asp.net pdf viewer disable save : Thumbnail pdf preview control software system azure winforms asp.net console Online_Statistics_Education33-part43

Degrees of Freedom
by David M. Lane
Prerequisites
Chapter 3: Measures of Variability
Chapter 10: Introduction to Estimation
Learning Objectives
1. Define degrees of freedom
2. Estimate the variance from a sample of 1 if the population mean is known
3. State why deviations from the sample mean are not independent
4. State the general formula for degrees of freedom in terms of the number of 
values and the number of estimated parameters
5. Calculate s
2
Some estimates are based on more information than others. For example, an 
estimate of the variance based on a sample size of 100 is based on more 
information than an estimate of the variance based on a sample size of 5. The 
degrees of freedom (df) of an estimate is the number of independent pieces of 
information on which the estimate is based.
As an example, let's say that we know that the mean height of Martians is 6 
and wish to estimate the variance of their heights. We randomly sample one 
Martian and find that its height is 8. Recall that the variance is defined as the mean 
squared deviation of the values from their population mean. We can compute the 
squared deviation of our value of 8 from the population mean of 6 to find a single 
squared deviation from the mean. This single squared deviation from the mean 
(8-6)
2
= 4 is an estimate of the mean squared deviation for all Martians. Therefore, 
based on this sample of one, we would estimate that the population variance is 4. 
This estimate is based on a single piece of information and therefore has 1 df. If we 
sampled another Martian and obtained a height of 5, then we could compute a 
second estimate of the variance,  (5-6)
2
= 1. We could then average our two 
estimates (4 and 1) to obtain an estimate of 2.5. Since this estimate is based on two 
independent pieces of information, it has two degrees of freedom. The two 
estimates are independent because they are based on two independently and 
randomly selected Martians. The estimates would not be independent if after 
sampling one Martian, we decided to choose its brother as our second Martian.
331
Thumbnail pdf preview - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
how to make a thumbnail of a pdf; pdf thumbnail creator
Thumbnail pdf preview - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
pdf thumbnail html; no pdf thumbnails in
As you are probably thinking, it is pretty rare that we know the population 
mean when we are estimating the variance. Instead, we have to first estimate the 
population mean (μ) with the sample mean (M). The process of estimating the 
mean affects our degrees of freedom as shown below.
Returning to our problem of estimating the variance in Martian heights, let's 
assume we do not know the population mean and therefore we have to estimate it 
from the sample. We have sampled two Martians and found that their heights are 8 
and 5. Therefore M, our estimate of the population mean, is
M = (8+5)/2 = 6.5.
We can now compute two estimates of variance:
Estimate 1 = (8-6.5)2 = 2.25
Estimate 2 = (5-6.5)2 = 2.25
Now for the key question: Are these two estimates independent? The answer is no 
because each height contributed to the calculation of M. Since the first Martian's 
height of 8 influenced M, it also influenced Estimate 2. If the first height had been, 
for example, 10, then M would have been 7.5 and Estimate 2 would have been 
(5-7.5)
2
= 6.25 instead of 2.25. The important point is that the two estimates are not 
independent and therefore we do not have two degrees of freedom. Another way to 
think about the non-independence is to consider that if you knew the mean and one 
of the scores, you would know the other score. For example, if one score is 5 and 
the mean is 6.5, you can compute that the total of the two scores is 13 and therefore 
that the other score must be 13-5 = 8.
In general, the degrees of freedom for an estimate is equal to the number of 
values minus the number of parameters estimated en route to the estimate in 
question. In the Martians example, there are two values (8 and 5) and we had to 
estimate one parameter (μ) on the way to estimating the parameter of interest (σ
2
). 
Therefore, the estimate of variance has 2 - 1 = 1 degree of freedom. If we had 
sampled 12 Martians, then our estimate of variance would have had 11 degrees of 
freedom. Therefore, the degrees of freedom of an estimate of variance is equal to N 
- 1 where N is the number of observations.
Recall from the section on variability that the formula for estimating the 
variance in a sample is:
332
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
With the SDK, you can preview the document content according to the preview thumbnail by the ways as following. C# DLLs for Word File Preview. Add references:
enable thumbnail preview for pdf files; pdf thumbnail generator
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
With the SDK, you can preview the document content according to the preview thumbnail by the ways as following. C# DLLs: Preview PowerPoint Document.
pdf first page thumbnail; disable pdf thumbnails
 
=
(   )
 
1
The denominator of this formula is the degrees of freedom.
333
How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET. To Preview Images in WinForm Application.
pdf thumbnail viewer; pdf files thumbnail preview
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
document in memory. With the SDK, you can preview the document content according to the preview thumbnail by the ways as following.
how to create a thumbnail of a pdf document; thumbnail view in for pdf files
Characteristics of Estimators
by David M. Lane
Prerequisites
Chapter 3: Measures of Central Tendency 
Chapter 3: Variability 
Chapter 9: Introduction to Sampling Distributions 
Chapter 9: Sampling Distribution of the Mean
Chapter 10: Introduction to Estimation 
Chapter 10: Degrees of Freedom
Learning Objectives
1. Define bias
2. Define sampling variability
3. Define expected value
4. Define relative efficiency
This section discusses two important characteristics of statistics used as point 
estimates of parameters: bias and sampling variability. Bias refers to whether an 
estimator tends to either over or underestimate the parameter. Sampling variability 
refers to how much the estimate varies from sample to sample.
Have you ever noticed that some bathroom scales give you very different 
weights each time you weigh yourself? With this in mind, let's compare two scales. 
Scale 1 is a very high-tech digital scale and gives essentially the same weight each 
time you weigh yourself; it varies by at most 0.02 pounds from weighing to 
weighing. Although this scale has the potential to be very accurate, it is calibrated 
incorrectly and, on average, overstates your weight by one pound. Scale 2 is a 
cheap scale and gives very different results from weighing to weighing. However, 
it is just as likely to underestimate as overestimate your weight. Sometimes it 
vastly overestimates it and sometimes it vastly underestimates it. However, the 
average of a large number of measurements would be your actual weight. Scale 1 
is biased since, on average, its measurements are one pound higher than your 
actual weight. Scale 2, by contrast, gives unbiased estimates of your weight. 
However, Scale 2 is highly variable and its measurements are often very far from 
334
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Word
Preview Document. Conversion. Convert Word to PDF. Convert Word Convert Word to ODT. Convert PDF to Word. Text Search. Insert Image. Thumbnail Create. Thumbnail Create
pdf thumbnail generator online; view pdf image thumbnail
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for PowerPoint
Preview Document. Conversion. Convert PowerPoint to PDF. Convert PowerPoint to Pages. Annotate PowerPoint. Text Search. Insert Image. Thumbnail Create.
view pdf thumbnails; enable pdf thumbnails in
your true weight. Scale 1, in spite of being biased, is fairly accurate. Its 
measurements are never more than 1.02 pounds from your actual weight.
We now turn to more formal definitions of variability and precision. 
However, the basic ideas are the same as in the bathroom scale example.
Bias
A statistic is biased if the long-term average value of the statistic is not the 
parameter it is estimating. More formally, a statistic is biased if the mean of the 
sampling distribution of the statistic is not equal to the parameter. The mean of the 
sampling distribution of a statistic is sometimes referred to as the expected value of 
the statistic.
As we saw in the section on the sampling distribution of the mean, the mean 
of the sampling distribution of the (sample) mean is the population mean (μ). 
Therefore the sample mean is an unbiased estimate of μ. Any given sample mean 
may underestimate or overestimate μ, but there is no systematic tendency for 
sample means to either under or overestimate μ.
In the section on variability, we saw that the formula for the variance in a 
population is 
 
=
(     )
 
whereas the formula to estimate the variance from a sample is
 
=
(   )
 
1
Notice that the denominators of the formulas are different: N for the population 
and N-1 for the sample. If N is used in the formula for s
2
, then the estimates tend to 
be too low and therefore biased. The formula with N-1 in the denominator gives an 
unbiased estimate of the population variance. Note that N-1 is the degrees of 
freedom.
Sampling Variability
The sampling variability of a statistic refers to how much the statistic varies from 
sample to sample and is usually measured by its standard error ; the smaller the 
standard error, the less the sampling variability. For example, the standard error of 
335
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Excel
Preview Document. Conversion. Convert Excel to PDF. Convert Excel to Insert Image. Thumbnail Create. Thumbnail Create. |. Home ›› XDoc.Excel ›› C# Excel
show pdf thumbnails in; generate pdf thumbnail c#
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.PowerPoint
document (ODP). Empower to navigate PowerPoint document content quickly via thumbnail. Able to you want. Create Thumbnail. See this
.pdf printing in thumbnail size; show pdf thumbnail in
the mean is a measure of the sampling variability of the mean. Recall that the 
formula for the standard error of the mean is
ߪ
=
ߪ
ܰ
The larger the sample size (N), the smaller the standard error of the mean and 
therefore the lower the sampling variability.
Statistics differ in their sampling variability even with the same sample size. 
For example, for normal distributions, the standard error of the median is larger 
than the standard error of the mean. The smaller the standard error of a statistic, the 
more efficient the statistic. The relative efficiency of two statistics is typically 
defined as the ratio of their standard errors. However, it is sometimes defined as the 
ratio of their squared standard errors.
336
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.Word
Tell C# users how to: create a new Word file and load Word from pdf; merge, append, and split Word files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy Create Thumbnail.
create pdf thumbnails; how to view pdf thumbnails in
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.Excel
Empower to navigate Excel document content quickly via thumbnail. Able to support text search in Excel document, as well as text extraction. Create Thumbnail.
pdf thumbnail; show pdf thumbnail in html
Confidence Intervals
by David M. Lane
A.Introduction
B.Confidence Interval for the Mean
C.t distribution
D.Confidence Interval for the Difference Between Means
E. Confidence Interval for Pearson's Correlation
F. Confidence Interval for a Proportion
These sections show how to compute confidence intervals for a variety of 
parameters.
337
Introduction to Confidence Intervals
by David M. Lane
Prerequisites
Chapter 5: Introduction to Probability
Chapter 10: Introduction to Estimation
Chapter 10: Characteristics of Estimators
Learning Objectives
1. Define confidence interval
2. State why a confidence interval is not the probability the interval contains the 
parameter
Say you were interested in the mean weight of 10-year-old girls living in the 
United States. Since it would have been impractical to weigh all the 10-year-old 
girls in the United States, you took a sample of 16 and found that the mean weight 
was 90 pounds. This sample mean of 90 is a point estimate of the population mean. 
A point estimate by itself is of limited usefulness because it does not reveal the 
uncertainty associated with the estimate; you do not have a good sense of how far 
this sample mean may be from the population mean. For example, can you be 
confident that the population mean is within 5 pounds of 90? You simply do not 
know.
Confidence intervals provide more information than point estimates. 
Confidence intervals for means are intervals constructed using a procedure 
(presented in the next section) that will contain the population mean a specified 
proportion of the time, typically either 95% or 99% of the time. These intervals are 
referred to as 95% and 99% confidence intervals respectively. An example of a 
95% confidence interval is shown below:
72.85 < µ < 107.15
There is good reason to believe that the population mean lies between these two 
bounds of 72.85 and 107.15 since 95% of the time confidence intervals contain the 
true mean.
If repeated samples were taken and the 95% confidence interval computed 
for each sample, 95% of the intervals would contain the population mean. 
Naturally, 5% of the intervals would not contain the population mean.
338
It is natural to interpret a 95% confidence interval as an interval with a 0.95 
probability of containing the population mean. However, the proper interpretation 
is not that simple. One problem is that the computation of a confidence interval 
does not take into account any other information you might have about the value of 
the population mean. For example, if numerous prior studies had all found sample 
means above 110, it would not make sense to conclude that there is a 0.95 
probability that the population mean is between 72.85 and 107.15. What about 
situations in which there is no prior information about the value of the population 
mean? Even here the interpretation is complex. The problem is that there can be 
more than one procedure that produces intervals that contain the population 
parameter 95% of the time. Which procedure produces the “true” 95% confidence 
interval? Although the various methods are equal from a purely mathematical point 
of view, the standard method of computing confidence intervals has two desirable 
properties: each interval is symmetric about the point estimate and each interval is 
contiguous. Recall from the introductory section in the chapter on probability that, 
for some purposes, probability is best thought of as subjective. It is reasonable, 
although not required by the laws of probability, that one adopt a subjective 
probability of 0.95 that a 95% confidence interval, as typically computed, contains 
the parameter in question.
Confidence intervals can be computed for various parameters, not just the 
mean. For example, later in this chapter you will see how to compute a confidence 
interval for ρ, the population value of Pearson's r, based on sample data.
339
t Distribution
by David M. Lane
Prerequisites
Chapter 7: Normal Distribution,
Chapter 7: Areas Under Normal Distributions
Chapter 10: Degrees of Freedom
Learning Objectives
1. State the difference between the shape of the t distribution and the normal 
distribution
2. State how the difference between the shape of the t distribution and normal 
distribution is affected by the degrees of freedom
3. Use a t table to find the value of t to use in a confidence interval
4. Use the t calculator to find the value of t to use in a confidence interval
In the introduction to normal distributions it was shown that 95% of the area of a 
normal distribution is within 1.96 standard deviations of the mean. Therefore, if 
you randomly sampled a value from a normal distribution with a mean of 100, the 
probability it would be within 1.96σ of 100 is 0.95. Similarly, if you sample N 
values from the population, the probability that the sample mean (M) will be 
within 1.96 σ
M
of 100 is 0.95.
Now consider the case in which you have a normal distribution but you do 
not know the standard deviation. You sample N values and compute the sample 
mean (M) and estimate the standard error of the mean (σ
M
) with s
M
. What is the 
probability that M will be within 1.96 s
M
of the population mean (μ)? This is a 
difficult problem because there are two ways in which M could be more than 1.96 
s
M
from μ: (1) M could, by chance, be either very high or very low and (2) s
M
could, by chance, be very low. Intuitively, it makes sense that the probability of 
being within 1.96 standard errors of the mean should be smaller than in the case 
when the standard deviation is known (and cannot be underestimated). But exactly 
how much smaller? Fortunately, the way to work out this type of problem was 
solved in the early 20th century by W. S. Gosset who determined the distribution of 
a mean divided by its estimate of the standard error. This distribution is called the 
Student's t distribution or sometimes just the t distribution. Gosset worked out the t 
340
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested