asp.net pdf viewer control free : Create thumbnail from pdf SDK application service wpf html asp.net dnn sreo10150-part1865

Create thumbnail from pdf - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
create pdf thumbnail image; generate pdf thumbnails
Create thumbnail from pdf - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
create thumbnail jpeg from pdf; show pdf thumbnails in
World Economic and Financial Surveys
Regional Economic Outlook
.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 
15
I N
T E
R
N
A T I O
N
A
  M
O
N
E T A R
  F U
N
D
OCT
Sub-Saharan Africa
Dealing with the Gathering Clouds
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Word
Images. Convert Word to ODT. Convert PDF to Word. Convert ODT to Text Search. Insert Image. Thumbnail Create. Thumbnail Create. |. Home ›› XDoc.Word ›› C# Word
thumbnail view in for pdf files; print pdf thumbnails
VB.NET Image: Program for Creating Thumbnail from Documents and
language. It empowers VB developers to create thumbnail from multiple document and image formats, such as PDF, TIFF, GIF, BMP, etc. It
create pdf thumbnails; how to create a thumbnail of a pdf document
©2015 International Monetary Fund
Cataloging-in-Publication Data
Regional economic outlook. Sub-Saharan Africa. — Washington, D.C.: International
Monetary Fund, 2003–
v. ;   cm. — (World economic and financial surveys, 0258-7440)
Began in 2003. 
Some issues have thematic titles.
1. Economic forecasting — Africa, Sub-Saharan — Periodicals.  2. Africa, Sub-Saharan — 
Economic conditions — 1960 — Periodicals.  3. Economic development — Africa, Sub-Saharan 
— Periodicals.  I. Title: Sub-Saharan Africa.  II.International Monetary Fund.  III. Series: World 
economic and financial surveys.
HC800.A1 R445 
ISBN-13: 978-1-51359-733-1 (paper)
ISBN-13: 978-1-51358-600-7 (Web PDF)
周e Regional Economic Outlook: Sub-Saharan Africa is published twice a year, in the 
spring and fall, to review developments in sub-Saharan Africa. Both projections and 
policy considerations are those of the IMF staff and do not necessarily represent the 
views of the IMF, its Executive Board, or IMF management.
Publication orders may be placed online, by fax, or through the mail: 
International Monetary Fund, Publication Services 
P.O. Box 92780, Washington, DC 20090 (U.S.A.)
Tel.: (202) 623-7430    Telefax: (202) 623-7201 
E-mail : publications@imf.org 
www.imf.org 
www.elibrary.imf.org
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for PowerPoint
Preview Document. Conversion. Convert PowerPoint to PDF. Convert PowerPoint to PowerPoint Pages. Annotate PowerPoint. Text Search. Insert Image. Thumbnail Create
show pdf thumbnails; pdf thumbnail preview
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Raster
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET And generating thumbnail for Raster Image is an easy work. How to Create Thumbnail for Raster in C#.
show pdf thumbnail in; view pdf thumbnails
iii
Contents
Abbreviations  ........................................................................................................................................vi
Acknowledgments  ................................................................................................................................vii
Executive Summary  ..............................................................................................................................ix
1.  Dealing with the Gathering Clouds ................................................................................................1
Strong Headwinds from the External Environment ......................................................................3
More Difficult Domestic Conditions ...........................................................................................4
Lower Growth amid Persistent Risks ............................................................................................9
Special Focus: Creating Fiscal via Better Domestic Revenue Mobilization..................................12
Annex 1.1. Estimating the Tax Frontier .....................................................................................26
2.  Competitiveness in Sub-Saharan Africa: Marking Time or Moving Ahead? ...............................29
Setting the Stage ........................................................................................................................29
Indicators of Competitiveness: What Do 周ey Reveal? ..............................................................32
Competitiveness and Growth .....................................................................................................45
Some Policy Implications ...........................................................................................................47
Annex 2.1. Methodology on Construction of GVC-Based REER ..............................................50
Annex 2.2. Construction of Import Average and Export Average Relative Price Measures ..........52
Annex 2.3. Estimation of Duration Dependence of Growth Spells.............................................53
3.  Inequality and Economic Outcomes in Sub-Saharan Africa ........................................................55
Sub-Saharan African Trends in Inequality ..................................................................................56
Inequality and Growth Performance in the Region ....................................................................58
What Drives Income Inequality? ................................................................................................62
Policies to Reduce Inequality .....................................................................................................65
Conclusions ...............................................................................................................................67
Annex 3.1. Understanding Income and Gender Inequality in Sub-Saharan Africa......................72
Annex 3.2. Drivers of Inequality ................................................................................................75
Statistical Appendix ..............................................................................................................................77
References  ..........................................................................................................................................109
Publications of the IMF African Department, 2009–15  ..................................................................115
Boxes
1.1. 
Commodity Price Shocks and Financial Sector Fragility ............................................................18
1.2. 
Rapid Credit Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa: What Does It Portend? ........................................21
1.3. 
Putting the Sustainable Development Goals into Macroeconomic Perspective ...........................24
2.1. 
CFA Franc Devaluation .............................................................................................................48
2.2. 
South Africa’s Export Performance and the Role of Structural Factors .......................................49
3.1. 
Why Care About Income and Gender Inequality? Global Evidence and Macroeconomic  
Channels ..................................................................................................................................68
3.2. 
Financial Inclusion, Growth and Inequality in Sub-Saharan Africa ............................................69
3.3. 
Policies to Close Gender Gaps: Insights from Sub-Saharan African Countries............................71
Create Thumbnail in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
or Images; Create Thumbnail; Generate Barcodes on Your Documents; Read Barcodes from Your Documents. Multi-page Tiff Processing; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading
generate pdf thumbnails; thumbnail view in for pdf files
Create Thumbnail Winforms | Online Tutorials
Create Thumbnail; Generate Barcodes on Your Documents; Read Barcodes from Your Documents. Multi-page Tiff Processing; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode
how to view pdf thumbnails in; pdf thumbnail preview
REGIONAL ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
iv
Tables
1.1. 
Sub-Saharan Africa: Real GDP Growth .....................................................................................10
1.2. 
Sub-Saharan Africa: Other Macroeconomic Indicators ...............................................................11
2.1. 
Competitiveness Indicators ........................................................................................................33
3.1. 
Growth, Income Inequality and Gender Inequality: Regression Results .....................................59
3.2. 
Various Regressions of Determinants of Change in Inequality (Net Gini) ..................................64
Figures
Chapter 1
1.1. 
Selected Commodity Prices, January 2013–August 2015 ............................................................3
1.2. 
Sub-Saharan Africa: Exports to China, 2014 ...............................................................................4
1.3. 
Sub-Saharan Africa: Recent Eurobond Issuances .........................................................................4
1.4. 
Sub-Saharan African Emerging and Frontier Market Economies: Sovereign Bond Spreads .........4
1.5. 
Emerging Market Spreads, 2014–15 ...........................................................................................5
1.6. 
Sub-Saharan Africa: Current Account Balance and Fiscal Balance, 2008–15 ...............................5
1.7. 
Sub-Saharan Africa: Distribution of Countries’ Fiscal Balance, 2008 and 2014 ...........................5
1.8. 
Emerging and Frontier Market Countries and Comparators: Total Public Debt Ratio ................6
1.9. 
Sub-Saharan Africa: Debt Risk Status for Low-Income Countries, 2008–14 ...............................6
1.10.  Selected Countries: Depreciation of National Currency Against U.S. Dollar Since  
October 2014 ............................................................................................................................7
1.11.  Inflation, Inflation Bands, and Monetary Policy Changes ...........................................................7
1.12.  Sub-Saharan Africa: Reserves .......................................................................................................8
1.13.  Sub-Saharan Africa and Comparators: External Debt ..................................................................8
1.14.  Sub-Saharan Africa: Real GDP Growth Projections, 2015, Current Projections versus  
October 2014 Projections ........................................................................................................10
1.15.  Sub-Saharan Africa Excluding Nigeria: Public Expenditure and Sources of Financing ...............13
1.16.  Sub-Saharan Africa: Change in Tax Revenue, Average for 2000–04 and 2011–14 .....................14
1.17.  Selected Regions: Total Tax Revenue, 1995–2000 and 2014 .....................................................14
1.18.  General Government Capital Expenditure, 2000–04 and 2011–14 ...........................................15
1.19.  Sub-Saharan Africa: Tax Revenue Potential Estimates ................................................................15
1.20.  Selected Countries: Tax Ratio and Potential, 2014.....................................................................16
Chapter 2
2.1. 
Sub-Saharan Africa: Goods Trade Balance as a Share of GDP, 2000–14 ....................................30
2.2. 
Sub-Saharan Africa: Effects of Prices and Volume Variations on the Change in the  
Trade-Balance-to-GDP Ratio between 2004 and 2014 ............................................................31
2.3. 
Sub-Saharan Africa: Imports to GDP, 1995–2011 .....................................................................31
2.4. 
Selected Countries: Domestic Exports as a Share of Total Global Exports, Change from  
1995–2014 ..............................................................................................................................32
2.5. 
Sub-Saharan Africa and Comparator Countries: Manufacturing’s Share of Gross Exports by  
Country Relative to World, Average over 2008–12 ..................................................................32
How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET. With XImage.Raster SDK library, you can create an image viewer and
generate thumbnail from pdf; can't view pdf thumbnails
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Excel
Preview Document. Conversion. Convert Excel to PDF. Convert Excel to HTML5. Insert Image. Thumbnail Create. Thumbnail Create. |. Home ›› XDoc.Excel ›› C# Excel
pdf files thumbnails; create pdf thumbnails
CONTENTS
v
2.6. 
Sub-Saharan Africa and Comparator Countries: Change in Real Effective Exchange Rate,  
Standard versus Global Value Chains, 1995–2014 ...................................................................34
2.7. 
Sub-Saharan Africa: Change in Real Effective Exchange Rate, Global Value Chains 
versus Standard, 1995–2014 ....................................................................................................34
2.8. 
Sub-Saharan Africa: Change in Standard Real Effective Exchange Rate, Commodity Exporters 
versus Noncommodity Exporters, 1995–2014 .........................................................................34
2.9. 
Sub-Saharan Africa: Change in Standard Real Effective Exchange Rate, Countries with 
Floating versus Pegged Exchange Rate Systems, 1995–2014 ....................................................35
2.10.  Sub-Saharan Africa: Contribution to Change in Standard Real Effective Exchange Rate,  
1995–2012 Cumulative ...........................................................................................................36
2.11.   Sub-Saharan Africa and Rest of the World: Balassa-Samuelson Effect ........................................36
2.12.  Sub-Saharan Africa: Balassa-Samuelson-Adjusted Real Exchange Rate .......................................37
2.13.  Sub-Saharan Africa and Rest of Emerging and Developing Economies: Real GDP Per Capita  
and Real Hourly Wage, 1983–2008 .........................................................................................38
2.14.  Sub-Saharan Africa: Relative Price of Key Nontraded Goods and Services .................................39
2.15.  Sub-Saharan Africa and Comparator Countries: Shipping Cost per Container, 2014 .................40
2.16.  Sub-Saharan Africa: Relative Price-Based Measure of Real Effective Exchange Rate, 2005–11 ...41
2.17.  Sub-Saharan Africa: Pillars of Competitiveness...........................................................................42
2.18.  Sub-Saharan Africa, Other Regions, and Comparator Countries: Global Competitiveness  
Index, 2014 ..............................................................................................................................43
2.19.  Sub-Saharan Africa: Price Competitiveness Indicator Heatmap ..................................................44
2.20   Sub-Saharan Africa: High Growth Spells, 1980–2014................................................................46
2.21.  Selected Countries: Spell Duration and Competitiveness ...........................................................46
2.22.  Sub-Saharan Africa: Competitiveness with Growth Spells since 2000 ........................................46
Chapter 3
3.1. 
Selected Regions: Poverty Headcount Ratio ...............................................................................57
3.2. 
Selected Regions: Gini Index of Net Income Inequality, 1980–2011 .........................................57
3.3. 
Selected Regions: Gender Inequality Index, Average 1990–94, and 2010 ...................................57
3.4. 
Selected Regions: Change in Gini Coefficient and Real GDP per Capita Growth, 1995–2011 ..57
3.5. 
Sub-Saharan Africa: Kuznets Curve, Effects of GDP Per Capita on Gini Coefficient .................58
3.6. 
Sub-Saharan Africa: Income Inequality and Gender Inequality, 1990–2010 ..............................58
3.7. 
Sub-Saharan Africa: Growth Differential with ASEAN Countries  .............................................60
3.8. 
Subgroups of Sub-Saharan Africa: Growth Differential with ASEAN Countries ........................61
3.9. 
Sub-Saharan Africa: Average Years of Schooling Completed Among People Age 25 and  
Above, 2010 .............................................................................................................................63
3.10.  Sub-Saharan Africa: Account at a Financial Institution, 2014 ....................................................63
3.11.  Sub-Saharan Africa: Legal Gender-Based Restrictions, 1990 and 2010 .......................................63
3.12.  Sub-Saharan Africa: Female Labor Force Participation and Development ..................................63
3.13.  Sub-Saharan Africa: Tax Revenue, 1990–2011 ..........................................................................66
3.14.  Selected Sub-Saharan African Countries: Highest Education Level Attained ..............................67
vi
ASEAN  
Southeast Asian Nations
CEMAC  
Economic and Monetary Community of Central Africa
CFA 
currency zone of CEMAC and WAEMU
CGER   
Consultative Group on Exhange Rate Issues
CIS 
Commonwealth of Independent States
CPI 
consumer price index
EAC   
East African Community
EBA 
External Balance Assessment
FDI 
foreign direct investment
GII 
the United Nation’s gender inequality index
GDP   
gross domestic product
GVC   
global value chain
ICP 
International Comparison Program
IDB 
Inter-American Development Bank
IMF 
International Monetary Fund
INS 
Information Notice System
LICs   
low-income countries
LAC   
Latin America and Carribean region
MENA  
Middle East and North Africa region
MICs   
middle-income countries
NPLs   
nonperforming loans
PWT   
Penn World Tables
Q
M
The Import Average Relative Price
Q
The Export Average Relative Price
REER   
real effective exchange rate 
REO   
Regional Economic Outlook
ROA   
return on asset
SDGs   
Sustainable Development Goals
SSA 
Sub-Saharan Africa
SWIID  
The Standardized World Income Inequality Database
VAT   
value-added tax
WAEMU 
West African Economic and Monetary Union
WBL   
World Bank’s Women, Business and the Law database
WEF   
World Economic Forum
WEO   
World Economic Outlook
Abbreviations
vii
周is October 2015 issue of the Regional Economic Outlook: Sub-Saharan Africa (REO) was prepared by  
a team led by Céline Allard under the direction of Abebe Aemro Selassie. 
周e team included Rahul Anand, Jorge Iván Canales Kriljenko, Wenjie Chen, Christine Dieterich,  
Emily Forrest, Jesus Gonzalez-Garcia, Cleary Haines, Dalia Hakura, Anni Huang, Mumtaz Hussain, 
Naresh Kumar, Azanaw Mengistu, Clara Mira, Joannes Mongardini, Bhaswar Mukhopadhyay, 
MoniqueNewiak, Marco Pani, Shane Radick, Francisco Roch, George Rooney, Magnus Saxegaard, 
Vimal 周akoor, Alun 周omas, Juan Treviño, Fan Yang, and Mustafa Yenice.
Specific contributions were made by Tidiane Kinda, Montfort Mlachila, and Rasmané Ouedraogo.
Natasha Minges was responsible for document production, with production assistance from  
Charlotte Vazquez. 周e editing and production were overseen by Joanne Creary Johnson of  
the Communications Department.
Acknowledgments
周e following conventions are used in this publication:
•  In tables, a blank cell indicates “not applicable,” ellipsis points (. . .) indicate “not available,” and 
0 or 0.0 indicates “zero” or “negligible.” Minor discrepancies between sums of constituent figures 
and totals are due to rounding.
•  An en dash (–) between years or months (for example, 2009–10 or January–June) indicates the 
years or months covered, including the beginning and ending years or months; a slash or virgule 
(/) between years or months (for example, 2005/06) indicates a fiscal or financial year, as does the 
abbreviation FY (for example, FY2006).
•  “Billion” means a thousand million; “trillion” means a thousand billion.
•  “Basis points” refer to hundredths of 1 percentage point (for example, 25 basis points are  
equivalent to ¼ of 1 percentage point).
ix
Executive Summary
DEALING WITH THE GATHERING CLOUDS
Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa has weakened markedly, and is now expected at 3¾ percent this year and 
4¼percent in 2016, from 5 percent in 2014. Of the three factors that have underpinned the region’s solid 
performance of the last decade or so—a much improved business and macroeconomic environment, high 
commodity prices, and highly accommodative global financial conditions—the latter two have become far less 
supportive. As a result, while activity remains more solid than in many other developing and emerging regions 
of the world, the strong growth momentum evident in the region in recent years has dissipated. And with the 
possibility that the external environment might turn even less favorable, risks to this outlook remain on the 
downside, especially because a number of countries are entering this new period with more limited external 
and fiscal buffers than they did at the time of the global financial crisis.
周is overall difficult picture, however, masks, considerable variations across the region. 
•  In most of the region’s low-income countries, growth is holding up, supported by ongoing infrastructure 
investment and solid private consumption. But even within this group, quite a few countries are being 
negatively affected by the sharp decline in the prices of their main commodity exports, even as lower oil 
prices ease their energy import bill.
•  Even more hard hit are the region’s eight oil exporters—which together account for about half of the 
region’s GDP and include the largest producers, Nigeria and Angola—as falling export incomes and 
resulting sharp fiscal adjustments are taking their toll on activity.
•  Several middle-income countries, such as Ghana, South Africa, and Zambia, are also facing unfavor-
able conditions, including weak commodity prices, difficult financing conditions in the context of large 
domestic imbalances, and electricity shortages.
Policies need to adjust to this new environment.
•  On the fiscal policy front, for the vast majority of the countries in the region, there is only limited fiscal 
space to counter the drag on growth. Among oil exporters, the sharp and seemingly durable decline in oil 
prices makes adjustment unavoidable, and while some had space to draw on buffers or borrow to smooth 
the adjustment, that space is becoming increasingly limited. For most other countries, fiscal policies need 
to continue to be guided by medium-term spending frameworks, striking an appropriate balance between 
debt sustainability considerations, on the one hand, and addressing development needs, on the other.
•  On the monetary policy front, wherever the terms-of-trade declines have been significant and the 
exchange rate is not pegged, it is important to allow for the exchange rate depreciation to absorb the 
shock. Even in those countries that are not heavily reliant on commodity exports and have seen their cur-
rency come under pressure, given the strong global forces behind these pressures, resisting them risks 
losing scarce reserves. Accordingly, interventions should be limited to disorderly movements of the 
exchange rate. Monetary policy should only respond to second-round effects, if any, of exchange rate pass-
through and other upward shocks to inflation. 
•  Finally, risks to the financial sector from the commodity price declines, especially in oil-exporting coun-
tries, and from exchange rate depreciation require careful monitoring.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested