asp.net pdf viewer control free : Print pdf thumbnails Library control component .net azure web page mvc sreo10154-part1872

REGIONAL ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
30
growth in the region has not only been driven by 
commodities.
3
Many countries in the region that are 
not reliant on commodities were also able to achieve 
rapid growth by creating a virtuous circle of good 
macroeconomic policies and important structural 
reforms that attracted higher aid flows. 周us,  
eight of the 12 fastest growing countries in the 
region over 1995–2010 were nonresource-depen-
dent economies. Growth across the region has also 
benefited from increased private capital flows. 周e 
period since the mid-1990s saw a spurt of financial 
innovations that, together with the improved policy 
environment and debt relief, allowed such flows to 
the region to increase very significantly.
While some of these growth drivers will continue 
to yield dividends, others have run their course. 
As noted in Chapter 1, commodity prices have 
retreated, the ongoing shift in China’s growth 
model is likely to reduce demand for the region’s 
raw materials, and the period of abundant global 
liquidity is tapering down. At the same time, the 
convergence growth dividend resulting from the 
poor initial conditions in many countries in the 
region is slowly dissipating. 周is suggests that in 
order for countries in the region to maintain growth 
moving forward, they will increasingly have to rely 
on more traditional growth drivers such as com-
petitiveness, which has been a key determinant of 
sustained growth elsewhere in the world, including 
in Asia most recently. 
Evolution of Trade Balances
Against this background, the deterioration in 
sub-Saharan Africa’s trade balances since the mid- 
2000s raises questions about the region’s competi-
tiveness (Figure 2.1).
•  周e increase of import volumes has been the 
driving force behind the deterioration of trade 
balances in the region (Figure 2.2). 周is is 
largely explained by capital goods imports,  
as the region has sought to overcome its infra-
structure deficit (Figure 2.3). 周is represents 
a positive development as it enhances the 
prospects for future growth.
3
See Chapter 2 of Regional Economic Outlook: Sub-Saharan 
Africa, October 2008, and Chapter 2, Regional Economic 
Outlook: Sub-Saharan Africa, October 2013.
•  However, a concern is that export volume 
growth has been largely concentrated in non-oil 
commodity exporters, driven by strong external 
demand and high prices. Elsewhere, export 
volume growth has been weak.
Global Export Shares
周ese concerns are borne out by changes in the 
region’s share of global exports, and its domestic 
value added exported as a share of global domestic 
value added exported (that is, its global value- 
added income).
4
Figure 2.4, which reports data 
for countries with GDP per capita below $20,000 
in 2014, indicates that, with the exception of 
commodity exporters, the penetration of sub- 
Saharan African countries in global trade in terms 
of gross exports has barely changed since 1995.
5
周is is in marked contrast with countries in other 
regions, many of which have experienced significant 
increases in their market share. 
4
Trade in value-added terms has become more prominent 
in the last decade due to the increased fragmentation of 
production. As firms in many countries have integrated into 
global value-chains, it is important to assess trade in value-
added terms rather than gross exports. For sub-Saharan African 
countries, however, the integration into global value chains has 
been only a nascent development as discussed in Chapter 3, 
Regional Economic Outlook: Sub-Saharan Africa, April 2015.
5
A similar pattern emerges when using the domestic value-
added exported as a share of global domestic value added 
exported.
Figure 2.1. Sub-Saharan Africa: Goods Trade Balance as a 
Share of GDP, 2000–14
Source: IMF, World Economic Outlook database.
-10
-5
0
5
Percent of GDP
P
-20
-15
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
P
Interquartile range
Median
Average
e
Print pdf thumbnails - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
print pdf thumbnails; pdf first page thumbnail
Print pdf thumbnails - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
pdf thumbnail preview; cannot view pdf thumbnails in
2. COMPETITIVENESS IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA: MARKING TIME OR MOVING AHEAD?
31
Diversification into Manufactured Exports
Export diversification, especially into manufactur-
ing, has been shown to be an important indicator of 
competitiveness (for example, Johnson, Ostry, and 
Subramanian 2010).
6
One possible reason for this is 
Hausmann and Hidalgo’s (2012) finding that most 
manufactured goods tend to be closely connected to 
other goods, facilitating further diversification.
6
While globally, export diversification towards the 
manufacturing sector has been closely related to growth, 
some sub-Saharan African countries have enjoyed success in 
diversifying their exports of services and commercial/non-
traditional agricultural products. 周is could be a path that a few 
other countries in the region may take too.
•  周e share of manufacturing in the region’s 
exports, relative to the share of global manu-
facturing in total global exports, confirms that 
sub-Saharan Africa remains far less specialized 
in manufacturing than other countries that  
have grown strongly for a sustained period 
(Figure 2.5).
7
•  Specifically, sub-Saharan Africa shows a degree 
of specialization in manufacturing that is just 
above half of that in the world as a whole. 
However, the region’s share was higher than the 
average degree of specialization in other low- 
income developing countries.
8
Moreover, many 
countries in the region have manufacturing 
shares comparable to Bangladesh and Vietnam, 
countries that have made substantial progress in 
recent years in diversifying their exports. 
•  Of greater concern is the fact that between 
1991–95 and 2008–12, the share of manufac-
turing in the region’s exports declined relative 
to the world as a whole (Figure 2.5). 
7
周e manufacturing sector’s domestic value-added exported as 
a share of total value-added exports relative to the same ratio for 
the world has a similar pattern.
8
周ese countries include: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, 
Cambodia, Djibouti, Haiti, Honduras, Kyrgyz Republic, 
LaoPDR, Mauritania, Moldova, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nepal, 
Nicaragua, Papua New Guinea, Sudan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, 
Vietnam, and Yemen.
Figure 2.2. Sub-Saharan Africa: Effects of Prices and Volume Variations on the Change in the Trade-Balance-to-GDP Ratio  
between 2004 and 2014
Source: IMF, World Economic Outlook database.
-60
-30
0
30
60
90
Percent of GDP
Effect of export prices
Effect of export volume
Effect of import prices
Effect of import volume
Oil exporters
Resource-intensivenon-oil countries
Nonresource-intensive coastal countries
Nonresource-
intensive landlocked 
countries
-90
Chad
Congo, Rep.
Angola
Nigeria
Equatorial Guinea
Gabon
Cameroon
Guinea
Central African Rep.
Zimbabwe
Namibia
Tanzania
Niger
Botswana
South Africa
Congo, Dem. Rep.
Mali
Zambia
Liberia
Sierra Leone
Ghana
Burkina Faso
Mozambique
Seychelles
Comoros
Kenya
Mauritius
Gambia, The
São Tomé & Príncipe
Togo
Senegal
Côte d'Ivoire
Guinea-Bissau
Cabo Verde
Benin
Madagascar
Eritrea
Burundi
Rwanda
Uganda
Lesotho
Ethiopia
Swaziland
Malawi
Average
Median
Figure 2.3. Sub-Saharan Africa: Imports to GDP, 1995–2011
Source: IMF staff calculations based on Penn World Tables 8.0.
Note: Capital goods include capital goods and industrial supplies. 
Consumption goods include consumer goods, food and beverages,  
fuel and lubricants, and transport equipment.
11
10
10
10
11
12
14
13
15
15
20
25
30
Percent
Capital goods
Consumption goods
11
11
11
10
10
10
11
10
12
0
5
10
1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Export PDF in WPF. Print PDF in WPF. PDF Create. Create PDF from Word. Create PDF from Excel. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages
show pdf thumbnail in; pdf thumbnail generator online
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
View PDF in WPF. Annotate PDF in WPF. Export PDF in WPF. Print PDF in WPF. PDF Create. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page
pdf preview thumbnail; pdf files thumbnail preview
REGIONAL ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
32
In summary, the evolution of trade aggregates 
presents a mixed picture of competitiveness in 
sub-Saharan African countries. While the significant 
role of capital imports in explaining the deteriora-
tion in trade balances is reassuring, the performance 
of exports, particularly of the manufacturing sector, 
raises questions about the region’s competitiveness. 
周ese developments suggest that a deeper analysis 
of the region’s competitiveness is warranted to 
assess where sub-Saharan African countries stand in 
relation to their peers.
INDICATORS OF COMPETITIVENESS: 
WHAT DO THEY REVEAL?
In the discussion below we consider the evolution 
of a wide range of competitiveness indicators  
(Table 2.1). We first look at real effective exchange 
rate (REER) indices, followed by relative aggregate 
price levels adjusted for changes in productivity 
across countries (for example, the Balassa-
Samuelson effect), and then at disaggregated price 
components. Finally, this section looks at nonprice 
Figure 2.4. Selected Countries: Domestic Exports as a Share of Total Global Exports, Change from 1995–2014
Source: IMF staff calculations based on data from IMF, Direction of Trade Statistics.
Note: Only emerging and developing countries with 2012 GDP per capita below US$20,000 from each region are considered. China is excluded from 
the Asia group and Russia from the Europe and Central Asia Group, as their value is significantly greater than the average for that region.
0.0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1.0
1.2
Percentage points
Asia (excluding 
China)
Europe and 
Central Asia 
(excluding
Russia)
Sub-Saharan 
Africa
Latin America and 
the Caribbean
Middle East and 
North Africa
-0.2
India
Malaysia
Thailand
Indonesia
Vietnam
Philippines
Bangladesh
Mexico
Brazil
Venezuela
Chile
Argentina
Colombia
Peru
Poland
Turkey
Hungary
Romania
Kazakhstan
Ukraine
Bulgaria
Iraq
Iran
Algeria
Egypt
Pakistan
Morocco
Libya
South Africa
Nigeria
Angola
Côte d'Ivoire
Congo, Rep. of
Ghana
Gabon
Figure 2.5. Sub-Saharan Africa and Comparator Countries: Manufacturing’s Share of Gross Exports by Country Relative to World,  
Average over 2008–12
Source: IMF staff calculations based on data from IMF, Eora database.
Note: A value of 0.5 indicates that, for the country in question, the share of manufacturing in gross exports is only 50 percent  
of that share at the global level. 
¹Excluding sub-Saharan African countries. LIDCs = low-income developing countries.
0.8
1.0
1.2
1.4
1.6
1.8
2.0
Shares
Oil exporters
Comparator countries
Non-oil resource-intensive countries
Rest of sub-Saharan Africa
1991-95 average
World average
0.0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1.0
1.2
2
Mauritius
Senegal
Swaziland
Namibia
Ghana
S
outh Africa
Seychelles
Zambia
C
ôte d'Ivoire
Tanzania
Botswana
Kenya
M
adagascar
Cameroon
M
ozambique
Lesotho
C
abo Verde
Liberia
Uganda
Togo
h
aran Africa
G
ambia, The
Malawi
Zimbabwe
S
ierra Leone
Burundi
Ethiopia
Benin
Mali
Eritrea
urkina Faso
Niger
A
frican Rep.
Rwanda
C
ongo, Rep.
, Dem. Rep.
Guinea
Nigeria
é
 & Príncipe
Chad
Angola
Gabon
China
Bangladesh
Chile
Vietnam
 Economies
ng Markets¹
LIDCs¹
Shares
World average
Mauriti
u
Seneg
Swazila
n
Namib
Gha
n
South Afri
c
Seychell
e
Zamb
Côte d'Ivoi
r
Tanzan
Botswa
n
Ken
y
Madagasc
a
Camero
o
Mozambiq
u
Lesot
h
Cabo Ver
d
Liber
Ugan
d
To
g
Sub-Saharan Afri
c
Gambia, T
h
Mala
w
Zimbab
w
Sierra Leo
n
Burun
Ethiop
Ben M
a
Eritr
e
Burkina Fa
s
Nig
e
Central African Re
p
Rwan
d
Congo, Re
p
Congo, Dem. Re
p
Guin
e
Niger
São Tomé & Prínci
p
Ch
a
Ango
Gab
o
Chi
n
Banglade
s
Chi
Vietna
m
Advanced Economi
e
Emerging Market
s
LIDC
s
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Support of converting from any single one PDF page and multiple pages. Thumbnails can be created from PDF pages. Support for customizing image size.
can't see pdf thumbnails; create thumbnail from pdf c#
C# PDF Print Library: Print PDF documents in C#.net, ASP.NET
WPF Viewer & Editor. WPF: View PDF. WPF: Annotate PDF. WPF: Export PDF. WPF: Print PDF. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page
pdf thumbnail viewer; create pdf thumbnail image
2. COMPETITIVENESS IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA: MARKING TIME OR MOVING AHEAD?
33
competitiveness indicators, with a view to capturing 
institutional and structural constraints that hold 
back the tradable sector.
Real Effective Exchange Rate Indices
周e REER, which measures relative movements 
in aggregate price indices across countries, has 
traditionally been a key indicator to assess com-
petitiveness. We consider here two concepts of the 
REER. 周e standard REER measures the changes 
in the consumer price index (CPI) relative to 
trade partners, expressed in a common currency 
and weighted by the gross bilateral trade share by 
partner. 周e analogous value-added REER (the 
global value chain [GVC] REER), which takes  
into account value-added instead of gross bilateral 
trade, also substitutes GDP deflators, as a proxy  
for the price of exported domestic value added  
(see Annex 2.1).
9
9
See Bems and Johnson (2012) for a discussion of the 
construction of this index.
An appreciation of the REER makes exports more 
expensive than foreign competition and imports 
cheaper than domestic production, and thus 
signals a loss in competitiveness relative to trading 
partners.
10
周e aggregate picture is of a modest appreciation 
in both the REER and the GVC REER over 
1995–2014 (Figure 2.6). However, this masks the 
pronounced change in trend over time and the 
marked diversity at the individual country level. 
•  Notably, both REERs point to a sustained 
depreciation over 1995–2002 followed by a 
strong appreciation since 2002 (Figure 2.7).
•  周is pattern is more pronounced in commodity 
exporters, where REERs have on average 
appreciated by 40 percent since 2002, and is 
10
Alternatively, an appreciation of the REER signals an 
improvement in the profitability of nontraded goods relative to 
traded goods. 周is draws resources away from the traded sector 
and eventualy results in a deterioration in the trade balance.
Table 2.1. Competitiveness Indicators
Price Index-Based Indicators
Standard real effective exchange rate (REER)
The REER is an index calculated as the trade-
weighted average of bilateral  real exchange rates 
against trade partners that uses the Consumer Price 
Index (CPI) as the price deflator and gross bilateral 
trade shares as weights. An increase in the 
REER implies that exports become more expensive 
and imports become cheaper; that is, a loss in trade 
competitiveness.
Widely used; easy to compute. 
It is an index that only provides information on 
changes in competitiveness relative to trade partners; 
uses gross exports and imports that are not an 
accurate reflection of domestic production in the 
calculation of trade shares; and uses the CPI, which 
does not accurately reflect domestic costs of 
production. Reflects the use of different consumption 
baskets across countries. Trade partners remain fixed 
over time. 
Global value chain (GVC) REER
GVC-based REER uses value-added exports and 
imports as weights instead of gross exports as in the 
case of the standard REER.
Provides a more accurate description of domestic 
production due to the use of value-added trade 
weights and the GDP deflator, which better reflect 
production costs.
Data are less easily available, with some missing data 
in terms of countries. Data available only through 
2012. 
Price Level-Based Indicators
Balassa-Samuelson adjusted relative price 
level
This is a direct measure of competitiveness of the real 
exchange rate, taking account of the Balassa-
Samuelson effect, that is, the deviation of the real 
exchange rate from the level predicted taking account 
of the Balassa-Samuelson effect, whereby wealthier 
countries have more appreciated real exchange rates 
on account of higher productivity.
Based on price-level data relative to the United States. 
Strong theoretical link to export performance and 
growth. Estimated using Penn World Tables data that 
include consistent data for a large amount of countries 
over a long time period.
Does not capture other structural factors (for example, 
business environment) that may have an impact on 
competitiveness. Unlike the REER does not provide an 
assessment of competitiveness relative to all trading 
partners.
Import and export basket
Calculates the domestic cost of the country's import 
basket, and the foreign cost of the export basket using 
price-level data from the World Bank's International 
Comparison Program. 
Uses comparable consumption baskets across 
countries; uses price level instead of indices and 
allows trade weights to change over time. This makes 
it comparable across countries and over time.
Data are available for only two years, 2005 and 2011.  
Non-Price-Based Indicators
Global Competitiveness Index
Based on surveys and data collection, describes 
institutions, policies and factors that determine 
productivity in a country.
Based on theoretical and empirical research, takes 
into account the different stages of development of 
countries.
Opinions collected in surveys answered by business 
leaders are subjective, may be influenced by changes 
in perceptions.
Indicator
Description
Strengths
Weaknesses
Source: Prepared by IMF staff.
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
image resources: Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size Embedded page thumbnails. Embedded print settings.
enable pdf thumbnails in; create thumbnails from pdf files
VB.NET PDF Print Library: Print PDF documents in vb.net, ASP.NET
View PDF in WPF. Annotate PDF in WPF. Export PDF in WPF. Print PDF in WPF. PDF Create. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page
pdf thumbnail generator; how to make a thumbnail of a pdf
REGIONAL ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
34
suggestive of Dutch disease associated with the 
period of strong commodity prices (Figure 2.8). 
As a consequence, many commodity exporters, 
including Nigeria and Angola, which are among 
the largest countries in the region, show sub-
stantial appreciation of their REERs over the 
entire period 1995–2014.
•  REERs of noncommodity exporters have also 
appreciated since 2002, but not as sharply as 
in commodity exporters (Figure 2.8). Indeed, 
over 1995–2014, REERs in most noncommod-
ity exporters either appreciated modestly or 
depreciated. 
•  Countries with pegged exchange rates seem to 
show a more stable REER than floaters 
(Figure 2.9).
A decomposition indicates that nominal exchange 
rate depreciations are the main contributors to 
the depreciation of the REER, most notably in 
countries with floating exchange rate regimes, 
Figure 2.6. Sub-Saharan Africa and Comparator Countries: Change in Real Effective Exchange Rate,  
Standard versus Global Value Chains, 1995–2014
Sources: IMF, staff calculations based on data from IMF, Information Notice System (INS), and Eora database.
¹Global value chain (GVC) REERs (in bars) are based on 1995–2012. Data for these countries begin after 1995 due to data availability 
(with start dates in parentheses): Angola (2000); Democratic Republic of Congo (2010); Liberia (2000); Nigeria (1999). 
² Excluding sub-Saharan African countries. LIDCs = low-income developing countries.
100
-50
0
50
100
150
200
250
Percent change, 1995–2014
Oil exporters
Non-oil commodity exporters
Rest of sub-Saharan Africa
Comparator countries
Standard
Appreciation
Depreciation
-100
Congo, Rep.
Nigeria¹
Angola¹
Chad
Gabon
Cameroon
Zambia
Tanzania
Namibia
Ghana
Sierra Leone
Mali
Burkina Faso
Niger
Congo, Dem. Rep.¹
Central African Rep.
South Africa
Botswana
Liberia¹
Guinea
Eritrea
Kenya
Madagascar
Côte d'Ivoire
Togo
Benin
Swaziland
Malawi
Ethiopia
Senegal
Mozambique
Mauritius
Burundi
Lesotho
São Tomé & Príncipe
Rwanda
Cabo Verde
Seychelles
Uganda
Gambia, The
China
VietnamChile
Bangladesh
Emerging Markets²
LIDCs²
Sub-Saharan Africa
Advanced Economies
Figure 2.7. Sub-Saharan Africa: Change in Real Effective 
Exchange Rate, Global Value Chains versus Standard, 
1995–2014
Sources: IMF staff calculations based on data from IMF, Information 
Notice System (INS), and Eora database.
80
90
100
110
120
e
 exchange rate (2010 = 100)
60
70
80
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
Real effectiv
e
Global value chains 
Standard
Figure 2.8. Sub-Saharan Africa: Change in Standard Real 
Effective Exchange Rate, Commodity Exporters versus 
Noncommodity Exporters, 1995–2014
Source: IMF staff calculations based on data from IMF, Information 
Notice System (INS).
80
90
100
110
120
exchange rate (2010 = 100)
60
70
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
Real effective
Commodity exporters
Noncommodity exporters
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
image resources: Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size Embedded page thumbnails. Embedded print settings.
how to create a thumbnail of a pdf document; enable thumbnail preview for pdf files
VB.NET PDF - Print PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
View PDF in WPF. Annotate PDF in WPF. Export PDF in WPF. Print PDF in WPF. PDF Create. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page
disable pdf thumbnails; create pdf thumbnails
2. COMPETITIVENESS IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA: MARKING TIME OR MOVING AHEAD?
35
whereas relatively large inflation is often the 
driver behind their appreciation (Figure 2.10). In 
a number of countries, mainly floaters, nominal 
currency depreciations were accompanied by 
offsetting inflation, although many were also able 
to sustain a depreciation of the REER. Peggers 
generally saw little change in their nominal 
exchange rates or inflation.
Relative Price Level Adjusted for Balassa-
Samuelson Effects
An important advantage of the standard REER is 
that it is easily computable from readily available 
data. However, REERs are indices, and hence only 
permit a comparison of relative price changes, 
but not relative and absolute price levels across 
countries. 周us, movements in the REER may 
indicate that a country is becoming more com-
petitive relative to its trading partners, while it 
remains at a competitive disadvantage on account 
of its higher cost levels. To account for this, we 
consider a country’s aggregate price level relative to 
the United States to assess where countries in the 
region presently stand (in level terms) with regard 
to competitiveness.
11
11
Specifically, we use aggregate price-level data since 1980 from 
the Penn World Tables, consisting of the price level in the 
country concerned relative to the United States. As noted by 
Rodrik (2008) this is equivalent to the real exchange rate.
周is indicator also adjusts for the Balassa-Samuelson 
effect, that is, the upward bias of the REER and 
GVC REER indicators associated with faster pro-
ductivity growth in the tradable goods sector, which 
is not necessarily reflective of a deterioration in 
competitiveness.
12
Hence, this adjustment corrects 
for differences in relative price levels that result 
from differences in productivity across countries 
and time. Figure 2.11 plots the relative price level 
for countries around the world. As predicted by the 
Balassa-Samuelson effect, there does indeed seem 
to be a robust positive relationship between relative 
prices and income levels.
13
A price level relative 
to the United States below the trend line could 
be indicative of a country benefitting from strong 
competitiveness, and vice versa. Many sub-Saharan 
African countries have relative prices that are higher 
than predicted by their income levels, suggesting 
they could be uncompetitive relative to other 
countries.
To further explore the competitiveness of 
sub-Saharan African countries we run a series of 
cross-section regressions that correct relative prices 
for differences in income levels. 周e results suggest 
that relative prices in sub-Saharan Africa in 2014 
(or latest observation available) are on average 8 
percent above the level predicted after adjusting 
for the Balassa-Samuelson effect, pointing to signs 
of a competitiveness problem (Figure 2.12). With 
a few notable exceptions (for example, Burundi, 
Kenya, and Mozambique) nearly all countries that 
appear to be uncompetitive are either commodity 
12
周e Balassa-Samuelson effect conjectures that fast-growing 
countries are characterized by relatively faster productivity 
and wage growth in the tradable sectors that also exert upward 
pressure on wages in the nontradable sector. With no increase 
in productivity in the nontradable sector, prices rise, resulting 
in a deterioration in competitiveness. For further details see 
Rogoff (1996).
13
We use data from the Penn World Tables (version 8.0), 
extended to 2014 (or the latest observation available) using data 
from the World Bank’s WDI database. 周e Penn World Tables 
have the benefit of being consistent across countries and over 
time, and also including comparable data back to at least the 
1970s—an important element given evidence that the Balassa-
Samuelson effects matter over longer-term horizons 
(De Gregorio and Wolf 1994).
Figure 2.9. Sub-Saharan Africa: Change in Standard Real 
Effective Exchange Rate, Countries with Floating versus 
Pegged Exchange Rate Systems, 1995–2014
Source: IMF staff calculations based on data from IMF, Information 
Notice System (INS).
80
90
100
110
120
e
 exchange rate (2010 = 100)
60
70
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
Real effectiv
e
Floaters
Pegged
REGIONAL ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
36
producers or have pegged exchange rates. By 
contrast, countries with competitive relative price 
levels tend to have floating exchange rates and not 
be commodity exporters.
14
14
周is lack of competitiveness among countries with pegged 
exchange rates contrasts with the earlier finding that countries 
with fixed exchange rates have experienced less REER 
appreciation since 2010 because of lower inflation. A closer 
examination of data suggests however that this low inflation 
was often accompanied by lackluster growth. Côte d’Ivoire 
and Senegal, for example, have recorded average real per capita 
GDP growth below 1 percent since 2004.
For the purpose of assessing the competitiveness of 
countries in the region, we also identify as com- 
parators a group of other low-income countries, 
whose economic circumstances are likely to be most 
closely related to sub-Saharan African countries. 
Furthermore, we restrict the comparators to 
countries that have in recent years managed to 
integrate well into global trading networks and 
diversify their exports, and hence are likely to be 
sub-Saharan Africa’s main competitors as they seek 
to achieve similar objectives. On this basis, we use 
Bangladesh, Cambodia, Lao PDR and Vietnam as  
a set of comparators for sub-Saharan Africa.
15
It is 
notable that relative price levels in our comparator 
group in 2014 were below the level consistent with 
competitiveness after the Balassa-Samuelson adjust-
ment, in some instances by large margins.
Moreover, a comparison with data for 2004 
suggests that competitiveness has deteriorated in all 
but a handful of countries. Commodity exporters 
appear to have struggled with uncompetitive relative 
price levels for a number of years. On the other 
hand, it is noticeable that many noncommodity 
15
Low-income countries (LICs) in the Middle East and North 
Africa (MENA) and Latin America and the Carribean (LAC) 
have not enjoyed the same success in integrating into global 
trading networks. As defined by the IMF, the only LIC in 
Europe is Moldova, which is structurally very different from 
sub-Saharan African LICs.
Figure 2.11. Sub-Saharan Africa and Rest of the World: 
Balassa-Samuelson Effect
Source: IMF, staff calculations based on data from Penn World Tables 
and World Bank, World Development Indicators (2015).
3.5
4.0
4.5
5.0
5.5
6.0
o
f price level of GDP relative 
to the U.S.
y = 0.17x + 2.64
2.0
2.5
3.0
4
6
8
10
12
14
Log 
o
Log of real GDP per capita
Rest of the world
Sub-Saharan Africa
Figure 2.10. Sub-Saharan Africa: Contribution to Change in Standard Real Effective Exchange Rate, 1995–2012 Cumulative
Source: IMF staff calculations based on data from IMF, Information Notice System.
Note: Real effective exchange rate is Information Notice System weighted and uses consumer price indices.
300
Exchange rate contribution
-50
0
0
50
100
150
200
250
300
Percent
Exchange rate contribution
Price contribution
Real effective exchange rate change
Appreciation
on
-150
-100
-50
0
50
Zambia
Kenya
Madagascar
Mozambique
Ethiopia
Tanzania
Mauritius
Sierra Leone
Botswana
South Africa
Rwanda
Burundi
Uganda
Ghana
Guinea
Nigeria
Malawi
Seychelles
Gambia, The
Liberia
Eritrea
Congo, Rep.
Chad
São Tomé & Príncipe
Benin
Burkina Faso
Swaziland
Côte d'Ivoire
Cameroon
Central African Rep.
Niger
Namibia
Cabo Verde
Mali
Togo
Senegal
Gabon
Lesotho
Floaters
Peggers
Depreciation
São To
m
Centra
l
2. COMPETITIVENESS IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA: MARKING TIME OR MOVING AHEAD?
37
exporters with floating exchange rates appear to 
have benefited from competitive relative price levels 
in the past, a fact that may help explain their recent 
robust growth performance.
Disaggregated Price Components
周e previous section pointed to the high relative 
price levels in sub-Saharan Africa that made it 
uncompetitive, especially in relation to its key 
comparators. Against this background, this section 
discusses sub-Saharan Africa’s standing in relation 
to its competitors with respect to key production 
inputs, which have a strong bearing on relative price 
levels. In particular, we discuss the cost of labor, 
transportation, communication, and electricity.
Cost of Labor
周e cost of labor is an important determinant 
of production costs, but available wage data for 
sub-Saharan Africa are scarce. Furthermore, wages 
in the large informal sector, where employees have 
a low reservation wage, are not readily available 
and hence the data may indicate a higher wage 
level than what actually prevails. 周is calls into 
question how good a proxy these wage data are for 
competitiveness. On the other hand, export activity 
typically requires larger firm size to overcome the 
fixed costs of trade, and such firms generally rely on 
higher-skilled formal sector labor.
Real hourly dollar wages in sub-Saharan Africa, 
in many instances, seem to be higher than in 
other emerging and developing countries.
16
Notwithstanding lower nominal dollar wages in the 
region than elsewhere, it is instructive to note that 
real wage levels in sub-Saharan African countries 
remain relatively high. Indeed, when real wages are 
plotted against real GDP per capita (Figure 2.13) 
it appears that real wages in the region’s countries 
are higher than in other emerging and developing 
countries at a comparable income level, likely 
reflecting the scarcity of skilled labor in the region.
17
周us, taking account of sub-Saharan Africa’s lower 
productivity, the gap with other regions in terms of 
unit labor costs is higher still.
Developments in Nontradable Input Prices
Communications, transport, and electricity are 
among the most important nontraded inputs in 
the production process and their costs have a major 
bearing on a country’s aggregate price level. 周is 
subsection compares how such costs have evolved 
in the region and its key comparators (Bangladesh, 
16
周ese data refer to economy-wide wages, which are 
particularly susceptible to the caveat about coverage noted 
above. However, wages in the manufacturing sector exhibit the 
same pattern.
17
周is result is consistent with findings elsewhere in the 
literature. See for instance Gelb, Meyer, and Ramchandran 
(2013).
Figure 2.12. Sub-Saharan Africa: Balassa-Samuelson-Adjusted Real Exchange Rate
Sources: Penn World Tables 8.0; World Bank, World Development Indicators database; and IMF staff estimates. 
100
Lesscompetitive
M
ore competitive
100
M
-40
-20
0
20
40
60
80
Percent
Commodity exporters
Noncommodityexporters
Comparator 
countries
e
p
-100
-80
-60
40
Chad
Botswana
Tanzania
South Africa
Ghana
Zambia
Guinea
Sierra Leone
Nigeria
Cameroon
Gabon
Mali
Namibia
Niger
Congo, Rep.
Congo, Dem. Rep.
Angola
Central African Rep.
Malawi
Gambia, The
Rwanda
Lesotho
Swaziland
Burkina Faso
Uganda
Liberia
Guinea-Bissau
Ethiopia
Madagascar
Benin
Mauritius
Togo
Mozambique
Burundi
Senegal
Kenya
Côte d'Ivoire
Cambodia
Vietnam
Lao PDR
Bangladesh
Peggers 2014 (or latest observation)
Floaters 2014 (or latest observation)
2004
i
REGIONAL ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
38
Cambodia, Lao PDR, and Vietnam), mainly using 
comparable data on nontradable goods prices across 
countries for 2005 and 2011, which are available 
from the International Comparison Program (ICP) 
of the World Bank.
18
Figure 2.14 plots average costs of transport, com-
munications, and electricity in sub-Saharan African 
countries in 2005 and 2011 relative to the four 
comparator countries identified previously. Avalue 
greater than one indicates that the country in 
question is more expensive than the average of the 
four comparator countries. 周e data indicate that:
•  周e relative cost of transportation has improved 
significantly in almost all sub-Saharan African 
countries. While almost all sub-Saharan African 
countries were relatively expensive in 2005, 
many had managed to lower transportation 
costs by 2011, and several had transport costs 
that were lower than the average comparator. 
Other data sources, though, present a somewhat 
less positive picture, with the cost of shipping 
containers from sub-Saharan African countries 
still very high in relation to comparators 
18
周e ICP collects prices for more than 1,000 products to 
estimate purchasing power parities for the world economies 
(the latest round of the ICP, 2011, covered 198 countries). 
Data on 12 common consumption categories are made publicly 
available. For details, see http://siteresources.worldbank.org/
ICPEXT/Resources/ICP_2011.html. See also World Bank 
(2015b).
(Figure 2.15). For instance, the average cost of 
exporting a container from sub-Saharan Africa 
is around US$2,200, whereas a container can be 
shipped for as low as US$610 out of Vietnam.
•  While the absolute cost of communications 
had also declined in most sub-Saharan African 
countries, they have been unable to match the 
45 percent decline in such costs in the average 
comparator over the 2005–11 period. 周us, in 
relative terms, the cost of communication has 
increased in most countries of the region.
•  Compared with 2005, the cost of electricity 
has increased in almost all sub-Saharan African 
countries. While several countries were cheaper 
than the average comparator in 2005, rising 
electricity costs have rendered most of them 
relatively expensive.
The Impact of Changing Trade Partners on 
Competitiveness
An important development in recent years has been 
the change in the composition of the region’s trade 
partners, with a sharp increase in the share of trade 
with emerging markets and developing economies.
19
周is has a bearing on the region’s competitiveness, 
and to assess this, we construct two alternate 
measures of effective exchange rates (see Annex 2.2 
for details of the construction).
20
In addition to 
factoring in the change in trade weights over time, 
something that the standard CPI-based REER 
does not do, these alternative effective exchange 
rate measures are based on price levels rather than 
indexes. Furthermore, these measures also assess 
relative prices based on common consumption 
baskets. By construction, as with the standard 
REER, an increase in the value of these indices 
indicates a loss in competitiveness.
周e Import Average Relative Price (Q
M
) evaluates 
the relative price of the home consumption basket 
in the domestic market with the price of the same 
basket in the “average” partner country. In particu-
lar, the measure is obtained by calculating the price 
of the basket relative to each partner country and 
then aggregating over the home country’s trading 
19
See Chapter 3 of Regional Economic Outlook: Sub-Saharan 
Africa, April 2015.
20
See Tulin and Kranjnyák (2010).
Figure 2.13. Sub-Saharan Africa and Rest of Emerging  
and Developing Economies: Real GDP Per Capita and  
Real Hourly Wage, 1983–2008
Sources: Penn World Tables 8.0; and Occupational Wages around the 
World database. 
Note: Only emerging markets and developing countries from each 
region are considered. 
-2.5
-2.0
-1.5
-1.0
-0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
Average real hourly wages
Log of real GDP per capita
Rest of emerging and
developing countries
Sub-Saharan Africa
2. COMPETITIVENESS IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA: MARKING TIME OR MOVING AHEAD?
39
Figure 2.14. Sub-Saharan Africa: Relative Price of Key Nontraded Goods and Services
Sources: World Bank, International Comparison Program; and IMF staff calculations. 
Note: Comparators include Bangladesh, Cambodia, Lao PDR, and Vietnam.
1
2
3
4
5
6
Ratio of prices
2011
2005
Oil exporters
Resource-intensive non-oil countries
Nonresource-intensive coastal 
countries
Nonresource-
intensive 
landlocked 
countries
0
Congo, Rep. of
Angola
Equatorial Guinea
Gabon
Chad
Cameroon
Nigeria
Zambia
South Africa
Namibia
Congo, Dem. Rep.
Mali
Central African Rep.
Botswana
Liberia
Burkina Faso
Niger
Sierra Leone
Guinea
Tanzania
Ghana
Mauritius
Cabo Verde
Togo
Comoros
Senegal
São Tomé & Príncipe
Mozambique
Guinea-Bissau
Kenya
Côte d'Ivoire
Madagascar
Benin
Gambia, The
Malawi
Rwanda
Swaziland
Lesotho
Uganda
Ethiopia
2. Cost of Transport Relative to Average Comparator
1
2
3
4
5
6
Ratio of prices
2011
2005
Oil exporters
Resource-intensive non-oil countries
Nonresource-intensive coastal 
countries
Nonresource-
intensive 
landlocked 
countries
0
Angola
Chad
Gabon
Cameroon
Equatorial Guinea
Nigeria
Congo, Rep. of
South Africa
Liberia
Burkina Faso
Mali
Niger
Congo, Dem. Rep.
Central African Rep.
Sierra Leone
Zambia
Namibia
Botswana
Tanzania
Ghana
Guinea
Comoros
Benin
Cabo Verde
Senegal
Madagascar
Togo
São Tomé & Príncipe
Gambia, The
Kenya
Guinea-Bissau
Mozambique
Mauritius
Côte d'Ivoire
Lesotho
Swaziland
Rwanda
Uganda
Malawi
Ethiopia
3. Cost of Electricity Relative to Average Comparator
1
2
3
4
5
6
Ratio of prices
2011
2005
Oil exporters
Resource-intensive non-oil countries
Nonresource-intensive coastal 
countries
Nonresource-
intensive 
landlocked 
countries
0
Gabon
Angola
Congo, Rep. of
Cameroon
Chad
Equatorial Guinea
Nigeria
Zambia
Central African Rep.
Niger
Congo, Dem. Rep.
Liberia
Sierra Leone
South Africa
Mali
Namibia
Burkina Faso
Guinea
Ghana
Botswana
Tanzania
Comoros
Togo
Côte d'Ivoire
Mozambique
Senegal
São Tomé & Príncipe
Guinea-Bissau
Madagascar
Benin
Mauritius
Cabo Verde
Kenya
Gambia, The
Lesotho
Malawi
Swaziland
Rwanda
Uganda
Ethiopia
1. Cost of Communications Relative to Average Comparator
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested