asp.net pdf viewer devexpress : How to create a thumbnail of a pdf document software Library project winforms asp.net wpf UWP ta-11-063-_esrf-_mashindano._final_research_report%5B1%5D1-part1988

11 
According to FAO statistics (see Tables1.1), 
Tanzania’s position among world top producers 
of fresh vegetables improved from No 20 in 2003 to No 18 in 2007. The potential for increasing 
production  of  non-traditional  horticulture  products  in  Tanzania  is  enormous  (URT,  2002, 
ESRF, 2010). However, the country lags behind in exporting the same in the world market.  
Table 1. 1: Top 20 Producers of Vegetables 
2000 
2007 
Rank  Country 
Production (MT)  Rank  Country 
Production (MT) 
China 
121553141 
China 
146902838 
India 
28630000 
India 
29117400 
Viet Nam 
5632100 
Viet Nam 
6600000 
Philippines 
4100000 
Nigeria 
4861720 
Nigeria 
3945000 
Philippines 
4000000 
Korea 
3679000 
Korea 
3171000 
France 
3000000 
Myanmar 
3200000 
Japan 
2900000 
Japan 
2825000 
Myanmar 
2800000 
Russian Federation 
2542000 
10 
Korea (DPR)  
2400000 
10  Brazil 
2410000 
11 
Brazil 
2200000 
11  Nepal 
2328945 
12 
Italy 
2400000 
12  Korea (DPR) 
2250000 
13 
Iran 
1739000 
13  Iran 
1750000 
14 
Nepal 
1489660 
14  Italy 
2000000 
15 
Germany 
1484000 
15  Bangladesh 
1096000 
16 
Russian Federation 
1401000 
16  Pakistan 
1026564 
17 
Pakistan 
1102534 
17  Thailand 
1015000 
18 
USA 
1054000 
18  Tanzania 
955000 
19 
Thailand 
970000 
19  USA 
907680 
20 
Tanzania,  
940000 
20  Cuba 
922601 
Source: http://www.fao.org. 
While Kenya is not among top producers of fresh vegetable, she was No. 6 in 2003 and 2007 
in exporting the products in the world market. This shows that Tanzania has a comparative 
advantage in  producing agricultural-based products, in  this case,  vegetables. It is therefore 
important  to  find out the reasons  for  this  huge mismatch in the horticulture  sub sector  in 
Tanzania by investigating on overriding policies as well as institutional framework governing 
the sector.  
The national policy frameworks in Tanzania which govern horticulture industry include the 
Tanzania National Development Vision 2025 (TDV 2025); the Five Year Development Plan 
(2011-2015);  National Strategy  for  Growth and Poverty Reduction  (NSGRP);  and sectoral 
policies such as Agriculture  and  Livestock Policy  of  1997,  Agriculture Marketing  Policy, 
Agriculture Sector Development Strategy (ASDS), and Agriculture Sector Development Plan 
(ASDP).  
How to create a thumbnail of a pdf document - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
pdf thumbnail; pdf thumbnails
How to create a thumbnail of a pdf document - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
pdf thumbnail generator; pdf thumbnail generator online
12 
Table 1. 2: Top 20 Exporters of Vegetables 
2000 
2007 
Rank  Country 
Quantity 
(Tonnes) 
Value 
(1000 $) 
Rank  Country 
Quantity 
(Tonnes) 
Value 
(1000 $) 
USA 
223565 
155979 
Mexico 
531298 
438944 
Italy 
151718 
106888 
Netherlands 
161095 
287461 
China 
370498 
84588 
Italy 
179561 
234486 
France 
61916 
82563 
USA 
220887 
189203 
Netherlands 
103432 
70446 
France 
68774 
177790 
Kenya 
25238 
63827 
Kenya 
51506 
168997 
Spain 
72305 
36761 
Spain 
96071 
121746 
Israel 
13718 
33523 
China 
410048 
104499 
Thailand 
27198 
20992 
Israel 
35484 
94670 
10 
Belgium 
38149 
18066 
10 
Thailand 
33279 
71861 
11 
India 
55686 
16120 
11 
Belgium 
34985 
55924 
12 
Syria 
29174 
14000 
12 
Germany 
31859 
40318 
13 
Mexico 
55922 
13147 
13 
India 
65856 
36860 
14 
New Zealand 
32339 
12124 
14 
Bangladesh 
22744 
31071 
15 
Bangladesh 
7000 
11000 
15 
Panama 
49754 
27405 
16 
Costa Rica 
28865 
10985 
16 
Jordan 
18951 
25491 
17 
Malaysia 
50727 
10927 
17 
Saudi Arabia 
82745 
25449 
18 
Philippines 
5633 
9705 
18 
Uzbekistan 
28971 
22401 
19 
Australia 
8577 
8099 
19 
Malaysia 
69123 
20792 
20 
Germany 
8216 
8082 
20 
Costa Rica 
47658 
19586 
Source: http://www.fao.org 
Many studies have been conducted in this subsector which documents various problems that 
limit or inhibit export of horticulture products both on the demand and supply side. Several 
recommendations have been made to improve for example storage facilities in our airports, 
packaging materials, use of quality seeds etc. These include a study undertaken by the Ministry 
of Agriculture, Food Security and Cooperatives (MAFC) in Tanzania (2002) on the horticulture 
development in Tanzania and a study on export market for high value vegetables in Tanzania 
undertaken by USAID in 2007. However, not much has been researched on the extent at which 
the current policy and institutional frameworks, and strategies are supportive to the horticulture 
industry such as taping export opportunity on horticulture products like fresh vegetables and 
fruits. 
This study therefore focuses on export potential for horticulture products by looking at current 
policy  and  institutional  frameworks  that  are  expected  to  support  and  set  good  business 
environment to stimulate trade and export of horticulture products.  
1.2  Problem Statement 
Tanzania offers a wide range of horticulture products including: Asian Vegetables, Baby corn, 
baby marrow, Beetroots, Beans, Cabbage, Carrots and baby Carrots, Cauliflower, Eggplant, 
Kale,  Leeks, onions and  shallots, Okra, Peas (mange-tout, snap  and snow  peas),  Potatoes, 
Spinach and Tomatoes. The foreign income earned from horticulture industry has increased 
from USD 1.4million per annum in 2002 to USD 140 million in 2008 and was expected to rise 
to US $ 340 million in year 2009/2010 (TAHA Report, 2008). According to data from the 
Ministry of Agriculture in Tanzania, the total export of horticulture crops (in metric tonnes) in 
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Word
Word to ODT. Convert PDF to Word. Document Builder. Document Pages Processing. Document Processing. Text Search. Insert Image. Thumbnail Create. Thumbnail Create.
pdf reader thumbnails; program to create thumbnail from pdf
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for PowerPoint
Conversion. Convert PowerPoint to PDF. Convert PowerPoint PowerPoint Files. File: Split PowerPoint Document. PowerPoint. Text Search. Insert Image. Thumbnail Create
create thumbnails from pdf files; enable pdf thumbnails in
13 
2006/7  was  82,000  and  in  2007/8  it  increased  to  330,000MT.  It  started  to  drop  again  to 
183,000MT  in  2009/2009  and  in  2010/11  the  volume  slightly  increased  to  197,000MT 
(MAFSC, 2012). The value of these produce in 2006/7 was 46,751,000USD. In 2008/9 the 
value of exports increased to 112,596,000USD and in 2010/11 the value was 127,707,000USD. 
Generally there seems to be increasing in the value of exports and volume of production. The 
percentage change  of value earned since 2006/7  to 2010/11 is 25.5% while the percentage 
change in exports is 7.8% (et al, 2012). 
Tanzania’s level of production of fresh vegetables is increasing and th
ere is still enormous 
production potential. However, the country does not contribute much in the vegetable export 
market though she is among the top 20 producers of the same globally. As noted earlier, though 
Kenya, is not among the top 20 producers she has maintained her 6th position among the top 
20  exporters  of  fresh  vegetables  in  both  periods  (see  Table  1.1  above).  This  shows  that 
Tanzania does not utilize her comparative advantage in the production of agro-based products 
in making potential impact in the world export market. In addition, there is a huge mismatch 
which needs to  be investigated to find out the  reasons  for the inconsistency by  looking at 
whether policies and institutions are supportive enough to address the widening anomaly in the 
horticulture industry. 
Given the export potential, it is important to find out factors that limit Tanzania from utilizing 
and  therefore  benefiting  from  export  opportunities.  This  inquiry  has  included  analysis  of 
horticulture export supporting institutions, policy frameworks and strategies. It also focused on 
the extent at which these policy frameworks and institutions facilitate or hinder exploitation of 
the export opportunity as a pre-requisite to transform horticultural SMEs in Tanzania. 
1.3  General Objectives and Research Questions 
Thus the overall objective of this study is to present a synopsis of the status of the export sub-
sector  of  horticulture  products  (performance),  and  investigate  on  the  determinants  of 
horticulture exports in Tanzania in the perspective of policy and institutional frameworks. 
1.3.1  Specific Objectives 
Specifically, this inquiry intends to focus at the following objectives: 
(a)  To  present  an  overview  of  the  status  and/or  performance  of  the  export  of 
horticulture products from Tanzania 
(b)  To assess the national policy frameworks and strategies supporting the horticulture 
sub sector in Tanzania 
(c)  To assess institutional networks supporting the horticulture sub sector in Tanzania  
(d)  To investigate the determinants of export of horticulture products in Tanzania 
(e)  To analyze the performance and prospects of the business enterprises (SMEs) in 
terms of its contribution to export growth of the horticulture in Tanzania 
VB.NET Image: Program for Creating Thumbnail from Documents and
language. It empowers VB developers to create thumbnail from multiple document and image formats, such as PDF, TIFF, GIF, BMP, etc. It
pdf first page thumbnail; pdf files thumbnails
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
Tell C# users how to: create a new PDF file and load PDF from other file You may easily generate thumbnail image from PDF. C#.NET: Protect Your PDF Document.
view pdf thumbnails; html display pdf thumbnail
14 
1.3.2  Research Questions 
(a)  What is the status of the horticultural products exports in Tanzania? 
(b)  How  do  the  national  policy  frameworks,  strategies  and  institutional  networks 
support production and export activities in horticulture sub sector? 
(c)  What are the major determinants of horticulture products exports in Tanzania? 
(d)  What  other  challenges  limit  SMEs  from  processing and exporting  horticultural 
products? 
1.4  Rationale for Undertaking the Study 
Most of the empirical findings have shown that Tanzania has enormous potential of horticulture 
production,  and it  is producing  even more than  what Kenya  is  producing,  but  still Kenya 
appears on top of the list (i.e. the 6th position among the top 20) of exporters of horticulture 
products. This is an indication that Tanzania has not fully utilized its competitive edge in the 
world horticultural export market. 
Unlike most of the studies undertaken on the horticulture exports, very few have gone deep to 
up-root the extent at which policies and institutional frameworks can have impact on the export 
markets.  Moreover, there are few if any studies that have been undertaken to establish the 
factors  which hinder the SMEs (who are participating in  the horticulture production)  from 
direct  participation  in  the  export  markets.  The  issues  of  whether  policies  and  regulatory 
frameworks could be among factors that inhibit the participation of SMEs in the export markets 
of horticulture products remain uncovered.  
Given  the  importance  of  policies  and  regulatory  frameworks  in  the  implementation  of 
programmes in the country, it is thus critical to analyze the existing policy and institutional 
frameworks to establish their adequacy in terms of addressing the challenges of horticulture 
industry in the country. In consideration of the fact that most of the agricultural related policies 
and strategies were formulated some years back even before the horticulture exports gained 
momentum (in the late 1989s), the chances that some of the important policies governing the 
horticulture sub-sector have been overlooked are high, thus placing the need for this study.  
Another aspect that this study has focused on is what role the local government is playing to 
promote the SMEs participation, since most of the studies undertaken have not focused on the 
extent to which the local government plays its role in promoting and supporting the SMEs in 
the horticulture export markets. The exception of horticulture sub-sector with crops such as 
cashew, cotton, tobacco, coffee etc, is that the horticulture sub-sector does not have any crop 
board. This study therefore seeks to explore gaps that are likely to impact on the export market 
of the horticulture products. 
1.5  Significance of the Sector 
Horticulture products are very important as they are the source of improving the quality of diet 
and  human  nutrition and  income to the  enterprises in the agricultural sector. Horticultural 
growth  in Tanzania is recorded to be 8-10%  per annum (Mkindi, 2009). The  industry has 
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Raster
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET And generating thumbnail for Raster Image is an easy work. How to Create Thumbnail for Raster in C#.
pdf thumbnail viewer; print pdf thumbnails
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
XDoc.PDF SDK allows users to perform PDF document security settings in In addition, you can easily create, modify, and delete PDF annotations PDF Thumbnail Edit.
create thumbnail from pdf; create thumbnail jpeg from pdf
15 
recently been recognized as an engine for economic growth and significant contributor in the 
national poverty alleviation strategy.  
Promoting horticultural exports can greatly benefit the country in the following ways. Firstly, 
horticulture can be an important source of more diversified and higher value non-traditional 
exports. In contrast to the declining prices of traditional agricultural commodities, prospects 
for horticultural products are very promising. International  demand has  been rapidly  rising 
since the mid-1990s. Secondly, horticultural production creates employment opportunities for 
the rural poor, notably women, and has significant impacts on poverty reduction. Studies also 
show that households who participate in horticultural production, in both rural and urban areas, 
earn higher incomes than households who do not. Thirdly, horticultural exports can enable the 
country  to  acquire  new  knowledge  and  technology  in  producing  and  marketing  high-end 
products.  The  perishable  nature  of  the  horticultural  products  and  high  Sanitary  and 
Phytosanitary  standards  (SPS)  require  technical  know-how  and  quality  control.  The 
horticulture  industry  is  characterized  by  rapid  structural  change,  requiring  upgrading  by 
producing countries. Increasingly, distribution is dominated by large supermarket chains with 
quality standards (UNCTAD XII). 
The  horticultural  industry  in  Tanzania  is  among  the  most  important  subsectors  to  the 
agricultural economy that needs serious attention to enable the industry move forward. At the 
moment, the industry earns the country about US $ 380 million; which is equivalent to 40% of 
the total export economy of the agricultural sector and abou
t 9 % of the country’s total export 
value (TAHA, 2012)
2
. The industry is growing at the rate of about 9% % per year, being among 
the fastest growing sectors of the economy. With these registered achievements, horticulture 
industry  provides  an  ideal  position  in  providing  opportunities  to  small  holder  farmers  to 
increase  their  earnings per annum that  would in  return help alleviate  poverty and  achieve 
development goals set by the government. 
Tanzania’s contribution in the global production of fresh vegetables 
shows that between 1990 
and 2008, annual average growth rate of production was 0.14%. Production of fresh vegetables 
was highest in 1990 at 1 million tonnes, but it tapered off two years later to 800,000 tonnes. 
Between  1994  and  2001,  production  showed  an  increasing  but  fluctuating  trend  (FAO 
Website).  
According to FAO statistics (see Tables 1.1 and 1.2), 
Tanzania’s position among world top 
producers of fresh vegetables improved from No 20 in 2003 to No 18 in 2007. The potential 
for increasing production of non-traditional  horticulture  products in Tanzania  is  enormous 
(URT, 2002, ESRF, 2010). However, the country lags behind in exporting the same in the 
world market.  
1.6  Layout of the Report 
After the introduction, chapter two reviews related literature on the horticulture sector. This 
chapter critically reviews the literature on horticulture sector and draws best practices from 
2 Position Paper: Key Policy Issues Affecting Tanzania’s Horticultural Industry (DRAFT) January 
Create Thumbnail in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
guides for AJAX Zero-Footprint Document Viewer You Wish; Annotate & Redact Documents or Images; Create Thumbnail; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode & Decode
pdf thumbnail html; pdf no thumbnail
How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET. With XImage.Raster SDK library, you can create an image viewer and
pdf files thumbnail preview; show pdf thumbnails
16 
other countries. Chapter  three covers  the  methodology  which was  used  in  this  study.  The 
methodology focuses on the study area and scope, type of data and data sources, sample size, 
sampling methods, data collection methods and analytical  framework. Chapter four details 
discussion  of  the  study  findings  which  covers  the  performance  of  horticulture  exports  in 
Tanzania, assessment of policy frameworks and strategies supporting horticulture, assessment 
of institutional frameworks supporting horticulture, determinants of horticulture exports and 
performance and prospects of the business enterprises (SMEs). Chapter five concludes and 
provides main policy recommendations. 
2.0 Lessons from Related Literature 
2.1  Introduction 
World trade in horticultural products has been growing steadily. The sector has become the 
single  largest  category  in  agricultural  trade,  accounting  for  more  than  20  %  of  world 
agricultural exports.  In line  with  this overall  trend, horticultural  exports from  sub-Saharan 
Africa have also increased and now exceed US$2 billion. The horticultural exports from sub-
Saharan Africa represent only 4 % of world exports, which suggests that there is scope for the 
countries in the region to expand their exports of flowers, fruits and vegetables (UNCTAD field 
case studies show success stories in Uganda, Ethiopia, and Senegal for horticulture trade, 
July 2012). 
This chapter presents lessons learnt from the literature of countries including Ethiopia, Kenya, 
Rwanda,  Tanzania  and  China  in  respect  of  (i)  the  status/performance  of  the  export  of 
horticulture products; (ii) National policy frameworks and strategies supporting the sector; (iii) 
Institutional  networks  supporting  the  sector;  (iv)  Determinants  of  export  of  horticulture 
products and (v) Performance and prospects of the business enterprises (SMEs) in terms of its 
contribution to export growth of the horticulture. 
2.2  An  overview  of  the  status  and/or  performance  of  the  export  of  horticulture 
products 
2.2.1  Ethiopia 
Within the span of less than a decade, Ethiopia emerged as a global player in the cut flowers 
business.  Production  conditions  in  Ethiopia  favour  the  cultivation  of  a  wide  variety  of 
horticultural  products.  Given  the  diverse  range  of  altitudes  in  combination  with irrigation 
potential in different parts of the country it is possible to produce virtually all tropical, sub-
tropical and temperate horticultural crops. During the past decade the floriculture sector in 
Ethiopia has developed considerably and Ethiopia is now the second largest exporter of cut 
flowers in Africa after Kenya. In terms of employment, technology transfer and generation of 
export revenue, the  floriculture sector 
has  significantly contributed to Ethiopia’s economic 
development. For formerly unemployed Ethiopians who have jobs because of the country’s 
burgeoning rose industry, they consider a rose is a rose and also a means for a better life 
(EHDA and EHPEA, 2011)
17 
The export value of cut flowers and cuttings from Ethiopia has shown a steady rise up to more 
than USD 200 million in 2009 (EHDA and EHPEA, 2011).With a good mix of incentives and 
active facilitation, the Government of Ethiopia took a non-existing flower sector and developed 
it into millions of dollars from the export sector with more than 85,000 jobs created. The sector 
is very high on the priority of the Government of Ethiopia, and so the suitable land for investors 
has been  prepared, creating a better business operating environment, as well as facilitating 
adequate cold chain and logistics investments to ensure produce reaches regional and global 
markets in an efficient manner. 
Based on existing market positions in international trade statistics, three specific regions were 
selected as target markets for further development: European Union, Middle East and Regional 
Markets  in  East  Africa  (EHDA  and  EHPEA,  2011).  In  terms  of  total  value  of  Ethiopian 
vegetable exports, the European market has gained a third position after the regional African 
markets and the Middle East. Existing Ethiopian producer/exporters are all well linked to the 
European  importers,  either  through  strategic  alliances  or  based  on  ownership  structure  of 
vertically integrated companies that control the value chain from primary production to the 
supply to retailers. European importers look at new sources like Ethiopia through the lens of 
global sourcing  programs:  they want to serve customers with  year-round programs  against 
competitive prices  with  outstanding  quality.  This  provides new  sources  like  Ethiopia with 
opportunities  in  terms  of  supply  windows  (advantageous  seasonality)  or  price/quality 
competitiveness.  
2.2.2  Rwanda 
Rwanda’s climate and topography are very suited to production of a r
ange of fruits, vegetables 
and flowers. A broad band of cool and humid terrain in the west is suited to European-style 
fruits and vegetables, including beans, peas, cauliflower, mushrooms, citrus and strawberries. 
The warm and humid central-south is ideal for tropical fruits such as banana, passion fruit and 
pineapple.  The  warm  and  dry  north-east  is  suited  to  groundnut,  sunflower  and  pulses.  In 
summary,  Rwanda enjoys the same agro-climatic advantages for horticulture as other East 
African countries  with some additional natural niche advantages due to the diversity of its 
topography (Booth et al, 2012). 
The Government of Rwanda has identified horticulture as a “jobs
-
intensive” and “investment
-
attracting” sector. An estimated 1.5 million are employed in hortic
ultural production, handling 
and marketing in Rwanda. According to (UNCTAD XII Publication), Rwanda produced some 
4,633 tons and earned the country over Frw 775 million in 2007. This performance more than 
doubled the following year when 13,723 tons were produced fetching receipts of Frw 3.159 
billion (Plunnkett, 2008). The performance of horticulture sector has significantly improved 
over  the past years. One of the main  impetuses behind  Rwanda’s  interest in  exporting cut 
flowers is the example of nearby Kenya, which in the past 15 years has become a leading 
supplier of cut flowers to the European market (Plunnkett, 2008). Unlike the case of major 
staples, yields for fruit horticulture in 2009 were already within the regional band 
between 
Kenya and Ethiopia at the top end and Uganda and Tanzania at the bottom. This was before 
much investment had taken place in improved planting materials or methods. The government 
18 
considers  this as indicative  of an extraordinary potential for growth.  Rwandan horticulture 
seems  well  placed  to  benefit  from  the  current  revival  in  global  demand  for  horticultural 
products (from China, India and the Gulf more than from Europe) as well as in sub-regional 
markets (Congo) and domestically. (Booth et al, 2012). 
Most  Rwandan  horticultural  exports  go  to  small  retail  shops  in  Europe
targeting  African 
population resident there, not to  the chain  supermarkets requiring  the Global GAP  standards. 
(Plunnkett, 2008).
The government hopes to lure investors into the sector and it equally sought 
to  allay investment fears regarding issues of quality  and standardization. Last year (2011), 
Rwanda had only three products that merited quality standards but this year the products have 
increased to 40. That is a sign of good progress and will continue to ensure that more products 
meet the required standards (UNCTAD XII Publication).  
The government has supplied some of the infrastructural conditions for Rwanda to become a 
global  player  in  horticulture,  and  has  generally  played  an  active  facilitating  role.  It  has 
constructed a cold storage facility at Kigali airport and a flower park is under construction.
(Booth et al 2012) notes serious problems hitting the sector which among others are small size, 
scattered land dedicated for production and lack of high yielding varieties. Other problems 
include inadequate post-harvest infrastructure and facilities such as pack houses, cold rooms, 
cold trucks, just to name but a few. This is coupled with high transport costs (freight cost and 
road transport) and high 
costs for packaging materials as there’s no local manufacturer.  
Currently, however, commercial horticulture in Rwanda is constrained by series of problems 
of market coordination. For the time being, assured production volumes are low. There is a 
good  deal  of  work  to  be done  with  groups  of  small-scale producers  and  their cooperative 
structures to establish the right expectations and incentives for producing at high volumes with 
the necessary quality standards. Rwanda has already experienced a temporary ban on exports 
to the EU because of a failure to comply with sanitary and phyto-sanitary standards. Getting 
the industry started on the cultivation side is transaction-intensive, and both the technical and 
the commercial learning costs are high. Until this is resolved, storage and transport facilities 
will be under-utilised, resulting in unit costs which cannot beat the competition (Booth et al, 
2012). 
The tentative solutions include mapping land and marshlands for horticultural production and 
providing farmers high yield seeds. Already around 15 hectares have been identified for East 
African growers to grow avocados whose international demand is very high. As for seeds, 
Rwanda agricultural board is helping to produce several resistant breeds but some imports are 
also being made from Kenya and Uganda especially for avocados and mangoes. Under the six-
year (2012 
2017) action plan for the sector, the government plans to construct a modern pack 
house with a capacity of 20,000 tones per day in Kigali at a cost of $500,000. It also plans to 
construct 30 collection centres at a cost of $1 million, and purchase post-harvest equipment, a 
move that is expected to reduce post-harvest losses from 40 % to about 10 % and improve the 
quality of export produce. "Currently Rwanda has inadequate post-harvest infrastructure and 
facilities. Four cold trucks will be put in place in partnership with the private sector on a 50-50 
cost sharing arrangement. The sector is plotting to resort to high yielding varieties of fruits to 
19 
produce at least 147,551 tons by 2012 and increase this to  188,317 tons by 2017, this however 
will require some US$ 1.4 million dollars. The country has estimated the needs to increase 
vegetable production and it will require some 10,000 hectares and mobilize farmers to increase 
area under production (e.g. marshlands, irrigated land and greenhouses). Between 2012 and 
2017 the horticulture sector will  actually require over  US$ 28  million, a hefty but worthy 
budget, looking at the potential it holds in the long run. Yet, the whole sector is actually looking 
at implementing at least 1,500 projects in 2012 alone and 2,500 projects by 2017. This will 
require  establishing  a  Horticulture  Investment  Fund  worth  US$  15  million.  Exporters  are 
looking  forward  to  development  of  the  cargo  sector.  The  structural  challenges  such  as 
maintaining supply as well as organizational will be addressed by exporters through organizing 
themselves in to a strong cooperative which would give them the ability to export in volumes 
and being able to hire cargo planes easily. Aside from the demands by exporters to avail cargo 
services, prominent airlines have expressed their wish to invest in cargo services as the market 
continually grows. 
“Risk and cost
-sharing for airfreight is in consideration where government 
pays  the  difference of freight  prices in  comparison  with  the  tariffs  of  Kenya  and  Uganda 
(UNCTAD XII Publication).  
Rwanda  has  started  on  the  process  of  international  certification  by  Global  G.A.P  (a  key 
reference for Good Agricultural Practice (G.A.P.) in the global market) with 29 co-operatives 
(involved in horticulture) but the target is to have at least 50 co-operatives certified by 2017 to 
help  the  exporters  to  penetrate  international  markets.  Through  an  array  of  interventions 
including agricultural extension agents, land consolidation and tax incentives for value addition 
are expected to encourage participation (UNCTAD XII Publication). 
2.2.3  Kenya 
Horticulture is among the leading contributors to the Agricultural GDP at 33% and continues 
to  grow at  between 15  and 20% per year. The horticultural industry is  among  the leading 
foreign exchange earners and contributes enormously to food security and household incomes 
to  a  majority of Kenyan  producers  who carry out  one form of  horticultural  production or 
another.  Of  the  total  horticultural  production  about  96%  is  consumed  locally,  while  the 
remaining 4% is exported; yet in terms of incomes, the export segment earns the country huge 
amounts of foreign exchange (National Horticulture Policy, 2010). 
The total horticultural production is close to 3 million tones making Kenya one of the major 
producers and exporters of horticultural products in the world. Europe is the main market for 
Kenyan fresh horticultural produce with the main importing countries being United Kingdom, 
Germany, France, Switzerland, Belgium, Holland and Italy. Other importing countries include 
Saudi Arabia and South Africa (EPZA, 2005).  
Over the last several years Kenya has steadily increased her production and share of the world 
market for fresh fruits, vegetables and cut flowers. The industry has had remarkable growth, 
with exports climbing steadily from 200.6 thousand tons in 1999 to 346.1 thousand tons in 
2003 (EPZA, 2005). The sub-sector contributes more than 10% of total agricultural production 
and employs approximately 4.5 million people countrywide directly in production, processing 
20 
and marketing while 3.5 million people benefit indirectly through trade and other activities. 
The sub-sector contributes positively to wealth creation, poverty alleviation and gender equity 
especially in the rural areas. It contributes to the Kenyan economy through income generation, 
creation  of  employment  opportunities  for  rural  people  and  foreign  exchange  earnings,  in 
addition to providing raw materials to the agro-processing industry (HCDA, 2009). 
It is stated in the National Horticulture Policy that Kenya is strategically placed to serve as the 
hub of air traffic for Eastern and Central Africa. The country has a relatively well developed 
air transport industry with three international  airports,  four domestic airports and over 400 
aerodromes and airstrips. The horticultural industry can greatly benefit from the available and 
increasing advancement in air transport facilities in the country and the region by transporting 
high value of horticultural produce to local and regional markets. 
The Horticultural Crops Development Authority (HCDA, 2009) further narrates that, a well-
developed and dynamic private sector has profitably marketed a wide range of horticultural 
products to diverse international markets. Government intervention in this area has been mainly 
facilitating  the  sectoral growth through infrastructure development, incentives  and  support 
services. Structural and macroeconomic reforms, plus the introduction of more liberal trading 
environment has  also provided  a major  boost  to  the  country’s horticultural  prospects
The 
Horticultural Crops Development  Authority  is a  parastatal  established  by the  Government 
under the Agricultural Act 1967 with the aim of developing and regulating the horticultural 
industry. The organization does this through the provision of technical and marketing services 
to farmers and other stakeholders in the horticulture industry.  
The horticultural industry earned the country Kenya shillings 71.6 billion in 2009 from exports 
and an estimated KES 153 billion from the domestic market. Despite the success, still agro 
processing, packaging and quality standards in the domestic market are not fully developed. 
There is need to invest in better production methods, post-harvest care and quality to improve 
consumer acceptance of produce in the local market. There are still several factors hindering 
the potential of the industry. These include multiple taxation regimes, low incentives in terms 
of local market prices, high costs of inputs, water, energy, and air freight, and a generally 
unregulated  environment leading to produce poaching and lack of quality control for local 
produce (National Horticulture Policy, 2010). 
The justification for the provision of the National Horticulture Policy (2010) in Kenya follows 
the increasing emergence of serious challenges both locally and internationally and it has been 
developed to provide sustainability and further spur growth in the industry. The policy also 
aims  at  addressing  challenges  due  to  inadequate  and  inappropriateness  of  the  extension 
services,  collapse  of  extension  institutions  and  low  budgetary  allocations;  limited  use  of 
modern science and technology in production; inadequate quality control systems, a multiple 
number of taxes at both national and local level in the form of cess without correspondingly 
providing the requisite services. Such taxes have contributed to a reduction of the net farm 
incomes  and  created distortions  in  marketing  structures  without necessarily  improving the 
revenue for local authorities; low availability of capital and limited access to affordable credit 
to  finance  purchase  of  inputs  and  capital  investment;  Inadequate  market  and  marketing 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested