21
Jan-07-03, 05:36 PM (PST)
collector  
Charter Member
24 posts
"insect farm Papua New Guinea"
Is the "Insect Farming and Trading Agency of Papua New Guinea" a reliable supplier? 
I would appreciate to hear from anyone who has ordered from them. 
Thank You
prelson  
Charter Member 
14 posts 
1. "RE: insect farm Papua New Guinea" 
In response to message #0
The single transaction I had with them was somewhat slow, but everything that they promised to 
send they did and the condition was as indicated.
They did forget to attach the CITES permit original to the outside of the package, which made for 
a bit of a hassle on the "import side", so you might want to remind them of that.
I'm not sure that my bank had ever done a wire transfer to Papua New Guinea before, but it 
worked fine.
Peter
Pdf reader thumbnails - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
pdf reader thumbnails; pdf files thumbnails
Pdf reader thumbnails - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
pdf file thumbnail preview; show pdf thumbnail in html
Aug-08-06, 08:38 AM (PST)
jasj  
Member since Jul-17-06
2 posts
"Is IFTA reliable?"
Hi 
I made an order to IFTA in March. A few days later I recieved the invoice with the message not 
to pay until the CITES permits was OK. After about two months I asked for a status on my 
order. I sent the message several times before response. The status was that the administration 
who gives the permits was delaying the prosess. Over the last months I have made many 
requests without any response. Should I forget the whole thing and find the specimens 
elsewhere? 
Jan
Aug-09-06, 02:04 PM (PST)
vytas  
Member since Oct-31-05
18 posts
1. "RE: Is IFTA reliable?"
In response to message #0
Hi Jan, 
I tried to make trade with IFTA about a year ago. It took about 8 months of "communication" till 
finally I stopped this nonsense. My recommendation - don't waste your time! 
wish you luck 
Vytautas Visinskas
Aug-09-06, 06:46 PM (PST)
ML  
Charter Member
151 posts
2. "RE: Is IFTA reliable?"
In response to message #1
Waste of time.
Michel Lauzon/Montreal, Canada 
Michel.Lauzon@Gmail.com
I drank milk with Elvis last night.  
Man did not land on the moon. 
Bush is not a lying SOB.
Aug-09-06, 06:46 PM (PST)
cetoniinae  
Member since Feb-4-05
75 posts
3. "RE: Is IFTA reliable?"
In response to message #1
Sadly IFTA does not seem to respond any longer. The organization had a good start with a 
good ecological ethic, but I think it is poorly manned and underfunded nowadays. I have 
picked up some amazing specimens from them in the past but only when an American or 
European was at the helm and responses were more forthcoming - and even then, I had 
better luck when I phoned them.... I have no idea who is working with them now, but after 
three years of trying to get a response from them, I too have given up...
22
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages.
enable thumbnail preview for pdf files; view pdf image thumbnail
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages.
show pdf thumbnails in; pdf thumbnail viewer
Alert
| IP
Printer-friendly page
| Edit
| Reply
| Reply With Quote
| Top
Aug-09-06, 06:46 PM (PST)
bgarthe  
Member since May-8-03
495 posts
4. "RE: Is IFTA reliable?"
In response to message 
#
0
Jan,
I "second" the motion. Give it up
Many of us have tried (check the archival posts on this topic) 
to no avail. A few have managed to get through, but not many. Interestingly, I was once one of 
a group order to IFTA and we got burned.
There are many good dealers and collectors who can get most of what you'd be after from IFTA 
for you. 
FYI, IFTA's idea of A1 is really A3, A- is really B2, and their A2 would fall in the C4 range. 
That organiaztion (for whatever reasons) needs an overhaul. In fact, it has been so poorly 
managed, that a mere overhaul might not do it
They are not crooks, but people who have NO 
idea on how to run a business, don't have the government support to do so, and they don't 
even appear to'know' that a male Ornithoptera meridionalis meridionalis has TWO tails. Yep, I 
ordered one and got a male with one tail----a few years ago. Did they attempt to care to fix our 
big group order? Nope. 
Bill Garthe
Alert
| IP
Printer-friendly page
| Edit
| Reply
| Reply With Quote
| Top
Aug-10-06, 08:29 AM (PST)
ML  
Charter Member
151 posts
5. "RE: Is IFTA reliable?"
In response to message #4
23
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Embedded page thumbnails.
enable pdf thumbnails in; how to create a thumbnail of a pdf document
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Support of converting from any single one PDF page and multiple pages. Thumbnails can be created from PDF pages. Support for customizing image size.
html display pdf thumbnail; pdf thumbnail creator
Jan-10-06, 10:23 PM (PST)
vytas  
Member since Oct-31-05
12 posts
"Something more about IFTA"
My adventure with IFTA from Papua New Guinea started in february 2005 when I made payment 
by W.U. Now it is more than 10 month passed and today I took these money back. They did not 
find time to take this payment. I do not understand this kind of business and do not recommend 
to make any deals with IFTA to nobody. 
Best regards to all 
Vytautas Visinskas 
Lithuania
Jan-25-06, 00:36 AM (PST)
papilio28570  
Member since Nov-1-05
195 posts
1. "RE: Something more about IFTA"
In response to message #0
I had searched their web site and wondered how they could be in business selling so cheaply at 
the prices they had listed. I suspected scam right away.
Bob Cavanaugh
Jan-26-06, 01:11 PM (PST)
Agrias  
Member since Jan-20-06
3 posts
2. "RE: Something more about IFTA"
In response to message #1
Just to let you know I had a transaction with IFTA approximately 2 years ago that took a 
while (about 5 months) but it worked out fine. The specimens were packaged well and A1. 
Sincerely,
Maurice Bottos
Jan-27-06, 01:11 PM (PST)
bgarthe  
Member since May-8-03
415 posts
3. "RE: Something more about IFTA"
In response to message #1
Yep---------be careful!!!!
1. A couple of years ago I received (as part of a group order) stuff that was simply BAD. 
Specimens were not nearly as promised. Did they replace or re-send?? No. I lost out on 
some $ and will not try it again
2. I actually tried to set up an order with several staff people there and for nearly a year, 
24
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Embedded page thumbnails.
can't see pdf thumbnails; pdf thumbnails
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages.
can't view pdf thumbnails; no pdf thumbnails in
nothing came to be. Luckily I did not send $.
3. I personally don't think it (IFTA) is a scam, but I do think that IFTA is about the most 
poorly run business in the lepidoptera arena
Some of the garbage, no doubt, is due to the 
governmental "stuff" that has happened, but still I expect businesses to do business and not 
to jerk around potential customers and certainly fix issues with people who poured thousands 
of dollars into a transaction that "went south".
4. Actually, one train of thought on this a while back was that only the biggest of big buyers 
get any kind of service. This may be true. My group order was in the thousands, but we got 
screwed big time. Who knows? That is who knows (besides the people at IFTA)?
5. SIMPLY-------------don't order from there!! There are plenty of great dealers with great 
prices and quality stuff out there. 
Respectfully, 
Bill Garthe
25
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Converter control easy to create thumbnails from PDF pages. Selection for compressing to multiple image formats. Cut and paste any areas in PDF pages to images.
create thumbnail from pdf; pdf thumbnail generator online
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages.
enable pdf thumbnail preview; generate thumbnail from pdf
26
Mar-28-04, 09:34 PM (PST)
brainy88  
Member since Mar-28-04
9 posts
"Question about Safe Collecting, and Collectors."
Hello, I wanted to purchase some insects from Insect-Sale.com but are they safe? But my main 
question is how good is IFTA? Insect FARMING trade AGENCY? are they really good, and on 
average how much does the shipping and handling cost? If anyone has done any business with 
them I would love to hear beacause I want to send them money, but I want to be sure that they 
are honest? ALSO VERNON EVAN?!?!? THIS JUST POPPED INTO MY HEAD. Is he reputable? or 
honest? Any responses would be great!!! 
Happy Collecting! 
Mar-31-04, 06:08 PM (PST)
Bizarro  
Charter Member
81 posts
1. "RE: Question about Safe Collecting, and Collectors."
In response to message #0
Hello!
I've done some business with IFTA a few years ago... everything went well. I still have some 
Delias and papered Ornithoptera from that package... with CITES certification.
They MUST have to be professionals and honest BECAUSE THEY'RE the oficial Papua New Guinea 
insect trading agency, the only one allowed to sell native insects abroad. In other words, they 
just simply can't afford scams... OK!
Actually they make more money from tourist visitation, than from the selling of butterflies 
because they care that the aborigen papuans that collect/breed the butterflies will keep 75% of 
the insect selling income (totally oposite to what happens in South America whose insects are 
bought very cheap and retailed with profits averaging +300%!!).
The major issue with IFTA dealings I think is to get atention from them if you're not a BIG 
CUSTOMER, or you do irregular, small orders. I think regular curtomers get in front... but this is 
something I've heard, not actually experienced. I've put a small order and I receive all items 
after sending the payment first.
Believe me, they are the pioneers of Butterfly Farming Biocomerce in the Tropical World ... just 
take a look at their website .
Hope it helped
Bizarro
27
Improving the customer service that IFTA provides 
It is possible for you to regain the ground that you have lost with dissatisfied customers. This 
is not only through apologizing and reconciling with the people that have made comments on 
the insectnet website but through improving your day to day practices. 
Remember that the survival of IFTA relies on having satisfied customers. Without them there 
will be no money coming in and not enough money to keep it a going concern. 
Insect and butterfly grading 
The correct grading of butterflies and other insects is very important and will make or break 
your reputation with your customers.  
If customers receive an order of A1 specimens from you that they think are actually A2 they 
will not trust the service which you provide. 
You must be very careful when grading insects and if you are not sure if a specimen is A1 
then just make it an A2. That way when a customer receives an order from you they will be 
very happy. 
Packing specimens 
You may feel that you already know how to pack specimens but it never hurts to revisit your 
packing techniques to ensure that your customers will always be happy with you. 
Packing butterflies 
1.  Kill live butterflies 
2.  Cut and fold A4 paper triangle 
3.  Label specimen (name and location of specimen)  
e.g. O. goliath from Gumi, Watut, Morobe Province, Papua New Guinea 
(do not use abbreviations for provinces) 
4.  Put a piece of folded toilet tissue around the specimen and place carefully into the paper 
triangle 
5.  Dry the specimen 
6.  Store the specimen in the appropriate storage cupboard 
7.  On receipt of an order for the specimen double check to see if the specimen is A1 
8.  If A1 replace the tissue paper with a fresh sheet 
9.  If it is a rare specimen double wrap it 
Packing beetles 
1.  Kill the live beetle 
2.  Make card strips and cut plastic sheet to size 
3.  Place tissue paper on the card strip  
4.  Place beetle onto the tissue strip and secure plastic sheet with staples 
e.g.  eupholus spp. -  pack singly (unless otherwise directed by customer) 
R. straussi  - pack in pairs 
E. horridus – pack singly 
5. Label the specimen 
e.g. E.clarki from Lumi, Torricelli Mountains, Sandaun Province, Papua New Guinea  
(do not use abbreviations for provinces) 
6.  Dry the specimen 
28
7.  After 7 days check that the specimen is fully dried 
8.  After drying store in the appropriate storage cupboard 
9.  On receipt of an order for the specimen double check to see if the specimen is A1 
Packing an order for a customer  
1.  Check the specimens for their quality and then fumigate them 
2.  Use a strong box for the packing of an order 
3.  Place a layer of cotton wool into the box 
4.  If the order is for butterflies place one single layer of butterflies onto the first layer of 
cotton wool then add another layer of cotton wool and another single layer of butterflies 
repeat this until the box is full 
5.  If the order is for beetles place a single layer of beetles onto the cotton wool face up and 
then another layer of beetles face down so that the two layers fit snuggly. Then add 
another layer of cotton wool and another double layer of beetles until the box is full 
6.  Never over pack the box by pushing specimens down to fit more in as this will only ruin 
them and upset your customers 
7.  If you are packing a mixed order of beetles and butterflies into one box place the beetle 
layers into the box first followed by the butterfly layers 
8.  Sprinkle a very small quantity of crushed moth balls or naphthalene flakes onto each 
layer of cotton wool that you place in the box 
9.  Gently shake the packed box to make sure that none of the specimens are loose 
10. Seal the box with sticky tape 
11. Place this box into a larger box and surround it on all sides with shredded paper 
12. Stick an envelope containing both export and import permits to the outside of the larger 
box 
13. Dispatch the order with EMS 
29
CITES
What is CITES? 
CITES (the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and 
Flora)  is  an  international  agreement  between  governments.  Its  aim  is  to  ensure  that 
international trade in specimens of wild animals and plants does not threaten their survival. 
Annually, international wildlife trade is estimated to be worth billions of dollars and to 
include hundreds of millions of plant and animal specimens. The trade is diverse, ranging 
from live animals and plants to a vast array of wildlife products derived from them, including 
food products, exotic leather goods, wooden musical instruments, timber, tourist curios and 
medicines. Levels of exploitation of some animal and plant species are high and the trade in 
them, together with other factors, such as habitat loss, is capable of heavily depleting their 
populations and even bringing some species close to extinction. Many wildlife species in 
trade are not endangered, but the existence of an agreement to ensure the sustainability of the 
trade is important in order to safeguard these resources for the future. 
Because the trade in wild animals and plants crosses borders between countries, the effort to 
regulate  it  requires  international  cooperation  to  safeguard  certain  species  from  over-
exploitation. CITES was conceived in the spirit of such cooperation. Today, it accords 
varying degrees of protection to more than 30,000 species of animals and plants, whether 
they are traded as live specimens, fur coats or dried herbs. 
CITES was drafted as a result of a resolution adopted in 1963 at a meeting of members of 
IUCN (The World Conservation Union). The text of the Convention was finally agreed at a 
meeting of representatives of 80 countries in Washington DC., United States of America, on 
3 March 1973, and on 1 July 1975 CITES entered in force.  
CITES is an international agreement to which States (countries) adhere voluntarily. States 
that have agreed to be bound by the Convention ('joined' CITES) are known as Parties. 
Although CITES is legally binding on the Parties – in other words they have to implement 
the Convention – it does not take the place of national laws. Rather it provides a framework 
to be respected by each Party, which has to adopt its own domestic legislation to ensure that 
CITES is implemented at the national level. 
For  many  years CITES  has  been  among  the  conservation  agreements  with the largest 
membership, with now 169 Parties. 
How many species are listed in the CITES Appendices?  
Around 25,000 plant species and 5,000 animal species are covered by the provisions of the 
Convention, in the following proportions:  
1) Appendix I: about 600 animal species and 300 plant species;  
2) Appendix II: about 1,400 animal species and 25,000 plant species; and  
3) Appendix III: about 270 animal species and 30 plant species.  
How can I know whether I need a permit to import or export wildlife 
specimens? 
Import, export and re-export of any live animal or plant of a species listed in the CITES 
Appendices (or of any part or derivative of such animal or plant) requires a permit or 
certificate.  
30
How CITES works in Papua New Guinea 
The Department of Environment and Conservation is the CITES management authority for 
Papua New Guinea. This is the government department that anyone who wants to export 
CITES listed species from Papua New Guinea has to go to in order to get permits. 
CITES traded species exported from Papua New Guinea include crocodile skins, eaglewood, 
live reef fish and of course birdwing butterflies. 
1.  IFTA fills out CITES application form and it is sent to DEC. 
2.  DEC review the application and when approved it is stamped and signed by Wildlife 
Inspection  Officer,  the  Deputy  Secretary  for  Conservation  (Dr.  Guy  Gowae),  the 
Conservator of Fauna and Flora (Dr. Wari Iamo). 
3.  Approved CITES permit is sent back to IFTA. 
4.  Copy of permit made by IFTA and sent to country of import in order to receive import 
approval from customs. 
5.  A copy of the import permit sent back to IFTA from importing country. 
6.  Both the CITES export permit and copy of import permit are put into an envelope on the 
outside of the order before being sent to the customer via EMS. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested