (AMD), ‘The industry 
association of the South African defence-related industry (SADRI)’, Marketing brochure, [n.d.], 
<http://www.amd.org.za/docs/amd-marketing-brochure-web.pdf>; Campbell, K., ‘SA military-
vehicle servicing firm seeking out African niche’, Engineering News, 15 June 2007; and Kraft, J., 
‘Military vehicle specialist gains strong foothold in Africa’, Engineering News, 17 Sep. 2010. 
15
Data received from South African defence-related industry, email with author, 21 Oct. 2010. It 
is unclear from the data if sub-Saharan Africa or the whole of Africa is included.
16
SIPRI Arms Transfers Database (note 8).   
17
Denel, Annual Report 2010 (Denel: Centurion, [n.d.]), p.86.
18
South African National Assembly, Defence Portfolio Committee, ‘Excessive stock management 
within the Department of Defence’, Restricted document, 26 Aug. 2003, available on the website of the 
Box 1. The South African arms fair
One particular way in which South Africa is involved in the flow of arms to Africa is the Africa Aerospace and Defence (AAD) fair 
that is organized every second year by the South African arms industry in cooperation with the government.
a
Although AAD is 
small in comparison with similar fairs in Europe and the Middle East, it is by far the largest event of its kind in Africa. 
At the fair—the latest one took place in 2010—arms producing companies from all over the world are given the opportunity 
to market a wide variety of arms to prospective buyers. Most South African arms producers present at the fair try to interest 
visitors, predominantly from Africa, in their products. During the most recent AAD one South African company tried to show 
its dedication to the African market by unveiling a new armoured vehicle with the name ‘Mbombe’, a mythical western African 
warrior. Many foreign companies tried to interest the South African military, which is by far the largest client for arms in sub-
Saharan Africa, in their products, but many of the weapons on display were more likely to attract the interest of other African 
countries.
a
See the website of the fair at <http://www.aadexpo.co.za/links.htm>. Other information is based on observations by the author during a visit 
to AAD2010.
south african arms supplies to sub-saharan africa 
7
SANDF surplus in the period 2000–2009. In particular, surplus wheeled 
armoured vehicles have been supplied to African countries together with a 
small number of surplus SANDF combat aircraft. In at least one case, surplus 
SANDF equipment has been sold to a foreign company and then resold to an 
African destination: in 1999, 120 Eland/AML armoured vehicles were sold 
from SANDF surplus stocks to a company in Belgium, which upgraded the 
vehicles and resold approximately 82 of them to Chad in 2007–2008.19 
SALW are widely used in conflict and violence throughout Africa. It is there-
fore significant that in February 1999 the South African Government decided 
to destroy all state-held redundant semi-automatic and automatic weapons 
of calibre 12.7 mm or smaller. This decision was taken in accordance with the 
1997 report of the United Nations Secretary-General on small arms, which 
recommended, among other things, that all states should con sider destroying 
all surplus small arms.20 The destruction of more than 262000redundant 
SALW belonging to the SANDF commenced in July 2000.21 
Transit of arms through South Africa
Two recent incidents have shown that arms shipments to African destina-
tions transit through South African ports and territory. First, in April 2008 
a shipment of arms was to be ooaded in Durban for further transport 
overland to Zimbabwe (see section IV below). Second, in 
November 2009 the South African authorities impounded 
in Durban a shipment of spare parts for tanks and other 
military goods from North Korea that were to be shipped 
via South Africa to the Republic of Congo (Brazzaville) in violation of the 
UN embargoes on arms exports from North Korea.22 However, little infor-
mation is available on the transit of arms through South Africa, and based on 
these two examples alone, no conclusions can be drawn about the volume of 
such arms transits. Nevertheless, considering that South Africa has several 
major ports and serves as a gateway for goods transported to its landlocked 
neighbours, it is possible that South Africa plays a significant role as a transit 
country for weapons. 
Parliamentary Monitoring Group, <http://www.pmg.org.za/docs/2003/appendices/030826stock.
htm>. 
19
Mampaey, L., Commerce d’armement triangulaire Belgique-France-Tchad : limites et lacunes de 
la réglementation belge et européenne [Triangular arms trade between Belgium, France and Chad: 
shortcomings and limits of Belgian and European legislation], Note d’analyse (Groupe de recherche 
et d’information sur la paix et la sécurité/GRIP: Brussels, 14 Feb. 2008), <http://www.grip.org/fr/
siteweb/dev.asp?N=simple&O=291&titre_page=NA_2008-02-14_FR_L-MAMPAEY>. 
20
United Nations, General Assembly, Report of the Panel of Governmental Experts on Small 
Arms, A/52/298, 27 Aug. 1997.
21
South African Department of International Relations and Cooperation, ‘Small arms non-
proliferation’, [n.d.], <http://www.dfa.gov.za/foreign/Multilateral/profiles/arms.htm>.
22
South African National Assembly, Question 2633, answers to questions from Mr D. J. Maynier, 
[n.d.], Parliamentary Monitoring Group, <http://www.pmg.org.za/node/23057>; and United 
Nations, Security Council, Report of the Panel of experts established pursuant to Resolution 1874, 
annex to S/2010/571, 5Nov. 2010, p. 25.
Exports are essential for sustaining the 
South African arms industry
8
sipri background paper
III. South African arms export criteria and foreign policy
During the apartheid era, arms exports were a secretive business often 
involving arms supplies to controversial destinations. Soon after the African 
National Congress (ANC) came to power in 1994, South Africa adopted a 
new and, on paper, more restrictive arms export policy and control system. 
This system revolved around the National Conventional Arms Control Com-
mittee (NCACC), a permanent cabinet-level committee that was established 
Box 2. Transparency in South African arms exports
Transparency is an essential element in facilitating the accountability of arms export policies. This was recognized in South 
Africa in the late 1990s when new arms export control regulations were introduced. South African law determines that the 
National Conventional Arms Control Committee (NCACC), which oversees the implementation of the country’s arms export 
policy, must report to the United Nations Register of Conventional Arms (UNROCA).
a
Since 1995 South Africa has reported 
fairly regularly to UNROCA.
b
Compared to other countries’ submissions to the UNROCA, the South African reports have been of 
a relatively high standard, in part because of their specificity: they have included details about the actual type and designation of 
equipment and the intended end-user. However, South Africa has never included background information about the import and 
export of small arms and light weapons (SALW), as formally requested by the UN General Assembly since December 2003.
c
In 
2010 South Africa, for the first time, did not submit its report before October. 
In addition to, and separate from, the UNROCA report, the NCACC is legally obliged to provide a parliamentary committee 
with quarterly reports and the Parliament and the public with annual reports on arms exports.
d
The reports provide information 
about the financial values of items exported in five general categories, but do not provide details about the actual types of equip-
ment involved and in most cases do not provide details about the intended end-user or end-use. This poses an obstacle for the use 
of the information for understanding the potential impact of South African arms supplies.
Despite the obligation to report, during 2003 and 2006 no report was released. Only in 2007 was a report published about the 
years 2003 and 2004.
e
Reports detailing transfers in 2005 and 2006 were presented to the parliament but were blocked from 
public release. In 2009 the law was amended such that, when the new regulations come into force, there will no longer be an 
obligation to make the annual report publicly available.
f
In August 2009 the opposition Democratic Alliance (DA) party criticized the NCACC for not disclosing information to the 
Parliament and the public as required by law. In response, in a public parliamentary meeting, the NCACC chairman presented 
general data about South African arm exports in 2008 but refused to provide details on specific deals.
g
Furthermore, members 
of the ruling African National Congress stated that the DA was potentially guilty of releasing classified information and that 
the individuals involved could face up to 20 years in prison, although no action has taken place. Following the controversy, the 
NCACC gave its first briefing to the Parliament since August 2005 and released a public report detailing arms exports from South 
Africa in 2008.
h
In March 2010 the report detailing arms exports in 2009 was, for the first time since 2002, released on time.
i
a
National Conventional Arms Control Amendment Act, Act no. 73 of 2008, assented to 14 Apr. 2009, Government Gazette (Pretoria), vol. 526, 
no. 32136 (16 Apr. 2009).
b
United Nations Register of Conventional Arms, ‘Overall participation’, <http://unhq-appspub-01.un.org/UNODA/UN_REGISTER.nsf>.
c
UN General Assembly Resolution 58/54, A/RES/58/54, 8 Jan. 2004. The texts of UN General Assembly resolutions are available at <http://
www.un.org/documents/resga.htm>.
d
National Conventional Arms Control Amendment Act, Act no. 41 of 2002, assented to 12 Feb. 2003, Government Gazette (Pretoria), vol. 452, 
no. 24575 (20 Feb. 2003).
e
Lamb, G., ‘ISS Today: the transparency and accountability of South Africa’s arms trade’, Institute for Security Studies (ISS), Web news, 6 Aug. 
2007, <http://www.iss.co.za/pgcontent.php?UID=5063>.
f
National Conventional Arms Control Amendment Act (note a); and South African Conventional Arms Control Directorate, ‘2008 national 
conventional arms control committee (NCACC) annual report’, May 2009, p. 3.
g
South African Press Association, ‘Radebe silent on questionable arms deals’, Polity.org.za, 2 Sep. 2009, <http://www.polity.org.za/article/
radebe-silent-on-questionable-arms-deals-2009-09-02>.
h
South African National Conventional Arms Control Committee (NCACC), 2008 annual reports, 27 Aug. 2009, available on the SIPRI 
website at <http://www.sipri.org/research/armaments/transfers/transparency/national_reports>. See also Parliamentary Monitoring Group, 
‘National Conventional Arms Control Committee (NCACC) Introductory & Annual Report 2008 briefing’, 2 Sep. 2009, <http://www.pmg.org.
za/print/18065>.
i
Engelbrecht, L., ‘NCACC approves contracts worth R82.5 billion in 2009’, defenceWeb, 8 Apr. 2010, <http://www.defenceweb.co.za/index.
php?option=com_content&view=article&id=7455:1>.
south african arms supplies to sub-saharan africa 
9
in 1995 (see box 2).23 Under the NCACC’s current export guidelines, South 
Africa is committed to avoiding arms exports to recipients involved in crime, 
terrorism, armed conflict or the systematic violations of human rights.24 
South Africa reiterated its arms export criteria when speaking out in favour 
of efforts to establish an international arms trade treaty with common inter-
national standards and criteria for transfers of conventional arms.25 South 
African arms regulations also control brokering activities, whereby a person 
resident in South Africa rendering a brokering service between persons resi-
dent in foreign countries requires a permit.26 Although some adminis trative 
problems have occurred, the export control system appears to function 
reasonably well.27
In the mid-1990s some people within the new ANC-led government saw 
arms exports as a potential tool for foreign policy and the industry as an 
essential attribute of a strong sovereign state. They placed 
an emphasis on arms exports within Africa, in particular 
to states in southern Africa, an area perceived as South 
Africa’s natural sphere of influence. Politicians and govern-
ment ocials hoped that arms sales within Africa would 
provide political leverage, and they promoted arms sales 
as a key to establishing regional security cooperation. Furthermore, they 
argued that African states would benefit from buying South African arms 
because it would lessen their dependence on non-African sources. However, 
countries in Africa proved apprehensive of strengthening South African 
dominance in the region and have been hesitant about procuring arms from 
South Africa.28
To date, South Africa has not become the arms supplier to Africa that 
some South African politicians and the arms industry had hoped it would be. 
Furthermore, arms supplies do not play a major role in South Africa’s politics 
of peace and security in Africa. Only occasionally does South Africa donate 
military equipment to African countries.29 Mediation, its role in the African 
Union and participation in peacekeeping operations are South Africa’s key 
instruments with regards to its efforts at shaping peace and security in 
Africa.30
23
See Batchelor, P., ‘Arms and the ANC’, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, vol. 54, no. 5 (Sep./Oct. 
1998), pp. 56–61. 
24
South African National Conventional Arms Control Committee, ‘Policy for the control of trade 
in conventional arms’, Jan. 2004, <http://www.dti.gov.za/nonproliferation/ArmsControl.html>, 
pp. 7–8.
25
United Nations, General Assembly, ‘Towards an arms trade treaty: establishing common 
international standards for the import, export and transfers of conventional arms’, Report of the 
Secretary-General, 17 Aug. 2007, A/62/278, p. 194.
26
Lamb, G., ‘The regulation of arms brokering in Southern Africa’, Disarmament Forum: Tackling 
Illicit Brokering, no. 3 (2009), pp. 45–46.
27
South African Department of Defence (DOD), Annual Report FY 2008–2009 (DOD: Pre-
toria, 2009), pp. 399–401; Joubert, J., ‘Arms control chaos’, City Press, 31 Jan. 2010; Engelbrecht, 
L., ‘NCACC approves R8.1bn in deals’, defenceWeb, <http://www.defenceweb.co.za/index.
php?option=com_content&task=view&id=3375&Itemid=366>, 7 Aug. 2009; and South African 
Department of Defence (DOD), Annual Report FY 2009/10 (DOD: Pretoria, 2010), p. 303.
28
Batchelor and Willett (note 5), pp. 128–30.
29
South African Department of Defence (note 27), p. 347.
30
See e.g. Vines, A., ‘South Africa’s politics of peace and security in Africa’, South African Journal 
of International Affairs, vol. 17, no. 1 (Apr. 2010), pp. 53–63.
South Africa has not become the arms 
supplier to Africa that some had hoped it 
would be
10
sipri background paper
IV. The use of South African arms in sub-Saharan Africa
Although South African arms supplies to sub-Saharan Africa are small, they 
can play a significant role in fuelling armed conflicts or human rights abuses 
in the region. A typical and widely criticized example was the delivery of 
small arms and other military equipment from South Africa to Rwandan 
Government security forces in 1992—weapons which were soon after 
involved in the 1994 Rwandan genocide.31 On the other hand, weapons and 
military equipment can also contribute to stability, for example when they 
are supplied to peacekeeping forces.
Arms and conflict
The ocial South African arms export data shows that in the period 
2000–2009 arms and military goods were exported to several sub-Saharan 
countries involved in armed conflict, including Chad in 2008–2009, Rwanda 
in 2004–2009, Sudan in 2007–2008 and Uganda in 2002–2009 (see table2 
above).Assessing the impact that these deliveries may have had on conflict 
in these recipient countries is not possible because it remains unclear what 
type of equipment was delivered to which end-user, and if and how it was 
used. For example, concerns could be raised that the delivery to Sudan in 
2008 of 64 million rand ($9 million) worth of items related to 
major weapons could be used by the Sudanese Government 
in the conflict in Darfur. Concerns could also be raised that 
the 169million rand ($24 million) worth of military products 
supplied to Uganda in 2009 might be used in the war against 
the Ugandan rebel group the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) 
or in Ugandan military activities in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. 
However, it is also possible that the equipment could be essential for 
Ugandan peacekeepers involved in the African Union Mission in Somalia 
(AMISOM).32
There have been several documented cases of the use of South African-
supplied arms in human rights abuses in the period 2000–2009. Mamba 
armoured personnel carriers supplied by a South African company in 2003 
were used in September 2009 by Guinean police forces when forcefully dis-
persing a gathering of people related to those killed during anti-government 
demonstrations.33 Armoured vehicles supplied from South Africa were also 
used in the violent suppression of demonstrations in Uganda in 2006.34
The risk that arms supplied to Zimbabwe via or from South Africa could 
be used in government violence against the opposition is widely debated.35 
In April 2008 national and international civil society groups and foreign 
31
Smyth, F., Arming Rwanda: The Arms Trade and Human Rights Abuses in the Rwandan War, 
Human Rights Watch (HRW), Arms Project Series, vol. 6, no. 1 (HRW: New York, 1994), appendix B. 
32
Wezeman, P. D., ‘Arms flows and the conflict in Somalia’, SIPRI Background Paper, Oct. 2010, 
<http://books.sipri.org/product_info?c_product_id=416>.
33
Amnesty International, Guinea: ‘You Did Not Want the Military, So Now We Are Going to Teach 
You a Lesson’ (Amnesty International Publications: London, Feb. 2010), p. 28.
34
Oxfam, ‘Loopholes in British law allow sale of military equipment to Uganda’, Press release, 
1Mar. 2006. 
35
Du Plessis, M., ‘ Chinese arms destined for Zimbabwe over South African territory: the R2P 
norm and the role of civil society’, African Security Review, vol. 17, no. 4 (Dec. 2008), pp. 17–29; 
There have been several documented 
cases of the use of South African-
supplied arms in human rights abuses
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested