asp.net pdf viewer control free : How to view pdf thumbnails in SDK control service wpf web page windows dnn sreo10157-part1876

REGIONAL ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
60
countries and the other countries in the sample.
10, 11
周e main results of the analysis are as follows:
•  周e negative association between growth and 
income inequality among low-income countries 
is robust to the measure of inequality, proxied 
by the Gini coefficient, the income gap between 
the top 20 percent and the poorest 40 percent 
segments of the population, or the income share 
of the middle class (as proxied by the 40thto  
80th percentiles of population in the income 
distribution), as shown in Models 1 to 3 of 
Table 3.1. For example, a 1 percentage point  
reduction in the initial Gini coefficient  
in low-income countries is associated with a 
0.15percentage point cumulative increase in 
growth over a five-year period. 
•  Growth is also negatively associated with gender 
inequality in low-income countries and with 
gender-related legal restrictions for all countries, 
as shown in Models 4 to 6 of Table 3.1. A 1 
percentage-point reduction in gender inequality 
in low-income countries is associated with 
higher cumulative growth over five years of 
0.2percentage point in low-income countries, a 
result in line with previous estimates (Amin and 
others 2015).
12
•  周e finding that both inequality variables 
significantly affect growth suggests that gender 
inequality impacts growth through other 
channels than income inequality. For example, 
higher gender inequality may adversely 
impact educational attainment and hence 
growth. Similarly, other aspects of household 
income inequality that are unrelated to gender 
10
In the following, low-income countries refers to the group of 
low-income countries and lower-middle-income countries, as 
classified by the World Bank. 
11
周e analysis uses interaction terms to capture nonlinearities 
in the inequality-growth nexus. However, the estimated effects 
of the income and gender inequality variables are broadly 
robust to limiting the sample only to developing countries 
and to reducing the number of control variables. 周e finding 
of significant effects of income and gender inequality after 
controlling for variables that may be interrelated with the 
inequality variables is consistent with Berg and Ostry (2011), 
and Ostry, Berg, and Tsangarides (2014). 
12
Many studies also rightly note the significance of the value 
added to the economy by women from family-related activities, 
which are not measured in GDP, and hence not captured here.
inequality may be affecting growth, such as 
rural-urban income inequality.
•  A growth decomposition analysis suggests 
that addressing high inequality could signifi-
cantly affect growth in sub-Saharan Africa 
(Figure3.7). Compared to a subgroup of 
ASEAN countries (Indonesia, Malaysia,  
the Philippines, 周ailand and Vietnam) that 
have a strong track record in terms of growth, 
sub-Saharan Africa’s average annual real GDP 
per capita growth has been about 1½ percent-
age points lower over the last decade. Weaker 
infrastructure, lower levels of investment in 
fixed and human capital, higher dependency 
ratios, and lower quality of institutions were key 
factors explaining this growth shortfall. But the 
contribution of inequality was also substantial. 
More precisely, reducing the three inequality  
indicators to the level currently observed in  
ASEAN countries could boost the region’s 
average annual per capita GDP growth by  
0.9of a percentage point, roughly the same  
order of magnitude as the impact on annual per 
capita GDP growth from closing the infrastruc-
ture gap between the two regions.
Figure 3.7. Sub-Saharan Africa: Growth Differential with 
ASEAN Countries  
(Percentage points)
Sources: IMF, World Economic Outlook database; PRS Group; 
World Bank, World Development Indicators database; and IMF staff 
estimates.
Note: The estimated regression coefficients of model 6 in Table 3.1 are 
applied to the differences between the average values of the factors 
associated with growth for the last 10 years for sub-Saharan Africa 
and comparator (ASEAN-5) countries. Green bars represent the 3 
inequality indicators included in the regression. A bar with a negative 
value denotes what share of the growth shortfall in sub-Saharan Africa 
is explained by a particular variable. The ASEAN-5 are Indonesia, 
Malaysia, the Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam.
Change in terms of trade
High inflation 
Schooling (years)
Investment (percent of GDP)
Infrastructure
Dependent population
Initial income (catching up)
Average annual growth differential of 1.5 percent
-1.5
-0.5
0.5
1.5
2.5
Other country effects
Gender inequality
Female legal equity
Income inequality
Institutional quality (index)
Change in terms of trade
Average growth differential, 2005–14
-1.5
5
-0.5
0.5
1.5
2.5
5
Average growth differential, 2005–14
How to view pdf thumbnails in - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
show pdf thumbnails; generate pdf thumbnail c#
How to view pdf thumbnails in - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
create thumbnail jpg from pdf; generate pdf thumbnails
3. INEQUALITY AND ECONOMIC OUTCOMES IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
61
Some Variations across Countries
周e impact of income and gender inequality on 
growth varies across subgroups in sub-Saharan 
Africa (Figure 3.8). Using the same approach as 
for the whole region, the growth decomposition 
analysis for the subgroups yields the following  
additional lessons:
•  In low-income countries, low initial income 
compared with ASEAN countries contributes 
about 2½ percentage points of real GDP per 
capita growth. However, this catch-up effect 
is largely undone by weak infrastructure, 
lower human capital accumulation, and high 
population dependency. Likewise, for fragile 
states, the lower quality of infrastructure and 
institutions explains the largest fraction of the 
growth differential. For both country groups, 
reducing gender inequality could boost annual 
GDP per capita growth by two-thirds of a 
percentage point, while the potential effects 
of a reduction in income inequality and legal 
gender-based restrictions are estimated to be 
smaller
•  For middle-income countries—where infra-
structure and educational attainment gaps tend 
to be smaller—and for oil-exporting countries, 
Figure 3.8. Subgroups of Sub-Saharan Africa: Growth Differential with ASEAN Countries 
(Percentage points)
Sources: IMF, World Economic Outlook database; PRS Group; World Bank, World Development Indicators database; and IMF staff estimates.
Note: The estimated regression coefficients of model 6 in Table 3.1 are applied to the differences between the average values of the factors associated 
with growth for the last 10 years for sub-Saharan Africa and comparator (ASEAN) countries. Green bars represent the three inequality indicators 
included in the regression. A bar with a negative value denotes what share of the growth shortfall in sub-Saharan Africa is explained by a particular 
variable. The ASEAN-5 are Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam.
Other country effects
Gender inequality
Female legal equity
Income inequality
Institutional quality (index)
Change in terms of trade
High inflation 
Schooling (years)
Investment (percent of GDP)
Infrastructure
Dependent population
Initial income (catching up)
1. Sub-Saharan African Oil Exporters
Annual average growth differential of 1 percent
Other country effects
Gender inequality
Female legal equity
Income inequality
Institutional quality (index)
Change in terms of trade
High inflation 
Schooling (years)
Investment (percent of GDP)
Infrastructure
Dependent population
Initial income (catching up)
2. Sub-Saharan African Low-income Countries
Annual average growth differential of 0.7 percent
-1.5
-0.5
0.5
1.5
2.5
Other country effects
Average growth differential, 2005–14
Income inequality
Institutional quality (index)
Change in terms of trade
High inflation 
Schooling (years)
Investment (percent of GDP)
Infrastructure
Dependent population
Initial income (catching up)
3. Sub-Saharan African Middle-income Countries
Annual average growth differential of 1 percent
-1.5
-0.5
0.5
1.5
2.5
Other country effects
Average growth differential, 2005–14
Income inequality
Institutional quality (index)
Change in terms of trade
High inflation 
Schooling (years)
Investment (percent of GDP)
Infrastructure
Dependent population
Initial income (catching up)
4. Sub-Saharan African Fragile States
Annual average growth differential of 2.7 percent
-1.5
-0.5
0.5
1.5
2.5
Other country effects
Gender inequality
Female legal equity
Income inequality
Institutional quality (index)
Average growth differential, 2005–14
-1.5
-0.5
0.5
1.5
2.5
Other country effects
Gender inequality
Female legal equity
Income inequality
Institutional quality (index)
Average growth differential, 2005–14
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Ability to show PDF page thumbnails for quick navigation. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. C# HTML5 PDF Viewer: View PDF Online.
pdf thumbnails in; pdf thumbnail
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Ability to show PDF page thumbnails for quick navigation. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: View PDF Online.
create pdf thumbnail; how to view pdf thumbnails in
REGIONAL ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
62
reducing income inequality to the levels 
observed in ASEAN countries is an important 
factor to raise growth. 周e growth payoff from 
removing legal gender-related restrictions also 
appears particularly strong for oil-exporting 
sub-Saharan African countries.
13
WHAT DRIVES INCOME INEQUALITY?
With income inequality appearing to have had an 
adverse impact on growth in sub-Saharan African 
countries, it is important to understand the factors 
that may be driving income inequality in the region. 
Taking Stock of Inequality of Opportunity
Studies have associated income inequality with 
inequality of opportunity, including across genders 
(Dabla-Norris and others 2015b; Gonzales and 
others forthcoming). In sub-Saharan Africa, these 
opportunities have generally improved but many 
countries are lagging behind countries of similar 
income in other regions.
•  Overall educational attainment improved as 
progress has been made in raising male and 
female primary school enrollment since the turn 
of the century in the context of the Millennium 
Development Goals. Education inequality 
has declined, and health indicators generally 
improved. However, average educational attain-
ment remains low compared with other regions 
(Figure 3.9). In addition, access to education 
and health care remains restricted for certain 
categories of the population due to insufficient 
resources to pay for these services, limited  
geographical access (especially in rural areas), 
legal restrictions, and social norms.  
•  Infrastructure gaps remain large. For instance, 
electricity production in other developing 
countries was nearly eight times sub-Saharan 
13
周e finding that the removal of gender-related restrictions 
affects growth positively in the oil-exporting countries may 
reflect correlation rather than causation given that oil-exporting 
countries can, if conditions are right, grow without much 
labor effort as oil and minerals are capital intensive. 周is 
would be the case if gender equality were correlated with 
other conditions, such as better property rights, or a greater 
integration with developed-country capital markets, that make 
it easier for foreign companies to exploit mineral reserves. 
Africa’s average of 200 KWh per capita in 
2010 (Regional Economic Outlook: Sub-Saharan 
Africa, October 2014). Limited access to basic 
infrastructure and utilities such as clean water 
and electricity, can divert time from education 
and productive activities in poor households, 
particularly in rural areas and for women 
(World Bank 2012). 
•  Financial inclusion has generally improved. 周e 
percentage of the population with an account 
at a financial institution has increased in recent 
years, but more so for men than for women. In 
some countries, such as Kenya, mobile-based 
money has overtaken access to traditional bank 
accounts, thereby contributing to reducing 
inequality in access to finance between income 
groups. However, gender gaps in access to 
mobile money are generally even higher than 
for traditional bank accounts. Gender gaps in 
financial access are similar to those in other 
regions but gaps across income groups are larger 
(Figure 3.10). Box 3.2 illustrates the effective-
ness of lowering constraints on firms’ access to 
finance to raise growth and reduce inequality in 
various countries of the region. 
•  Legal restrictions on women’s economic activity 
remain the highest in the world (Figure 3.11). 
周ese legal restrictions discourage women from 
saving in a formal institution and borrowing for 
business activities, and are estimated to account 
for as much as 5 percentage points of the dif-
ference in labor market participation between 
men and women in some countries of the 
region (Hallward-Driemeier and Hasan 2013; 
Demirguc-Kunt and others 2013; Gonzales and 
others 2015). 
周e inequality of opportunity across genders high-
lighted above contrasts with the comparatively low 
gender gaps in female labor force participation.  
周e gap between male and female labor force 
participation rates, which is used to proxy employ-
ment given scarce employment data in low-income 
countries, is on average 15 percentage points lower 
in sub-Saharan Africa than in the rest of the world. 
周is mainly reflects the generally low female labor  
force participation gaps in low-income and fragile  
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document in VB.NET WPF program. PDF thumbnails for navigation in .NET project. VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer: View PDF Document.
show pdf thumbnails in; how to make a thumbnail from pdf
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
Users can view any page by using view page button. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. PDF thumbnails for navigation in .NET WPF Console application.
view pdf thumbnails in; pdf thumbnails
3. INEQUALITY AND ECONOMIC OUTCOMES IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
63
economies, where women have to work for sub 
sistence, often in the low-productivity agricultural 
sector. At higher income levels, the gap increases, as 
women may face the trade-off between homemak-
ing and joining the labor force (Figure 3.12). 周e 
poor ranking of low-income sub-Saharan African 
countries in terms of the gender inequality index, 
despite relatively low gender differences in labor 
force participation rates, suggests that other aspects 
of gender inequality in education, health, and 
empowerment play a substantial role.
Accounting for Income Inequality: 
Structural Features and Policies
To shed further light on the factors driving 
income inequality in the region, an empirical 
analysis is undertaken using a sample of 135 
advanced, emerging, and developing countries 
over 1991–2010. 周eanalysis assesses if changes 
in inequality can be explained by various country 
characteristics—demographic factors, various other 
dimensions of inequality, dependence on trade in 
natural resources, fiscal policy variables, including 
Figure 3.10. Sub-Saharan Africa: Account at a Financial 
Institution, 2014
Source: Findex 2014.
Note: SSA = sub-Saharan Africa.
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
Gender gap
Income gap
Gender gap
Income gap
Gender gap
Income gap
Gender gap
Income gap
Gender gap
Income gap
Gender gap
Income gap
SSA oil 
exporters
Other oil 
exporters
SSA 
middle-
income 
countries
Other 
middle-
income 
countries
SSA low-
income 
countries
Other low-
income 
countries
Percent of population
Male
Female
Richest 60 percent
Poorest 40 percent
Figure 3.9. Sub-Saharan Africa: Average Years of Schooling 
Completed Among People Age 25 and Above, 2010
Source: Barro and Lee Education Attainment dataset.
Note: SSA = sub-Saharan Africa.
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Years
0
1
2
SSA oil 
exporters
Other oil 
exporters
SSA 
middle-
income 
countries
Other 
middle-
income 
countries
SSA low-
Income 
countries
Other low-
income
Figure 3.11. Sub-Saharan Africa: Legal Gender-Based 
Restrictions, 1990 and 2010
Sources: World Bank, Women, Business and the Law 2014; and 
Gonzales and others (2015).
Note: SSA = sub-Saharan Africa.
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
t
 of total potential restrictions
1990
2010
0
5
10
SSA oil 
exporters
Other oil 
exporters
SSA 
middle-
income 
countries
Other 
middle-
income 
countries
SSA low-
income 
countries
Other low-
income 
countries
Percen
t
Figure 3.12. Sub-Saharan Africa: Female Labor Force 
Participation and Development
Sources: IMF, World Economic Outlook database; and World Bank, 
World Development Indicators database.
40
60
80
100
120
f
 female to male labor force 
participation, 2013
Oil exporter
0
20
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Ratio o
f
Log GDP per capita, 2013
Oil exporter
Middle-income countries
Low-income countries
Fragile states
Rest of the world
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Support of converting from any single one PDF page and multiple pages. Thumbnails can be created from PDF pages. Support for customizing image size.
thumbnail pdf preview; generate thumbnail from pdf
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Embedded page thumbnails.
pdf thumbnail html; pdf thumbnail fix
REGIONAL ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
64
the extent of redistribution and public spending 
on education spending, and other macroeconomic 
determinants identified in the literature (see 
Annexes 3.1 and 3.2 for further details)
14
周e 
association between changes in inequality and each 
of these characteristics is examined in separate 
regressions, and is reported in separate lines in 
Table 3.2. 周e exercise is intended to provide 
broad evidence on the factors that are associated 
with changes in inequality rather than to articulate 
channels through which the various factors affect 
income inequality, not least because many of the 
variables are endogenous. 周e analysis for the most 
part relies on relating five-year changes in inequality 
to beginning-of-period values of drivers of inequal-
ity to mitigate such possible reverse causality. 周e 
regressions also control for the effect of the initial 
level of inequality.
15
Among the wide range of factors analyzed, the 
following appear to be positively associated with 
reducing inequality: GDP per capita growth, private 
capital stock, education spending, the share of the 
working-age population, and fiscal redistribution, 
measured as the difference between market and 
net Gini. Conversely, higher beginning-of-period 
gender inequality tends to increase net income 
inequality. 周e results also support the existence of 
a convergence effect, whereby countries starting at 
a higher level of inequality tend to experience larger 
reductions in income inequality.
周e effect of financial sector deepening does 
not seem to matter for inequality. 周is is in line 
with recent literature findings that at early stages 
of development, financial sector deepening can 
aggravate inequality by mainly benefiting higher- 
income groups that already have financial sector 
access (for example, Roine and others 2009). For 
14
周e sample includes 469 observations of nonoverlapping 
five-yearly changes in inequality between 1991 and 2010. To 
disentangle the factors specific to low-income countries and 
sub-Saharan Africa and to account for the income dimension 
under high collinearity, interaction terms are included. 
Quantile regressions are used as their estimates are more 
efficient than those focusing on the mean, including binary 
models. 周is also allows for investigating the drivers of both 
increases and decreases in inequality over the sample period.
15
周e initial level of income per capita is not included as an 
additional explanatory variable in the regressions because it is 
highly correlated with the initial level of inequality. 
Table 3.2. Various Regressions of Determinants of Change in 
Inequality (Net Gini)
1
Source: IMF staff calculations.
Note: LIC = low-income countries; SSA = sub-Saharan Africa. 
1
The table summarizes the findings from separate regressions, with 
the dependent variable being the change in net Gini. GDP per capita 
growth, education inequality, and the change in the share of natural 
resource exports are averaged over the period. All other variables 
are initial period observations. The results are based on quantile 
regressions, with the initial level of inequality included as an explanatory 
variable throughout. Interaction terms reflect development level and 
regional specificities. LIC is a dummy that takes a value of 1 for low- 
and lower-middle income countries as defined by the World Bank and 
0 otherwise. SSA is a dummy that takes a value of 1 for sub-Saharan 
African countries and is 0 otherwise. The symbols *, **, and *** indicate 
that the estimated coefficient is statistically significantly different from 
zero at the 10, 5, and 1 percent level, respectively.  
2
Exports of agricultural raw materials, ores and metals, and fuel as a 
percentage of total merchandise exports. 
1. GDP per capita growth 
-0.1010 ***
0.0994
2. GDP per capita growth
-0.0991 ***
0.3500 ***
3. Share of agriculture
0.0515 ***
-0.0544 ***
4. Share of working-age 
population
-0.0585 *
-0.0084
5. Education inequality
0.0168
-0.0113
6. Education inequality
0.0240 **
-0.0349 ***
7. Gender inequality index
0.0301 **
-0.0150 *
8. Gender inequality index
0.0308 ***
-0.0251 ***
9. Women's right to open bank 
account (dummy)
1.3330 *
-0.0213
10. Women's right to open 
bank account (dummy)
1.4530 *
-0.6840
11. Change in share of natural 
resources exports2
-0.0275
0.0978 **
12. Change in share of natural 
resources exports
2
-0.0335
0.1060 ***
13. Fiscal redistribution
-0.0842 ***
-0.3280 **
14. Education spending
-0.1830 *
-0.2000
15. Education spending
-0.1400
-0.2060 **
16. Financial depth (M2/GDP)
-0.0014
-0.0018
17. Public capital stock
-0.0003
-0.0055
18. Private capital stock
-0.0056 ***
-0.0051 *
19. Trade openness
0.0008
0.0031
EV
EV*LIC
EV*SSA
Growth:
Explanatory variable (EV)
Fiscal policy:
Other macroeconomic factors:
Structural factors:
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
by large enterprises and organizations to distribute and view documents. size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size Embedded page thumbnails.
pdf files thumbnail preview; generate pdf thumbnail c#
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Converter control easy to create thumbnails from PDF pages. Selection for compressing to multiple image formats. Cut and paste any areas in PDF pages to images.
cannot view pdf thumbnails in; show pdf thumbnail in html
3. INEQUALITY AND ECONOMIC OUTCOMES IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
65
the group of countries that achieved large reduc-
tions in inequality (not reported in Table 3.2), 
enhancing women’s access to financial services 
seems to have played a role in reducing income 
inequality. One last noteworthy result is that the 
effects of some of the determinants of changes in 
income inequality appear, in some cases, to be 
different in sub-Saharan Africa.
周e key takeaways for sub-Saharan Africa are as 
follows: 
•  In recent years, per capita income growth has 
not been sufficient to reduce income inequality 
in sub-Saharan Africa. Indeed, on average for 
the region and unlike elsewhere, higher GDP 
per capita growth appears to have been accom-
panied by higher inequality. Given the already 
high level of income inequality in the region, 
this is very concerning. 
•  周e channels linking growth to inequality 
may be different than in other developing 
countries, given the importance of commodity 
price booms in driving growth in a number of 
sub-Saharan African countries. Indeed, increases 
in dependence on trade in natural resources, 
most notably oil, are found to be associated 
with increases in economic inequality over the 
same period. 周is is consistent with Buccellato 
and Alessandrini (2009), who find that when 
revenues from natural resources and their 
extraction process are controlled by a limited 
number of households, a greater dependence 
on trade in natural resources can raise income 
inequality.
•  Other structural features of sub-Saharan African 
economies also appear to be associated with 
higher inequality. 周e region’s continued high 
fertility rate limits the share of the working-age 
population, thereby postponing the expected 
“demographic dividend” in terms of lowering 
inequality. 周is underscores the importance 
of accelerating the demographic transition by 
raising investment in human capital (Regional 
Economic Outlook: Sub-Saharan Africa, April 
2015).
•  Fiscal policy can be used to lower inequality: 
redistribution (through taxes and transfers) and 
government education spending appear to be 
associated with larger reductions in inequality 
in sub-Saharan Africa than in other countries. 
•  Reduced gender inequality appears to be asso-
ciated with subsequent reductions in economic 
inequality, although the effect is weaker than 
for other countries.
POLICIES TO REDUCE INEQUALITY 
While the focus here is on policies that could 
contribute to reducing inequality in the region, it 
is important to emphasize that the link between 
these policy measures, reductions in inequality, and 
growth remains complicated. While the literature 
finds that redistribution in general does not impede 
growth, particular redistributive policies aimed at 
reducing income inequality can also create distor-
tions and disincentives to participate in the labor 
force. 周e specific design of redistributive policies 
should therefore be mindful of these potential 
tradeoffs. 周e policy recommendations in this 
section are based on combining the analyses in the 
previous sections with the findings in the literature, 
but should not be considered comprehensive. For 
example, price stability has been shown to also have 
important distributional consequences (Bulir 2001), 
but this is not explored here. 
Improving Fiscal Policy
As pointed out in the previous section, redistrib-
utive policies in the form of taxes and transfers 
can be highly relevant for reducing inequality in 
low-income countries. Moreover, Ostry, Berg and 
Tsangarides (2014) provide cross-country empirical 
evidence that these redistributive policies do not 
adversely impact growth.
16
Tax systems in the region have become more pro-
gressive, but partly at the expense of exemptions. 
周e region is increasingly relying on value-added 
tax (VAT) revenues (Figure 3.13). VAT is by 
16
周is finding is also confirmed when the redistribution 
variable is added as an additional explanatory variable as well as 
with an interaction term for sub-Saharan Africa in the growth 
regression analysis undertaken earlier in the chapter. 
REGIONAL ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
66
nature a regressive tax, but this is mitigated in 
many countries by substantial recourse to VAT 
exemptions and reduced tax rates for basic goods.
17
However, this approach is a poorly targeted 
redistributive tool because most revenues foregone 
accrue to the better off. Even though the poor 
spend a large proportion on basic goods, the rich 
are likely to spend more in absolute terms  
(Keen 2013).
On the spending side, redistributive policies often 
remain highly untargeted. In particular, across-the-
board fuel subsidies, meant to support the poorer 
segments of the population, tend to benefit mainly 
richer households (Arze del Granado, Coady, and  
Gillingham 2012). 周ere is also evidence from 
household surveys that even health and education 
spending, usually considered “social expenditures,” 
are mainly benefiting the well-off, instead of facil-
itating access to opportunities that are crucial to 
reduce inequality (Figure 3.14).
A more effective approach would be to focus on 
reaching the targeted populations via spending 
policies while reducing tax exemptions.
•  周e progressivity of specific tax measures should 
be assessed taking into account the distribution 
of the benefits of the additional expenditure  
17
See, for example, Grown and Valodia (2010); and World 
Bank (2014).
they finance. For instance, in some cases, a 
regressive tax may be the most efficient way to 
finance strongly progressive spending.
•  Redistributive policies on the spending side 
should be implemented through more targeted   
tools. Some countries (for example, Burkina 
Faso, the Republic of Congo, Liberia, Malawi, 
Niger, Tanzania, Togo, and Madagascar) are 
currently conducting pilots to develop the 
institutional, implementation, and monitor-
ing frameworks for targeted cash transfers. 
Spending on health care and education would 
also need to be better targeted to reduce their 
regressivity and possible gender bias.
Removal of Legal Restrictions
Removing legal gender-based restrictions in the 
region can boost growth and reduce inequality by 
stimulating female economic activity. Meanwhile, 
doing away with restrictions on ownership and 
inheritance of assets would provide women with 
access to collateral. 周is, together with removing 
restrictions for married women to open a bank 
account, would promote women’s inclusion in the 
financial system and support entrepreneurship  
(Box 3.3). In middle-income countries, removing 
restrictions on women’s rights to freely pursue  
a profession would facilitate and encourage their 
participation in formal-sector activity. However, 
by advocating for equal opportunities for women, 
this chapter does not render a judgment about 
countries’ broadly accepted cultural and religious 
norms. 
Facilitating Access to Financial Sector 
Services
周e analysis in this chapter shows that financial 
sector deepening alone could aggravate inequality. 
周erefore, it should be accompanied with reforms 
aimed at facilitating access to financial services, 
including for women (Box 3.3). New technologies 
like mobile banking have the potential to facilitate 
access and should be complemented by other 
measures that reduce costs and enhance efficiency, 
such as establishing or strengthening credit and  
collateral registries, which reduce banks’ informa-
tion costs.
Figure 3.13. Sub-Saharan Africa: Tax Revenue, 1990–2011
Source: IMF, Fiscal Affairs Department database.
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
cent of total tax revenue
e
0
10
20
1990
1992
1994
1996
1998
2000
2002
2004
2006
2008
2010
Per
c
Corporate income tax
Individual income tax
Property tax
Value-added tax
Excise tax
Trade transaction tax
3. INEQUALITY AND ECONOMIC OUTCOMES IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
67
CONCLUSIONS
Despite some progress in reducing income and 
gender inequality in sub-Saharan Africa over the last 
20 years, the region continues to be characterized 
by comparatively high levels of inequality. 周e 
analysis in this chapter highlights that addressing 
the high levels of inequality could yield important 
growth payoffs. Given that inequality varies from 
country to country, and in view of the multiple 
factors driving inequality, policies must be tailored 
to country-specific situations and take into account 
administrative capacity and potential trade-offs. In 
the context of efforts to achieve the Millennium 
Development Goals, good progress has been made 
in alleviating poverty as well as boosting male and 
female primary school enrollment. Building on this 
progress, sub-Saharan Africa should accentuate its 
efforts to reduce inequality in support of more rapid 
and inclusive development in the context of the 
post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals. 
Carefully designed policies are key to continued 
progress in reducing inequality and enhancing 
inclusiveness in the region. Accordingly, fiscal 
policy should aim at making the tax system more 
progressive, removing regressive fuel subsidies, 
enhancing the progressivity of expenditures on 
health and education, and providing equal oppor-
tunities for women. By the same token, financial 
sector and labor market policies should be aimed 
at strengthening legal, regulatory, and institutional 
frameworks that support women’s ability to partici-
pate fully and productively in economic activities.
Figure 3.14. Selected Sub-Saharan African Countries: Highest Education Level Attained
Source: Country household survey data. 
Note: Countries are ordered from lowest to highest real GDP per capita in 2005 U.S. dollars. Survey years are as follows: Rwanda 2009;  
Uganda 2009; Tanzania 2009; Ghana 2005; Senegal 2005; Cameroon 2007; and South Africa 2013.
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
e
nt of persons age 25 and above
College/tertiary level
Upper secondary level
Lower secondary level
Primary level
0
10
Poorest 
quartile
Others Poorest 
quartile
Others Poorest 
quartile
Others Poorest 
quartile
Others Poorest 
quartile
Others Poorest 
quartile
Others Poorest 
quartile
Others
Rwanda
Uganda
a
Tanzania
Ghana
Senegal
l
Cameroon
South Africa
Perc
e
REGIONAL ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
68
Box 3.1. Why Care About Income and Gender Inequality?  
Global Evidence and Macroeconomic Channels
At the global level, there is growing evidence that inequality of income and gender hampers growth:
•  Lower net income inequality (measured by the Gini coefficient after taking into account the effects 
of taxes and redistributive government programs) has been robustly associated with faster growth and 
longer growth spells for a large number of advanced and developing countries (Berg and Ostry 2011; 
Ostry and others 2014). Other evidence suggests that income inequality holds back growth in low-
income countries but encourages growth in high-income countries (Barro 2000).   
•  Increases in the income share of the richest 20 percent of the population have been associated with 
lower GDP growth for a large sample of advanced, emerging-market, and developing countries, while 
increases in the income share of the poorest 10 percent were associated with higher growth (Dabla-
Norris and others 2015a). 
•  Gender gaps in economic participation have been shown to result in large GDP losses across countries 
of all income levels (Cuberes and Teigner 2015; Stotsky 2006). 
周e negative effects of income and gender inequality on growth work through various channels. Some of these 
channels may have a stronger impact at early stages of development and become less binding as economies develop.
Income Inequality 
With imperfect credit markets, income inequality prevents an efficient allocation of resources by reducing low-
income households’ ability to make investments in education and physical capital. It also limits income mobility 
(Galor and Zeira 1993; Corak 2013). 
High inequality of income and wealth can lead to  socio-political instability and poor governance, which  
dis-courages private  investment (Bardhan 2015).
Gender Inequality
Gender gaps in economic participation restrict the pool of talent in the labor market, yielding a less efficient  
allocation of resources and total factor productivity losses (Cuberes and Teigner 2015). 
As women are more likely than men to invest a large proportion of their household income in the education of 
their children and grandchildren, closing the earnings gap between men and women could translate into higher 
expenditure on school enrollment for children (Duflo 2003; Heintz 2006; Miller 2008, Rubalcava and others 2004; 
周omas 1990).
3. INEQUALITY AND ECONOMIC OUTCOMES IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
69
Box 3.2. Financial Inclusion, Growth, and Inequality in Sub-Saharan Africa
Accelerating financial deepening in many sub-Saharan African countries over the past two decades has not yet 
translated into broad-based use of financial services. To illustrate the impact of financial inclusion on growth, pro-
ductivity, and inequality in the region, this box draws on the findings from an application of a recently developed 
micro-founded general equilibrium model by Dabla-Norris, Townsend, and Unsal (2015b) to quantify the effects 
of removing the most binding financial constraints to firms’ financial inclusion for a set of countries and monetary 
unions (Kenya, Mozambique, Nigeria, Uganda, Zambia, the Central African Economic and Monetary Community 
(CEMAC) and the West African Economic and Monetary Union (WAEMU)). 
Model Specification
周e model allows for assessing the effects of relaxing three financial constraints on GDP, productivity, interest rate 
spreads, income inequality,the share of firms with access to credit, and the nonperforming loan ratio:
High collateral requirements due to imperfect enforceability of contracts. Poor legal, regulatory, and institutional frame-
works that fail to adequately protect property and creditor rights result in higher collateral requirements and hence 
smaller collateral leverage ratios and overall bank lending. 
High participation costs. 周ese costs relate to factors such as physical distance to banks or automated teller machines 
(ATMs), the documentation required for opening or maintaining an account or applying for a loan, and the use of 
electronic payments and new technologies.
High intermediation costs.High intermediation costs often stem from a lack of public information on borrowers, for 
example through credit bureaus or credit registries. Also, limited bank competition can increase inefficiencies and 
raise intermediation costs.
周e impact on growth and inequality of increased financial access operates through two different channels. First, by 
increasing the availability of credit, it facilitates firms’ borrowing and investment, which in turn increases capital, 
output, and productivity, as firms can operate at a larger scale. 周is channel could increase inequality if credit is 
mainly reallocated to firms that are already in the financial system and that have relatively higher income. Second, 
lowering participation costs permits new firms to access the market, borrow and invest, and increase output. 周is 
channel may reduce inequality, as more businesses are able to access credit.
Model Findings 
Lowering collateral constraints is the most effective way to boost 
growth and productivity, though its impact on inequality is less 
clear. 周e value of collateral needed for a loan is high in the 
region—on average above 160 percent of the value of the loan— 
with the exceptions of Kenya, Mozambique and Nigeria and 
broadly in line with the average for emerging market and develop-
ing economies (Figure 3.2.1). GDP increases from easing collateral 
requirements range between 8 and nearly 20 percentage points 
(Figure 3.2.2). Lowering borrowing constraints slightly increases 
inequality, with the exception of the cases of Uganda and Kenya 
(Figure 3.2.3).
Lowering participation costs would generally boost growth and 
productivity and reduce inequality. In the region, the percentage 
of firms with a bank loan or line of credit is low, with an average 
close to 25 percent, compared with nearly 35 percent on average 
Figure 3.2.1. Selected Countries: Borrowing 
Constraints, Value of Collateral Needed for a Loan
Source: World Bank, Enterprise Survey.
0
50
100
150
200
250
Percent of loan amount
0
CEMAC
Kenya
Mozambique
Nigeria
Uganda
WAEMU
Zambia
Value of collateral needed for a loan
Sub-Saharan Africa
Emerging markets and developing countries
(continued)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested