Pdf thumbnail viewer - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
create thumbnail jpg from pdf; show pdf thumbnail in
Pdf thumbnail viewer - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
can't view pdf thumbnails; view pdf thumbnails
Stop Stealing Dreams
Free Printable Edition
2
This edition is designed to be printed, copied and shared.
If you’d like the on-screen edition, 
click here.
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Word
for DNN, C#.NET Winforms Document Viewer, C#.NET WPF Document Viewer. VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Word
print pdf thumbnails; show pdf thumbnails
How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET. XImage.Raster SDK library, you can create an image viewer and view
pdf files thumbnails; pdf thumbnail preview
Stop Stealing Dreams
Free Printable Edition
3
if  you don’t 
underestimate 
me, I won’t 
underestimate 
you
Bob Dylan
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for PowerPoint
for DNN, C#.NET Winforms Document Viewer, C#.NET WPF Document Viewer. VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for PowerPoint
enable thumbnail preview for pdf files; program to create thumbnail from pdf
VB.NET Image: Program for Creating Thumbnail from Documents and
multiple document and image formats, such as PDF, TIFF, GIF you have a demand of creating thumbnail in any in WinForms and Web Document Image Viewer Installation
pdf first page thumbnail; pdf reader thumbnails
Stop Stealing Dreams
Free Printable Edition
4
Dedicated to every teacher who cares enough to change the system, and to every 
student brave enough to stand up and speak up.
Specifically, for Ross Abrams, Jon Guillaume, Beth Rudd, Steve Greenberg, 
Benji  Kanters,  Patti  Jo  Wilson,  Florian  Kønig,  and  that  one  teacher  who 
changed everything for you.
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Raster
for DNN, C#.NET Winforms Document Viewer, C#.NET WPF Document Viewer. VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Raster.
cannot view pdf thumbnails in; view pdf image thumbnail
Create Thumbnail in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
Web Image Viewer Installation; View and Display Images; Annotate & Redact Documents or Images; Create Thumbnail; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode & Decode
create thumbnail from pdf c#; create thumbnail from pdf
Stop Stealing Dreams
Free Printable Edition
5
1. Preface: Education transformed
As I was finishing this manifesto, a friend invited me to visit the Harlem Village Academies, a 
network of charter schools in Manhattan.
Harlem is a big place, bigger than most towns in the United States. It’s difficult to generalize 
about a population this big, but household incomes are less than half of what they are just a mile 
away, unemployment is significantly higher and many (in and out of the community) have given 
up hope.
A million movies have trained us about what to expect from a school in East Harlem. The 
school  is  supposed  to  be  an  underfunded  processing  facility,  barely  functioning,  with  bad 
behavior, questionable security and most of all, very little learning.
Hardly the place you’d go to discover a future of our education system.
For generations, our society has said to communities like this one, “here are some teachers (but 
not enough) and here is some money (but not enough) and here are our expectations (very low)
… go do your best.” Few people are surprised when this plan doesn’t work.
Over the last ten years, I’ve written more than a dozen books about how our society is being 
fundamentally changed by the impact of the internet and the connection economy. Mostly I’ve 
tried to point out to people that the very things we assumed to be baseline truths were in fact 
fairly recent inventions and unlikely to last much longer. I’ve argued that mass marketing, mass 
brands,  mass  communication,  top-down  media  and  the  TV-industrial  complex  weren’t  the 
pillars of our future that many were trained to expect. It’s often difficult to see that when you’re 
in the middle of it.
In this manifesto, I’m going to argue that top-down industrialized schooling is just as threat-
ened, and for very good reasons. Scarcity of access is destroyed by the connection economy, at 
the very same time the skills and attitudes we need from our graduates are changing.
While the internet has allowed many of these changes to happen, you won’t see much of the 
web at the Harlem Village Academy school I visited, and not so much of it in this manifesto, 
either.  The  HVA  is  simply  about  people  and  the  way  they  should  be  treated.  It’s  about 
abandoning  a  top-down  industrial  approach  to  processing  students  and  embracing  a  very 
human, very personal and very powerful series of tools to produce a new generation of leaders. 
There are literally thousands of ways to accomplish the result that Deborah Kenny and her 
team at HVA have accomplished. The method doesn’t matter to me, the outcome does. What I 
saw that day were  students  leaning forward  in  their  seats,  choosing to pay attention.  I saw 
teachers engaged because they chose to as well, because they were thrilled at the privilege of 
teaching kids who wanted to be taught.
The  two  advantages  most successful  schools  have  are  plenty  of  money  and  a  pre-selected, 
motivated  student  body.  It’s  worth  highlighting  that  the  HVA  doesn’t  get  to  choose  its 
C# Image: Quick to Navigate Document in .NET Web Viewer
To set the specific size for thumbnail image in Web to the target part of web viewer document by of the well-formed documents, like Word and PDF, will contain
enable pdf thumbnail preview; pdf thumbnail html
How to C#: Overview of Using XImage.Raster
test. OR create a WinForms Viewer. Basic SDK Concept. Refer navigation. You may edit the tiff document easily. Create Thumbnail. See
pdf preview thumbnail; no pdf thumbnails in
Stop Stealing Dreams
Free Printable Edition
6
students, they are randomly assigned by lottery. And the HVA receives less funding per student 
than the typical public school in New York. HVA works because they have figured out how to 
create a workplace culture that attracts the most talented teachers, fosters a culture of owner-
ship, freedom and accountability, and then relentlessly transfers this passion to their students.
Maestro Ben Zander talks about the transformation that happens when a kid actually learns to 
love music. For one year, two years, even three years, the kid trudges along. He hits every pulse, 
pounds every note and sweats the whole thing out.
Then he quits.
Except a few. The few with passion. The few who care.
Those kids lean forward and begin to play. They play as if they care, because they do. And as 
they lean forward, as they connect, they lift themselves off the piano seat, suddenly becoming, 
as Ben calls them, one-buttock players. 
Playing as if it matters.
Colleges are fighting to recruit the kids who graduate from Deborah’s school and I have no 
doubt that we’ll soon be hearing of the leadership and contribution of the HVA alumni—one-
buttock players who care about learning and giving. Because it matters.
2. A few notes about this manifesto
I’ve numbered the sections because it’s entirely possible you’ll be reading it with a different 
layout than others will. The numbers make it easy to argue about particular sections.
It’s written as a series of essays or blog posts, partly because that’s how I write now, and partly 
because I’m hoping that one or more of them will spur you to share or rewrite or criticize a 
point I’m making. One side effect is that there’s some redundancy. I hope you can forgive me 
for that. I won’t mind if you skip around.
This isn’t a prescription. It’s not a manual. It’s a series of provocations, ones that might resonate 
and that I hope will provoke conversation.
None of this writing is worth the effort if the ideas aren’t shared. Feel free to email or reprint 
this manifesto, but please don’t change it or charge for it. If you’d like to tweet, the hashtag is 
#stopstealingdreams. You can find a 
page for comments at 
http://www.stopstealingdreams.com
Most of all, go do something. Write your own manifesto. Send this one to the teachers at your 
kid’s school. Ask hard questions at a board meeting. Start your own school. Post a video lecture 
or two. But don’t settle.
Thanks for reading and sharing.
Stop Stealing Dreams
Free Printable Edition
7
3. Back to (the wrong) school
A hundred and fifty years ago, adults were incensed about child labor. Low-wage kids were 
taking jobs away from hard-working adults.
Sure, there was some moral outrage about seven-year-olds losing fingers and being abused at 
work, but  the  economic rationale  was  paramount. Factory owners insisted that losing child 
workers would be catastrophic to their industries and fought hard to keep the kids at work—
they said they couldn’t afford to hire adults. It wasn’t until 1918 that nationwide compulsory 
education was in place.
Part of the rationale used to sell this major transformation to industrialists was the idea that 
educated kids would actually  become more compliant  and productive  workers. Our  current 
system of teaching kids to sit in straight rows and obey instructions isn’t a coincidence—it was 
an investment in our economic future. The plan: trade short-term child-labor wages for longer-
term productivity by giving kids a head start in doing what they’re told.
Large-scale education was not developed to motivate kids or to create scholars. It was invented 
to churn out adults who worked well within the system. Scale was more important than quality, 
just as it was for most industrialists.
Of course, it worked. Several generations of productive, fully employed workers followed. But 
now?
Nobel prize–winning economist Michael Spence makes this really clear: there are tradable jobs 
(doing  things  that  could  be  done  somewhere  else,  like building  cars,  designing  chairs,  and 
answering the phone) and non-tradable jobs (like mowing the lawn or cooking burgers). Is there 
any question that the first kind of job is worth keeping in our economy?
Alas, Spence reports that from 1990 to 2008, the U.S. economy added only 600,000 tradable 
jobs. 
If you do a job where someone tells you exactly what to do, he will find someone cheaper than you to do it. 
And yet our schools are churning out kids who are stuck looking for jobs where the boss tells 
them exactly what to do.
Do you see the disconnect here? Every year, we churn out millions of workers who are trained 
to do 1925-style labor. 
The bargain (take kids out of work so we can teach them to become better factory workers as 
adults) has set us on a race to the bottom. Some people argue that we ought to become the 
cheaper, easier country for sourcing cheap, compliant workers who do what they’re told. Even 
if we could win that race, we’d lose. The bottom is not a good place to be, even if you’re capable 
of getting there. 
As we get ready for the ninety-third year of universal public education, here’s the question every 
Stop Stealing Dreams
Free Printable Edition
8
parent and taxpayer needs to wrestle with: Are we going to applaud, push, or even permit our 
schools (including most of the private ones) to continue the safe but ultimately doomed strategy 
of churning out predictable, testable, and mediocre factory workers?
As long as we embrace (or even accept) standardized testing, fear of science, little attempt at 
teaching leadership, and most of all, the bureaucratic imperative to turn education into a factory 
itself, we’re in big trouble.
The post-industrial revolution is here. Do you care enough to teach your kids to take advantage 
of it?
4. What is school for?
It seems a question so obvious that it’s hardly worth asking. And yet there are many possible 
answers. Here are a few (I’m talking about public or widespread private education here, grade K 
through college):
To create a society that’s culturally coordinated.
To further science and knowledge and pursue information for its own sake.
To enhance civilization while giving people the tools to make informed decisions. 
To train people to become productive workers.
Over the last three generations, the amount of school we’ve delivered to the public has gone 
way up—more people are spending more hours being schooled than ever before. And the cost 
of that schooling is  going up  even faster, with trillions  of dollars being spent on delivering 
school on a massive scale.
Until recently, school did a fabulous job on just one of these four societal goals. First, the other 
three:
A culturally coordinated society: School isn’t nearly as good at this as television is. There’s a huge 
gulf  between  the  cultural  experience  in  an  under-funded, overcrowded  city  school  and  the 
cultural  experience  in  a  well-funded  school  in  the  suburbs.  There’s  a  significant  cultural 
distinction between a high school drop-out and a Yale graduate. There are significant chasms in 
something as simple as whether you think the scientific method is useful—where you went to 
school says a lot about what you were taught. If school’s goal is to create a foundation for a 
common culture, it hasn’t delivered at nearly the level it is capable of.
The pursuit of knowledge for its own sake: We spend a fortune teaching trigonometry to kids who 
don’t understand it, won’t use it, and will spend no more of their lives studying math. We invest 
thousands of hours exposing millions of students to fiction and literature, but end up training 
most of them to never again read for fun (one study found that 58 percent of all Americans 
never read for pleasure after they graduate from school). As soon as we associate reading a book 
Stop Stealing Dreams
Free Printable Edition
9
with taking a test, we’ve missed the point.
We continually raise the bar on what it means to be a college professor, but churn out Ph.D.s 
who don’t actually teach and aren’t particularly productive at research, either. We teach facts, 
but the amount of knowledge truly absorbed is miniscule.
The tools to make smart decisions: Even though just about everyone in the West has been through 
years of compulsory schooling, we see ever more belief in unfounded theories, bad financial 
decisions, and poor community and family planning. People’s connection with science and the 
arts is tenuous at best, and the financial acumen of the typical consumer is pitiful. If the goal was 
to raise the standards for rational thought, skeptical investigation, and useful decision making, 
we’ve failed for most of our citizens.
No, I think it’s clear that school was designed with a particular function in mind, and it’s one 
that school has delivered on for a hundred years. 
Our  grandfathers  and  great-grandfathers  built  school to  train  people  to  have  a  lifetime  of 
productive labor as part of the industrialized economy. And it worked.
All the rest is a byproduct, a side effect (sometimes a happy one) of the schooling system that we 
built to train the workforce we needed for the industrialized economy.
5. Column A and Column B
Aware
Caring
Committed
Creative
Goal-setting
Honest
Improvising
Incisive
Independent
Informed
Initiating
Innovating
Insightful
Leading
Strategic
Supportive ——————————————- >
or
Obedient
Stop Stealing Dreams
Free Printable Edition
10
Which column do you pick? Whom do you want to work for or work next to? Whom do you 
want to hire? Which doctor do you want to treat you? Whom do you want to live with?
Last question: If you were organizing a trillion-dollar, sixteen-year indoctrination program to 
turn out the next generation of our society, which column would you build it around?
This is more of a rant than a book. It’s written for teenagers, their parents, and their teachers. 
It’s written for bosses and for those who work for those bosses. And it’s written for anyone who 
has paid taxes, gone to a school board meeting, applied to college, or voted.
6. Changing what we get, because we’ve changed what 
we need
If school’s function is to create the workers we need to fuel our economy, we need to change 
school, because the workers we need have changed as well.
The mission used to be to create homogenized, obedient, satisfied workers and pliant, eager 
consumers.
No longer.
Changing school doesn’t involve sharpening the pencil we’ve already got. School reform cannot 
succeed if it focuses on getting schools to do a better job of what we previously asked them to 
do. We don’t need more of what schools produce when they’re working as designed. The challenge, 
then, is to change the very output of the school before we start spending even more time and 
money improving the performance of the school.
The  goal  of  this  manifesto  is  to  create  a  new  set  of  questions  and  demands  that  parents, 
taxpayers,  and kids  can bring to the people  they’ve  chosen,  the  institution we’ve  built  and 
invested our time and money into. The goal is to change what we get when we send citizens to 
school.
7. Mass production desires to produce mass
That statement seems obvious, yet it surprises us that schools are oriented around the notion of 
uniformity.  Even though the workplace  and  civil  society  demand variety,  the  industrialized 
school system works to stamp it out.
The industrialized  mass nature of  school  goes back  to  the very beginning, to  the common 
school and the normal school and the idea of universal schooling. All of which were invented at 
precisely the same time we were perfecting mass production and interchangeable parts and then 
mass marketing. 
Some quick background:
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested