REGIONAL ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
20
and equivalent to a 3.6 standard deviation) results in an increase in NPLs of 3.5 percentage points for the whole 
sample and 4.5 percentage points in sub-Saharan Africa. In addition, the results are robust to a battery of robustness 
checks, including: (1) an alternative measure of commodity price shocks; (2) a differentiation between hydrocarbon 
and other nonrenewable commodities; (3) a focus on shocks lasting more than one year; and (4) a focus on large 
shocks.
3
周e recognition that declines in commodity prices are an important source of financial fragility raises questions 
about the appropriate framework to ensure financial stability in face of these shocks. While there is not much that 
macroeconomic policy can do to prevent commodity price shocks, the analysis shows that the impact of these shocks 
on the banking system depends on the economic, financial, and institutional conditions in place when the shocks 
occur. Indeed, the adverse effects of commodity price shocks on financial fragility tend to occur more severely in 
countries with poor quality of governance, in those with weak fiscal space, as well as in those that do not have a 
sovereign wealth fund, do not implement macroprudential policies, and do not have a diversified export base. In 
addition, stronger public finance management capacity can help prevent the occurrence of domestic arrears in the 
wake of negative commodity price shocks. Addressing these weaknesses could reduce financial sector fragility and 
the probability of banking crises.
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)
(8)
(9)
NPLs
Provisions to NPLs
ROA
ROE
Cost
Reg. Capital
Liq. Assets
Index
Crisis
Price shocks
2.2840***
-16.0300***
-0.5810***
-6.5350***
1.5370*
-0.3440
-1.9730**
-0.0083***
1.8750**
(0.52)
(3.69)
(0.13)
(1.58)
(0.90)
(0.37)
(0.93)
(0.002)
(0.78)
Exchange rate, t-1
4.7850***
-16.6900
-1.1000
-22.0800
4.9110
-2.7760
-0.6880
-0.0133
-0.6720
(1.34)
(12.09)
(1.35)
(26.51)
(11.71)
(3.54)
(3.74)
(0.01)
(1.12)
Real interest, t-1
0.1160**
-0.8220***
-0.0223
-0.2310
0.1380*
0.0009
-0.0502
-0.0005**
0.0977***
(0.05)
(0.24)
(0.01)
(0.18)
(0.07)
(0.02)
(0.05)
(0.0002)
(0.04)
M2/reserve, t-1
0.0500
-0.7010
0.0099
0.1010
0.0828
-0.0013
-0.0980
0.0002
0.3730**
(0.19)
(2.23)
(0.01)
(0.29)
(0.34)
(0.10)
(0.48)
(0.00)
(0.15)
Inflation, t-1
0.0001
0.0523
0.0051
0.1510
0.0058
0.0388
0.0300
0.0001
0.0855**
(0.04)
(0.28)
(0.02)
(0.40)
(0.16)
(0.04)
(0.09)
(0.00)
(0.04)
Credit growth, t-1
-5.0090
14.0000
-0.2430
-5.8580
-0.3940
-5.3770***
-6.7660
-0.0140**
0.0444
(3.19)
(17.88)
(0.30)
(3.85)
(3.12)
(1.55)
(4.17)
(0.01)
(2.98)
Log(GDPPC), t-1
-1.5950
-3.6980
-0.1660
0.0153
-2.0160
-0.1780
-6.4890**
-0.0132**
-3.4290**
(1.50)
(6.45)
(0.24)
(2.55)
(1.76)
(0.68)
(2.73)
(0.00)
(1.55)
Debt, t-1
0.1070**
0.0298
-0.0053*
0.0100
0.0696***
0.0218
0.0026
-0.00004
-0.0225*
(0.04)
(0.17)
(0.00)
(0.05)
(0.02)
(0.03)
(0.05)
(0.00)
(0.01)
Constant
40.9800
185.1000
6.0470
15.6500
99.5600**
20.9800
195.5000***
0.8470***
(37.96)
(159.60)
(5.92)
(63.20)
(42.68)
(17.50)
(65.68)
(0.16)
Observations
457
426
691
691
693
454
697
697
191
Countries
45
45
58
58
58
45
58
58
15
R-squared
0.3470
0.1290
0.0580
0.0460
0.1230
0.1290
0.0920
0.0520
Note: Fixed effects are included. Robust standard errors in parentheses.
Note: ***p<0.01, significant at 1%, **p<0.05, significant at 5%, *p<0.10, significant at 10%.   NPLs = nonperforming loams; ROA = return on assets; ROE = return on equity.
12
Table 1.1.1. Impact of Declines in Commodity Prices and Financial Sector Fragility
Table 1.1.1. Impact of Declines in Commodity Prices and Financial Sector Fragility
Note: Fixed effects are included. Robust standard errors in parentheses. ***denotes significance at the 1 percent confidence level; 
**significance at the 5 percent confidence level; and *significance at the 10 percent confidence level. NPLs = nonperforming loans; 
ROA = return on assets; ROE = return on equity.
3
周e alternative measure of commodity price shocks follows Arezki and Brückner (2012) and Brückner and Ciccone (2010), 
and measures commodity price shocks by changes in prices.
Box 1.1. (continued)
Pdf thumbnail creator - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
view pdf thumbnails in; program to create thumbnail from pdf
Pdf thumbnail creator - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
how to create a thumbnail of a pdf document; create thumbnail jpg from pdf
1.  DEALING WITH THE GATHERING CLOUDS
21
Box 1.2. Rapid Credit Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa: What Does It Portend? 
Real credit to the private sector has risen fivefold on average in sub-Saharan African countries over the last 12 years. 
周e ensuing increased financial deepening and inclusion are certainly welcome, but authorities should be mindful of the 
increased financial risks associated with potentially excessive credit growth where it has been particularly buoyant.
Most sub-Saharan African countries have experienced a decade-long 
rapid increase in private credit. Real credit to the private sector grew 
fivefold over the period 2003–14—an average annual progression 
of 16 percent over 10 years, leading to a doubling of the credit-to-
GDP ratio for the region as a whole (Figure 1.2.1). Progression was 
particularly strong in oil-exporting economies and fragile states, albeit 
starting from a low base—credit-to-GDP ratios now hover around 
15 percent in each of these groups (Figure 1.2.2). Middle-income 
countries (excluding South Africa) provide larger credit support 
to the private sector, at 36percent of GDP, although this remains 
slightly below the average 40 percent observed in non–sub-Saharan 
African emerging market and developing economies. 
International experience shows that episodes of unusually high 
credit growth tend to be associated with increased financial risk. 周e 
literature identifies rapid credit growth as a key precursor of financial 
crises, although macroeconomic variables affecting the debt dynamics, 
such as low real growth and high real interest rates, also play a role 
(Demirgüç-Kunt and Detragiache 1998; Beck and others 2005). To 
some extent, rising credit-to-GDP ratios reflect financial deepening 
and the typical procyclicality of credit associated with terms-of-trade 
gains, but increases going well beyond those stylized trends have also 
been identified as an important early warning indicator of banking 
crises over longer horizons (Drehmann and Juselius 2013). Various 
credit-to-GDP gap measures have been developed to separate the 
long-term financial component associated with financial deepening 
from excessive credit expansion and to identify countries with a 
higher probability of a banking crisis (Dell’Ariccia and others 2012; 
Ortiz Vidal-Abarca and Ugarte Ruiz 2015). 
However, some factors accompanying the rapid  expansion in credit 
in sub-Saharan Africa are in fact reassuring:
•  Increased banking intermediation has been underpinned 
by a growing deposit base, as per capita incomes and the share of the urbanized population have risen. 
Banks have been more inclined to lend, with the loan-to-deposit ratio rising steadily since 2009 from 
63 to 66 percent (Figure 1.2.3). Finally, the expansion of mobile banking has also played a positve role 
in fostering financial deepening, especially in east Africa, by reducing transaction costs, notably in rural 
areas. Banking penetration, defined as total banking assets to GDP, has increased by roughly 50 percent 
over the last 12 years, and now stands at close to 60 percent of GDP.
Figure 1.2.1. Sub-Saharan Africa: Real Credit to the  
Private Sector, 2003–14
Sources: IMF African Department database; and  
IMF, World Economic Outlook database.
Note: Deflated by the consumer price index.
¹Excludes South Africa.
300
400
500
600
700
800
Index, 2003 = 100
Sub-Saharan Africa¹
Oil exporters
Middle-income countries¹
Low-income countires
Fragile states
0
100
200
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
Figure 1.2.2. Sub-Saharan Africa: Credit to the 
Private Sector, 2003 and 2014
Source: IMF, World Economic Outlook database.
1
Excludes South Africa.
10
20
30
40
Percent of GDP
2003
2014
0
Sub-Saharan 
Africa¹
Oil exporters
Middle-income 
countries¹
Low-income 
countires
Fragile states
(continued)
Create Thumbnail in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
Go to the toolbar: Select "Thumbnail Creator" & activate "HQ Annotate & Redact Documents or Images; Create Thumbnail; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode &
pdf thumbnail generator; generate thumbnail from pdf
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
VB.NET Image Cropping Assembly to Crop Image, VB.NET Image Thumbnail Creator Control SDK.
pdf thumbnail preview; enable thumbnail preview for pdf files
REGIONAL ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
22
•  More broadly, financial soundness indicators (FSI), where 
available, indicate that sub-Saharan African banks are on 
average healthy and profitable. A total of 20 out of 45 
countries in the region regularly publish FSI indicators, 
although in some cases with a lag. For these countries, 
returns on equity are generally high, nonperforming loan 
ratios are low, and capital and liquidity buffers are strong 
(Table 1.2.1, Statistical Appendix Tables 27 and 28). 
Nonperforming loans are, however, sizable in Burundi, 
Cameroon, Ghana, and Sierra Leone. At the same time, 
capital adequacy ratios are relatively high in all countries 
except Cameroon. Sierra Leone experienced a significant 
increase in nonperforming loans in 2014 (33 percent), 
partly related to the Ebola epidemic; however, capital 
buffers there still remain relatively strong at 20percent.
•  Credit expansion for the region as a whole has not 
been unusually strong by international comparison. 
Sub-Saharan African low-income countries still have 
lower credit-to-GDP ratios than do their peers in 
other regions and the increase in their credit-to-GDP 
ratios has been slightly lower than that in other regions 
(Figure 1.2.4). Moreover, the region still has one of the 
lowest credit-to-GDP ratios in the world, suggesting 
some potential for further financial deepening. And 
while its percentage point increase has been substantial, 
it is well below that seen in emerging and developing 
Europe and Commonwealth of Independent States 
(CIS) countries (Figure 1.2.5).
Nevertheless, in a few countries, credit expansion may have gone 
beyond what is warranted by financial deepening—we highlight 
seven of them. Disentagling the degree of financial deepening from 
excessive credit growth is not straightforward.
A proper assessment 
requires being able to determine the right level of credit warranted 
by country-specific circumstances, something beyond the scope of 
this box. Instead, we identify a number of countries in the region in 
which credit has grown much faster than GDP over the last decade, 
relying on the threshold of a 20 percentage point increase in credit-
to-GDP ratio in a single year used by Dell’Ariccia and others (2012) 
combined with whether countries experienced an increase in credit 
that was far above the region’s average. Based on these criteria, 
Table 1.2.1. Sub-Saharan Africa: Bank Soundness  
Indicators, 2013
Source: IMF, Financial Soundness Indicators database.
Note:Simple average across 20 sub-Saharan African 
countries with available data.
2013
Capital to risk-weighted assets
18.5
Nonperforming loans to total loans
7.2
Liquid assets to total assets (liquid asset ratio)
26.2
Bank returns on assets
2.7
Bank returns on equity
23.1
Source: IMF Financial Soundness Indicators database.
ge across 20 sub-Saharan African countries 
Figure 1.2.4. Credit to the Private Sector, 2003, 2014  
(Median across countries, balanced sample)
Sources: IMF, International Financial Statistics; and 
IMF staff calculations.
15
20
25
30
35
ercent of GDP
P
2003
2014
0
5
10
Low-income sub-Saharan Africa
Other low-income
P
e
Figure 1.2.3. Sub-Saharan Africa: Banking Penetration  
and Loan-to-Deposit Ratio, 2003 and 2014
Source: IMF, International Financial Statistics. 
Note: Excludes South Africa. Banking penetration 
data excludes Ethiopia, Guinea, Liberia, Rwanda, and 
Zimbabwe due to data availability. Data on credit-to-
deposit ratio additionally exclude Madagascar and 
Malawi.
64
66
68
40
45
50
55
60
-
to-deposit ratio, percent
e
netration, percent of GDP
Banking penetration
Loan-to-deposit ratio (right scale)
60
62
30
35
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
Loan
-
Banking p
e
Box 1.2. (continued)
1
Marchettini and Maino (2015), in particular, highlight that, when the level of financial depth is low, traditional leading 
indicators of banking crises have a lower predictive power. In addition, financial deepening often goes beyond bank credit 
(Sahayand others 2015).
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
allows you to read, add, edit, update, and delete PDF file metadata, like Title, Subject, Author, Creator, Producer, Keywords, etc. C#.NET: Edit PDF Thumbnail.
can't view pdf thumbnails; show pdf thumbnail in
VB.NET Image: .NET Imaging Viewing and Processing Programming SDK
RasterEdge.Imaging.Barcode.Scanner.dll: contrary to the barcode creator, barcode scanner RasterEdge.Imaging.PDF.dll: used to processing PDF file in VB project
pdf thumbnail html; pdf thumbnail creator
1.  DEALING WITH THE GATHERING CLOUDS
23
seven countries stand out: Angola, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Ghana, Lesotho, 
and the Republic of Congo (Figure 1.2.6, Table 1.2.2). 周ese countries therefore warrant close financial surveil-
lance, especially oil-exporting countries, where lower export receipts can trigger a tightening of financial conditions, 
and as evidence shows that financial stability indicators tend to deteriorate when commodity exporters experience 
sharp negative terms-of-trade shocks (see Box 1.1).
Figure 1.2.5. Credit to the Private Sector,  2003 and 2014 
(Simple average across countries, balanced sample) 
Sources: IMF, International Financial Statistics; and  
IMF staff calculations.
¹Includes Pakistan and Afghanistan.
10
20
30
40
50
60
Percent of GDP
2003
2014
0
Sub-Saharan Africa
Commonwealth of 
Independent States
Emerging and 
developing Asia
Latin America 
and Caribbean
Middle East 
and North Africa¹
Emerging and 
developing Europe
Figure 1.2.6. Selected Countries: Real Private Credit and 
Real GDP Indices, 2014
Sources: IMF, African Department; and IMF, World 
Economic Outlook databases.
Note: The gray line indicates the same credit and GDP 
index, or cumulative growth. See page 78 for country 
acronmyms.
AGO
COD
COG
GNQ
GHA
A
GNB
1000
1500
2000
2500
edit  (Index, 2003 = 100)
)
BEN
BWA
BFA
BDI
CMR
CPV
CAF
TCD
COM
CIV
ERI
ETH
GAB
GMB
GIN
KEN
LSO
LBR
MDG
MWI
MLI
MUS
MOZ
NAM
NER
NGA
RWA
STP
SEN
SYC
SLE
SWZ
TZA
TGO
UGA
ZMB
0
500
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
700
Real cr
e
Real GDP (Index, 2003=100)
Table 1.2.2. Credit Booms in Sub-Saharan Africa
Note: Credit booms are defined here as an episode of a 20 percentage point increase in one year in the credit-to-
GDP ratio, followed by continuous increase in the ratio, as in Dell’Arriccia and others (2012). * Denotes countries 
where the increase in credit was far above the region’s average.
Past Credit Booms
Start End
Ongoing Credit Booms
ms
Start
Angola
la
* 2006 2009
Chad
2008
Central African Republic
2010 2013
Comoros
2009
Congo, Democratic Republic of the
e
* 2006 2009
Congo, Republic of
f
* 2008
Gabon
2012 2013
Equatorial Guinea
* 2013
Ghana
* 2005 2008
Guinea
2013
Lesotho
* 2005 2012
Guinea-Bissau
* 2005
Liberia
2008 2011
Mozambique
2008
Malawi
2008 2012
South Sudan
2011
Niger
r
2006 2012
Togo
o
2011
Nigeria
a
2007 2008
Rwanda
2008 2008
São Tomé and Príncipe
2009 2010
Seychelles
s
2010 2010
Sierra Leone
2007 2009
Zambia
2012 2012
1
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Support editing PDF document metadata: Title, Subject, Author, Creator, Producer, Keywords, Created Date, and Last Modified Date; PDF Thumbnail.
pdf file thumbnail preview; create pdf thumbnail
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
Author, Creator, Producer, Keywords, Created Date, and Last Modified Date. Class: PDFMetadata. Thumbnail. You can generate thumbnail image(s) from PDF file for
pdf files thumbnail preview; cannot view pdf thumbnails in
REGIONAL ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
24
Box 1.3. Putting the Sustainable Development Goals into Macroeconomic Perspective
1
周e development agenda in sub-Saharan Africa for the next 15 years is set to be shaped by the Sustainable 
Development Goals (SDGs) launched at the New York UN summit this September. Centered around 17 goals, the 
SDGs are broader in scope than the Millennium Development Goals endorsed at the turn of the century, and aspire 
to improve economic and social well being on a sustainable basis. More equitably distributed growth would improve 
living conditions not only in terms of material goods and services but also in terms of social cohesion. To sustain 
growth over time, economies must reduce their vulnerability to external shocks and domestic conflicts, encourage 
the rational use of nonrenewable resources, and minimize social and environmental externalities. While these efforts 
will specifically target the least-developed countries, they will require collaboration on many fronts among develop-
ing and higher-income countries.
Macroeconomic and financial policies have a crucial role to play in achieving these goals. 周e specific form these 
take would depend greatly on each country’s specificities, including its economic structure, level of economic 
and human capital development, and institutional capacity. Nevertheless, there are common elements, which are 
detailed in the remainder of this box.
Macroeconomic stability. One of the main contributions policymakers can make to meet the development goals is to 
deliver a stable macroeconomic and financial environment that provides the necessary backdrop for individuals to 
build their skills and invest to make society more productive. 
Quality of public spending. Within the overall budgetary envelope, the choice of public spending components can 
make a significant difference in encouraging economic growth and promoting opportunities and equity. In particu-
lar, properly designed and prioritized public spending on infrastructure, public health, and education can contribute 
to develop human and physical capital and unleash potential for new activities. Spending on these items can also 
play a redistributive role that reduces inequality and social tensions while increasing basic aspects of human capital 
in the underprivileged population, who typically do not have the same access to opportunities as do other groups.
•  Public investment can contribute to sustainable development by connecting citizens and firms to 
economic opportunities, serving as a catalyst for private investment. In a context of limited financing 
resources, efforts at increasing the efficiency of public spending and the quality of public service delivery 
become even more crucial. 
•  Public spending on education helps provide the future workforce, including young female adults, with 
the basic skills needed by more productive and higher technology sectors, hence sowing the seeds for 
economic diversification and resilience.
•  Untargeted subsidies are traditionally expensive and often fail to reach the intended population. 周e 
overarching objective should be to replace them with well-targeted schemes that avoid the waste of 
public resources. Because the public sector in many developing economies is a nontrivial employer, 
it can also serve as a role model in adopting hiring policies that avoid gender and other types of labor 
market discrimination, which at the macroeconomic level tend to perpetuate inequality. 
Tax policy. 周e tax structure can play a substantial role in distributing fairly across the population the burden of 
financing public spending, creating incentives that promote development, and minimizing to the extent possible 
distortions. Tax systems could be modernized with a view to increasing their progressivity and widening their base 
(including by reducing exceptions that favor politically influential interest groups), allowing for a lower and more 
equitable burden on each individual taxpayer. Fairer tax systems can also help improve the investment climate and 
hence promote economic activity and jobs. 
1
For more details, see Fabrizio and others (2015).
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
Author, Creator, Producer, Keywords, Created Date, and Last Modified Date. Class: PDFMetadata. Thumbnail. You can generate thumbnail image(s) from PDF file for
no pdf thumbnails in; create thumbnail jpeg from pdf
C# Image: How to Add Antique & Vintage Effect to Image, Photo
A: Sorry, the API that RasterEdge C#.NET antique effect creator control add are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
create thumbnails from pdf files; pdf thumbnail fix
1.  DEALING WITH THE GATHERING CLOUDS
25
Financial sector development. 周e first objective of financial policies should be to encourage behaviors that maintain 
financial sector stability through appropriate supervision and regulation of the financial sector. Macroprudential 
policies that manage incentives for risk-taking throughout the business and financial cycles can play a crucial role 
in maintaining stability; so does an institutional setting that properly factors in the interaction between monetary 
and financial policies. Within that framework, policymakers should also strive to encourage financial deepening and 
financial inclusion, that is, access to financial services to the largest possible share of the population.
Economic transformation and inclusiveness. Structural reforms, ranging from trade policies to labor markets and the 
regulatory framework, can go a long way toward promoting economic transformation and inclusiveness. 周ey can 
help shift resources to the most productive uses and diversify production and exports. 周ey can also play a role in 
promoting gender inclusion, which tends to deliver significant payoffs in terms of long-term demographic dynamics 
and private investment in human capital. Well-designed regulations can help strengthen the governance of key 
institutions and enhance the business climate, promote market competition and innovation, reduce barriers to entry 
for new products, and enlarge trade networks. In combination with the operation or supervision of public utilities 
and policies on fiscal subsidies, appropriate regulation can foster the proper pricing policies on energy and water 
resources, which are critical to achieve environmentally sustainable economic outcomes.
C# PowerPoint - PowerPoint Creating in C#.NET
The PowerPoint document file created by RasterEdge C# PowerPoint document creator library is searchable and can be fully populated with editable text and
generate pdf thumbnail c#; how to make a thumbnail from pdf
C# Word - Word Creating in C#.NET
The Word document file created by RasterEdge C# Word document creator library is searchable and can be fully populated with editable text and graphics
can't see pdf thumbnails; thumbnail view in for pdf files
REGIONAL ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
26
Annex 1.1. Estimating the Tax Frontier
1
Concepts and Definitions
Fenochietto and Pessino (2010, 2013) define the tax frontier—
also known as tax capacity—as the maximum tax revenue 
(usually measured in proportion of GDP) a country can achieve 
given its economic, institutional, and demographic character-
istics (level of development, trade openness, sectoral structure, 
education, income distribution, and institutional, factors). 周e 
“distance” between the tax frontier and the actual tax collection 
is defined as the country’s tax potential (Annex Figure 1.1.1). 
周is distance partially reflects potential gains in tax revenue 
that can be achieved through increased collection efficiency as 
well as a relative acceptance for taxation in exchange for public 
goods and services. As a result, a positive tax potential does not 
necessarily imply the need to mobilize additional revenue, but 
may also reflect certain tax policy choices and a preference  
for low taxation (even if that means fewer public services provided). 
Regression Estimation
Following Fenochietto and Pessino (2010, 2013), a model is 
estimated to determine the tax frontier for a group of 113 countries 
between 2000 and 2013 (Annex Table 1.1.1). 周e tax frontier is 
estimated using Mundlak’s (1978) random effects model, which 
allows for identifying inefficiency from unobserved heterogeneity 
across countries—that is, the random effect is correlated with the 
explanatory variables. 周e estimated model is as follows:
where y
it
is the log of total tax revenue (the sum of tax and social 
security contributions) in percent of GDP for country i in periodt 
for oil importers and the log of non-oil tax revenue in percent of 
non-oil GDP for oil exporters;
2
x
it
is a vector of variables that affect 
tax revenue for country i in period t as described below; 
y
x
revenue for 

i
is a country-
is a 
country-specific effect correlated with (the average of) the explana-
tory variables and 
I
a country-specific random disturbance; v
a country-specific random disturbance; v
it
is a 
zero-mean normally distributed error term for country i at time t; 
and u
it
is an exponentially distributed (nonnegative) random variable 
independent of v
it
. Hence, in this setup, 
me t; and u

’x
x
i
corresponds to country 
i’s (deterministic) tax frontier, v
it
is the noise, and u
it
represents the 
tax potential, that is, the extent to which country i is away from its 
maximum level of tax collection. 
Annex Figure 1.1.1. Tax Frontier
Source: IMF staff based on Fenochietto and Pessino (2010).
g
 of tax revenue to GDP
Tax frontier
x
Logof actual tax revenue 
to GDP for country 
i
Country 
i'
tax potential
Lo
g
Log of real GDP per capita
Annex Table 1.1.1. Country List
Note: * Denotes countries with an income below $20,000.
Albania*
Estonia*
Latvia*
Portugal
Algeria*
Ethiopia*
Lebanon*
Romania*
Angola*
Finland
Libya*
Russia*
Armenia*
France
Lithuania*
Saudi Arabia
Australia
Gambia, The*
Luxembourg
Senegal*
Austria
Germany
Madagascar*
Serbia and 
Montenegro*
Bahrain
Ghana*
Malawi*
Singapore
Bangladesh*
Greece
Mali*
Slovak Rep.*
Belarus*
Guatemala*
Mexico*
Slovenia
Belgium
Guinea*
Moldova*
South Africa*
Bolivia*
Guinea-Bissau* Mongolia*
Spain
Brazil*
Guyana*
Morocco*
Sri Lanka*
Bulgaria*
Honduras*
Mozambique* Suriname*
Burkina Faso*
Hungary*
Namibia*
Sweden
Cameroon*
Iceland
Netherlands
Switzerland
Canada
India*
New Zealand Tanzania*
Chile*
Indonesia*
Nicaragua*
Thailand*
China, People's 
Rep. of*
Iran, Islamic 
Rep. of*
Niger*
Togo*
Colombia*
Ireland
Nigeria*
Trinidad and 
nd 
Tobago*
Congo, Rep. of* Israel
Norway
Tunisia*
Costa Rica*
Italy
Oman
Turkey*
Croatia*
Jamaica*
Pakistan*
Uganda*
Cyprus
Japan
Panama*
Ukraine*
Czech Republic* Jordan*
Papua New 
Guinea*
United 
Kingdom
Denmark
Kenya*
Paraguay*
United States
Dominican Rep.* Korea
Peru*
Uruguay*
Egypt*
Kuwait
Philippines*
Vietnam*
El Salvador*
Kyrgyz Rep.*
Poland*
Zambia*
1
We are grateful to Ricardo Fenochietto for sharing his database and code and for assisting us in our estimations. 
2
周is differentiated treatment of oil exporters is meant to estimate the potential for revenue mobilization that is not related to oil 
activities, as these fluctuate substantially with the (externally driven) price of oil.
'
it
i
it
it
it
y
x
v u
i
i
i
t
x
1
1
T
it
i
i
x
x
T
and
2
(0, )
i
iid
~
1.  DEALING WITH THE GATHERING CLOUDS
27
周e vector of exogenous variables x
it
includes the following, taken from the World Bank, World Development Indicators, 
IMF statistics, and Transparency International:
lgd: log of real GDP per capita (purchasing power parity constant 2005);
lgd2: square of lgd, to account for the nonlinear concave relationship between 
GDP per capita and tax revenue (the increase in tax revenue as GDP per capita 
increases becomes marginally smaller).
tr: trade openness, as measured by the sum of imports plus exports in percent 
of GDP;
ava: value added of agriculture in percent of GDP;
gini: distribution of income, as measured by the GINI coefficient;
gov: dummy variable to control for the fact that central government revenue 
is used in place of general government revenue in some countries due to data 
restrictions;
pe: total public expenditure in education in percent of GDP; and
oil: dummy variable for revenue-dependent oil-exporting countries
Two regressions are estimated, the first one with the full sample of countries,  
and the second one excluding countries with real GDP per capita above 
$20,000, to capture only developing and emerging market economies in the 
subsample (Annex Table 1.1.1). 周e results, presented in Annex Tables 1.1.2 
and 1.1.3, are generally consistent with Fenochietto and Pessino (2010, 2013).  
Calculating the Tax Potential
周e estimation procedure yields a time-invariant tax effort for country i as 
exp(−u
i
), which takes values between zero and one.  周is corresponds to the 
average ratio for the estimation period (2000–13) of that country’s actual 
tax revenue (in percent of GDP) to the corresponding estimated frontier tax 
revenue. From that ratio, we derive the average tax potential for country i, 
that is, the difference in percentage points between the potential tax-to-GDP 
ratio and the actual tax ratio over 2000–13. We then calculate the remaining 
tax potential compared to the tax ratio observed in 2014, as presented in 
Figure 1.20 in the text. A negative tax potential does not necessarily indicate 
that there is no room for revenue mobilization in a given country. Rather, it 
reflects that the most recent observation exceeds the time-invariant estimate  
of the tax frontier, which takes into account the average tax-to-GDP ratio  
over the entire period, and reflects revenue mobilization progress over the 
most recent years.
Based on the estimation results, the tax potential for the median sub-Saharan African country is estimated at  
6.1 percentage points of GDP using the full set of countries, and at 3.1 percentage points of GDP for the developing  
and emerging market economies subsample (as shown in Figure 1.19 in the text). 
Similarly, using the estimated coefficients for lgd and lgd2, and assuming that real GDP per capita grows at an average of 
2 percent during the next 10 years, while holding all other variables unchanged, we estimate that the tax frontier would 
shift up by 6.7 percentage points for the median sub-Saharan African country with the full set of countries estimates 
(Annex Table 1.1.2), and by 7.4 percentage points with the developing and emerging economies subsample estimates 
(Annex Table 1.1.3).
Annex Table 1.1.3. Mundlack Estimation: Devel-
oping and Emerging Market Economies Sample
Source: IMF staff calculations. 
Note: ***, **, * denote significance at the 1, 5, 
and 10 percent levels.
Variable
Standard Error
constant
2.3564
1.82
lgd
1.6820 ***
0.22
lgd2
-0.0877 ***
0.01
tr
0.0020 ***
0.00
ava
-0.0032 **
0.00
gini
-0.0042 **
0.00
gov
0.1844 ***
0.04
pe
0.0167 ***
0.01
oil
0.0993 **
0.04
sigma_u
0.4800 ***
0.04
sigma_v
0.0927 ***
0.00
lambda
5.1788 ***
0.04
Coefficient
Inefficiency
Annex Table 1.1.2. Mundlack Estimation: Full 
Sample
Variable
Standard Error
constant
-3.7456
1.57
lgd
1.5483 ***
0.19
lgd2
-0.0781 ***
0.01
tr
0.0013 ***
0.00
ava
-0.0039 **
0.00
gini
-0.0030
0.00
gov
0.1927 ***
0.05
pe
0.0091 **
0.00
oil
-0.0873
0.06
sigma_u
0.6912 ***
0.05
sigma_v
0.0898 ***
0.00
lambda
7.6945 ***
0.05
Source: IMF staff calculations.
Coefficient
Inefficiency
Source: IMF staff calculations. 
Note: ***, **, * denote significance at the 1, 5, 
and 10 percent levels.
29
In recent years the sub-Saharan African region has 
experienced strong real GDP growth and substan-
tial trade integration. However, growth in sub- 
Saharan Africa’s trade volumes has not kept up with 
growth in the volume of global trade during this 
period and its trade imbalances have begun to rise 
in recent years. Meanwhile, the drivers of growth 
since the mid-1990s—improved policies, increased 
aid, debt relief, abundant global liquidity, and high 
global commodity prices—have started to dissipate. 
Moving forward, to sustain rapid growth the region 
will need to diversify away from commodities, 
increase export sophistication, and integrate into 
global value chains. 周is chapter assesses how 
competitiveness indicators in sub-Saharan Africa 
have evolved, and on this basis asks if the region is 
well placed to diversify its export base and sustain 
growth. It also discusses policy options to improve 
competitiveness.
周e main findings of the chapter are:
•  Strong average growth in the last decade in 
sub-Saharan Africa has benefited from a set 
of unique circumstances. At the same time, a 
broad range of indicators point to weak and 
deteriorating competitiveness in the region, 
especially in commodity exporters.
1
1
A substantial literature suggests the tradable sector is “special” 
from the standpoint of growth because of learning externalities 
and technological spillovers that result from being exposed to 
international competition (Rodrik 2008), complementarities 
between activities that can spur integration into global value 
chains (Eichengreen 2007), and economies of scale (Feder 
1983). 周us, institutional weaknesses and market failures that 
are thought to disproportionately affect the tradable sector 
result in an underallocation of resources to the tradable sector 
and low growth. Maintaining a competitive real exchange rate 
•  周e region has experienced fewer episodes of 
sustained growth necessary to produce a durable 
increase in incomes than has other regions, but 
the frequency of such spells has increased in the 
last 15 years. When growth spells have occurred 
in the region, three factors primarily explain 
them: high commodity prices; emergence from 
a period of civil conflict; and competitive real 
exchange rates. Overall, the empirical analysis 
provides strong evidence for the importance of 
competitive real exchange rates for sustaining 
growth spells.
2
•  While specific recommendations depend on 
country circumstances, some broad principles 
for policy action are pursuing sound mac-
roeconomic policies, including not resisting 
near-term depreciation pressures in the face of 
terms-of-trade shocks; undertaking productiv-
ity-enhancing infrastructure investments while 
maintaining debt sustainability; eliminating 
remaining trade barriers; and improving institu-
tions to enhance the business climate.
SETTING THE STAGE
Developments in Growth
After several decades of lackluster growth, the pace 
of economic activity in the region picked up in the 
mid-1990s. Particularly, since the global financial 
crisis, growth in sub-Saharan Africa has outpaced 
that in other regions with the exception of emerging 
and developing Asia. 
While the rapid growth in the region’s many 
commodity exporters has been supported by rising 
commodity prices, as has been observed previously, 
can correct some of the misallocation of resources and spur 
growth in the short to medium term.
2
A competitive real exchange rate in this sense is different 
from the exchange rate assessment under the External Balance 
Assessment (EBA) methodology, which relates the exchange 
rate to external stability (see Phillips and others 2013).
2. Competitiveness in Sub-Saharan Africa: 
Marking Time or Moving Ahead?
周is chapter was prepared by a team led by  
Bhaswar Mukhopadhyay, comprising of Rahul Anand,  
Wenjie Chen, Jesus Gonzalez-Garcia, Naresh Kumar, and 
Magnus Saxegaard. Research assistance was provided by  
Cleary Haines, Shane Radick, George Rooney, FanYang,  
and Mustafa Yenice.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested