asp.net pdf viewer control c# : Create thumbnail from pdf software SDK project winforms wpf html UWP SIPRIPP435-part1718

CHINA
S ADAPTATION TO WESTERN EXPORT CONTROLS   39
( ,  zizhu  chuangxin)  capabilities,  for  example  through  higher  R&D 
expenditures,  subsidies to Chinese  state-owned  enterprises (SOEs), and  ‘forced 
technology transfers’ from foreign companies seeking to invest in China. 
China’s acquisitions of military technology from the West 
Acquisitions prior to 1989 
During the 1960s and 1970s the contribution of Western states to China’s military 
modernization  was  almost  non-existent.  An  important exception  was  the  UK’s 
1975  decision  to  authorize  a  contract  for  the  licenced  production  in  China  of 
Rolls-Royce  Spey  Mk-202  turbofan  engines  to  equip  JH-7  long-range  fighter-
bombers  (see  chapter  4).  Overall,  the  modernization  of  China’s  conventional 
forces  stagnated  during  these  two  decades.  The  lack  of  foreign  input  was 
aggravated  by  Mao’s  strategic  decision  to  prioritize  R&D  funding  for  nuclear 
technologies, including nuclear-powered submarines.236  
While the 1980s are regarded as the golden decade of China’s military cooper-
ation  with  the  West,  exports  to  China  were,  at  that  time,  still  controlled  and 
coordinated  among  Western allies through  COCOM, and only took place in the 
form  of  exemptions. Nevertheless, the 1980s was also a period of strategic con-
vergence  between  the  West  and  China  against  the  Soviet  Union,  and  Western 
states’  hopes  that  Deng  Xiaoping  would  bring  political  reform  in  Beijing.  The 
USA’s sales  of  major conventional arms to China peaked at  $98 million in 1985, 
out  of  a  total  of  $188  million  between  1984  and  1996.237 These  transfers  had  a 
significant impact  on  the  modernization  of the  PLAAF  and  PLAN  in  a  decade 
during  which  China’s  budget  for  foreign  acquisitions  amounted  to  less  than 
25 billion yuan ($4 billion).
238
Western transfers helped China develop attack and assault helicopters now in 
use  in  the  PLAAF,  the  PLAN  and  PLA  ground  forces  in  a  variety  of  versions 
(including  ASW,  anti-tank  and  SAR).  The  USA  authorized  the  sale  of  
24 S-70/UH-60A Sikorsky Black Hawk helicopters, the only assault helicopter in 
service  in  the  PLA  capable  of  operating  in  high-altitude  environments,  while 
Boeing sold 6 Chinook heavy-lift helicopters. France also had fruitful cooperation 
with China in the 1980s in the area of military helicopters. Transfers from France 
enabled  the  PLA  to  add  anti-tank  (AS-565  Panther  and  SA-342  Gazelle)  and  
ASW helicopters (SA-321 Super Frelon) to its arsenal. In 1987 France also author-
ized the transfer of an unknown number of high subsonic optical remote-guided, 
tube-launched (HOT) anti-tank missiles for use on Gazelle helicopters.  
European transfers in the 1980s also had a significant impact on the modern-
ization  of  the  PLAN,  which  upgraded  or  retrofitted  a  dozen  platforms  (Luhu-
236
Godwin, P., ‘China’s defense establishment, the hard lessons of incomplete modernization’, L. Burkitt 
et al. (eds), The Lessons of History: the Chinese People’s Liberation Army at 75 (Strategic Studies Institute, US 
Army War College: Carlisle, 2003), pp. 15–58. 
237
SIPRI Arms Transfers Database (note 13). 
238
Wang,  S.  G.,  ‘The  military  expenditure  of  China,  1989–98’,  SIPRI  Yearbook  1999:  Armaments, 
Disarmament and International Security (Oxford University Press: Oxford, 1999), pp. 334–49.  
Create thumbnail from pdf - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
enable pdf thumbnails in; pdf file thumbnail preview
Create thumbnail from pdf - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
pdf thumbnail generator online; create pdf thumbnails
40   WESTERN ARMS EXPORTS TO CHINA
class destroyers, Jiangwei I/II-class frigates and some old Luda-class destroyers) 
with better defensive capabilities as a result of transfers of naval combat systems, 
100 mm guns, anti-submarine sensors, air defence radars and anti-air missiles.239 
French, German and US companies also played a key role in the propulsion of the 
PLAN’s  new  surface  and  underwater  platforms  with  the  transfer  of  MTU  and 
Pielstick diesel engines and General Electric’s LM 2500 gas turbines for a Luhu 
(Type  052)  destroyer.  Finally,  Western  countries  transferred  sea-based  arma-
ments to equip Chinese surface ships and submarines.  
The USA authorized the transfer of Mark-46 Mod 2 torpedoes, a standard ASW 
weapon  for  navies  operating  across  the  world.  Although  the  USA’S  FMS  pro-
gramme was interrupted in 1989, the bilateral cooperation that had already taken 
place  allowed China to mass-produce its  own  domestic  version of the Mark-46 
Mod  2  torpedo,  the  Yu-7.  France  exported  the  PLAN’s  first  short-range,  air-
defence missile, the Crotale, a state-of-the art technology when the contract was 
signed in the first half of the 1980s. The Crotale and the retro-engineered Chinese 
version (the  HQ-7) are  now  used  by the  majority of  China’s  surface  combatant 
ships as short-range air defence systems. China also developed land versions on 
wheeled vehicles to protect ground forces and bases. In 1988 France authorized 
the transfer of the compact 100 mm naval gun, the first modern heavy naval gun 
to equip the PLAN destroyers and frigates, which formed the  basis for the con-
struction of a similar canon by the Chinese arms industry.  
Western  transfers  also  had  an  impact  on  the  modernization  of  the  PLAAF, 
especially  in  the  area of avionics.  The  largest  FMS item authorized by the USA 
was avionics for the F-8 interceptor in 1986, for a total value of $501 million. Air 
and  naval  systems  were  the  majority  of  items  licensed  by  US  export  control 
authorities, for a total  value of $501  million in 1982–86, although China report-
edly  purchased  only  17  per  cent  of  the  authorized  items.240 Between  1979  and 
1989,  China  and  the  UK  cooperated  on  an  avionics  suite  for  the  J-7  fighter, 
China’s version of the Mig-21.  
Finally,  in  the  area  of  land  systems,  France,  the  UK  and  the  USA  provided 
assistance to  the  Chinese  main  battle  tank and  light  infantry armoured  vehicle 
programmes by transferring main guns and assisting in upgrading turrets.  
Acquisitions since 1989 
After 1989, Western governments interrupted the majority of contracted defence 
programmes.  The  four  FMS  programmes  were  cancelled,  and  in  1992  the  US 
Department  of  State  decided  to  reimburse  unused  funds  to  China  and  return 
equipment present on US soil to implement the contracts.241 However, there were 
exceptions. In particular, a number of European states allowed companies to con-
tinue to honour some contracts signed during the 1980s. China also managed to 
239
Duchâtel, M. and  Sheldon-Duplaix,  A., ‘The European Union  and the  modernisation of  the People’s 
Liberation Army Navy: the limits of Europe’s strategic irrelevance’, China Perspectives, vol. no. 4 (2011), p. 37. 
240
Kenny,  H.,  ‘Underlying  patterns  of US arms  sales to China’,  World Military Expenditures  and Arms 
Transfers 1986 (US Arms Control and Disarmament Agency: Washington DC, 1987), pp. 39–47. 
241
Gill, B. and Kim,  T., China’s Arms Acquisitions from Abroad: A Quest for ‘Superb and Secret Weapons’, 
SIPRI Research Report No. 11 (Oxford University Press: Oxford, 1995), p. 74.  
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Word
Images. Convert Word to ODT. Convert PDF to Word. Convert ODT to Text Search. Insert Image. Thumbnail Create. Thumbnail Create. |. Home ›› XDoc.Word ›› C# Word
pdf preview thumbnail; pdf reader thumbnails
VB.NET Image: Program for Creating Thumbnail from Documents and
language. It empowers VB developers to create thumbnail from multiple document and image formats, such as PDF, TIFF, GIF, BMP, etc. It
disable pdf thumbnails; enable thumbnail preview for pdf files
CHINA
S ADAPTATION TO WESTERN EXPORT CONTROLS   41
identify loopholes in Western export control systems to acquire military-relevant 
technology  after  1989.  In  addition,  European  governments  granted  licences  for 
the  export  of  certain  technologies that  were  of benefit  to  the Chinese  military, 
particularly in  the fields of propulsion, helicopters, and certain radars and elec-
tronic  equipment. Some of  these  exports related to military items and others to 
dual-use goods, while others were civilian technologies not covered by either set 
of  controls.  As  such,  the  transfers  illustrate  the  thin  line  between  civilian  and 
military equipment in some areas of defence modernization.  
Transfers  after  1989 had an important  role  in  the development  of  the  PLAN 
fleet  through  the  sale  of  diesel  engines,  albeit  not  state-of-the-art  military 
versions. The German company MTU signed at least two new contracts to equip 
Song-class diesel submarines and continued deliveries of pre-1989 contracts  for 
propulsion of PLAN surface ships. In terms of surface-ship combatants, the 1988 
French contract to sell  DUBV 23  ASW  sonars  to equip PLAN frigates  and  des-
troyers was honoured and deliveries took place between 1991 and 1999, helping 
the PLAN to develop an embryonic ASW capability.  
A major feature of the West’s military cooperation  with China since 1989 has 
been its continued and expanded support in building China’s fleet of combat heli-
copters. Although most contracts have been with  civilian end-users,  there  is no 
doubting their constructive impact on Chinese military capabilities. In addition, 
engines  are  provided  to  helicopters  in  service  in  the  PLA,  and  sometimes  for 
export versions too. In 1996 China placed an order to acquire at least six Search-
water  radar  systems from the  UK,  for use  on  aircraft  with  AEW  and maritime 
patrol roles. The order was ocially placed for civilian purposes, including anti-
smuggling operations in maritime law enforcement. However, the radar system is 
now  operating  on  Y-8  maritime  patrol  aircraft  in  the  PLAN,  and  might  have 
assisted the development of China’s AEW capabilities.  
China’s cooperation with other exporting countries  
The Soviet Union and Russia   
Soviet  aid was decisive in the initial development of the Chinese  arms industry 
and the  PLA.  Soviet  transfers  of machine  guns,  artillery pieces,  mortars,  tanks, 
naval vessels and aircraft in the mid- and late-1940s had already helped the Com-
munist  Party  of  China  (CPC)  achieve  final  victory  in  its  civil  war  against  the 
Nationalist  Kuomintang  (KMT).242 Under  the  1950  Treaty  on  Friendship  and 
Mutual Assistance, the Soviet  Union provided assistance to the development  of 
Chinese  defence  enterprises  in  all  areas  of  military  modernization,  including 
upstream heavy industry for the production of aluminium,  cables  and electrical 
appliances.243 The PRC’s  first industrial complexes  in the areas  of  land systems, 
aviation, electronics, space and shipbuilding were all started with Soviet support. 
242
Goncharenko, S., ‘Sino–Soviet military cooperation’, O. A. Westadt (ed.), Brothers in Arms: The Rise and 
Fall of the Sino–Soviet Alliance (Woodrow Wilson Center Press: Washington, DC, 1998), pp. 141–64.  
243
Goncharenko (note 242), p. 153.  
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for PowerPoint
Preview Document. Conversion. Convert PowerPoint to PDF. Convert PowerPoint to PowerPoint Pages. Annotate PowerPoint. Text Search. Insert Image. Thumbnail Create
show pdf thumbnail in; pdf thumbnails
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Raster
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET And generating thumbnail for Raster Image is an easy work. How to Create Thumbnail for Raster in C#.
how to make a thumbnail of a pdf; pdf thumbnail fix
42   WESTERN ARMS EXPORTS TO CHINA
In the context of the 1950–53 Korean War, the PLA also acquired Soviet arms and 
weapon  systems in  order to  equip  60 army  divisions, 12  air  force divisions and  
36 naval  vessels. The PLAAF and PLAN were  established on the basis of Soviet 
military assistance with Russian systems, so that the PLA was able to ‘leap over a 
generation of weaponry’ during the early 1950s.244 Soviet engineers and advisers 
also played a key role in the early development of China’s nuclear programme and 
missile industry. Mao’s main foreign policy guideline, to ‘lean on one side’ (
, yibiandao)—that is, to rely exclusively on relations with the Soviet Union—also 
applied  to  acquisition  of  military  equipment.  However,  following  the  break  in 
relations between  China  and  the  Soviet  Union in  1960, Soviet  experts  in  China 
were recalled.  
The interruption in acquisitions of military technology from the West in 1989 
coincided with  a revival  in relations between China and the Soviet Union.  The 
visit to Beijing of the Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev during the May 1989 pro-
tests leading up to the Tiananmen Square incident paved the way for a major new 
turning  point  in  China’s  quest  for  advanced  military  technology.  In  addition, 
China developed a robust military relationship with Ukraine and was also able to 
purchase military technology and weapon systems from Israel before US oppos-
ition put an end to that cooperation. As a result, the 1990s and the 2000s were a 
period  of  enormous  foreign  input  in  China’s  military modernization.  After  the 
1995–96 Taiwan Strait crisis, the Chinese Government decided to accelerate mili-
tary  modernization in order  to deter Taiwan’s  declaration  of  independence  and 
create a strategic environment conducive to unification.  
After  the  collapse  of  the  Soviet  Union,  Russia  became  the  main  source  of 
advanced defence technologies for China in a context of double-digit growth of 
the  Chinese  military  budget.  According  to  SIPRI  estimates,  between  1991  and 
2013,  more  than  80  per  cent  of  China’s  imported  major  conventional  weapons 
were supplied by Russia, while China accounted for nearly 30 per cent of Russian 
arms  exports.245 During  this  period,  Russia  supplied  China  with  Su-27/Su-30 
combat aircraft,  transport aircraft,  Mi-17 military transport helicopters, Tor-M1 
mobile  air defence systems,  S-300PMU1/2 air  defence systems, Type 636E and 
Type 877E submarines, Sovremenny destroyers and  a wide range of missiles.  In 
addition, China secured agreement for the licensed production of Su-27 combat 
aircraft, Mi-17 helicopters and anti-tank and anti-ship missiles.246 The acquisition 
of  complete  weapon  systems  from  Russia  tremendously  increased  the  combat 
capabilities of the PLA, especially in the areas of air and sea superiority in China’s 
periphery.  It  also  laid  the  basis  for  the  development  of  the  PLA’s  long-range 
deployment capabilities.  
Since  the  mid-2000s,  Chinese  imports  of  Russian  arms  have  fallen  signif-
icantly.247 After peaking in 2005, they fell by over 50 per cent in just two years and 
244
You, J., ‘The Soviet model and the breakdown of the military alliance’, T. Berstein and Y. Hua (eds), 
China Learns from the Soviet Union, 1949–Present (Lexington Books: Plymouth, 2010), pp. 131–52.  
245
SIPRI Arms Transfers Database (note 13). 
246
SIPRI Arms Transfers Database (note 13). 
247
Jakobson,  L.  et  al.,  China’s  Energy  and  Security  Relations  with  Russia:  Hopes,  Frustrations  and 
Uncertainties, SIPRI Policy Paper no. 29 (SIPRI: Stockholm, Oct. 2011), pp. 17–22.  
Create Thumbnail in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
or Images; Create Thumbnail; Generate Barcodes on Your Documents; Read Barcodes from Your Documents. Multi-page Tiff Processing; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading
html display pdf thumbnail; view pdf thumbnails in
Create Thumbnail Winforms | Online Tutorials
Create Thumbnail; Generate Barcodes on Your Documents; Read Barcodes from Your Documents. Multi-page Tiff Processing; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode
thumbnail pdf preview; view pdf thumbnails
CHINA
S ADAPTATION TO WESTERN EXPORT CONTROLS   43
have remained on a much lower level ever since (see figure 4.1). Russia’s ability 
and willingness to deliver arms desired by China continues to be affected by six 
factors:  (a)  Russian  technology  levels;  (b)  competition  (or  lack  thereof )  from 
other suppliers; (c) the quality of Russian arms exports; (d) Russian arms trans-
fers  relations  with  India and other  countries;  (e)  concerns  about  unauthorized 
Chinese copying (reverse-engineering) of Russian systems; and (f) Chinese com-
petition with Russia in the global arms market.
248
Alleged unauthorized Chinese 
copies of Russian weapon systems include the J-11B combat aircraft (Russian SU-
27SK).  According  to  media  reports,  Russian  concerns  about  Chinese  reverse-
engineering are one  of  the  major reasons  behind the stalling of negotiations on 
the  sale  of  advanced  Sukhoi  SU-35  multirole  combat  aircraft  to  the  Chinese 
military.249 
Ukraine  
After the breakup of the Soviet Union, Ukraine became another major supplier of 
arms  to  China.  Reported  Ukrainian  supplies  to  China  include  four  Il-78  aerial 
refuelling tankers, AI-222K-25 engines for the Chinese L-15 combat trainer pro-
gramme, a  Russian  T-10K-7 fighter plane (a prototype  of  the  Su-33) and 6TD-2 
engines and transmission blocks used in VT1A export versions of the MBT-2000 
main  battle  tank.250 Ukraine  has  also  made  an  essential  contribution  to  the 
Chinese aircraft  carrier programme: in  2002  China  purchased  the half-finished 
Soviet  Project  11436 aircraft-carrying cruiser Varyag  from  Ukraine.  The cruiser 
was towed from Nikolayev in Ukraine to Dalian in China and, starting in 2005, it 
was  refitted  at  the  China  Shipbuilding  Industry  Corporation’s  (CSIC)  Dalian 
shipyards. In August 2011 the aircraft carrier, now named the Liaoning, started a 
sea-trials  programme.  China  also  acquired  the  prototype  of  a  Russian-made 
Sukhoi-33  from  Ukraine  in  2001,  which  it  used  as  a  basis  to  develop  its  own 
carrier-based fighter-bomber, the J-15.251  
248
Jakobson et al. (note 247). 
249
Wood,  P.,  ‘How  China  plans  to  use  the  Su-35’,  The  Diplomat,  27  Nov.  2013, 
<http://thediplomat.com/2013/11/how-china-plans-to-use-the-su-35/>.  
250
Barabanov,  M.,  Kashin,  V.  and  Makienko,  K.,  Shooting  Star:  China’s  Military  Machine  in  the  21st 
Century (East View Information Services: Minneapolis, 2012), pp. 52, 84, 100, 106, 109, 125. 
251
Minnick,  W.,  ‘Chinese  media  take  aim  at  J-15  fighter’,  Defense  News,  28  Sep.  2013,  <http://www. 
defensenews.com/article/20130928/DEFREG/309280009/Chinese-Media-Takes-Aim-J-15-Fighter>.  
How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET. With XImage.Raster SDK library, you can create an image viewer and
pdf thumbnail creator; cannot view pdf thumbnails in
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Excel
Preview Document. Conversion. Convert Excel to PDF. Convert Excel to HTML5. Insert Image. Thumbnail Create. Thumbnail Create. |. Home ›› XDoc.Excel ›› C# Excel
no pdf thumbnails in; enable pdf thumbnail preview
44   WESTERN ARMS EXPORTS TO CHINA
The emergence of a pro-Western  interim  government  in  Ukraine in 2013, the 
annexation of the Crimean peninsula by Russia in 2014 and the ongoing conflict 
in Ukraine could  lead  to interruptions  in  joint Chinese–Ukrainian programmes. 
Most Ukrainian arms industry assets are located in the crisis-hit areas of south-
ern and eastern Ukraine, and in Crimea.252 Plans for cooperation between China 
and Ukraine  on  the  development of an upgraded version of the Antonov An-70 
transport  plane  and  the  PLAN’s  purchase  of  four  Zubr-class  landing-craft  air 
cushions (LCACs) for $315 million may both be affected.253 Two of the LCACS are 
produced under licence in China, while a third was delivered in April 2013, and 
the fourth hovercraft was hurriedly shipped out of the Crimean port of Feodosiya 
in March 2014 despite not having finished its safety-trials programme.254 
Israel 
With its traditionally export-oriented arms industry, Israel was another source of 
military-relevant  technology  transfers  to  China  both  before  and  after  the 
implementation  of  the  US  and  EU  arms  embargoes  in  1989.  Between  the  late 
1970s  and  2000  China  and  Israel  struck  more  than  60  arms  deals  worth  an 
estimated $1–2 billion. Transfers included technology to upgrade Chinese T- 59-
252
Choursina,  K.  and  Gomez,  J.  M.,  ‘Ukraine’s  arms  industry  is  both  prize  and  problem  for  Putin’, 
Bloomberg,  7  May  2014,  <http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-05-07/putin-eyes-ukrainian-arms-prize-
as-troops-build-up-along-border.html>. 
253
Gordon, Y. and Komissarov, D., Chinese Air Power: Current Organisation and aircraft of all Chinese air 
forces (Midland Publishing: Surrey, 2010), pp. 393–94. 
254
Rahmat, R., ‘Ukraine crisis prompts hurried delivery of second Zubr LCAC to China’, IHS Jane’s Navy 
International,  6 Mar.  2014, <http://www.janes.com/article/35030/ukraine-crisis-prompts-hurried-delivery-
of-second-zubr-lcac-to-china>. 
Figure 4.1. Russian exports of major conventional weapons to China,  
1992–2013 
Source: SIPRI Arms Transfers Database, <http://www.sipri.org/databases/armstransfers>. 
0
500
1000
1500
2000
2500
3000
3500
2013
2010
2007
2004
2001
1998
1995
1992
Volume of exports 
(SIPRI Trend-Indicator Values)
CHINA
S ADAPTATION TO WESTERN EXPORT CONTROLS   45
type tanks, night vision systems, radio systems, electronic warfare systems, air-to-
air  missiles,  antiradar  assault  unmanned  aerial  vehicles  (Harpy)  and  others.255 
The supply of Israeli military equipment to  China  has been  a source of tension 
between the  USA  and Israel for many  years,  with the  USA  pressuring Israel  to 
cancel  deals and restrict transfers  (see chapter 2). Despite these  developments, 
Chinese interest in Israeli technologies remains high. China blamed the USA for 
the  disruption  of  defence ties and,  mirroring  the  situation  with  Western coun-
tries, continued  its science  and technology  cooperation by  shifting  to high-tech 
trade (e.g. integrated circuits and micro assemblies and electrical components for 
communications  systems),  investments  and  academic  exchanges  in  dual-use 
areas. These  developments are posing  new challenges  for Israeli export control 
mechanisms.256  
China’s military modernization and self-reliance  
China’s  goal  of  building  a  self-reliant arms  industry  seems  increasingly  within 
reach,  and  this  shapes  China’s  acquisition  strategy.  Following  the  military 
reforms  launched  in  the  late  1970s,  and  especially  the  acceleration  of  military 
modernizations  prompted  by  the  1995–96  Taiwan  Strait  Crisis,  imports  of 
weapon  systems  from Russia in the 1990s and early  2000s aimed to change the 
balance of military power in the Taiwan Strait: a goal that China achieved, largely 
without  Western  assistance.  Overall,  the  contribution  of  Western  states  to  the 
modernization of the PLA’s equipment was decisive in only a limited number of 
weapon  systems (mainly ship  propulsion and  helicopters). The key issue  in the 
post-1989  era,  however,  is  the extent  to which  Western  transfers  of  dual tech-
nologies have fuelled Chinese progress in systems integration, and in the area of 
command,  control,  communications,  computers,  intelligence,  surveillance  and 
reconnaissance  (C4ISR).  
The ultimate goal of self-reliance was always present  in  the  Chinese Govern-
ment’s view of defence modernization. The break in relations between China and 
the  Soviet  Union  in  1960,  and  China’s  subsequent  isolation  from  sources  of 
imports,  only  made  this  goal  more  urgent.257 The  then  Soviet  leader  Nikita 
Khrushchev’s refusal to provide technological assistance for the construction of 
Chinese nuclear-powered attack- and ballistic-missile submarines was one of the 
factors  that  increased  mutual  mistrust  and  led  to  the  split.
258
In  the  1980s,  US 
defence  analysts  noted  that  China  showed  greater  interest  in  acquiring  tech-
nologies for integration in Chinese systems, such as computers, electronics, com-
munications equipment, night-vision devices, fire-control systems and airborne-
reconnaissance systems.259
Even at the height  of the transatlantic  debate  on  the arms  embargo, Chinese 
255
Evron,  Y.,  ‘Between Beijing and Washington:  Israel’s technology  transfers to China’, Journal of East 
Asian Studies, vol. 13, no. 3 (2013), pp. 509–10. 
256
Evron (note 255), p. 505. 
257
Gill and Kim (note 241), p. 32.  
258
Chen, J., Mao’s China and the Cold War (University of North Carolina Press: Chapel Hill, 2001), p. 74.   
259
Kenny (note 240), pp. 61–71.  
46   WESTERN ARMS EXPORTS TO CHINA
analysts  were  warning  in  specialized  military  publications  that  China  should 
focus  on  integrating  European  technologies  in  Chinese  systems  rather  than 
acquire  complete  weapon  systems.  The  analysts  invoked  a  number  of  reasons. 
First, the USA would be in position to block European decisions on arms sales to 
China, as the case of Israel exemplified. Second, acquiring complete systems from 
US allies would cause security concerns as they could be compromised or deliv-
eries of spare parts or maintenance services could be cancelled during any future 
conflict  with  the  USA.  Third,  importing  complete  European  systems  would 
generate a  range of  problems regarding their integration  with the PLA’s mostly 
Russian and domestic equipment.260 Other experts note that, even if the embargo 
were  lifted,  European  export  control  legislation  would  still  place  considerable 
restraints on acquiring advanced weapon systems.  The main  concrete effects of 
the  lifting  of the  arms embargo would have been  increased  leverage in  negoti-
ations with Russia and greater cooperation with  Europe in other areas of  inter-
national politics.261 
The tremendous progress of the Chinese arms industry in the past two decades 
has solidified China’s  quest for  self-reliance. As advocated  by Deng Xiaoping in 
the  1980s,  China’s  military  modernization  has  progressed  through  ‘pockets  of 
excellence’ in areas such as missile technology and satellites. Today, the Chinese 
defence  industry  is  consistently  posting  record  annual  profits.  It  develops  and 
produces  new  advanced  generations  of  weapon  systems  and  has  created  more 
dynamic  R&D institutions with  a  younger  and better-trained  workforce.262 As  a 
result, China has gained independence in building air and sea platforms and aims 
now  at reducing  its dependency on imports for  engines  and electronic systems. 
Although China is still considering imports of complete systems from Russia, the 
main objective of China’s acquisition strategy has shifted to focus on overcoming 
the  bottlenecks  that  prevent  the  independent  construction  of  fully  indigenous 
systems  in  naval  propulsion,  aircraft  engines  and  new  materials.  As  a  result, 
China’s priority is to acquire dual-use technologies through trade and investment, 
scientific cooperation and espionage.  
China’s  efforts  to  acquire  military  technology  are  best  understood  in  the 
broader  context of Chinese  efforts to build an advanced dual-use economy  that 
allows the defence industry to gain access to more advanced and globalized civil-
ian industries. Tai-Ming Cheung defines the goal as ‘the establishment of a civil-
ian apparatus that  has  the technological  and  industrial capabilities  to meet  the 
needs  of the  PLA and the defence  economy.’
263
Therefore, transfers of  dual-use 
technology  and  know-how  through China–EU  trade  and  scientific  cooperation 
might serve as a loophole that allows China to circumvent Western export con-
trol restrictions and acquire military-relevant technologies. Since the early 2000s, 
260
Wang, Y., ‘      
 
’ [Exocet  attraction: How to handle the lifting of 
the EU arms embargo], Shipborne Weapons, no. 1 (Jan. 2005). 
261
Wang X. and Xu G., ‘
 

   ’ [The EU’s lifting of the arms embargo on 
China, principal causes and impact], Junshi jingji yanjiu [Research on military economy], no. 8 (Aug. 2005).  
262
T. M. Cheung (ed.), Forging China’s Military Might: A New Framework for Assessing Innovation (John 
Hopkins University Press: Baltimore, 2014), p. 9.  
263
Cheung, T. M., Fortifying China: The Struggle to Build a Modern Defense Economy (Cornell University 
Press: Ithaca, 2009), p. 9. 
CHINA
S ADAPTATION TO WESTERN EXPORT CONTROLS   47
the  Chinese  Government  has  strongly  promoted  civil-military  integration  and 
supported  the  creation  of  a  dual-use  economy  based  on  four  principles:  
(a) combining civilian and military needs   ( ( ", junmin jiehe); (b) locating 
military potential in civilian capabilities  (  , yujun yumin); (c) vigorously 
promoting  coordination  and  cooperation  [between  military  and  civilian 
industries] (  , dali xietong); and (d) conducting indigenous innovation (#
, zizhu chuangxin).
264
The Chinese approach to civil–military integration is reflected in a broad range 
of  industrial  policies,  most  prominently  in  the  CPC’s  five-year  plans  and  the 
‘National Outline for Medium and Long Term Science and Technology Develop-
ment Planning’ (2006–2020, 
' 
 % !$, MLP), which 
was published by the State Council in 2006.
265
The plan aims to transform China 
into an ‘innovation-oriented society’ by 2020 and into a ‘global science and tech-
nology leader’ by 2050. In order to achieve these ambitious goals, China plans to 
increase its R&D expenditure to 2.5 per cent of GDP in 2020 (from c. 1.98 per cent 
in  2012).266 In  addition,  China  wants  to  drastically  increase  the  output  of 
innovation  patents  and  scientific  publications,  and  develop  world-class 
universities and research institutes.267 National defence plays a major role within 
the MLP and is one of its 11 key areas. At least 10 of the 16 ‘megaprojects’ (
&
((, Guojia keji zhongda zhuanxiang xiangmu) and 6 of the 8 ‘frontier 
technologies’  mentioned  in  the  MLP  are  either  directly  military-relevant  or  of 
dual civilian and military use. In addition, the Chinese leadership has designated 
seven  ‘strategic  emerging  industries’  (      ,  Zhanlüexing 
xinxingchanye),  all  of  which  have  dual-use  applications.268 These  projects  and 
programmes are mostly led by civilian ministries and research institutions, but in 
several  cases  also  involve  defence  procurement  agencies  (the  State  Admini-
stration for  Science,  Technology  and Industry  for National Defense [SASTIND] 
and  the  PLA  General  Armament  Department)  or  defence  conglomerates  (e.g. 
AVIC).269 In  recent  years,  efforts  to  adapt  civilian  technologies  for  military  use 
and to provide civilian capital for military use have been increased, for example 
through a reform  of  the  defence industry’s shareholding system  that allows  for 
the  creation of subsidiary enterprises  that can  attract  civilian capital  and other 
resources.270  These  policies  underline  the  central  significance  of  the  arms 
264
Cheung (note 263), pp. 176–85. 
265
Chinese State Council, ‘
' 
 % !$’ [The National Medium- and Long-Term 
Program  for Science and Technology  Development, 2006–20],  9 Feb.  2006, <http://sydney.edu.au/global-
health/international-networks/National_Outline_for_Medium_and_Long_Term_ST_Development1.doc> 
[unocial translation].  
266
Yang, F., ‘China’s spending in R&D 1.98 per cent of GDP’, Xinhua, 22 Oct. 2013. 
267
Cong,  C.,  Suttmeier,  R.  P.  and  Simon,  D.  F.,  ‘China’s  15-year  science  and  technology  plan’,  Physics 
Today, Dec. 2006, <http://levin.suny.edu/pdf/physics%20Today-2006.pdf>. 
268
The  8  ‘frontier  technologies’  are  advanced  energy,  advanced  manufacturing,  aerospace  and 
aeronautics,  biotechnology,  information  technology,  lasers,  new  materials  and  ocean  technologies.  The  
7  ‘strategic emerging industries’  are information technology,  energy-saving  and environmental  protection, 
biology, high-end equipment manufacturing, new energy, new materials and new energy automobiles.  
269
T. M. Cheung (ed.), The Chinese Defense Economy Takes O: Sector-By-Sector Assessments and the Role 
of Military End-Users (University of California: San Diego, 2013), pp. 12, 14. 
270
Alderman, D. et al., ‘The rise of Chinese civil-military integration’ in Cheung (ed.) (note 262), p. 114.  
48   WESTERN ARMS EXPORTS TO CHINA
industry  and  of  civil-military  integration  for  the  Chinese  leadership’s  overall 
science and technology strategy. As a result, China adopted a number of measures 
to  adapt  its  strategy  of  acquiring  military-relevant  technologies  from  Western 
sources, including the following four examples. 
First, as in the case of Israel described above, dual-use technology transfers to 
China now often take place in the form of trade and investment, as well as science 
and  technology  cooperation,  sometimes  through  joint  research  in  academia  or 
industry.  For  example,  commercial  and  scientific  exchanges  in  dual-use  areas 
between China and the EU and its member states occur in commercial aerospace, 
information  and  communications  technologies,  material  science,  mechanical 
engineering  and  nuclear  physics.271 Apart  from  the  long-standing  technology-
trading ties, Chinese investments in Western dual-use sectors are also on the rise, 
with Chinese analysts identifying foreign technology firms as lucrative targets for 
Chinese  investors.272 According  to  research  by  the  Rhodium  Group,  the  period 
from 2000 to 2012 has seen significant Chinese foreign direct investment (FDI) in 
technology-intensive  and  sometimes  also  dual-use sensitive  sectors  in both  the 
EU  and  the  USA.  Examples  of  Chinese  FDI  include  aerospace  equipment  and 
components (€256 million, $506 million) and information technology equipment 
(€1209  million;  $411  million).273 Chinese  investments  include  the  acquisition  in 
2009 of the Austrian aircraft supplier FACC by Xi’an Aircraft Industry Company 
Ltd (XAC), a subsidiary of the Aviation Industry Corporation of China (AVIC).274 
FACC  supplies  components  for  many  major  aircraft  producers  (e.g.  Airbus, 
Boeing and Eurocopter) and engine producers (e.g. Rolls-Royce). It also supplies 
winglets  and  spoilers  for  China’s  Comac  C919  commercial  airliner  and  outer 
bypass  ducts  for  the  Northrop  Grumman  RQ-4  Global  Hawk  unmanned  aerial 
vehicle  (UAV)  surveillance  aircraft.275 In  addition  to  its  production  of  civilian 
turboprop  airliners, XAC is a major supplier  of  military aircraft  for the  PLAAF, 
and has designed  bombers, trainer aircraft and transport aircraft (including the 
new Y-20) for the Chinese military.276  
Second, Chinese  ‘indigenous innovation’ policies  have  also  been criticized  by 
foreign analysts for  containing regulations leading to  ‘forced technology’ trans-
fers, for example by forcing foreign companies into joint ventures with  Chinese 
partners. These policies are based on China’s MLP, a policy guideline that a 2010 
271
On the EU case see Bräuner (note 3). 
272
Chen, B., Peng C. and Chen Y., ‘ ‘               [Using multinational mergers and 
acquisitions  to  gain  international  sources  of  innovation]’,  S&T  Daily,  12  Aug.  2013,  <http:// 
digitalpaper.stdaily.com/http_www.kjrb.com/kjrb/html/2013-08/12/content_218320.htm?div=-1>. 
273
Hanemann,  T.,  ‘Chinese  investment:  Europe  vs.  the  United  States’,  Rhodium  Group,  25  Feb.  2013, 
<http://rhg.com/notes/chinese-investment-europe-vs-the-united-states>. 
274
In  May  2014  AVIC  announced  plans to list FACC  on  the  Vienna  Stock Exchange in  order to  raise 
money to expand and strengthen R&D. Weber, A., ‘AVIC plans to list aerospace parts maker FACC on Vienna 
Exchange’,  Bloomberg,  13  May  2014,  <http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-05-13/avic-plans-to-list-
aerospace-parts-maker-facc-on-vienna-exchange.html>. 
275
FACC company website, <http://www.facc.com/en>. 
276
Barabanov, Kashin and Makienko (note 250), p. 111. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested