US EXPORT CONTROLS ON TRANSFERS TO CHINA    9
In  particular,  while  seeking  to  control  transfers  that  may  benefit  the  Chinese 
military, the USA has also sought to facilitate the export of certain dual-use items 
to the Chinese commercial sector. In 2007 the USA launched the Validated End 
User  (VEU) programme as the  third  component of  the  China  Rule.45 The VEU 
programme  is  aimed  at  facilitating  exports  to  trusted  companies  in  China  but 
exposes  US  exporters—and  Chinese  importers—to  greater  scrutiny  by  the  US 
Government.  Under  the  programme,  pre-screened  companies  in  China  can 
receive  certain  dual-use  items  without  the  US-based  exporter  applying  for  an 
export  licence.46 In  2009  the  programme  was  extended  to  include  Indian 
importers.47 However,  doubts  among  Chinese  and  US  companies  about  the 
benefits of the programme and delays in setting up an agreement with China for 
on-site inspections of Chinese companies have limited the programme’s impact.48 
The programme has also been criticized for alleged flaws in the assessment appli-
cations  from  Chinese  companies  for  VEU  status.49 As  of  November  2013,  only  
13 Chinese companies had been authorized as VEUs.50 
One  analyst  has  characterized the development  of US  policy on  exports con-
trols  to  China  as  ongoing  competition  between  two  schools  of  thought  in  US 
policymaking: the so-called ‘Control Hawks’ and the ‘Run Faster’ coalition. Both 
groups emphasize the  potential threat posed  by China’s  military modernization 
and  the  need  to  limit  China’s  access  to  key  technologies  but  differ  on  their 
preferred  policy  response.  The  ‘Control  Hawks’  advocate  strict  US  export 
controls and restrictions on transfers of a wide range of goods and technologies to 
China, fearing these transfers would damage US national security interests. The 
‘Run  Faster’  camp  advocates a  more streamlined  US export control system  that 
targets  the  most  sensitive  items  (or  ‘crown  jewels’),  supports  the  US  defence 
industry and allows the US to run faster than its competitors. The China Rule is 
the  outcome  of  the  competition  between  these  two  rival  coalitions,  while  the 
ECR  initiative  reflects  the  growing  ascendancy  of  the  ‘Run  Faster’  viewpoint 
during the administration of US President Barack Obama.51 
Application of national export controls on transfers to China 
One indication of the extent to which the USA prioritizes enforcing controls on 
exports of military goods and dual-use items to China is the close attention paid 
to potential end users of exported goods in China. The US Department of State 
45
Fergusson  (note  39),  p.  24;  and  BIS,  ‘Validated  End-User  Program’,  [n.d.],  <http://www.bis.doc. 
gov/index.php/licensing/validated-end-user-program>. 
46
BIS (note 45).  
47
Corr, C. F., and Hungerford, J. T., ‘The struggles of shipping dual-use goods to China’, China Business 
Review (Jan.–Feb. 2010), pp. 44–46. 
48
US Government Accountability Oce (GAO), Challenges with Commerce’s Validated End-User Program 
May Limit Its Ability to Ensure that Semiconductor Equipment Exported to China Is Used As Intended, GAO-
08-1095 (GAO: Washington, DC, 25 Sep. 2008); and Corr and Hungerford (note 47). 
49
‘Newest  designation  reinforces concerns  about  Validated  End-User  Program’,  Wisconsin  Project  on 
Nuclear  Arms  Control,  10  June  2009,  <http://www.wisconsinproject.org/export-control/documents/ 
avizareport-061009.pdf>. 
50
BIS (note 45).  
51
Meijer (note 29), p. 49. 
How to view pdf thumbnails in - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
pdf thumbnail generator; view pdf image thumbnail
How to view pdf thumbnails in - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
view pdf thumbnails in; .pdf printing in thumbnail size
10   WESTERN ARMS EXPORTS TO CHINA
and the US Department of Commerce both maintain global watch lists of ‘entities 
of  concern’  to  guide  licensing  and  inform  companies.  China  is  the  primary 
location for such entities on both lists.52 Another indication is the efforts to pros-
ecute  companies  and  individuals  involved  in  unlicensed  exports.  Preventing 
‘exports to China for military end-uses and military end-users’ is one of the main 
priorities  of  US  export  control  enforcement.53 Between  2011  and  2013  the  US 
Government prosecuted 25 export  control-related cases involving the shipment 
of controlled items to China.54 In the most recent case, Pratt & Whitney Canada 
(P&WC)  was  fined  for exporting  US-made  components used in China’s combat 
helicopter programme (see box 2.1).  
The  USA  also  seeks  to  influence  other  states’  policies  on  exports  of military 
goods  and  dual-use  items  to  China.  In  2003  the  Wassenaar  Arrangement—a 
voluntary,  consensus-based  export  control  regime,  covering  transfers  of  both 
military items and dual-use  goods,  of which the  USA is a  member—agreed on a 
‘statement of understanding’ in which participating governments agreed that an 
authorization  would  be  required  for  exports  of  non-listed,  dual-use  items  for 
military end uses in destinations subject to a United Nations arms embargo or any 
relevant regional or national arms embargo.55 In 2007, under the China Rule, and 
as part of its implementation of the terms of the statement of understanding, the 
USA  enacted stricter  controls  on  exports  to  China  and  tried  to  convince other 
states  to  do  the  same.56 However,  these  attempts  appear  to  have  been  largely 
unsuccessful.57  
52
US GAO, US Agencies Need to Assess Control List Reform’s Impact on Compliance Activities, GAO-12-613 
(GAO: Washington, DC, Apr. 2012), p. 36. 
53
Helder,  J., et  al.,  ‘Lessons learned  from export  controls  and  sanctions  enforcement’, Presentation  at 
Baker  &  McKenzie  International  Trade  and  Compliance  Conference,  Amsterdam,  8  Nov.  2013, 
<http://www.bakermckenzie.com/files/Uploads/Documents/International%20Trade%20&%20Compliance
%20Event/Panel_Lessons%20Learned%20from%20Export%20Controls%20&%20Sanctions%20Enforceme
nt%20Cases.pdf>.  
54
US  Department of Justice  (DOJ),  ‘Summary  of  major  US  export  enforcement, economic  espionage, 
trade secret and embargo-related criminal  cases  (January 2008 to  the present:  updated  March 26,  2014)’, 
Mar. 2014, <https://www.pmddtc.state.gov/compliance/documents/OngoingExportCaseFactSheet.pdf>. 
55
Wassenaar Arrangement, ‘Statement of understanding on control  of non-listed dual-use items’, 2003, 
<http://www.wassenaar.org/guidelines/docs/Non-listed_Dual_Use_Items.pdf>.  Established  in  1996,  the 
Wassenaar  Arrangement  encourages  responsible  behaviour  aimed  at  preventing  ‘destabilising 
accumulations’ through the agreement of best practices, shared control lists and exchanges of information. 
Wassenaar Arrangement, ‘Introduction’, <http://www.wassenaar.org/introduction/index.html>.  
56
Bromley,  M.,  Duchâtel,  M.  and Holtom,  P.,  China’s Exports of  Small Arms and Light Weapons,  SIPRI 
Policy Paper no. 38 (SIPRI: Stockholm, Oct. 2013), p. 18. 
57
US Embassy in Paris, ‘Export control bilats between France and DOC Assistant Secretary Christopher 
Padilla’,  Cable  to  US  Department  of  Commerce  no.  06PARIS7705_a,  7  Dec.  2006, 
<https://www.wikileaks.org/plusd/cables/06PARIS7705_a.html>;  US  Embassy  in  Berlin,  ‘Export  control 
bilateral talks  between  Germany  and DOC  Assistant Secretary Padilla’, Cable  to US  Secretary of State no. 
07BERLIN219_a,  2  Feb.  2007,  <https://www.wikileaks.org/plusd/cables/07BERLIN219_a.html>;  US 
Embassy in  Stockholm, ‘Export  control  bilats  between  Sweden and DOC  Assistant  Secretary  Christopher 
Padilla’,  Cable  to  US  Department  of  Commerce  no.  07STOCKHOLM77_a,  23  Jan.  2007, 
<https://www.wikileaks.org/plusd/cables/07STOCKHOLM77_a.html>; and Meijer (note 29).  
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Ability to show PDF page thumbnails for quick navigation. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. C# HTML5 PDF Viewer: View PDF Online.
show pdf thumbnail in html; enable pdf thumbnail preview
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Ability to show PDF page thumbnails for quick navigation. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: View PDF Online.
pdf first page thumbnail; create thumbnail jpeg from pdf
US EXPORT CONTROLS ON TRANSFERS TO CHINA    11
More directly,  the  USA seeks  to prevent  particular transfers  to China via  the 
implementation of  controls  on the  re-export  of US  technologies.  All  exports  of 
ITAR-controlled USML  goods  from  the  USA  restrict  use  to specified end-users 
and place controls on onward re-exports.58 These ‘re-export controls’ are used by 
the USA to block transfers to China by other states. For example, in 2012 the US 
Government  reported  that  it  was  able  to  block  China’s  attempt  to  acquire  an 
‘imaging  satellite constellation’ from  a European  company  because it  contained 
US technology.59 These re-export restrictions have  led foreign  companies  to try 
and minimize the presence of US components in their systems in order to avoid 
58
Gustavus,  J.  D.,  ‘What  US  and  Chinese  companies  need  to  know  about  US  export  control  laws 
applicable to China’, WorldECR, no. 26 (Oct. 2013). 
59
US DOD and US Department of State (note 32), Appendix 4, p. 2. 
Box 2.1. Pratt & Whitney Canada and the Z-10 helicopter  
In  2012  Pratt  &  Whitney  Canada  (P&WC),  a  Canadian  subsidiary  of  the  US-based  company 
United  Technologies  Corporation  (UTC),  admitted  to  supplying  components  procured  in  the 
USA for use in the development of China’s Z-10 combat helicopter, and to violations of US export 
controls.
a
In the 1990s P&WC had agreed to take part in a joint project with Eurocopter Southern Africa 
(Eurocopter SA) to assist the China Aviation Industry Corporation (AVIC II) with its helicopter 
programme.  P&WC’s  involvement  included  the  transfer  of  PT6C-67C  turbo  shaft  engines 
containing  the  electric-engine  control  (EEC)  system  produced  by  the  US-based  company 
Hamilton Sundstrand Cooperation (HSC), another subsidiary of UTC.
b
Unlike HSC, P&WC appears to have been aware that the PT6C-67C engines would be used in 
the development of a military helicopter and that this might contravene US export control laws. 
One  P&WC  marketing  manager wrote  in  an August 2000  email that ‘discussions  on [the PWC 
engine]  for  [the]  Chinese  Z-10  attack  helicopter  are progressing  smoothly’.
c
Nevertheless,  the 
prospect  of gaining  access  to  the  Chinese helicopter  market  appears  to  have convinced  P&WC 
that it was worth taking the risk.
In order to facilitate the granting of an export licence, AVIC II provided P&WC with a briefing 
paper outlining  plans for the development of a civil  helicopter. P&WC  managers were sceptical 
but  did  not  share  their  doubts  with  the  Canadian  authorities,  informing  the  Canadian 
Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development (DFATD) only that AVIC II had provided 
them with the basic elements of a civil  helicopter programme.  On  the basis of this  information, 
DFATD issued a license for the export for 10 67C engines for the programme.  
In June  2012,  following a  lengthy  investigation  by the  US authorities UTC, HSC and  P&WC 
agreed to pay fines to the US Government totalling $75 million.
a
US Department of Justice (DOJ), Oce of  Public Affairs, ‘United Technologies subsidiary  pleads 
guilty to criminal charges for helping China develop new attack helicopter’, Press release, 28 June 2012, 
<http://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/united-technologies-subsidiary-pleads-guilty-criminal-charges-help 
ing-china-develop-new>;  and Schmidt, M.  S.,  ‘Military  contractors are  fined  over  aid  to  China’,  New 
York Times, 28 June 2012.  
b
Reynolds,  S.  B.,  ‘The  United  Technologies  case:  investigating  and  prosecuting  a  major  defense 
contractor following a voluntary disclosure of unlawful exports to an embargoed nation’, Export Control 
Laws, vol. 61, no. 6 (Nov. 2013), p. 11.  
c
US  Attorney’s  Oce,  District  of  Connecticut,  ‘Deferred  Prosecution Agreement’,  <http://lib.law. 
virginia.edu/Garrett/prosecution_agreements/sites/default/files/pdf/United_Technologies.pdf>, p. 2.  
d
US DOJ, ‘Re: United States v. United Technologies Corporation, Hamilton Sundstrand Corporation 
and  Pratt  &  Whitney  Canada  Corp’,  Letter  dated  28  June  2012,  <http://www.ice.gov/doclib/news/ 
releases/2012/120628bridgeport3.pdf>. 
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document in VB.NET WPF program. PDF thumbnails for navigation in .NET project. VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer: View PDF Document.
pdf files thumbnails; create pdf thumbnails
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
Users can view any page by using view page button. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. PDF thumbnails for navigation in .NET WPF Console application.
create pdf thumbnail; how to create a thumbnail of a pdf document
12   WESTERN ARMS EXPORTS TO CHINA
US  restrictions  on  which  actors  they  can  supply.60 Under  the  ECR  initiative, 
aspects of US re-export controls to some  countries are being  relaxed. However, 
controls  on  re-exports  to  China  and  other  countries  subject  to  US  arms 
embargoes will remain in place.61  
The  USA  has  also  used diplomatic and economic  pressure to  persuade other 
states to block exports to China that were not subject to US re-export controls. In 
2003, for example, the USA persuaded the Czech Government to block the sale of 
10  Vera  radars  to  China.62 In  addition,  in  the  mid-to-late  2000s  US  diplomats 
lobbied  European ocials to block the transfer  to China of satellite technology 
under the Galileo programme.63 
The supply of Israeli military equipment to China has been a source of tension 
between the USA and Israel for many years (see chapter 4). In July 2000 Israel 
cancelled  a $250 million deal to  supply China with  the Phalcon Airborne Early 
Warning  and  Control  system  because  of  US  pressure.64 In  2005  the  US  DOD 
stated that  Israel  and  Russia were China’s  ‘primary  foreign  sources  of  weapon 
systems and military technology’.65 Also in 2005, the USA suspended several arms 
deals  with  Israel,  including  the  export  of  night  vision  goggles,  and  blocked 
Israel’s  participation  in  the  Joint  Strike  Fighter  (JSF)  combat  aircraft  pro-
gramme.66 The  measures  were  aimed  at  persuading  Israel  to  cancel  a  deal  to 
modernize  Harpy  anti-radar  unmanned  aerial  vehicles  (UAVs,  or  drones)  that 
China had acquired from Israel in the late 1990s.67 In addition to halting the deal, 
Israel  agreed  to:  (a)  consult  with  the  US  Government  on  future  arms  sales  to 
China;  (b)  tighten  restrictions  on  defence-related  technology  transfers; 
(c) downgrade military relations to a minimum; and (d) submit exports to China 
to a stricter export control regime.68 Reports from late 2013 indicate that Israel’s 
arms industry is lobbying the Israeli Government to ease restrictions on exports 
to  China.69 However,  the  Israeli  Ministry  of  Defense  (MOD)  is  keen  to  avoid 
60
US Embassy in Paris, ‘Airbus: fears of defense trade controls hurt US exports’, Cable to US Secretary of 
State no. 08PARIS1078, 5 June 2008, <http://wikileaks.org/cable/2008/06/08PARIS1078.html>. 
61
BIS, ‘Remarks of Under Secretary of Commerce  Eric L.  Hirschhorn  at the  Practicing  Law  Institute’,  
10  Dec.  2012,  <http://www.bis.doc.gov/index.php/2011-09-12-15-56-29/2012-06-26-19-35-02/newsroom-
archives/97-about-bis/newsroom/speeches/speeches-2012/476-remarks-of-under-secretary-of-commerce-
eric-l-hirschhorn-at-the-practicing-law-institute>. 
62
Saalman, L. and Yuan, J., ‘The European Union and the arms ban on China’, Nuclear Threat Initiative,  
1 Jul. 2004, <http://www.nti.org/analysis/articles/european-union-and-arms-ban-china/>. 
63
US  Embassy  in  Berlin, ‘Message  delivered:  Chinese  attempt  to  procure  illicit  satellite  components’, 
Cable  to  US  Secretary  of  State  no.  08BERLIN618,  9  May  2008,  <http://wikileaks.org/cable/ 
2008/05/08BERLIN618.html>;  and  Lague,  D.,  ‘In  satellite  tech  race,  China hitched  a  ride from  Europe’, 
Reuters, 22 Dec. 2013.  
64
‘Israel scraps China radar deal’, BBC News, 12 July 2000.  
65
US DOD, Annual Report to Congress: Military and Security Developments Involving the People’s Republic 
of China (US DOD: Washington, DC, 2005), p. 23. 
66
Ben-David, A., ‘US pressure threatens Israel–China trade’, Jane’s Defence Weekly, 12 Jan. 2005, p. 22. 
67
Ben-David (note 66).  
68
US DOD, ‘US Department of Defense–Israeli Ministry of Defense joint press statement’, Press Release 
no. 846-05, 16 Aug. 2005, <http://www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=8795>; Gertz, B., ‘US to 
restart arms technology transfers to Israel’, Washington Times, 17 Aug. 2005; and Evron, Y., ‘Between Beijing 
and Washington: Israel’s technology transfers  to China’, Journal of East Asian Studies, vol. 13,  no. 3 (2013),  
pp. 503–28. 
69
Coren,  O.,  ‘Israel’s  defense  industry  lobbying  to  ease  exports  to  China’,  Haaretz,  31  Dec.  2013, 
<http://www.haaretz.com/news/diplomacy-defense/.premium-1.566277>. 
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Support of converting from any single one PDF page and multiple pages. Thumbnails can be created from PDF pages. Support for customizing image size.
how to make a thumbnail from pdf; can't see pdf thumbnails
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Embedded page thumbnails.
generate pdf thumbnails; pdf thumbnail generator online
US EXPORT CONTROLS ON TRANSFERS TO CHINA    13
taking steps that might threaten security cooperation with the USA. In December 
2013  the  head  of  the  Israeli  MOD’s  Defense  Export  Control  Agency  resigned 
following  reports that an Israeli  subsystem  sold to  a French company had been 
supplied to China.70 
What has the USA licensed and exported to China? 
Prior to 1989, the USA supplied a number of key technologies to the Chinese mili-
tary and throughout the 1980s signed several major arms deals with China.71 The 
largest  of  these  was the  $550  million Peace  Pearl  programme  for  the  modern-
ization of China’s F-8 combat aircraft. Other transfers included: (a) the modern-
ization  of  a  production  facility  for  155mm  artillery  shells;  (b)  the  sale  of  
24 Sikorsky S-70 helicopters; (c) the  sale of Mark-46 anti-submarine torpedoes; 
and (d) the sale of AN/TPQ-37 artillery-locating radars.72 In 1990, with the appli-
cation of the US arms embargo, China cancelled the Peace Pearl programme and 
in  1992  the  USA  cancelled  its  remaining  arms  deals  with  China.73 Despite  the 
existence  of  the  embargo,  a  number  of  Chinese  weapon  systems  use  US-built 
components, either because the systems were supplied prior to 1990 or because 
the items concerned are not subject to US export controls. For example, the Chin-
ese K-8 trainer aircraft uses a flight instrumentation system built by US company 
Rockwell Collins and Chinese Dong Feng military trucks use diesel engines built 
by the US company Cummins.74 
The  Chinese  military  also  continues  to  deploy  a number  of  weapon  systems 
imported from the USA before the US arms embargo was imposed. For example, 
the PLA continues to use 24 Sikorsky-built S-70 transport helicopters, originally 
delivered  in  1984.  According  to  the  Chinese  military  the  helicopters  are  main-
tained using spare parts that were stockpiled before the US arms embargo. How-
ever, in 2005 a South Korean was convicted of trying to obtain engines for S-70 
helicopters in  order to  supply  them to  the Chinese  military.75 Supplies  of spare 
parts for these helicopters are blocked by the US arms embargo on China. Never-
theless,  Sikorsky has been  able to  sell  the civilian  version  of  the S-70 to  China 
continuously since 1984 and the civilian version of the S-92 transport helicopter 
70
Opall-Rome, B., ‘Israel replaces export control chief after tech transfer to China’, Defense News, 3 Jan. 
2014,  <http://www.defensenews.com/article/20140103/DEFREG04/301030014/Israel-Replaces-Export-Co 
ntrol-Chief-After-Tech-Transfer-China>. 
71
Archick, Grimmett and Kan (note 28), p. 4; and Meijer (note 4).  
72
Archick, Grimmett and Kan (note 28). 
73
Mann, J., ‘China cancels US deal for modernizing F-8 jet’, Los Angeles Times, 15 May 1990.  
74
‘K8/JL8 Trainer Jet: PLAAF’, Air Force World, [n.d.], <http://airforceworld.com/pla/english/k-8-JL-8-
JL-11-trainer-china-pakistan.html>;  ‘Rockwell  Collins  establishing  joint  venture  with  China  Electronics 
Technology  Avionics  Co.  Ltd.  to  support  COMAC  C919  program’,  Business  Wire,  24  Oct.  2012, 
<http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20121024006576/en/Rockwell-Collins-Establishing-Joint-Ven 
ture-China-Electronics#.UwdqiHmqB28>;  and  Amnesty  International,  ‘China:  Sustaining  conflict  and 
human  rights  abuses—the  flow  of  arms  accelerates’,  10  June  2006,  <http://www.amne 
sty.org/en/library/info/ASA17/030/2006/en>. 
75
Tran,  P.,  ‘China  extends  military  reach’, Defense News,  24  May  2010,  pp.  1,  8;  and  ‘Sikorsky engine 
trader sentenced’, Connecticut Post, 31 Aug. 2005. 
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
by large enterprises and organizations to distribute and view documents. size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size Embedded page thumbnails.
create thumbnail jpg from pdf; thumbnail view in for pdf files
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Converter control easy to create thumbnails from PDF pages. Selection for compressing to multiple image formats. Cut and paste any areas in PDF pages to images.
create pdf thumbnail image; disable pdf thumbnails
14   WESTERN ARMS EXPORTS TO CHINA
since  2005.76 In  2013  Sikorsky  and  the  Chinese  company  Changhe  Aircraft 
Industries Corporation signed a co-production deal for the civilian version of the 
S-76 in China.77 This kind of deal is likely to have provided Chinese industry with 
technologies and production  methods that  can  be applied  in  the production  of 
military  systems.78  In  late  2013  the  PLA  unveiled  a  new  indigenous-built 
helicopter—the  Z20—that  appears to  share  some of  the  design  and  technology 
aspects of the S-70.
79
76 
‘USA  lifts  barriers  to  sale  of  S-92  to  China’,  Flight  International,  23  Aug.  2005,  <http://www. 
flightglobal.com/news/articles/usa-lifts-barriers-to-sale-of-s-92-to-china-201146/>.
77
Sikorsky, ‘Sikorsky  and Changhe sign agreement  for S-76DCabin production in China’,  Press  release,  
 Sep.  2013,  <http://www.sikorsky.com/About+Sikorsky/News/Press+Details?pressvcmid=8c88d90f24fe 
0410VgnVCM1000004f62529fRCRD>. 
78
US DOD (note 34).  
79
Waldron, G., ‘Pictures: China pushes ahead with military helicopter programmes’, Flight Global, 9 Jan. 
2014,  <http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/pictures-china-pushes-ahead-with-military-helicopter-
394676/>. 
3. European export controls on transfers to 
China: France, Germany and the United 
Kingdom 
This chapter details the policies of the EU’s three largest arms exporters—France, 
Germany  and  the  UK—on  transfers  of  military-related  technologies  to  China, 
including  transfers  of  military  goods,  dual-use  items  and  other  non-controlled 
items relevant to the development of China’s military capabilities. It begins with a 
discussion of the EU arms embargo on China, which all three states are politically 
obliged to apply. Separate sections then outline the French, German and British 
export control systems, including their interpretations of and positions on the EU 
arms embargo, their application of national export controls on transfers to China, 
and details of what is being licensed and exported to China.  
The European Union arms embargo on China  
In  June  1989  the  European  Council  adopted  a  number  of  punitive  measures 
against China, including a halt to ‘military cooperation’ and ‘an embargo on trade 
in arms with China’.80 The imposition of the embargo predates the creation of the 
EU’s Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP) with the Maastricht Treaty in 
1993  and is, consequently, not  legally  binding  on  member  states.81 Furthermore, 
there has been no agreement on a list of items to be covered by the term ‘arms’. 
The  question  of  how  the  embargo  should  be  applied  is  left  to  individual  EU 
member states,  whose interpretations continue to  differ  in  terms of both policy 
and practice. In  addition, the embargo is not covered  by the 2009  EU Dual-use 
Regulation’s  so-called  ‘catch-all’  provision  that  requires  EU  member  states  to 
control  exports  of  unlisted  goods  to  military  end-users  in  embargoed  desti-
nations.82 
Each  of the  12 EU member  states that were members of the Union in 1989  is 
obliged to  implement the  EU  arms embargo  on China. While the 16 states  that 
have joined the EU since 1989  have accepted as binding all  EU  decisions  made 
prior  to  their  membership,  this  does  not  apply  to  the  European  Community’s 
political  declarations.83 However,  the  EU  Common  Position  defining  common 
rules governing control of exports of military technology and equipment covers 
80
European  Council,  ‘Council  of  Ministers  Declaration  on  China’,  27  June  1989,  <http://www. 
sipri.org/databases/embargoes/eu_arms_embargoes/china/eu-council-of-minister-declaration-on-china>.  
81
European Union External Action Service (EEAS), ‘Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP) of the 
European Union’, [n.d.], <http://eeas.europa.eu/cfsp/index_en.htm>. 
82
Council  of the European  Union, Council  Regulation  (EC)  No  428/2009 of  5 May 2009  setting  up a 
Community  regime  for  the  control  of  exports,  transfer,  brokering  and  transit  of  dual-use  items,  Official 
Journal of the European Union, L 134, 5 May 2009, Article 4(2). 
83
European  Commission,  ‘Conditions  for  membership’,  [n.d.],  <http://ec.europa.eu/enlargement/ 
policy/conditions-membership/chapters-of-the-acquis/index_en.htm>. 
16   WESTERN ARMS EXPORTS TO CHINA
the  EU  arms  embargo.84 The  EU  Common  Position  commits  member  states  to 
deny  arms  export  licences  inconsistent  with  ‘the  international  obligations  of 
Member  States  and  their  commitments  to  enforce  United  Nations,  European 
Union and  Organization for  Security and Co-operation in Europe  (OSCE)  arms 
embargoes’.85 This means that EU member states which joined the EU after 1989 
are obliged to take the EU arms embargo on China into account when assessing 
export licence applications.
86
Disputes about the lifting of the embargo  
The EU embargo on China was the source of an intense transatlantic and intra-
European dispute in 2003–2005, when both France and Germany indicated that 
they  were  in  favour  of  its  removal.87 At  the  December  2004  meeting  of  the 
Council of the European Union, EU member states ‘rearmed the political will 
to  continue  to  work  towards  lifting  the  arms  embargo’.88 At  the  same  time, 
member  states  recalled  ‘the  importance  of  the  EU  Code  of  Conduct  on  Arms 
Exports in particular criteria regarding human rights, stability and security in the 
region and the national security of friendly and allied countries in preventing an 
increase in arms sales to China from EU Member States’.89  
However, the proposal raised strong objections in the USA, with both  the US 
Congress and US President George W. Bush warning that such a move would be a 
significant obstacle  to  US  defence  cooperation  with  EU  member  states.90 In an 
attempt  to allay US  concerns, the EU made  it clear that  the  embargo  on China 
would not be lifted until a strengthened EU Code of Conduct was agreed.91 How-
ever,  US  opposition  to  lifting the  embargo  remained  strong.
The passing  of an 
anti-secession law by China’s National People’s Congress in March 2005—which 
threatened  military  force  if  Taiwan  formally  declared  its  independence—also 
influenced  EU member states’  thinking,  serving  to  further  dampen support  for 
lifting  the  embargo.92 Some  commentators  have  argued  that  the  passing  of  the 
anti-secession law provided convenient cover for EU member states to drop the 
plan,  which  they  were  now  keen  to  abandon  in  the  face  of  concerted  US 
84
The EU  Common Position  supersedes the 1998  Code  of  Conduct on Arms Exports, and is  a  legally 
binding agreement aimed  at  setting ‘high common standards’ in EU  member states’ arms  export policies. 
Council  of  the  European  Union,  ‘Council  Common  Position  2008/944/CFSP  of  8  Dec.  2008  defining 
common rules governing control of exports of military technology and equipment’ (EU Common Position), 
Official Journal of the European Union,  L335, 8 Dec. 2008; and  Council of  the European Union, ‘European 
Union Code of Conduct on Arms Exports’, 8675/2/98 Rev. 2, 5 June 1998. 
85
Council of the European Union, ‘EU Common Position’ (note 84), p. 2. 
86
British Government ocial, Interview with authors, 11 Feb. 2014. 
87
‘Schroeder backs sales to China of EU weapons’, Wall Street Journal, 2 Dec. 2003; and ‘Chirac renews 
call for end of EU arms embargo on China’, Agence France-Presse, 27 Jan. 2004. 
88
European  Council,  ‘Presidency  Conclusions’,  16–17  Dec.  2004,  Brussels,  <http://www.european-
council.europa.eu/council-meetings/conclusions/>. 
89
‘European Union Code of Conduct on Arms Exports’ (note 84); and European Council (note 88). 
90
Alden, E., ‘US threat to restrict arms sales to Europe’, Financial Times, 13 May 2004.  
91
Anthony,  I.  and  Bauer,  S.,  ‘Transfer  controls’,  SIPRI  Yearbook  2005:  Armaments,  Disarmament  and 
International Security (Oxford University Press: Oxford, 2005), pp. 699–719. 
92
US Embassy in Dublin, ‘Subject: Ireland still opaque on China arms embargo’, Cable no. 05DUBLIN512, 
29 Apr. 2005, <http://www.wikileaks.ch/cable/2005/04/05DUBLIN512.html>.  
EUROPEAN EXPORT CONTROLS ON TRANSFERS TO CHINA   17
pressure.93 In addition, there was strong opposition to lifting the embargo within 
Europe, from both  the  media and the  European and  member-state parliaments, 
mostly based on concerns relating to the human-rights situation in China.  
Since  2005  the  idea  of  lifting  the  arms  embargo  on  China  has  been  raised 
occasionally by EU member states and EU ocials but failed to gain the kind of 
support  needed  to  make it  a  serious  proposition.  In  January  2010  the  Spanish 
Government—which had just assumed the rotating Presidency of the Council of 
the  European  Union—indicated  its  desire  to  discuss  lifting  the  embargo.94 In 
December  2010  the  High  Representative  of  the  European  Union  for  Foreign 
Affairs and Security Policy, Catherine Ashton, described the EU arms embargo on 
China as ‘a major impediment for developing stronger EU–China cooperation
’.
95
However,  these moves  appear  to  have  had  limited support  among  EU member 
states, a number of which—particularly Germany and the UK—remain opposed to 
lifting  the  embargo.96 Indeed,  it  appears  that  the  real  ambition  of  the  two 
declarations  was  not  to  restart  a  serious  debate  about  lifting  the  embargo  but, 
instead, to send a friendly signal to China.  
Under President Obama, the USA has maintained its staunch opposition to the 
lifting of the EU arms embargo, despite the apparent lack of credible support for a 
policy  change  within  Europe.  In  2010  the  US  Department  of  State  issued  an 
action request ‘for all Embassies in EU countries to reiterate our position that the 
EU should retain its arms embargo on China’.97 US pressure is still widely seen as 
the  key  factor  blocking  any  move  towards  an  eventual  lifting  of  the  EU  arms 
embargo.98 It has been argued that the USA’s position on the embargo on China is 
illogical, since the embargo is not legally binding and provides no real constraint 
on EU member states’ transfers of military goods to China.99 One argument is that 
the USA is actually more concerned about denying the Chinese Government the 
symbolic victory that a decision to lift the embargo would represent.100 
Japan  has also consistently voiced its strong opposition to  any attempt to  lift 
the  EU  arms  embargo  on  China.101 In  addition,  a  majority  of  members  in  the 
93
‘The  EU  and  arms  for  China’,  The  Economist,  1  Feb.  2010,  <http://www.economist.com/blogs/ 
charlemagne/2010/02/eu_china_arms_embargo>. 
94
US Secretary of State, ‘Supporting the EU arms embargo on China’, Cable to US Embassy in Beijing and 
US Mission to  the  European Union  no.  10STATE13969,  17 Feb.  2010,  <https://wikileaks.org/plusd/cables/ 
10STATE13969_a.html>; and  Cowan,  G., ‘Spain looks  to  end  EU arms embargo  on  China’,  Jane’s Defence 
Weekly, 3 Feb. 2010, p. 14. 
95
Hale, J., ‘EU arms embargo called “bargaining chip” in wider China talks’, Defense News, 13 Jan. 2011, 
<https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/ENAAT/conversations/topics/984>. 
96
Kirkup, J., ‘Britain prepared to block Eurozone move to relax arms embargo on China’, Daily Telegraph, 
4 Nov. 2011; and German Parliament, ‘Antwort der Bundesregierung, Zur Sicherheitspolitischen Lage in Ost- 
und Südostasien’ [Reply by the Federal Government  on the  security  situation in East and Southeast Asia], 
Drucksache 17/8561, 8 Feb. 2012,  <http://dipbt.bundestag.de/dip21/btd/17/085/1708561.pdf>.  
97
US Secretary of State (note 94). 
98
‘The EU and arms for China’ (note 93). 
99
Lewis,  J.,  ‘EU  arms  embargo  on  China’,  Arms  Control  Wonk,  24  Mar.  2005,  <http://lewis.arms 
controlwonk.com/archive/496/eu-arms-embargo-on-china>. 
100
British  Parliament,  Select  Committee  on  International  Development,  ‘Examination  of  Witnesses 
(Questions  100–119)’,  12  Jan.  2005,  <http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200405/cmselect/ 
cmintdev/145/5011203.htm>. 
101
Willis,  A., ‘Japan: Ashton was wrong to  suggest lifting  China arms ban’,  EU Observer,  19  May 2011, 
<http://euobserver.com/news/32360>. 
18   WESTERN ARMS EXPORTS TO CHINA
European  Parliament  are  strongly  opposed  to  ending  the  ban.102 A  2008  reso-
lution in the Parliament stating that the EU ‘must maintain its arms embargo on 
China,  as  long  as  China  continues  to  export  arms  to  armed  forces  and  armed 
groups  in countries, many  of  them  in  Africa,  that  fuel conflicts and perpetrate 
gross violations of human rights’ was passed with 618 members in favour and 16 
against.103 While  the European  Parliament has no formal say in whether or not 
the embargo is lifted, any attempt to lift it while opposition remains strong could 
pose  significant  political  problems.104 Some  EU  think  tank  experts  have  voiced 
support for lifting the embargo if it can be used as leverage for gaining  Chinese 
concessions  in  other  areas  (e.g.  cooperation  against  the  Iranian  nuclear 
programme), but the issue is not currently a policy research priority.105  
China’s view of the embargo  
The EU arms embargo has been a source of intense irritation  to China since  its 
imposition and the Chinese Government has constantly called for it to be lifted. 
These  calls  grew  louder  following  the  publication  in  2003  of  China’s  first  EU 
Policy Paper, which stated that ‘the EU should lift its ban on arms sales to China 
at  an  early  date  so  as  to  remove  barriers  to  greater  bilateral  cooperation  on 
defence  industry  and  technologies’.106 The  Chinese  Government  considers  the 
embargo degrading as it puts China in the same category as other countries that 
are  under  EU  sanctions,  such  as  Belarus,  Myanmar,  Sudan  and  Zimbabwe.107 
During  a September 2012 visit to Brussels, Chinese Prime Minister Wen Jiabao 
reiterated  China’s  unhappiness  that  the  embargo  remained  in  place.108 A  char-
acteristic  of  Wen’s  policy  towards  the  EU  was  to  link  the  lifting  of  the  arms 
embargo  to  other  bilateral  issues—especially  the  EU’s  trade  deficit  with  China 
and international security cooperation.  
Although the  arms embargo  is still framed  in  China as  an obstacle to  greater 
China–EU  cooperation  on  international  security  matters,  there  are  also  clear 
signs that China is becoming less focused on lifting the EU arms embargo.109 The 
2014  update  to  China’s  EU  Policy  Paper  still  calls  on  the  EU  to  ‘lift  its  arms 
embargo on China at an early date’ but Chinese ocials are not pushing the issue 
with the same frequency or intensity of previous years.110 This position is likely to 
102
Cendrowicz, L., ‘Should Europe lift its arms embargo on China?’, Time, 10 Feb. 2010. 
103
European Parliament, ‘Chinese policy  and its  effects  on Africa’, Procedure File no. 2007/2255(INI),  
23 Apr. 2008, <http://www.europarl.europa.eu/oeil/popups/ficheprocedure.do?id=556476>. 
104
‘The EU and arms for China’ (note 93). 
105
Godement,  F.  and  Fox,  J.,  A  Power  Audit  of  EU–China  Relations  (European  Council  on  Foreign 
Relations: London, 2008).  
106
Chinese State Council, China’s European Union Policy Paper (Information Oce of the State Council: 
Beijing, Oct. 2003).  
107
Weitz,  R.,  ‘EU  should  keep  China  arms  embargo’,  The  Diplomat,  18  Apr.  2012, 
<http://thediplomat.com/2012/04/eu-should-keep-china-arms-embargo/>. 
108
Kanter, J., ‘Wen chides Europe on arms sale embargo’, New York Times, 20 Sep. 2012. 
109
Banks, M., ‘EU arms embargo against China dismissed as “unimportant”’, TheParliament.com, 2 Aug. 
2011, 
<http://www.china-defense-mashup.com/eu-arms-embargo-against-china-dismissed-as-unimport 
ant.html>. 
110
Chinese  State  Council,  ‘China’s  policy  paper  on  the  EU:  deepen  the  China–EU  comprehensive 
strategic  partnership for  mutual  benefit  and win-win  cooperation’,  Apr. 2014, <http://www.fmprc.gov.cn/ 
mfa_eng/wjdt_665385/wjzcs/t1143406.shtml>. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested