asp.net pdf viewer control free : Create pdf thumbnail application control tool html web page .net online SnapManual0-part1792

Build Your Own Blocks 
4. 0  
Brian Harvey
Jens Mönig
S
NAP
! Reference Manual 
Create pdf thumbnail - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
generate pdf thumbnails; thumbnail view in for pdf files
Create pdf thumbnail - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
create thumbnail from pdf c#; how to create a thumbnail of a pdf document
Table of Contents
I.
Blocks, Scripts, and Sprites 4
Hat Blocks and Command Blocks 5
A.
Sprites and Parallelism 6
Costumes and Sounds 6
Inter-Sprite Communication with Broadcast 7
B.
Nesting Sprites: Anchors and Parts 8
C.
Reporter Blocks and Expressions 8
D.
Predicates and Conditional Evaluation 10
E.
Variables 11
Global Variables 12
Script Variables 13
F.
Etcetera 13
II.
Saving and Loading Projects and Media 14
A.
Local Storage 14
Localstore 14
XML Export 15
B.
Cloud Storage 15
C.
Loading Saved Projects 16
III.
Building a Block 17
A.
Simple Blocks 17
Custom Blocks with Inputs 19
B.
Recursion 20
C.
Block Libraries 21
IV.
First Class Lists 22
A.
The list Block 22
B.
Lists of Lists 23
C.
Functional and Imperative List Programming 24
D.
Higher Order List Operations and Rings 25
V.
Typed Inputs 27
A.
Scratch’s Type Notation 27
B.
The Snap! Input Type Dialog 27
Procedure Types 28
Pulldown inputs 29
Input variants 30
Prototype Hints 31
Title Text and Symbols 31
VI.
Procedures as Data 32
A.
Call and Run 32
Call/Run with inputs 32
Variables in Ring Slots 33
B.
Writing Higher Order Procedures 33
Recursive Calls to Multiple-Input Blocks 35
C.
Formal Parameters 36
D.
Procedures as Data 37
E.
Special Forms 38
Special Forms in Scratch 39
VII.
Object Oriented Programming 40
A.
Local State with Script Variables 41
B.
Messages and Dispatch Procedures 42
C.
Inheritance via Delegation 43
D.
An Implementation of Prototyping OOP 43
VIII.
The Outside World 47
A.
The World Wide Web 47
B.
Hardware Devices 48
C.
Date and Time 48
IX.
Continuations 49
A.
Continuation Passing Style 50
B.
Call/Run w/Continuation 53
Nonlocal exit 55
X.
User Interface Elements 57
A.
Tool Bar Features 57
The Snap!!!Logo Menu 57
The File Menu 58
The Cloud Menu 61
The Settings Menu 62
Stage Resizing Buttons 64
Project Control Buttons 64
B.
The Palette Area 65
Context Menus for Palette Blocks 65
Context Menu for the Palette Background 66
C.
The Scripting Area 66
Sprite Appearance and Behavior Controls 66
Scripting Area Tabs 67
Scripts and Blocks Within Scripts 67
Scripting Area Background Context Menu 68
Controls in the Costumes Tab 70
The Paint Editor 71
Controls in the Sounds Tab 72
D.
Controls on the Stage 72
E.
The Sprite Corral and Sprite Creation Buttons 73
Index  75
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Word
Images. Convert Word to ODT. Convert PDF to Word. File: Create, Load a Word File. File: Merge Text Search. Insert Image. Thumbnail Create. Thumbnail Create. |. Home
create thumbnail jpg from pdf; pdf reader thumbnails
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for PowerPoint
Conversion. Convert PowerPoint to PDF. Convert PowerPoint File: Create, Load a PowerPoint File. File Annotate PowerPoint. Text Search. Insert Image. Thumbnail Create
pdf no thumbnail; cannot view pdf thumbnails in
Acknowledgements 
We have been extremely lucky in our mentors.  Jens cut his teeth in the company of the Smalltalk pioneers: 
Alan Kay, Dan Ingalls, and the rest of the gang who invented personal computing and object oriented 
programming in the great days of Xerox PARC.  He worked with John Maloney, of the MIT Scratch Team, 
who developed the Morphic graphics framework that’s still at the heart of Snap!. 
The brilliant design of Scratch, from the Lifelong Kindergarten Group at the MIT Media Lab, is crucial to 
Snap!
.  Our earlier version, BYOB, was a direct modification of the Scratch source code.  
Snap!
is a 
complete rewrite, but its code structure and its user interface remain deeply indebted to Scratch.  And 
the Scratch Team, who could have seen us as rivals, have been entirely supportive and welcoming to us. 
Brian grew up at the MIT and Stanford Artificial Intelligence Labs, learning from Lisp inventor John 
McCarthy, Scheme inventors Gerald J. Sussman and Guy Steele, and the authors of the world’s best computer 
science book, Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs, Hal Abelson and Gerald J. Sussman with Julie 
Sussman, among many other heroes of computer science. 
In the glory days of the MIT Logo Lab, we used to say, “Logo is Lisp disguised as BASIC.”  Now, with its 
first class procedures, lexical scope, and first class continuations, 
Snap!
is Scheme disguised as Scratch. 
We have been fortunate to get to know an amazing group of brilliant middle school(!) and high school students 
through the Scratch Advanced Topics forum, several of whom have contributed code to Snap!: Kartik Chandra, 
Nathan Dinsmore, Connor Hudson, and Ian Reynolds.  Many more have contributed ideas and alpha-testing 
bug reports.  UC Berkeley students who’ve contributed code include Michael Ball, Achal Dave. Kyle Hotchkiss, 
Ivan Motyashov, and Yuan Yuan.  Contributors of translations are too numerous to list here, but they’re in the 
“About…” box in Snap!! itself. 
This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation grant 1143566, and in part by MioSoft. 
VB.NET Image: Program for Creating Thumbnail from Documents and
language. It empowers VB developers to create thumbnail from multiple document and image formats, such as PDF, TIFF, GIF, BMP, etc. It
view pdf thumbnails; show pdf thumbnails
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Raster
PDF Reading, C#.NET Annotate PDF in WPF, C#.NET PDF Create, C#.NET VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Raster.
html display pdf thumbnail; enable pdf thumbnails
Snap!
Reference Manual 
Version 4.0 
Snap! (formerly BYOB) is an extended reimplementation of Scratch (h瑴p://scratch.mit.edu) that allows you to 
Build Your Own Blocks.  It also features first
class lists, first
class procedures, and continuations.  These added 
capabilities make it suitable for a serious introduction to computer science for high school or college students. 
To run Snap!,
open a browser window and connect to either h瑴p://snap.berkeley.edu/run to start with a 
minimal set of blocks or h瑴p://snap.berkeley.edu/init to load a small set of additional blocks (a little slower 
startup, but recommended for convenience and assumed in this manual). 
I.   Blocks, Scripts, and Sprites 
This secction describes the Snap!
features inherited from Scratch; experienced Scratch users can skip to 
subsection B. 
Snap!
is a programming language — a notation in which you can tell a computer what you want it to do.  
Unlike most programming languages, though, Snap!
is a visual language; instead of writing a program using the 
keyboard, the Snap!
programmer uses the same drag-and-drop interface familiar to computer users. 
Start Snap!. You should see the following arrangement of regions in the window: 
(The proportions of these areas may be different, depending on the size and shape of your browser window.)   
A Snap!
program consists of one or more scripts, each of which is made of blocks.  Here’s a typical script: 
How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET. With XImage.Raster SDK library, you can create an image viewer and
no pdf thumbnails in; pdf file thumbnail preview
Create Thumbnail in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
or Images; Create Thumbnail; Generate Barcodes on Your Documents; Read Barcodes from Your Documents. Multi-page Tiff Processing; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading
view pdf thumbnails in; pdf files thumbnail preview
The five blocks that make up this script have three different colors, corresponding to three of the eight palettes in 
which blocks can be found.  The palette area at the left edge of the window shows one palette at a time, chosen 
with the eight buttons just above the palette area.  In this script, the gold blocks are from the Control palette; the 
green block is from the Pen palette; and the blue blocks are from the Motion palette.  A script is assembled by 
dragging blocks from a palette into the scripting area in the middle part of the window.  Blocks snap together 
(hence the name Snap!
for the language) when you drag a block so that its indentation is near the tab of the one 
above it: 
The white horizontal line is a signal that if you let go of the green block it will snap into the tab of the gold one. 
Hat Blocks and Command Blocks 
At the top of the script is a hat block, which indicates when the script should be carried out.  Hat block names 
typically start with the word “when”; in this example, the script should be run when the green flag near the right 
end of the Snap!
!tool bar is clicked.  (The Snap!
tool bar is part of the Snap!
window, not the same as the browser’s 
or operating system’s menu bar.)  A script isn’t required to have a hat block, but if not, then the script will be 
run only if the user clicks on the script itself.  A script can’t have more than one hat block, and the hat block can 
be used only at the top of the script; its distinctive shape is meant to remind you of that. 
The other blocks in this script are command blocks.  Each command block corresponds to an action that Snap!
already knows how to carry out.  For example, the block                               tells the sprite (the arrowhead shape 
on the stage at the right end of the window) to move ten steps (a step is a very small unit of distance) in the 
direction in which the arrowhead is pointing.  We’ll see shortly that there can be more than one sprite, and that 
each sprite has its own scripts.  Also, a sprite doesn’t have to look like an arrowhead, but can have any picture as 
a costume.  The shape of the move block is meant to remind you of a Lego™ brick; a script is a stack of blocks.  
(The word “block” denotes both the graphical shape on the screen and the procedure, the action, that the block 
carries out.) 
The number 10 in the move block above is called an input to the block.  By clicking on the white oval, you can 
type any number in place of the 10.  The sample script on the previous page uses 100 as the input value.  We’ll 
see later that inputs can have non-oval shapes that accept values other than numbers.  We’ll also see that you 
can compute input values, instead of typing a particular value into the oval.  A block can have more than one 
input slot.  For example, the glide block located about halfway down the Motion palette has three inputs. 
Most command blocks have that brick shape, but some, like the repeat block in the sample script, are C-shaped.  
Most C-shaped blocks are found in the Control palette.  The slot inside the C shape is a special kind of input slot 
that accepts a script as the input.  In the sample script, the repeat block has two inputs: the number 4 and the script 
Create Thumbnail Winforms | Online Tutorials
Create Thumbnail; Generate Barcodes on Your Documents; Read Barcodes from Your Documents. Multi-page Tiff Processing; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode
pdf thumbnails in; enable thumbnail preview for pdf files
How to C#: Overview of Using XImage.Raster
You may edit the tiff document easily. Create Thumbnail. See this C# guide to learn how to use RasterEdge XImage SDK for .NET to perform quick file navigation.
create thumbnail jpeg from pdf; thumbnail pdf preview
A.   Sprites and Parallelism 
Just below the stage is the “new sprite” button         .  Click the button to add a new sprite to the stage.  The 
new sprite will appear in a random position on the stage, facing in a random direction, with a random color. 
Each sprite has its own scripts.  To see the scripts for a particular sprite in the scripting area, click on the 
picture of that sprite in the sprite corral in the bottom right corner of the window.  Try putting one of the 
following scripts in each sprite’s scripting area: 
When you click the green flag, you should see one sprite rotate while the other moves back and forth.  This 
experiment illustrates the way different scripts can run in parallel.  The turning and the moving happen 
together.  Parallelism can be seen with multiple scripts of a single sprite also.  Try this example: 
When you press the space key, the sprite should move forever in a circle, because the move and turn blocks are 
run in parallel.  (To stop the program, click the red stop sign at the right end of the tool bar.) 
Costumes and Sounds 
To change the appearance of a sprite, import a new costume for it.  There are three ways to do this.  First, select 
the desired sprite in the sprite corral.  Then, one way is to click on the file icon          in the tool bar, then choose 
the “Costumes…”menu item.  You will see a list of costumes from the public media library, and can choose 
one.  The second way, for a costume stored on your own computer, is too click on the file icon and choose the 
“Import…” menu item.  You can then select a file in any picture format (PNG, JPEG, etc.) supported by your 
browser.  The third way is quicker if the file you want is visible on the desktop:  Just drag the file onto the Snap!
window.  In any of these cases, the scripting area will be replaced by something like this: 
Just above this part of the window is a set of three tabs: Scripts, Costumes, and Sounds.  You’ll see that the 
Costumes tab is now selected.  In this view, the sprite’s wardrobe, you can choose whether the sprite should wear 
its Turtle costume or its Alonzo costume.  (Alonzo, the Snap!
mascot, is named after Alonzo Church, a 
mathematician who invented the idea of procedures as data, the most important way in which Snap!
is different 
from Scratch.)  You can give a sprite as many costumes as you like, and then choose which it will wear either by 
clicking in its wardrobe or by using the                                            or                          block in a script.  (Every 
costume has a number as well as a name.  The next costume block selects the next costume by number; after 
the highest-numbered costume it switches to costume 1.  The Turtle, costume 0, is never chosen by next 
costume.)  The Turtle costume is the only one that changes color to match a change in the sprite’s pen color. 
In addition to its costumes, a sprite can have sounds; the equivalent for sounds of the sprite’s wardrobe is called 
its jukebox.  Sound files can be imported in any format (WAV, OGG, MP3, etc.) supported by your browser.  
Two blocks accomplish the task of playing sounds. If you would like a script to continue running while the 
sound is playing, use the block                               . In contrast, you can use the                                                
block to wait for the sound's completion before continuing the rest of the script.  
Inter-Sprite Communication with Broadcast 
Earlier we saw an example of two sprites moving at the same time.  In a more interesting program, though, the 
sprites on stage will interact to tell a story, play a game, etc.  Often one sprite will have to tell another sprite to run 
a script.  Here’s a simple example: 
In the                                               block, the word “bark” is just an arbitrary name I made up.  When you click 
on the downward arrowhead in that input slot, one of the choices (the only choice, the first time) is “new,” which 
then prompts you to enter a name for the new broadcast.  When this block is run, the chosen message is sent to 
every sprite, which is why the block is called “broadcast.”  In this program, though, only one sprite has a script to 
run when that broadcast is sent, namely the dog.  Because the boy’s script uses broadcast and wait rather than 
just broadcast, the boy doesn’t go on to his next say block until the dog’s script finishes.  That’s why the two 
sprites take turns talking, instead of both talking at once. 
Notice, by the way, that the say block’s first input slot is rectangular rather than oval.  This means the input 
can be any text string, not only a number.  In the text input slots, a space character is shown as a brown dot, so 
that you can count the number of spaces between words, and in particular you can tell the difference between 
an empty slot and one containing spaces.  The brown dots are not shown on the stage when the block is run. 
The stage has its own scripting area.  It can be selected by clicking on the Stage icon at the left of the sprite 
corral.  Unlike a sprite, though, the stage can’t move.  Instead of costumes, it has backgrounds: pictures that fill the 
entire stage area.  The sprites appear in front of the current background.  In a complicated project, it’s often 
convenient to use a script in the stage’s scripting area as the overall director of the action. 
B.   Nesting Sprites: Anchors and Parts 
Sometimes it’s desirable to make a sort of “super-sprite” composed of pieces that can move together but can also 
be separately articulated.  The classic example is a person’s body made up of a torso, limbs, and a head.  Snap!  
allows one sprite to be designated as the anchor of the combined shape, with other sprites as its parts. To set up 
sprite nesting, drag the sprite corral icon of a part sprite onto the stage display (not the sprite corral icon!) of the 
desired anchor sprite.   
Sprite nesting is shown in the sprite corral icons of both anchors and parts: 
In this illustration, it is desired to animate Alonzo’s arm.  (The arm has been colored green in this picture to 
make the relationship of the two sprites clearer, but in a real project they’d be the same color, probably.)  
Sprite1, representing Alonzo’s body, is the anchor; Sprite2 is the arm.  The icon for the anchor shows small 
images of up to three attached parts at the bottom.  The icon for each part shows a small image of the anchor in 
its top left corner, and a synchronous rotation flag in the top right corner.  In its initial setting, as shown above, it 
means that the when the anchor sprite rotates, the part sprite also rotates as well as revolving around the 
anchor.  When clicked, it changes from a circular arrow to a straight arrow, and indicates that when the anchor 
sprite rotates, the part sprite revolves around it, but does not rotate, keeping its original orientation.  (The part 
can also be rotated separately, using its turn blocks.)  Any change in the position or size of the anchor is always 
extended to its parts.  
C.    Reporter Blocks and Expressions 
So far, we’ve used two kinds of blocks: hat blocks and command blocks.  Another kind is the reporter block, 
which has an oval shape:                    .   It’s called a “reporter” because when it’s run, instead of carrying out an 
action, it reports a value that can be used as an input to another block.  If you drag a reporter into the scripting 
area by itself and click on it, the value it reports will appear in a speech balloon next to the block: 
When you drag a reporter block over another block’s input slot, a white “halo” appears around that input slot, 
analogous to the white line that appears when snapping command blocks together.  Here’s a simple script that 
uses a reporter block:                   
Here the x position reporter provides the first input to the say block.  (The sprite’s X position is its horizontal 
position, how far left (negative values) or right (positive values) it is compared to the center of the stage.  
Similarly, the Y position is measured vertically, in steps above (positive) or below (negative) the center.) 
You can do arithmetic using reporters in the Operators palette: 
The round block rounds 35.3905… to 35, and the + block adds 100 to that.  (By the way, the round block is in 
the Operators palette, just like +, but in this script it’s a lighter color with black lettering because Snap!
alternates 
light and dark versions of the palette colors when a block is nested inside another block from the same palette: 
This aid to readability is called zebra coloring.)  A reporter block with its inputs, maybe including other reporter 
blocks, such as                                                 , is called an expression. 
10 
D.   Predicates and Conditional Evaluation 
Most reporters report either a number, like                 , or a text string, like                              .  A predicate is a 
special kind of reporter that always reports true or false.  Predicates have a hexagonal shape:  
The special shape is a reminder that predicates don’t generally make sense in an input slot of blocks that are 
expecting a number or text.  You wouldn’t say                                                 , although (as you can see from the 
picture) Snap! lets you do it if you really want.  Instead, you normally use predicates in special hexagonal input 
slots like this one: 
The C-shaped if block runs its input script if (and only if) the expression in its hexagonal input reports true. 
A really useful block in animations runs its input script repeatedly until a predicate is satisfied: 
If, while working on a project, you want to omit temporarily some commands in a script, but you don’t want to 
forget where they belong, you can say 
Sometimes you want to take the same action whether some condition is true or false, but with a different input 
value.  For this purpose you can use the reporter if block:
1
The technical term for a true or false value is a “Boolean” value; it has a capital B because it’s named after a 
person, George Boole, who developed the mathematical theory of Boolean values.  Don’t get confused; a 
hexagonal block is a predicate, but the value it reports is a Boolean. 
Another quibble about vocabulary:  Many programming languages reserve the name “procedure” for 
Commands (that carry out an action) and use the name “function” for Reporters and Predicates.  In this 
manual, a procedure is any computational capability, including those that report values and those that don’t.  
Commands, Reporters, and Predicates are all procedures.  The words “a Procedure type” are shorthand for 
“Command type, Reporter type, or Predicate type.” 
1
If you don’t see it in the Control palette, click on the File button 
in the Tool Bar and choose “Import tools.” 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested