REGIONAL ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
10
1½percent in 2015–16. Fiscal retrenchment, 
high inflation, reduced electricity supply, and  
a disappointing cocoa harvest are also weighing 
on Ghana’s growth, while Zambia’s economic 
activity is being held back by depressed copper 
prices, high interest rates, and severe electricity 
shortages. Conversely, growth is forecast to 
accelerate in Kenya, supported by public  
investment in transport and power generation, 
and in Senegal, supported by dynamic private  
sector activities.
•  A majority of low-income countries and fragile 
states will continue to experience solid growth, 
as infrastructure investment efforts continue, 
especially in the energy and transport sectors, 
and as private consumption remains strong, 
with continued large foreign direct investment 
(FDI) inflows in many of them. Countries 
such as Côte d’Ivoire, the Democratic Republic 
of the Congo, Ethiopia, Mozambique, and 
Tanzania are still expected to register growth  
of 7 percent or more this year and next.  
Figure 1.14. Sub-Saharan Africa: Real GDP Growth Projections, 2015, Current Projections versus October 2014 Projections
Source: IMF, World Economic Outlook database.
Note: SSA = sub-Saharan Africa.
4
6
8
10
cent
t
Oil exporters
Middle-income countries 
(MICs)
Low-income countries 
(LICs)
Fragile states
Figure 1.14. Sub-Saharan Africa: Real GDP Growth Projections, 2015, Current Projections versus October 2014 
Projections
-2
0
2
4
6
l SSA
Chad
eroon
n
igeria
orters
s
Gabon
n
Angola
a
 Rep.
Sudan
n
uinea
Kenya
a
negal
amibia
a
ambia
a
helles
s
Ghana
a
Verde
e
uritius
s
 MICs
s
sotho
swana
a
ziland
d
Africa
a
hiopia
a
bique
zania
wanda
a
l LICs
s
ganda
a
Benin
n
 Faso
o
Mali
Niger
Malawi
i
Leone
e
 Rep.
Ivoire
 Rep.
Togo
states
s
íncipe
e
Bissau
u
a, The
e
ascar
babwe
e
moros
s
iberia
Eritrea
a
uinea
urundi
i
Percent
-10.2
-23.9
-5.3
-7.2
-2
All SSA
Chad
Cameroon
Nigeria
All oil exporters
Gabon
Angola
Congo, Rep.
South Sudan
Equatorial Guinea
Kenya
Senegal
Namibia
Zambia
Seychelles
Ghana
Cabo Verde
Mauritius
All MICs
Lesotho
Botswana
Swaziland
South Africa
Ethiopia
Mozambique
Tanzania
Rwanda
All LICs
Uganda
Benin
Burkina Faso
Mali
Niger
Malawi
Sierra Leone
Congo, Dem. Rep.
Côte d'Ivoire
Central African Rep.
Togo
All fragile states
São Tomé & Príncipe
Guinea-Bissau
Gambia, The
Madagascar
Zimbabwe
Comoros
Liberia
Eritrea
Guinea
Burundi
Current projection
October 2014 projection
-10.2
-23.9
-5.3
-7.2
Source: IMF, World Economic Outlook database.
Note: SSA = Sub-Saharan Africa.
Source: IMF, World Economic Outlook database.
1
Excluding fragile states. 
2
Includes Angola, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of Congo, Republic of Congo, Equatorial 
Guinea, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Liberia, Mali, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. 
3
Includes Côte d’Ivoire, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Mauritius, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia.
2004
08
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
Sub-Saharan Africa
6.8
4.1
6.7
5.0
4.3
5.2
5.0
3.8
4.3
Of which:
Oil-exporting countries 
9.2
7.0
8.5
4.6
3.8
5.7
5.9
3.6
4.2
Of which:
Nigeria
8.6
9.0
10.0
4.9
4.3
5.4
6.3
4.0
4.3
Middle-income countries
1
5.0
0.2
4.6
4.7
3.5
3.7
2.7
2.6
2.9
Of which:
South Africa
4.8
-1.5
3.0
3.2
2.2
2.2
1.5
1.4
1.3
Low-income countries
1
8.0
6.6
7.8
8.1
6.6
7.5
7.4
6.2
6.8
Fragile states
2.8
2.6
4.4
2.9
6.9
5.6
5.8
5.2
5.9
Memorandum item:
World economic growth
4.9
0.0
5.4
4.2
3.4
3.3
3.4
3.1
3.6
Sub-Saharan Africa resource-intensive countries
2
6.9
3.9
6.7
4.7
3.8
4.9
4.5
3.0
3.6
Sub-Saharan Africa frontier and emerging market economies
3
6.7
4.8
7.1
5.1
4.3
4.9
5.0
4.0
4.3
Table 1.1. Sub-Saharan Africa: Real GDP Growth 
(Percent change)
Generate pdf thumbnails - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
how to show pdf thumbnails in; can't see pdf thumbnails
Generate pdf thumbnails - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
show pdf thumbnail in html; thumbnail view in for pdf files
1.  DEALING WITH THE GATHERING CLOUDS
11
But even as lower oil prices ease their energy 
import bill, other low-income countries, 
including Burkina Faso and Sierra Leone, are 
feeling the pinch from lower prices for their 
main export commodities. In Sierra Leone, 
the economy is expected to contract by more 
than 20 percent as the closure of the two main 
iron ore operators exacerbated the impact of 
the Ebola outbreak. However, as the acute toll 
of the disease fades, the economies of Guinea, 
Liberia, and Sierra Leone are expected to 
resume growth in the coming years. Floods 
and erratic weather in southern Africa are also 
reducing agricultural output in many countries, 
most notably in Malawi and Zimbabwe.
In that context, the region is expected to witness a 
further worsening of its fiscal position (Table1.2). 
周e overall fiscal balance (including grants) is 
projected to widen to −4.3 percent of GDP from 
−3.5 percent in 2014—the largest deficit in the 
region since 2009. Oil-exporting countries will 
drive most of that deterioration, as planned fiscal 
retrenchments, however severe, will not totally 
offset the substantial shortfall in oil-activities-related 
fiscal revenue, allowing for some smoothing of the 
adjustment. Elsewhere, the fiscal deficit is expected 
to remain particularly large, and above 7 percent 
in some countries, on the back of large invest-
ment projects (Kenya), high subsidies and arrears 
clearance (Zambia), or increased security spending 
(Niger). Ghana, conversely, is embarking on a 
multiyear fiscal consolidation, and its double-digit 
deficit in 2014 is projected to be cut to 5.9 percent. 
Likewise, with sharply lower proceeds from 
commodity exports, the external position is 
forecast to deteriorate further, especially among oil 
exporters. 周e current account deficit is expected 
to widen from 4.1 percent in 2014 to 5.7 percent 
in 2015, the largest current account deficit since 
the early 1980s, increasing the urgency to improve 
competitiveness and jumpstart new export streams, 
as discussed in Chapter 2. While the lower energy 
bill will help oil importers and softer growth will 
keep a lid on consumption imports, these effects 
will often be offset by lower prices for exported 
commodities and the continuation of substantial 
investment projects with high import content.
Downside Risks
Notwithstanding the realization of several adverse 
external factors embedded in the forecasts, risks to 
the outlook remain tilted to the downside.
Some domestic risk factors…
Security-related issues still prevail in a number of 
countries. 周e civil war continues to take a heavy 
toll on South Sudan, while the violence sparked 
by the general elections in Burundi and the recent 
developments in Burkina Faso are reminders that 
political cycles can still cause turmoil. Acts of 
violence by Boko Haram and other insurgency 
groups have increased in a region spanning 
Cameroon, Chad, Niger, and Nigeria, but also in 
Kenya and Mali. Beyond the tragic loss of human 
lives and widespread suffering, these acts of violence 
weigh on economic activity, strain fiscal budgets, 
and diminish the prospects for FDI. 周e negative 
impact on economic growth and the potential for 
regional political instability would be exacerbated if 
they were to persist or escalate.
Table 1.2. Sub-Saharan Africa: Other Macroeconomic Indicators
Source: IMF, World Economic Outlook database.
Inflation, average
8.8
9.8
8.2
9.5
9.4
6.6
6.4
6.9
7.3
Fiscal balance
1.7
-4.6
-3.4
-1.1
-1.8
-3.1
-3.5
-4.3
-3.6
Of which
:
Excluding oil exporters
-0.6
-4.1
-4.3
-3.7
-3.7
-3.9
-4.0
-4.2
-3.9
Current account balance
2.1
-2.8
-0.9
-0.7
-1.9
-2.4
-4.1
-5.7
-5.5
Of which
:
Excluding oil exporters
-4.3
-4.9
-3.9
-4.8
-7.1
-7.5
-7.3
-7.5
-7.8
Reserves coverage
5.1
5.2
4.2
4.7
5.2
5.0
5.4
4.8
4.2
2016
(Percent change)
(Percent of GDP)
(Months of imports)
2004
08
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
C# PDF - Read Barcode on PDF in C#.NET
File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF void ReadBarcodeFromPDF( string filename, int pageIndex) { // generate PDF document PDFDocument doc
print pdf thumbnails; pdf thumbnail preview
C# PDF - Create Barcode on PDF in C#.NET
File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing PDF Generate over 20 linear and 2d barcodes on PDF document page
pdf thumbnail; pdf first page thumbnail
REGIONAL ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
12
周e negative impact on domestic economies of 
the commodity price slump could also prove more 
pronounced than anticipated, especially among oil 
exporters. On the one hand, the planned spending 
cuts are sharp, and the impact on activity will 
reach widely across sectors—not only extractive 
activities but also sectors that had so far benefited 
from the commodity income windfall, such as the 
construction and services sectors. On the other 
hand, if the enacted fiscal adjustment were to fail 
to materialize, the macroeconomic deterioration 
would be even more tangible, with risks of arrears 
accumulation, crowding out of private activities 
by domestic borrowing, and intensifying pressures 
on the external position. Policy missteps could also 
further rattle investors’ confidence.
… could potentially be exacerbated if external 
headwinds intensify
Commodity prices have fallen sharply over recent 
months, but they could still fall further in a context 
of subpar global growth and if rebalancing from 
existing overcapacity were to prove weaker than 
currently forecast. Slower-than-expected global 
growth would also weigh further on the region. 
In particular, a more rapid slowdown in China as 
it transitions to its new growth model—or even 
potentially a hard landing—would intensify the 
strains on the region, in particular as they would 
put additional downward pressures on commodity 
prices. Finally, further risk retrenchment from 
emerging markets or a sharp reallocation of financial 
assets around the globe could lead to rapid capital 
outflows from sub-Saharan African emerging and 
frontier market economies and exacerbate current 
exchange rate pressures.
In that context, existing domestic vulnerabilities 
in some countries would come even more to the 
forefront, as financing would either rapidly become 
very expensive or totally unavailable—forcing 
a highly procyclical fiscal policy adjustment, 
and a much more rapid deceleration of growth. 
Concomitant exchange rate pressures, to the 
extent that they would feed into higher inflation, 
could also trigger a tighter monetary policy stance, 
adding headwinds to growth. More broadly across 
the region, countries that have been running large 
current account deficits, including the fastest- 
growing ones, would be particularly vulnerable 
to external financial shocks, even as reliance on 
FDI—a more stable source of financing—could 
provide some cushion in the shortrun.
SPECIAL FOCUS: CREATING FISCAL 
SPACE VIA BETTER DOMESTIC REVENUE 
MOBILIZATION
In this difficult macroeconomic context, preserving 
fiscal soundness in the short term and boosting 
fiscal buffers over the next few years take on 
renewed importance. Borrowing costs are on the 
rise for a number of countries, as overall financial 
conditions tighten, but also because, down the 
road, many countries in the region will graduate 
from concessional sources of financing—awelcome 
development by itself. All these factors converge 
to turn the spotlight more squarely on improving 
domestic revenue mobilization as a medium-term 
objective.
9
With domestic revenue mobilization 
the most durable way to create fiscal space, finance 
much-needed infrastructure and other development 
needs, and reduce reliance on public debt, this 
final section reviews advances since 2000 and offers 
options for the future.
While not the focus here, strengthening public 
financial management is of course also critical. 
Efforts to improve revenue mobilization need to 
be made in combination with measures to further 
optimize public spending, in particular by prioritiz-
ing investment projects with the highest economic 
return and streamlining expensive and not well- 
targeted energy subsidies—as some countries 
(Angola, Cameroon, Ghana) have started doing. 
By working on improving the quality of spending, 
the authorities will also demonstrate that they are 
making the most efficient use of fiscal revenues, 
helping to increase taxpayers’ acceptance.
9
周e topic of better domestic revenue mobilization was also at 
the center of the discussions during the July 2015 Addis Ababa 
UN conference on Financing for Development. See “Financing 
for Development: Revisiting the Monterey Consensus”  
(IMF 2015c).
C# Image: Tutorial for Document Viewing & Displaying in ASP.NET
To connect the Viewer with the Thumbnails, type WebAnnotationViewer1 into the dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
program to create thumbnail from pdf; show pdf thumbnails in
Process Images in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
Also can change the order of images & file pages by dragging & dropping thumbnails; Commonly used document types are supported, including PDF, multi-page TIFF
how to make a thumbnail from pdf; how to create a thumbnail of a pdf document
1.  DEALING WITH THE GATHERING CLOUDS
13
The Big Picture: Good Progress to Date
With the notable exception of Nigeria, the amount 
of resources devoted to public spending in sub- 
Saharan Africa has expanded strongly over the last 
15 years, by some 5 percentage points of GDP on 
average (Figure 1.15).
•  Public spending remains overwhelmingly 
financed via domestic tax revenue, which 
increased from 18 to 21 percent of GDP for 
sub-Saharan Africa excluding Nigeria between 
2000–04 and 2011–14—with the improve-
ment witnessed not only in oil exporters (on 
the back of strong oil prices), but also among 
low-income countries and fragile states. Space 
for additional spending was also created in part 
by the decline in the interest bill associated with 
debt relief granted in the second half of the 
2000s, and increased recourse to borrowing.
•  Excluding Nigeria, more than half of the 
increase in the spending envelope (some 3¼ 
percentage points of GDP) was accounted for 
by capital expenditure, evidence of the author-
ities’ effort to fill the large infrastructure gaps 
across the region. Capital expenditure now rep-
resents a quarter of the spending envelope (and 
some 7 percent of GDP), up from about a sixth 
in the early 2000s. 周e civil service wage bill—
which also includes human capital spending in 
the form of teachers’ and health care workers’ 
compensation—expanded by some 1½percent-
age points of GDP.
Zeroing in on Tax Revenues
周e increase in tax revenue in the region has been 
broad-based (Figure 1.16). With a few exceptions 
(Botswana, Nigeria, Zambia, and a few fragile 
states), all sub-Saharan African countries managed 
to lift their tax-to-GDP ratio, notwithstanding 
downward pressures on trade tax revenue as 
countries engaged in trade liberalization to support 
regional and international integration (Keen and 
Mansour 2009). Both direct and indirect tax ratios 
generally improved, although progress on the latter 
was not always as strong, underscoring outstanding 
challenges in keeping up with the taxation of 
new sectors, especially those where the informal 
economy plays a large role.
Putting these results into perspective, international 
comparisons show that the region experienced the 
largest increase in tax revenue across the globe since 
the turn of the century (Figure 1.17). 周e median 
country in sub-Saharan Africa managed to boost its 
tax ratio by some 5 percentage points of GDP since 
the mid-1990s, over a period when elsewhere in the 
world, the same ratio was flat or only marginally 
increasing (the Commonwealth of Independent 
States, Latin America, emerging Asia), if not 
declining (emerging Europe, the Middle East).
•  In part, this reflects the fact that the starting 
point was relatively lower in sub-Saharan Africa, 
signaling more potential for progress than 
in other regions where revenue mobilization 
efforts had already been implemented. 周ere 
is, however, more than a catch-up process in 
the region’s progress: the median low-income 
sub-Saharan African country entered the 
century with a higher tax-to-GDP ratio and 
also saw a larger improvement in revenue mobi-
lization than the median low-income country 
elsewhere in the world.
Figure 1.15. Sub-Saharan Africa Excluding Nigeria:  
Public Expenditure and Sources of Financing
Source: IMF, World Economic Outlook database.
Note: Nigeria is excluded, as unlike the rest of the region its tax- and 
spending-to-GDP ratios declined substantially over the period.
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
W
eighted average (percent of GDP)
Interest expenditure
Net lending/borrowing
Capital expenditure
Nontax revenue and grants
Current expenditure
Tax revenue
0
2000-04
2011-14
2000-04
2011-14
Expenditure
Sources of financing
W
C# Image: Create C#.NET Windows Document Image Viewer | Online
Support displaying and viewing multiple document & image formats (PDF, MS Word, Tiff Easy to create high-quality image thumbnails & automatic navigation from
pdf thumbnail html; how to make a thumbnail of a pdf
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
See this VB.NET guide to learn how to use RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET to perform quick file navigation. You may easily generate thumbnail image from PDF.
pdf no thumbnail; create pdf thumbnail image
REGIONAL ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
14
•  In addition, while many sub-Saharan 
African countries have increasingly relied on 
commodity exports over that period, this does 
not account by itself for the entire extent of 
the increase in tax revenue: the increase in the 
tax ratio since the mid-1990s for the median 
commodity-rich country in the region was 
6percentage points of GDP, versus 3¾ per-
centage points of GDP for the median in the 
rest of the region, and for both, the tax-to-GDP 
ratio is now around 15 percent of GDP. In fact, 
most resource-related fiscal revenues accrue 
through non-tax revenue, such as royalties and 
fees. However, to the extent that commodity 
activity also boosts tax receipts from corporate 
income and profit in the extractive sector, and 
indirectly tax revenue from stronger activity 
in nonextractive sectors, part of the increase in 
thetax ratio can indeed have been driven by 
commodity-related activities.
Challenges and Prospects
周ese results—good progress in domestic revenue 
mobilization but from a low starting point—raise 
the question as to how much more improvement 
can be achieved in the foreseeable future. 周is is 
of particular relevance not only given the current 
urgency in some countries to rebuild fiscal buffers 
and contain public debt, but also if the warranted 
and substantial efforts to upgrade infrastructure and 
human capital currently under way in the region—
with one of the highest capital spending ratios in 
the world over the last 15 years (Figure 1.18)—are 
to be sustained without jeopardizing public debt 
sustainability. Finally, robust revenue mobilization 
Figure 1.17. Selected Regions: Total Tax Revenue, 1995–2000 
and 2014
Source: IMF, World Economic Outlook database.
¹ The period 1995–2000 is chosen to smooth the cyclical decline in the 
tax revenue ratio around 2000 in many regions of the world. 
² Includes Pakistan and Afghanistan.
5
10
15
20
25
Median (percent of GDP)
Average 1995–2000¹
2014
Low-income 
countries
Selected regions
0
Middle East and North Africa²
Sub-Saharan Africa
Emerging and developing 
Asia
Commonwealth of 
Independent States
Latin America and Caribbean
Emerging and developing 
Europe
Sub-Saharan Africa
Rest of world
Figure 1.16. Sub-Saharan Africa: Change in Tax Revenue, Average for 2000–04 and 2011–14
Source: IMF, World Economic Outlook database.
-10
-5
0
5
10
15
d
p.
.
a
n
a
n
a
o
a
d
a
s
s
a
a
e
al
l
a
a
e r
r
a
a
e
a
n
li
i
a
a
p.
.
a
e
u
o
s
e
e r
r
di
i
p.
.
a
Percentage points of GDP
Oil exporters
Middle-incomecountries
Low-income countries
Fragilestates
Cha
d
Congo, Re
p
Equatorial Guine
a
Cameroo
n
Angol
a
Gabo
n
Nigeri
a
Lesoth
o
Namibi
a
Swazilan
d
Ghan
a
Seychelle
s
Mauritiu
s
Keny
a
South Afric
a
Cabo Verd
e
Seneg
a
Botswan
a
Zambi
a
Mozambiqu
e
Nige
Tanzani
a
Rwand
a
Sierra Leon
e
Ugand
a
Beni
n
Ma
l
Ethiopi
a
Liberi
a
Congo, Dem. Re
p
Guine
a
Gambia, Th
e
Guinea-Bissa
u
Tog
o
Comoro
s
São Tomé & Príncip
e
Côte d'Ivoir
e
Madagasca
Burun
d
Central African Re
p
Eritre
a
Tax on income, profits, and capital gains
Tax on goods and services
Tax on international trade and transactions
Other taxes
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
See this C# guide to learn how to use RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET to perform quick file navigation. You may easily generate thumbnail image from PDF.
enable pdf thumbnail preview; show pdf thumbnail in html
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
Thumbnail. You can generate thumbnail image(s) from PDF file for quick viewing and further manipulating. Class: PDFDocument. How to C#: XDoc.PDF Classes Usage.
pdf preview thumbnail; pdf thumbnails
1.  DEALING WITH THE GATHERING CLOUDS
15
will also be necessary to finance the ambitious 
Sustainable Development Goals just launched at  
the UN Summit in New York in September 2015  
(Box 1.3).
Cross-country observations can be used to estimate 
a global “tax frontier,” representing the upper level 
of tax revenue ratios that can be raised for a given 
level of economic and institutional development 
(Fenochietto and Pessino 2013). 周e distance to 
that tax frontier for any given country reflects in 
part tax policy preferences—countries closer to the 
tax frontier would tend to have a higher preference 
for the delivery of public services, and hence accept 
a higher tax burden to finance them—but also tax 
administration capabilities.
•  周is methodology allows for assessing the 
potential for further tax revenue mobilization in 
sub-Saharan Africa, defined as this distance to 
the tax frontier (see Annex 1.1 for more details). 
周e analysis suggests that the median country 
in sub-Saharan Africa might have a potential 
for another 3 to 6½ percentage points increase 
in tax revenue (Figure 1.19).
10
Among the 
largest countries, the unexploited tax potential 
appears particularly sizable in countries such as 
Angola, Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, 
and Tanzania (Figure 1.20). For oil-exporting 
countries, the need to increase tax revenue 
mobilization from non-oil sectors will be par-
ticularly urgent, as oil-activities-related (tax and 
non-tax) revenue fall sharply.
•  Moreover, a country’s position vis-à-vis the 
tax frontier is not static. As a country grows, 
the ability of its government to collect higher 
revenues and citizens’ acceptance for higher 
taxes typically rises—and the tax frontier that 
applies to that country moves up as GDP per 
capita increases. 周is means that, over time, 
as more sub-Saharan African countries reach 
middle-income status, their potential for higher 
tax revenue can be expected to expand as well. 
As an order of magnitude, we estimate that if 
the region’s GDP per capita were to grow by 
2 percent annually over the next 10 years—
itgrew on average by 3½ percent over the 
last 10 years—the tax frontier for the median 
country, and hence the potential for higher tax 
revenue ratio, would increase by another 6 to 
7½ percentage points of GDP in a decade.
10
Arguably, including advanced economies in the sample, 
in particular European ones where the tax ratio can reach as 
much as 35 percent of GDP, can potentially overestimate the 
tax potential for countries where tax administration capacity 
remain more modest. However, this order of magnitude—of 
3 to 6½ percentage points of GDP of additional potential tax 
revenue—is robust to restricting the sample to developing and 
emerging market economies.
Figure 1.18. General Government Capital Expenditure, 
2000–04 and 2011–14
Sources: IMF, World Economic Outlook and International Financial 
Statistics databases.
Note: CIS = Commonwealth of Independent States; LICs = low-income 
countries; MENA = Middle East and North Africa; MICs = middle-
income countries; SSA = sub-Saharan Africa. 
¹ Includes Pakistan and Afghanistan.
Emerging and 
developing 
MENA¹
¹
CIS
Latin America 
and Caribbean
Other LICs
SSA
SSA oil 
exporters
SSA MICs
SSA LICs
SSA fragile
4
6
8
10
12
Average 2011-14 
dian in percent of GDP)
)
Emerging and developing Asia
developing 
Europe
MENA
0
2
0
2
4
6
8
10
(me
d
Average 2000-04 (median in percent of GDP)
Figure 1.19. Sub-Saharan Africa: Tax Revenue Potential 
Estimates
Source: IMF staff estimates based on Fenochietto and Pessino (2013).
Note: See Annex 1.1 for details on the countries included in each 
sample.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
M
edian (percentage points of GDP)
0
1
Estimate based 
on world sample
Estimate based 
on developing and 
emerging market 
economies sample
M
REGIONAL ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
16
Figure 1.20. Selected Countries: Tax Ratio and Potential, 2014
Source: IMF staff estimates.
Note: The estimates are based on the developing and emerging market economies sample. The actual tax ratio corresponds to the 2014 tax-to-GDP 
ratio for oil importers, and to the non-oil-tax-revenue-to-non-oil-GDP ratio for oil-exporting countries (Angola, Cameroon, the Republic of Congo, and 
Nigeria). A negative tax potential does not necessarily indicate that there is no room for revenue mobilization in a given country. It reflects that the 
most recent observation exceeds the time-invariant estimate of the tax frontier, which takes into account the average tax-to-GDP ratio over the entire 
period.  In some countries, this result stems from rapidly rising tax-to-GDP ratios over recent years. See Annex 1.1 for more details.  
SSA = sub-Saharan Africa.
How can governments tap into this tax potential? 
In considering different options, country authorities 
could follow some key general principles.
11
•  周e tax system should be designed to minimize 
distortions and inefficiencies, but policy 
decisions should also take into account the con-
straints arising from limited tax administration 
capacity, especially in low-income countries and 
fragile states.
12
In addition, while protection 
of the poorest is an overarching concern, the 
fairness of a tax system cannot meaningfully be 
assessed in isolation of the spending it finances. 
For instance, in some cases, a regressive tax may 
be the only way to finance strongly progressive 
spending; and more generally, the progressivity 
of specific tax measures should be assessed 
taking into account the distribution of the 
benefits of the additional expenditure they 
finance, as discussed in Chapter 3.
11
For a more detailed discussion, see also “Revenue 
Mobilization in Developing Countries” (IMF 2011) and 
“Current Challenges in Revenue Mobilization—Improving Tax 
Compliance” (IMF 2015a).
12
On the effects of distortions and inefficiencies, and more 
broadly the role of growth-friendly fiscal reforms, see also 
“Fiscal Policy and Long-Term Growth” (IMF 2015d).
•  In that respect, in the shorter term, implement-
ing a broad-based value-added tax (VAT) with 
a fairly high threshold (not to overburden small 
businesses), and a single or limited number of 
rates (to preserve simplicity and limit opportu-
nities for rent-seeking) still has more revenue 
potential than other tax instruments in many 
sub-Saharan African countries, in particular 
as it helps reduce tax leakages compared with 
sales taxes, which are only collected at the 
end of the distribution chain—an important 
consideration in a region with large informal 
sectors. Meanwhile, establishing a broad-based 
corporate income tax remains a longer-haul 
objective for many countries in the region. 
周ose steps should go hand-in-hand with 
continuous efforts to improve public finance 
management and tax administration capacity.
•  Efforts to expand both the tax base and tax 
compliance should also be explored, as it would 
allow for raising higher revenues without 
burdening any existing single taxpayer group, 
therefore reducing distortions, improving 
economic efficiency, and supporting income 
and job creation. Doing so would involve (i) 
limiting exemptions that jeopardize revenue  
0
10
20
30
40
Percent of GDP
Actual tax ratio
o
Tax potential
-10
South Africa
Namibia
Congo, Rep.
Angola
Kenya
Ghana
Senegal
Guinea-Bissau
Cameroon
Togo
Mozambique
Gambia, The
Malawi
Tanzania
Zambia
Mali
Madagascar
Burkina Faso
Guinea
Uganda
Ethiopia
Nigeria
Niger
SSA median
Non-SSA median
1.  DEALING WITH THE GATHERING CLOUDS
17
and good governance, and are hard to reverse, 
(ii) better mobilizing information from the 
increasing number of transactions done via 
financial institutions and mobile banking to 
improve compliance, and (iii) making greater 
efforts to ensure tax compliance from high- 
income individuals and companies, as they 
account for a large share of the taxable income. 
In many countries, setting up a dedicated large 
taxpayers’ office has proved an effective measure 
to achieve that objective. Strengthening real 
estate taxes—minimal in many countries in the 
region—also offers some potential.
•  Finally, fiscal regimes for extractive industries 
deserve specific attention. 周ere is signifi-
cant scope in the region, especially for new 
producers, to improve the yield and stability 
of the revenue base from extractive industries 
(IMF 2012). Although country circumstances 
differ, combining a modest ad valorem royalty, 
a corporate income tax, and a separate resource 
rent tax has considerable appeal for low-income 
countries. Moreover, special attention needs 
to be paid to international tax treaties to avoid 
base erosion and profit shifting, which have a 
detrimental impact on producer countries  
(IMF 2014b).
周e progress achieved in mobilizing domestic 
revenue over the last 15 years is certainly encour-
aging. But as external sources of financing become 
less forthcoming, authorities in the region will need, 
more than ever, to tap into the additional revenue 
potential if they want to maintain their develop-
ment efforts in a sustainable way. Beyond a stable 
macroeconomic environment, this will critically 
define the region’s ability not only to weather the 
strong current headwinds but also to preserve the 
path of strong growth in the medium term.
REGIONAL ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
18
Box 1.1. Commodity Price Shocks and Financial Sector Fragility
周e recent sharp declines in commodity prices are not unprecedented and their frequent occurrence has led to a 
large number of studies analyzing the impact of lower commodity prices on economic growth (Deaton and Miller 
1995; Dehn 2000), debt (Arezki and Ismail 2013), and conflict (Brückner and Ciccone 2010). However, the 
literature lacks a systematic empirical analysis of the impact of commodity price shocks on the financial sector of 
commodity exporters. 
周e analysis presented here attempts to fill this gap by investigating the impact of commodity price declines on 
financial sector fragility. In the recent past, countries such as Ecuador, Malaysia, Nigeria, and Russia suffered con-
siderable financial sector dislocation following sharp commodity price declines. Financial fragility can be defined as 
the increased likelihood of a systemic failure in the financial system, for which the most obvious indicator would be 
a systemic banking crisis. A less dramatic definition would capture the sensitivity of the financial system to relatively 
small shocks. 周e study is based on a panel study of 71 commodity exporters among emerging market and develop-
ing economies over 1997–2013, including 22 sub-Saharan Africa countries.
1
Commodity price shocks can contribute to financial fragility through various channels. First, a decline in 
commodity prices in commodity-dependent countries results in reduced export income and fiscal retrenchment to 
deal with lower revenue, all of which can adversely impact economic activity and agents’ (including governments’) 
ability to meet their debt obligations, thereby potentially weakening banks’ balance sheets. Second, a surge in bank 
withdrawals following a drop in commodity prices may significantly reduce banks’ liquidity and potentially give 
rise to a liquidity crisis. 周ird, if the authorities fail to curtail public spending in the face of declining revenues, 
payment arrears might start to accumulate, putting suppliers in a difficult financial situation and potentially at risk 
of defaulting on their bank loans. Fourth, if large enough, commodity price shocks can also put downward pressure 
on the domestic currency. 周e currency depreciation can then lead to bank losses in the presence of net open foreign 
exchange positions in their balance sheets, or if unhedged borrowers are unable to service their loans. 
Periods of declining commodity prices tend, indeed, to be associated with more deteriorated financial sector condi-
tions, including higher nonperforming loans (NPLs) and a greater number of banking crises. 周is result holds for 
both the full sample and for sub-Saharan African countries (Figure 1.1.1).
2
周e empirical investigation therefore 
focuses on periods of commodity price declines and relies on two econometric models.
•  周e financial fragility analysis is based on the following equation:
 
���
�,�
�� �������������
�,�
�∑
���
���
��
���
��� 
where 
 
���
�,�
is one of seven financial soundness indicators: (1) share of bank NPLs, (2) provisions to 
NPLs, (3) return on assets, (4) return on equity, (5) cost-to-income ratio, (6) liquid assets to deposits 
and short-term funding, and (7) regulatory capital to risk-weighted assets. We also develop a synthetic 
index of the various indicators—computed as the mean of the seven indicators, each normalized to take 
a value between 0 and 1 (with higher values corresponding to more stability of the financial sector).
周is box was prepared by Tidiane Kinda, Montfort Mlachila, and Rasmané Ouedraogo and draws on Kinda and others 
(forthcoming).
1
Countries included in the sample are net exporters of a nonrenewable commodity, where that commodity represents at least 
10 percent of the country’s total exports in 2005, the base year, and for which sufficient financial sector data are available.  
Sub-Saharan African countries are Angola, Burundi, Botswana, Côte d’Ivoire, Cameroon, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, 
Equatorial Guinea, Mali, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Sudan, Togo, Tanzania, Uganda, South Africa, Zambia, and 
Zimbabwe. 
周e mean comparison test (t-test) shows that the differences are statistically significant for NPLs, provisions to NPLs, return  
on equity, and banking crises.
1.  DEALING WITH THE GATHERING CLOUDS
19
PriceShocks
i,t
represents commodity price shocks, computed as the residual of an econometric model 
that regresses the logarithm of commodity prices on its lagged values (up to three) and a quadratic time 
trend. 周is measure removes the predictable elements from our shock measure, ensuring that we only 
capture unforeseen price movements. 周e variable is rescaled to be 0 in case of positive shocks, and 
range from 0 to 1 in case of negative shocks—as a consequence, the variable only represents negative 
shocks, and a positive (negative) sign in the regressions presented thereafter means that negative 
commodity price shocks tend to increase (decrease) the indicator under study.
X
mit
denotes control variables such as inflation, credit growth, and income per capita; and 
��
stands 
for the error term including a country-specific fixed effect and an idiosyncratic term. Equation (1) is 
estimated using the panel fixed effects estimator. 
•  周e banking crisis analysis is based on the following equation:
The banking crisis analysis is based on the following equation: 
�������
�,�
��� �������������
�,�
�∑
���
���
��
���
                                                ��� 
��� 
�������
�,�
�������������
�,�
���
���
��
���
                                                ��� 
�������
�,�
�������������
�,�
���
��,� and, �������
�,�
�������������
�,�
���
��                     ��� 
where 
�������
�,�
�������
�,�
is the banking crisis dummy from Laeven and Valencia (2013), and 
�������
�,�
����������������
is the 
estimated value from the regression. As above, X
mit
denotes the control variables and 
��
the error term. 
Equation (2) is estimated using the conditional logit fixed effects estimator. 
周e results show evidence that declines in commodity prices are indeed associated with higher financial sector 
fragility, as measured by a wide range of indicators (Table 1.1.1). Drops in commodity prices are associated with 
higher NPLs and bank costs, while they reduce bank profitability (return on assets and return on equity), liquidity, 
and provisions to NPLs. As a result of this fragility, commodity price downturns tend to increase the likelihood of 
banking crises. While these results are found across regions, sub-Saharan African countries seem to be more affected, 
both via a higher impact on NPLs and a higher likelihood of banking crises following price declines. For instance, a 
50 percent decline in commodity prices (similar to the order of magnitude experienced over the last 12 months, 
Figure 1.1.1. Commodity Price Shocks and Selected Indicators of Financial Sector Fragility
4
6
8
10
12
Percent
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
Percent
Nonperforming loans (NPLs)
Provisions to NPLs
g
y
g y
0
2
4
6
All countries
Sub-Saharan Africa Developing countries
Perc
e
0
10
20
30
40
50
All countries
s
Sub-Saharan Africa Developing countries
Perc
e
20
25
40
45
50
Return on equity
Number of banking crises
0
5
10
15
20
All countries
s
Sub-Saharan Africa Developing countries
Percent
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
All countries
s
Sub-Saharan Africa Developing countries
0
All countries
s
Sub-Saharan Africa Developing countries
Positive shocks
0
All countries
s
Sub-Saharan Africa Developing countries
Negative shocks
Source: Authors’ estimates.
(continued)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested