Abbreviations
AECA 
Arms Export Control Act (USA) 
AEW 
Airborne early warning 
ASW 
Anti-submarine warfare 
BAFA 
German Oce for Economic Affairs and Export Control  
BMWi 
German Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy  
CAEC 
Committees on Arms Export Controls (UK)  
CCL 
Commerce Control List (USA) 
CHINCOM 
Coordinating Committee for Multilateral Export Controls, China 
CFSP 
Common Foreign and Security Policy (of the EU) 
COCOM  
Coordinating Committee for Multilateral Export Controls 
DOD 
Department of Defense (USA) 
EAA 
Export Administration Act (USA) 
EU  
European Union 
ECR 
Export control reform initiative (USA) 
FCO  
Foreign and Commonwealth Oce (UK) 
FMS  
Foreign Military Sales Programme (USA) 
ITAR 
International Trac in Arms Regulations  
MFA 
Ministry of Foreign Affairs  
MOD  
Ministry of Defence 
MOST 
Chinese Ministry of Science and Technology 
PLA  
People’s Liberation Army  
PLAAF 
People’s Liberation Army Air Force  
PLAN 
People’s Liberation Army Navy 
PRC  
People’s Republic of China  
R&D  
Research and development 
ROC 
Republic of China (Taiwan)  
SAR 
Search and rescue  
SMEs 
Small and medium-sized enterprises 
USML 
United States Munitions List  
VEU 
Validated End User 
Pdf thumbnail generator online - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
show pdf thumbnail in html; how to view pdf thumbnails in
Pdf thumbnail generator online - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
pdf no thumbnail; how to create a thumbnail of a pdf document
VB.NET Image: Program for Creating Thumbnail from Documents and
multiple document and image formats, such as PDF, TIFF, GIF version of RasterEdge .NET Imaging SDK online and you can use the thumbnail creation control
create thumbnails from pdf files; pdf thumbnails in
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Word
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel NET Twain, VB.NET Barcode Read, VB.NET Barcode Generator, view less. How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Word.
pdf thumbnail viewer; view pdf thumbnails in
1. Introduction
The  Chinese  People’s  Liberation  Army  (PLA)  is  currently  engaged  in  an 
accelerated process of modernization. This process is fuelled by unresolved terri-
torial claims and China’s perception of its emerging role as a global power, and 
sustained by a still rapidly growing economy. The modernization of the PLA has 
benefited enormously from products purchased off-the-shelf from Russia and (to 
a lesser extent) Israel  and  Ukraine but is  increasingly driven by  significant 
improvements in the capacities of the Chinese defence industry. Since the mid-
1990s accelerations in the PLA’s modernization push have benefited from con-
siderable domestic research and development (R&D) efforts, although the total 
value  of  China’s  military-related  R&D  spending  has  never  been  accurately 
established. SIPRI estimates that, while China’s ocial military budget for 2013 
was $132 billion, its total military spending in that year—including on R&D, the 
paramilitary  People’s  Armed  Police,  military  construction,  pensions  and 
demobilization payments, and arms exports—amounted to $188 billion.1 Through 
the process of military modernization, China has also integrated transfers of 
technology from abroad as well as unauthorized reverse-engineering of foreign 
weaponry.  
Major Western arms exporters’ contributions to China’s defence industrial and 
technological modernization have never been examined thoroughly. From the 
end  of  World  War  II  until  the  1970s,  most  Western  states  recognized  the 
Nationalist Republic  of China (ROC,  Taiwan) as  the  sole legitimate  Chinese 
Government and  had no relations with  the Communist People’s Republic  of 
China (PRC, China). Even the Western states that recognized the PRC did not 
transfer military equipment to China. With the outbreak of the 1950–53 Korean 
War, transfers of military equipment to China and other Communist states were 
severely  restricted  by  the  Coordinating  Committee  for  Multilateral  Export 
Controls (COCOM).2 In 1952 the United States established a separate COCOM 
subcommittee (CHINCOM) in order to prevent transfers of military technology 
to China. CHINCOM, which was run from the COCOM premises in Paris and 
continued its operations until 1957, controlled transfers based on lists of military-
relevant items. These lists contained around two hundred items that were not 
embargoed to the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, in what became known as 
the ‘China Differential’.3 After CHINCOM was disbanded, controls on trade with 
China were coordinated from within COCOM.4 Restrictions on trade with China 
1
Perlo-Freeman, S., ‘Deciphering China’s latest defence budget figures’, SIPRI Update: Global Security 
and Arms Control, Mar.  2014, <http://www.sipri.org/newsletter/march14>; and Perlo-Freeman, S. and 
Solmirano, C., ‘Military spending and regional security in the Asia-Pacific’, SIPRI Yearbook 2014: Armaments, 
Disarmament and International Security (Oxford University Press: Oxford, 2014), pp. 189–92.  
2
Cain, F., ‘The US-led trade embargo on China, the origins of CHINCOM, 1947–1952’, Journal of Strategic 
Studies, vol. 18, no. 4 (1995), pp. 33–54.  
3
Bräuner, O., ‘Beyond the arms embargo, EU transfers of defence and dual-use technologies to China’, 
Journal of East Asian Studies, vol. 13 (2013), p. 459.  
4
Meijer, H., ‘Balancing conflicting security interests: US defense exports to China in the last decade of the 
Cold War,’ Journal of Cold War Studies, vol. 16, no. 4 (fall 2014).  
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for PowerPoint
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET NET Twain, VB.NET Barcode Read, VB.NET Barcode Generator, view less. How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for PowerPoint.
enable pdf thumbnails; pdf thumbnail html
How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel NET Twain, VB.NET Barcode Read, VB.NET Barcode Generator, view less. How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET
how to show pdf thumbnails in; how to view pdf thumbnails in
2   WESTERN ARMS EXPORTS TO CHINA
were slightly relaxed after US President Richard Nixon’s groundbreaking 1972 
visit to China. The China Differential was abolished and COCOM conducted a 
policy of ‘even-handedness’, which meant that the PRC would be treated in the 
same way as the Soviet Union and the Communist states of Eastern Europe.5  
Chinese  experts  sometimes argue that  there is  a  long  history of  Western 
hostility to the modernization of the PLA, from CHINCOM and COCOM through 
to the post-1989 embargoes.
6
However, after the establishment of diplomatic ties 
between the PRC and the USA in 1979, the West gradually relaxed controls on 
exports to China and supported the PLA’s modernization effort. This support 
occurred within the strategic context of cooperation against the Soviet Union 
after its 1979 invasion of Afghanistan and the decade-long conflict that followed.7 
In 1984 the administration of US President Ronald Reagan made China eligible 
for the government-to-government Foreign Military Sales (FMS) programme.8 
Furthermore,  throughout  the  1980s  a  number  of  Western  states—including 
France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and the USA—
transferred large volumes of defence-related items to China.9  
The European Union (EU) and the USA both imposed arms embargoes on 
China after the 1989 Tiananmen Square incident. Other Western states, including 
Australia, Canada and Norway, also imposed restrictive policies on arms transfers 
to China.10 Therefore, it is often assumed that, since 1989, no transfers of military-
related technologies from Western states to China have taken place. However, 
while the US embargo restricts all transfers of military equipment and related 
components, the EU embargo lacks clear guidelines and has been interpreted 
differently by individual EU member states. As a result, while sales of complete 
weapons and weapon systems have not occurred, both components and sub-
systems have been supplied. Many Chinese submarines are powered by German 
engines or equipped with French sonar systems. China has also acquired French 
military helicopters and now produces its own using French technology. 
The Chinese defence industry has also benefited from an influx of civilian tech-
nologies and foreign investment in China. In fact, Western companies, faced with 
fierce competition in what is still perceived as a fast-growing emerging market, 
are increasingly willing to transfer a broad range of high-end technologies in 
order to do business in China. At the same time, the  dividing  line between 
‘civilian’  and  ‘military’  technologies  has  become  increasingly  blurred.  Tech-
nologies developed by the Chinese civilian aviation sector in joint ventures with 
5
Meijer (note 4).  
6
Du, W., ‘ ‘    18 8  ’ [The lifting of the EU arms embargo: the 18th lie], Bingqi 
Zhishi–Ordnance Knowledge, no. 4A (2010), pp. 20–23.  
7
Harding, H., A Fragile Relationship: The United States and China Since 1972 (The Brookings Institution: 
Washington, DC, 1992), pp. 91–93.  
8
Meijer (note 4).  
9
See Wezeman, S. T., ‘Table 43.A. Transfers of equipment that meet the SIPRI definition of major 
weapons from states belonging to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) to China, 1970–2013’, 
SIPRI, Jan. 2015, <http://www.sipri.org/research/security/china/western-arms-exports-to-china>. 
10
On Canada see Bromley, M., ‘Canada's controls on arms exports to China’, SIPRI Background Paper, 
Jan. 2015. On Norway see Bromley, M., ‘Norway's controls on arms exports to China’, SIPRI Background 
Paper, Jan. 2015.  
Create Thumbnail in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
You Wish; Annotate & Redact Documents or Images; Create Thumbnail; NET; XDoc.Converter for .NET; XDoc.PDF for .NET; Reader for .NET; XImage.Barcode Generator for
pdf preview thumbnail; how to make a thumbnail of a pdf
Create Thumbnail Winforms | Online Tutorials
Create Thumbnail; Generate Barcodes on Your Documents; Read Barcodes XDoc.Converter for .NET; XDoc.PDF for .NET; Reader for .NET; XImage.Barcode Generator for .NET
no pdf thumbnails in; pdf thumbnail viewer
INTRODUCTION   3
Western  companies,  for  example,  have  led  to  advances  in  Chinese  defence 
avionics and the management of aircraft production lines.  
China is keen to gain greater access to key military and civilian technologies in 
order to accelerate  its process  of  military modernization. It  remains  heavily 
dependent on foreign acquisitions to fill the remaining technology gaps in its 
domestic  arms industry,  including engines,  transmissions, avionics and  elec-
tronics. China is eager to tap new, non-Russian, sources of equipment. Tech-
nology cooperation between China and the West through trade, investment and 
scientific collaboration has increased dramatically in the past 30 years but there is 
little precise knowledge of how Western civilian technology transfers benefit the 
Chinese defence sector in key (non-lethal) areas such as command and control, 
communications, surveillance and reconnaissance.  
The  debate  about  lifting  the  EU  arms  embargo  on China  led  to  frictions 
between the USA and its EU partners in 2003–2005, with the USA even threaten-
ing to impose sanctions against European defence companies doing business with 
China. Today, the EU embargo is no longer a contentious issue in transatlantic 
relations, due to insucient political support in key EU member states for lifting 
the ban on arms sales. Nonetheless, the debate on lifting the arms embargo 
ignores two important issues: the impact of exports of dual-use items (goods and 
technologies that have the potential to be used in both civilian and military 
products) on China’s military capabilities; and the fact that the embargo is of 
largely political and symbolic value and allows states flexibility at the national 
level. Moreover, while the adoption of the embargo was motivated by human 
rights concerns, the major obstacle to its removal now appears to be the risk of 
military conflict between states in East Asia over territorial disputes.  
China has continually adapted its approach to acquiring military and dual-use 
technologies from the West. For instance, the lifting of the EU arms embargo is 
not a diplomatic priority for the new Chinese President, Xi Jinping. Influential 
Chinese experts have advocated moving beyond the arms embargo to focus on 
technology cooperation in priority sectors, including aerospace and aeronautics.11 
Although China’s latest White Paper on its policy towards the EU still formally 
lists lifting the embargo as a goal, China is expected to continue to operate its 
acquisition strategy within the current EU export control framework.12 On the 
one hand, this policy reflects a Chinese assessment that the lifting of the EU 
embargo is currently not a realistic objective. On the other hand, it confirms the 
fact that the modernization of China’s defence industries is reaching a turning 
point,  after  which  a  self-sucient  procurement  strategy  seems  increasingly 
attainable. This evolution also fits with China’s strong promotion of civil–military 
integration  and  its  support  for  the  creation  of  a  dual-use  economy.  The 
11
Wang, Z., ‘  
 
’[Experts calls for  upgrading  EU–China 
relations and not throwing stones  in a well in the context of  the  European  debt crisis],  Zhongguo 
Xinwenwang,  26  Nov.  2013,  <http://dailynews.sina.com/bg/news/int/chinanews/20131126/223052114 
04.html>. 
12
‘Full text  of China’s  Policy Paper on the  European Union’,  Xinhua,  2 Apr.  2014, <http://news. 
xinhuanet.com/english/china/2014-04/02/c_133230788.htm>.
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Raster
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel NET Twain, VB.NET Barcode Read, VB.NET Barcode Generator, view less. How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Raster
show pdf thumbnails in; generate pdf thumbnail c#
How to C#: Overview of Using XImage.Raster
Empower to navigate image(s) content quickly via thumbnail. Able to support text extract with OCR. You may edit the tiff document easily. Create Thumbnail.
show pdf thumbnail in; pdf thumbnail creator
4   WESTERN ARMS EXPORTS TO CHINA
integration of Western civilian and dual-use technologies in the development of 
Chinese defence systems is carried out within this strategic framework.  
This Policy Paper fills an important gap in the literature by examining the 
policies and practices of the four largest Western arms exporters—the USA, 
France,  Germany  and  the UK—with  respect to  controls  on  the  transfers  of 
military-related goods and technologies to China, as well as the key motivating 
factors behind the formulation and implementation of those policies.
13
In par-
ticular, it maps the different restrictions that Western states have imposed on the 
transfer of military items and dual-use goods to China since 1989, and in the 
respective arms embargoes imposed by the EU and the USA.  
Based on open source material and interviews with experts and ocials in 
China, Europe and North America, this Policy Paper documents known transfers 
of military-related technologies to China from Western states to China since 1989, 
including military goods, dual-use items and other non-controlled items that have 
played  a  role  in  the  development  of  China’s  military  capabilities.  Military-
relevant technology includes complete weapon systems as well as parts and com-
ponents that have either been directly integrated into Chinese weapon systems or 
else used in the production of weapon systems in China and include military 
items, dual-use goods and technologies, as well as other non-controlled items. In 
order to put this impact in perspective, the paper maps the more significant role 
that transfers from other states have played in the development of the Chinese 
military, particularly those from Russia, Israel and Ukraine.  
Chapter 2 details the US export control system, including the application of 
national export controls on transfers to China. Chapter 3 details the EU arms 
embargo,  and  the  export  control systems  of  France,  Germany  and the  UK, 
respectively, as well as their policies on transfers to China, and known transfers 
of military-relevant goods and technologies to China. Chapter 4 assesses the 
impact of Western transfers on China’s military–industrial and technological 
development, and China’s cooperation with other exporting countries. Chapter 5 
presents  conclusions  and  proposes  recommendations  for  states  seeking  to 
improve international coordination on transfers of military and dual-use items to 
China.  
13
The world’s 6 largest arms exporters in the period 2009–13 were the USA, Russia, Germany, China, 
France and the UK, accounting for 78 per cent of all transfers. SIPRI Arms Transfers Database, <http://www. 
sipri.org/databases/armstransfers>; and Wezeman, S. T. and Wezeman, P. D., ‘Trends in international arms 
transfers, 2013’, SIPRI Fact Sheet, Mar. 2014.  
2. The United States’ export controls on 
transfers to China 
This  chapter  details  the  USA’s  policies  on  transfers  of  military-related 
technologies to China, including transfers of military goods, dual-use items and 
other  non-controlled  items  relevant  to  the  development  of  China’s  military 
capabilities. Separate sections outline the US export control system; the appli-
cation of national export controls on transfers to China; and details of what is 
being licensed and exported to China.  
The US national export control system
US national export controls are governed by multiple acts and regulations, and 
administered  by  several  US  Government  departments.  The  central  piece  of 
legislation for US controls on exports of military goods is the 1976 Arms Export 
Control Act (AECA).14 The International Trac in Arms Regulations (ITAR) sets 
out licensing policy and includes the US Munitions List (USML), which defines 
controlled  items.15 The  1979  Export  Administration  Act  (EAA)  governs  US 
controls on exports of dual-use items.16  
The Export Administration Regulations (EAR) sets out licensing policy and the 
Commerce  Control List  (CCL) defines  controlled  items.17 The  Directorate  of 
Defense Trade Controls (DDTC) within the US Department of State is respon-
sible for  issuing and  refusing  licenses for the export of military goods.  The 
Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) within the US Department of Commerce is 
responsible for dual-use items.18 The US Department of Commerce administers 
trade prohibitions under the 1917 Trading with the Enemy Act and the 1977 Inter-
national  Emergency Economic  Powers Act.19 Other US  Government  agencies 
have licensing authority for certain types of exports. For example, the Depart-
ments of Energy and Commerce administer certain nuclear-related exports and 
the Department of the Treasury administers certain aspects of trade embargoes 
and sanctions.20  
14
Arms Export Control Act of 1976, US Public Law 94-329, signed into law on 30 June 1976, <https:// 
www.pmddtc.state.gov/regulations_laws/aeca.html>. 
15
On  ITAR  and  the  USML  see  US  Department  of  State,  [n.d.],  <https://www.pmddtc.state.gov/ 
regulations_laws/itar.html>.  
16
Export Administration Act of 1979, US Public Law 96-72, signed into law on 29 Sep. 1979, <http://www. 
house.gov/legcoun/Comps/eaa79.pdf>. 
17
US Bureau of Industry and Security  (BIS), ‘Export  Administration Regulations’,  [n.d.],  <http:// 
www.bis.doc.gov/index.php/regulations/export-administration-regulations-ear>;  and  BIS,  ‘Commerce 
Control List’, [n.d.], <http://www.bis.doc.gov/index.php/regulations/commerce-control-list-ccl>. 
18
US  Department  of  State,  ‘Overview  of  US  Export  Control  System’,  [n.d.],  <http://www. 
state.gov/strategictrade/overview/>. 
19
Trading with the Enemy Act of 1917 (40 Stat. 411) enacted 6 Oct. 1917; and International Emergency 
Economic Powers Act of 1977, US Public Law 95-223, enacted 28 Oct. 1977.  
20
US Department of State (note 18).  
6   WESTERN ARMS EXPORTS TO CHINA
The USA is currently engaged in a process of simplifying its controls on exports 
of military goods and dual-use items via the Export Control Reform (ECR) pro-
cess, which aims to reduce the regulatory burden on US industry and focus con-
trols on sensitive technologies and destinations.21 Launched in 2009, the ECR is 
based on achieving four ‘singularities’: (a) a single agency for administering all 
export controls on military goods and dual-use items; (b) a unified control list; 
(c) a single enforcement coordination agency; and (d) a single integrated infor-
mation technology system.22 To date, the main focus of the ECR has been moving 
tens of thousands of items from the USML—which will become more focussed on 
items deemed particularly sensitive to US security interests—to the CCL, where 
they will be subject to less stringent licensing controls for exports to trusted 
destinations.23 By the end of this process, the majority of items on the USML will 
have been either moved to the CCL or decontrolled. For example, it is anticipated 
that 90 per cent of the items under USML Category VII (Tanks and Military 
Vehicles) will be moved to the CCL or decontrolled.24  
A number of former US ocials and commentators have warned that moving 
items from the USML to the CCL and decontrolling others will increase the range 
of goods that can be shipped to companies acting as fronts for the Chinese mili-
tary, thereby generating new proliferation risks.25 However, US ocials argue 
that the reforms will have no impact on exports to China and that controls that 
were in place prior to 2009 will remain in force. According to one Department of 
Commerce ocial, ‘we have bent over backwards in all our training materials and 
preamble material to say we are maintaining the same embargo on China’.26 In 
particular, ocials note that most of the items moving to the CCL will be subject 
to additional controls—such as a presumption of denial—that will prevent their 
export to China.  
21
On the ECR initiative see <http://export.gov/ecr/>; Currier, C., ‘In big win for defense industry, Obama 
rolls back limits on arms exports’, ProPublica, 14 Oct. 2013, <http://www.propublica.org/article/in-big-win-
for-defense-industry-obama-rolls-back-limits-on-arms-export>; and Benowitz, B. and Kellman, B., ‘Rethink 
plans to loosen US controls on arms exports’, Arms Control Today, vol. 43 (Apr. 2013), <http://www.arms 
control.org/act/2013_04/Rethink-Plans-to-Loosen-US-Controls-on-Arms-Exports>. 
22
Fergusson, I. F. and Kerr, P. K., The US Export Control System and the President’s Reform Initiative, 
Congressional Research Service (CRS) Report for Congress R41916 (US Congress, CRS: Washington, DC,  
13 Jan. 2014), Summary. 
23
US Department of  State, ‘Export control reform:  first  final  rules go  into  effect’, 15  Oct.  2013, 
<http://www.state.gov/r/pa/prs/ps/2013/10/215428.htm>; and Fergusson and Kerr (note 22). 
24
White House, Oce of the Press Secretary, ‘White House Chief of Staff Daley highlights priority for the 
President’s  Export  Control  Reform  Initiative’,  19  Jul.  2011,  <http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-
oce/2011/07/19/white-house-chief-staff-daley-highlights-priority-presidents-export-cont>. 
25
Lowell, W. J., ‘Category VII Revision and USML—Positive List’, Letter to US Department of State, 7 Feb. 
2011, <http://www.armscontrol.org/system/files/Lowell_Comments_ExportReform_Feb7_2011.pdf>; Kimes, 
M., ‘America’s hottest export: weapons’, CNN Money, 24 Feb. 2011, <http://archive.fortune.com/2011/02/10/ 
news/international/america_exports_weapons_full.fortune/index.htm>;  and  Goodman,  C.,  ‘Growing 
concerns over deregulation of arms export controls’, Project on Government Oversight Blog, 7 Apr. 2014, 
<http://www.pogo.org/blog/2014/04/20140407-growing-concerns-over-deregulation-of-arms-export-contr 
ols.html>. 
26
Shiffman, J. and Wilson, D., ‘Turf battles hinder US efforts to thwart smugglers’, Reuters, 17 Dec. 2013.  
US EXPORT CONTROLS ON TRANSFERS TO CHINA    7
US national controls on exports to China 
After the establishment of diplomatic ties between the PRC and the USA in 1979, 
the administration of US President Jimmy Carter gradually lifted some of the 
restrictions that had made controls of exports to China even stricter than controls 
on exports to the Soviet bloc. In 1984 US President Ronald Reagan made China 
eligible for the government-to-government FMS programme.
27
After  the  1989 
Tiananmen Square incident, however, the USA suspended military-to-military 
contacts with and arms sales to China.28 US President George H. Bush passed a 
set of sanctions, including the suspension of arms sales. The US Congress then 
passed legislation that enshrined the embargo in law.29  
The US embargo covers the export to China and import from China of all items 
on the USML.30 As a result, unlike the EU embargo (see chapter 3), the US arms 
embargo on China is codified and linked to a control list. The President may 
waive the embargo if doing so is deemed in the US national interest. A total of 
13 waivers for transfers related to satellite projects were issued between 1989 and 
1998, and additional waivers have since been issued for items including a bomb-
disposal unit, equipment to help clean up chemical weapons, and sensors for 
commercial aircraft.31  
Since the collapse of the Soviet Union and the 1995–96 Taiwan Strait crisis, the 
maintenance of US restrictions on exports to China has been driven by a broader 
set of considerations related to the potential threat posed by China’s military 
modernization and its implications for the USA’s power-projection capabilities, 
particularly in the western Pacific Ocean.32 These concerns are shared by all 
security-related branches of the US Government and remain prominent in US 
thinking. A recent report by the US Department of Defense (DOD) and the US 
Department of State argued that China’s military ‘could be put to use in ways that 
increase China’s ability to gain diplomatic advantage or resolve disputes in its 
favour, and possibly against US national security interests’.33  
According to the US DOD, China’s sustained process of military modernization 
is supported by ongoing efforts to gain access to military-relevant technologies 
from the USA, including through civilian front companies and economic espion-
age.34 Seeking to limit China’s access to these technologies is a key rationale for 
the USA’s continued application of export control restrictions on China. Key 
27
Meijer (note 4).  
28
Archick, K., Grimmett, R. F. and Kan, S., European Union’s Arms Embargo on China: Implications and 
Options  for  US  Policy,  Congressional  Research  Service  (CRS)  Report  for  Congress  RL32870  (CRS: 
Washington, DC, 27 May 2005), p. 4. 
29
Meijer, H., Trading with the Enemy: The Making of US Export Control Policy Toward the People’s 
Republic of China, PhD Dissertation, Institut d’Etudes Politiques (Sciences Po), Paris, 2013, p. 116.  
30
Archick, Grimmett and Kan (note 28). 
31
Archick, Grimmett and Kan (note 28). 
32
US Department of Defense (DOD) and US Department of State, Risk Assessment of United States Space 
Export Control Policy, Report to Congress (US DOD: Washington, DC, 15 Mar. 2012), Appendix 4, p. 1; Meijer 
(note 29); and Dyer, G., ‘US v China: is this the new cold war?’, Financial Times, 20 Feb. 2014. 
33
US DOD and US Department of State (note 32), Appendix 4, p. 5. 
34
US DOD, Annual Report to Congress: Military and Security Developments Involving the People’s Republic 
of China (US DOD: Washington, DC, 2013), pp. 11–12. 
8   WESTERN ARMS EXPORTS TO CHINA
concerns for the USA include China’s improving capabilities in access denial—
including ‘short- and medium-range conventional ballistic missiles, land-attack 
and anti-ship cruise missiles, counter-space weapons, and military cyberspace 
capabilities’—as well as long-range strike and power projection.35 In recent years, 
China’s development of weapons capable of targeting space-based assets has been 
a particular concern for the USA. A 2012 US intelligence assessment mapped the 
vulnerability of the US military’s space-based assets to disruption by Chinese 
military satellites, missiles and ground-based jamming techniques.36  
While exports of dual-use items on the CCL are not covered by the US arms 
embargo, additional controls apply to certain exports of CCL items. For example, 
since the late 1990s the USA has maintained strict controls on exports of satellite-
related technologies to China. In 1998 a US Congressional Committee report on 
China’s attempts to acquire military technology from the USA (the so-called Cox 
Report) concluded that unauthorized transfers of satellite-related technologies 
had allegedly helped Chinese missile programmes (although many of the report’s 
findings, including on the extent to which the Chinese military benefitted from 
any transfers of technology, have since been challenged).37 In response, the USA 
banned both the export of satellite technologies to China and the launch of US 
satellites in China.38 In 2007 the USA also introduced a set of stricter controls on 
exports of CCL items to China under the so-called China Rule.39 In particular, 
exports of 20 categories of CCL items became subject to additional licensing 
requirements if they are, or may be intended for, ‘military end-use’ in China.40 
Requirements for  end-user  certificates (EUCs) were also expanded.41 In  par-
ticular, exporters of most CCL items to China must obtain an EUC issued by 
China’s Ministry of Commerce (MOFCOM), regardless of the end-user.42 
Total trade between China and the USA has increased massively in recent 
years, rising from $63 billion in 1996 to $562 billion in 2013.43 The growing inter-
dependence of the Chinese and US economies has created a complex set of policy 
choices for the USA as it seeks to balance national security and trade interests.44 
35
US DOD (note 34), p. i; and Nakashima, E., ‘Confidential report lists US weapons system designs 
compromised by Chinese cyberspies’, Washington Post, 27 May 2013. 
36
Shalal-Esa, A., ‘China’s space activities raising US satellite security concerns’, Reuters, 14 Jan. 2013; and 
Shalal-Esa, A., ‘Pentagon cites new drive to develop anti-satellite weapons’, Reuters, 7 May 2013.  
37
US House of Representatives, Select Committee on US National Security and Military/Commercial 
Concerns  with  the  People’s  Republic  of  China,  Final  Report,  3  Jan.  1999,  <http://www.house.gov/ 
coxreport/>; and M. M. May (ed.), The Cox Committee Report: An Assessment (Stanford University Centre for 
International Security and Cooperation: Stanford, CA, Dec. 1999), <http://cisac.stanford.edu/publications/ 
cox_committee_report_the_an_assessment/>. 
38
‘Congress returns export control over satellites to State Department’, Arms Control Today, Oct. 1998, 
<http://www.armscontrol.org/act/1998_10/satoc98>; and Lague, D., ‘In satellite tech race, China hitched a 
ride from Europe’, Reuters, 22 Dec. 2013. 
39
Fergusson, I. F., The Export Administration Act: Evolution, Provisions, and Debate,  Congressional 
Research Service (CRS) Report for Congress RL31832 (US Congress, CRS: Washington, DC, 15 Jul. 2009), 
pp. 24–26. 
40
Fergusson (note 39). 
41
Fergusson (note 39). 
42
BIS, ‘Export Administration Regulations’ (note 17), Part 748.10.  
43
United  States  International  Trade  Commission,  Interactive  Tariff  and  Trade  Data  Web,  ‘US 
merchandise trade balance, by partner country 2013’, <http://dataweb.usitc.gov>. 
44
Meijer (note 29). 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested