asp.net pdf viewer free : Html display pdf thumbnail SDK software service wpf windows winforms dnn PDFX-3_e_web1-part459

© 2004 bvdm, Ifra, Ugra
bvdm Informationen  •  Ifra Special Report 2.36  •  Ugra Bericht 122/4
11
3 PDF/X-3 production – a quick run-through
PostScript after PDF distilling
> as a first step, the “PDF-X_Distiller5.joboptions” preset-
ting file supplied together with the PDF/X-3 Inspector
must be copied into the “Settings” folder of Distiller 5.
> if spot colour gradations were used in XPress, then the
Distiller Assistant from Creo should be installed (down-
load free of charge under www.prinergy.com);
> in Distiller itself, before distilling the “PDF-X_Dis-
tiller5” setting is selected and the PostScript file con-
verted to PDF
Inspecting PDF
The produced PDF file should under all circumstances
be opened in Acrobat 5.05 and inspected in order to ensure
that its content and colour correrspond to expectations. To
do so, it is vital to deactivate “Use local fonts” in Acrobat
in order to to be able to recognise non-embedded fonts in
due time.
> with the “Geometry Editor Plug-In” from Creo (free-of-
charge download from www.prinergy.com) it is possi-
ble to check the settings for the page geometry (size
and position of net page – referred to in PDF as Trim-
Box – and bleed – referred to as BleedBox) and correct
as necessary;
> soft proofing can be done already on the display
screen by selecting the ICC output profile for the print-
ing process for which the PDF file was prepared in the
“Settings for proof printing". The most common ICC
output profiles for the most important printing
processes are supplied with the PDF/X-3 Inspector.
Converting to PDF/X-3
If the checking of the PDF in Acrobat is successful, the
PDF can be converted to PDF/X-3 by means of the PDF/X-
3 Inspector:
> Retrieve the menu item “PDF/X-3 Inspector (Freeware)"
> click “Save as PDF/X-3"
> select desired printing conditions
> as an option, additional checks can now be run that
are not defined in the PDF/X-3 standard itself. For ex-
ample, it can be set that only CMYK and spot colours
should be permitted, a mininum resolution can be de-
Setting PDF-X_Distiller5 joboption:
Main dialogue of the PDF/X-3 Inspector
A selection of the planned printing conditions as well as optional additional
checking settings
Html display pdf thumbnail - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
pdf reader thumbnails; enable pdf thumbnail preview
Html display pdf thumbnail - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
can't view pdf thumbnails; enable thumbnail preview for pdf files
bvdm Informationen  •  Ifra Special Report 2.36  •  Ugra Bericht 122/4
© 2004 bvdm, Ifra, Ugra
fined for images and a maximum number of colour
separations.
> click "Save"
> state where the PDF/X-3 file should be stored
Provided that the PDF/X-3 Inspector has not detected
any problems, the user receives confirmation that conver-
sion to PDF/X-3 was successful.
If one or several errors are detected, the system informs
the user that problems have been encountered.
In such a case, problems have been encountered with
the conversion to PDF/X-3. For more details, click
“Anzeigen…" (view).
By clicking “Anzeigen...” the user obtains a more exact
impression of where the problems lie (compare also the re-
marks in the following section). 
Proofing
The PDF/X-3 standard specifies that the only binding
proof is one that was produced from the PDF/X-3 file it-
self. For this purpose, the proofing system must be confi-
gured with exactly the same ICC output profile that was
used also for the printing conditions when storing as
PDF/X-3. If necessary, you can take a copy of the ICC out-
pout profile from the PDF/X-3 file itself by clicking on
“Extract ICC profile” in the PDF/X-3 Inspector dialogue
and storing the das ICC output profile in a suitable way. 
N.B.: It is important not to confuse the ICC profile for
12
3 PDF/X-3 production – a quick run-through
Stating destination for saving the PDF/X-3 file
The PDF file was successfully saved as a PDF/X-3 file.
Storing as PDF/X-3 unsuccessful
The check result of the PDF/X-3 Inspector indicates that, in this case, the
desired image resolution, though not required by the ISO standard, was not
reached.
VB.NET Image: Image and Doc Windows, Web & Mobile Viewers of
for users to do image displaying, thumbnail creation and are JPEG, PNG, BMP, GIF, TIFF, PDF, Word and and viewing are supported; Optimally display documents and
view pdf thumbnails; generate pdf thumbnails
How to C#: Create a Winforms Control
Tiff Edit. Image Thumbnail. Image Save. Advanced Save Options. Save Image. Image Viewer. You maybe interested: PDF in C#, C# convert PDF to HTML, C# convert PDF
create pdf thumbnail; pdf thumbnail html
© 2004 bvdm, Ifra, Ugra
13
Ifra Special Report 2.36
3 PDF/X-3 production – a quick run-through
the proofing system with the ICC profile for the printing
process that is to be simulated – two ICC profiles are al-
ways used for proofing. The proofer profile describes the
colour behaviour of the proofing system when a specific
paper as well as specific inks are used. The ICC profile for
the print to be simulated does the same, but for the corre-
sponding printing process. At the time of proofing, the
PDF is first converted via the ICC output profile for the
printing process to the colour space of the printing process
that is to be simulated and from there, by means of the
proofer profile, to the colour space of the proofing system.
Because in most cases the proofing system is able to repro-
duce more colours than the subsequent printing process, it
can in this way – as a type of illusionist – simulate the
printing process.
At the receiver end, a PDF/X-3 file should be proofed
in the same way in order to see the later printed result that
awaits the sender.
Processing
A number of workflow systems and production envi-
ronments are now available that are capable of working
completely with PDF. Even in cases where total support for
PDF/X-3 is not available it is usually also possible to pro-
duce successfully with PDF/X-3. The decisive factor is that
– whether it is single PDF pages or imposed PDF sheets
that are to be output – when separating use in-RIP separa-
tion in a modern PostScript RIP or PDF-RIP.
The same applies also if, for example, printing and
separating is to be done from Acrobat as PostScript – be
sue to set PostScript 3! In this case either the in-RIP sepa-
ration can be activated in the PostScript-RIP or plug-ins
such as Crackerjack from Lantana (www.lantanarips.com)
or MadeToPrint (www.callassoftware.com) can be used.
If the workflow does not fully support PDF, the PDF
data must be converted to EPS (once again, it is essential
to ensure that this is exported as PostScript 3) and subse-
quently imported into the concerned applications. Here
also, it is vital that the separation is done by means of in-
RIP separation.
VB.NET Image: Program for Creating Thumbnail from Documents and
thumbnail from multiple document and image formats, such as PDF, TIFF, GIF After creating thumbnail in VB.NET application, you are able to display an image
create pdf thumbnails; enable pdf thumbnail preview
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Full page navigation, zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; Convert PDF to Word (.docx); Convert PDF to HTML; Convert PDF to PDF Thumbnail
pdf thumbnails in; how to show pdf thumbnails in
4 The problems most frequently encountered when converting to PDF/X-3
14
4 The problems most frequently encountered 
when converting to PDF/X-3
bvdm Informationen  •  Ifra Special Report 2.36  •  Ugra Bericht 122/4
© 2004 bvdm, Ifra, Ugra
There are several problems that may repeatedly be en-
countered. Some can be overcome, but others require the
source document to be changed or PostScript produced
again.
4.1 Fonts not embedded
If, when the PostScript files were produced, it was for-
gotten to activate embedding of all fonts with the result
that Distiller cannot find the font concerned, it will also
not be embedded into the PDF. But embedding of the fonts
is essential for a safe production. In this case, the font
must be acquired or a different font used when producing
the source document. 
A similar problem can occur if fonts are used whose
embedding is prohibited by licensing laws. Both TrueType
and OpenType fonts may contain an element in the font it-
self that prevents embedding. As long as Type 1 fonts are
used, at least from the technical point of view, this prob-
lem will not be encountered. In principle it can be stated
that fonts which cannot be embedded are unsuitbale for
use in modern printing copy production. It is recommend-
ed to look for corresponding alternatives.
4.2 Page geometry
On an exposed film, provided that cutting marks are
present, the human eye can easily recognise how large the
net page should be. However, an imposition program or
output system does not have eyes, so that information
about the net page size and bleed must be available in dig-
ital form if PDF files are to be automatically positioned
and output. The most important specifications here are:
> TrimBox: position and size of the area for the trimmed
page or net page 
> BleedBox: TrimBox plus the area for bleed
> MediaBox: this is a type of virtual film role as “imag-
ined” area on which the actual page – defined by Trim-
Box and possibly BleedBox – is located. MediaBox
usually results from the page format that is set in the
Set Page or Print Dialogue of an application.
In many cases, PDF files that contain no information
in relation to TrimBox or BleedBox are produced from the
PostScript distilling. But this is stipulated for PDF/X-3.
With the Acrobat plug-in “Geometry Editor Plug-In”
(download free of charge under www.prinergy.com) it is
possible to subsequently incorporate the corresponding in-
formation.
4.3 Transparency
Transparency was introduced with PDF 1.4 (PDF/X-3
based on PDF 1.3). Not least because the output of PDF
documents with transparent objects has not yet been per-
fectly realised – especially where spot colours are involved
- it is essential that transparency for PDF/X-3 files should
be avoided.
4.4 RGB data 
Especially when PDF documents are produced from ap-
plications that are unsuitable for prepress production, e.g.
Microsoft Office, the page content is wholly or partially in
RGB, which is not permissible for PDF/X-3 and output in
CMYK process colours. With tools such as Quite A Box Of
Tricks (www.quite.com), Pitstop (www.enfocus.com) or
iQueue (www.gretagmacbeth.com), such documents can be
converted to CMYK in a controlled process.
4.5 No problem (anymore)
There are several properties that are not permissible in
PDF/X-3 files which the PDF/X-3 Inspector automatically
removes, or changes into permissible properties respective-
ly, that the user therefore need not worry about:
Automatically solved problems:
> LZW compressionis patented by Unisys belegt, which is
why ISO chose the equivalent ZIP compression. If
PDF/X-3 Inspector encounters LZW compression when
storing  as PDF/X-3,this will be converted to ZIP com-
pression automatically and without loss.
> Embedded PostScript (as PostScript XObjects and Post-
Script Operator) is extremely seldom and is removed by
PDF/X-3 Inspector.
> Transfer curvescan influence output in the RIP in an
unpredictable way and are removed automatically by
PDF/X-3 Inspector. In principle, it is preferable to have
XDoc.PowerPoint for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; Integrated annotation; More about Web Viewer ▶. PowerPoint Convert. Convert PowerPoint to PDF; Convert PowerPoint to
can't see pdf thumbnails; create thumbnail from pdf c#
XDoc.Excel for .NET, Comprehensive .NET Excel Imaging Features
zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; Integrated annotation; More about Web Viewer ▶. Excel Convert. Convert Excel to PDF; Convert Excel
pdf no thumbnail; generate thumbnail from pdf
© 2004 bvdm, Ifra, Ugra
15
4 The problems most frequently encountered when converting to PDF/X-3
bvdm Informationen  •  Ifra Special Report 2.36  •  Ugra Bericht 122/4
this done at the time of distilling by the Distiller and to
activate the application of transfer curves that may be
present.
> BX...EXensures the backwards compatibility with older
Acrobat versions - these may ignore everything posi-
tioned between BX and EX if they are unable to inter-
pret it. At present, BX....EX is used mainly with
Smooth Shades (resolution-independent, coded grada-
tions). PDF/X-3 Inspector removes these BX...EX-
Codes, Acrobat from version 4 as well as all modern
RIPs have no problem processing Smooth Shades.
> OPI comments:Because a PDF/X-3 file must be com-
plete in itself, the presence of OPI comments in a PDF-
X-3 file is not permissible. PDF/X-3 Inspector removes
all OPI comments that may be contained in a PDF file.
In principle, it is preferable to switch off the receiving
of OPI comments already at the distilling stage.
XDoc.Word for .NET, Advanced .NET Word Processing Features
& rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; Integrated annotation; More about Web Viewer ▶. Conversion. Word Create. Create Word from PDF; Create Word
program to create thumbnail from pdf; show pdf thumbnail in
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
this case, you can determine to display target document By clicking a thumbnail, you are redirect to a For documents like PDF, outline information is extracted
show pdf thumbnails in; how to create a thumbnail of a pdf document
6.1 What about ICC profiles in PDF/X-3?
ICC profiles have a special importance for PDF/X. On
the one hand, ICC profiles can be used in a PDF/X-3 file in
order to exactly colour-define an image or other object. It
is by no means obligatory to use ICC profiles in a PDF/X-3
file for images or other objects – indeed, it is absolutely
permissible to build a PDF/X-3 file exclusively with CMYK
and spot colours. On the other hand, an ICC output profile
is used in the so-called “OutputIntent" to indicate the
printing conditions for which a PDF/X-3 was created. 
It should be noted here ICC profiles for objects on a
PDF page always affect the result when displaying or out-
putting a PDF/X-3 file. As opposed to this, the ICC output
profile in the OutputIntent serves initially only for infor-
mation purposes – it tells the receiver of a PDF/X-3 file for
which printing process that file was created. Furthermore,
it should be used to correctly separate PDF/X-3 files that
use not only CMYK and spot colours but also ICC-based or
Lab-based colours.
Finally, it is specified that, for proof production, the
ICC output profile embedded as OutputIntent should be
used in combination with the ICC profile for the proofing
system. It is extremely important for practical application
that the ICC output profile is not used automatically in
OutputIntent, but only by corresponding defaults, or set-
tings in the processing routine of the receiver respectively.
Thus some proofing systems offer an option that automat-
ically recognises the ICC output profile in OutputIntent
and takes due account of it for the proof simulation. In the
same way, both Colorserver and iQueue from GretagMac-
beth automatically evaluate the OutputIntent and on its
basis convert a PDF/X-3 file to a PDF that only uses
CMYK and spot colours. Finally, there are PostScript-RIPs
that automatically use the ICC output profile embedded as
OutputIntent for the separation. But in all cases the user
must activate the corresponding functions. Especially with
PDF/X-3 files that only use CMYK and spot colours it is
possible to carry out the separation without having re-
course to the ICC output profile embedded as OutputIntent.
A precondition for this is, naturally, that the OutputIntent
suits the actual printing process – thus, for example, print-
ing gravure data by the newspaper printing process causes
considerable quality problems.
6.2 Which output profiles should I take for
OutputIntent?
OutputIntent is intended to indicate the printing con-
ditions for which the PDF/X-3 file to be transmitted was
prepared. Accordingly, the ICC output profile in the Out-
putIntent is also the determining factor (at both trans-
mitting and receiving ends) for the production of a bind-
6 Colour management and PDF/X-3
5 Additional checks in PDF/X-3 Inspector / 6 Colour management and PDF/X-3
16
5 Additional checks in PDF/X-3 Inspector
bvdm Informationen  •  Ifra Special Report 2.36  •  Ugra Bericht 122/4
© 2004 bvdm, Ifra, Ugra
Certain specifications, such as image resolution or number
of expected colour separations, cannot be uniformly stan-
dardised – the requirements in practice are too manifold to
establish uniform specifications for the entire printing in-
dustry. Despite this, such properties must be checked. In
order to save the user having to carry out a separate
checking step with one of the usual checking programs,
the following additional checking possibilities – not in-
cluded in the ISO PDF/X-3 standard – were integrated into
the PDF/X-3 Inspector:
> maximum number of colour separations: any number
can be entered – e.g. “4" if checking is done for CMYK
printing, or “2" if black must be produced with an ad-
ditional colour.
> minimum resolution for continuous tone images: for
each printing process there is usually a typically re-
quired minimum resolution for images. Whereas in
newspaper printing 150 dots/in suffice, high-quality
commercial printing demands 300 dots/in. At the same
time, in individual cases it can occur – e.g. screen
shots – that the resolution does not exceed 72 dots/in.
For this reason, it is recommended to preset the regular
resolution and lower the resolution as required in indi-
vidual cases, e.g. if a document contains screen shots.
> minimum resolution for line artwork: the same applies
as detailed in the above, but for line artwork (bitmaps).
If Copydot scans – i.e. films scanned as bitmaps – are
expected, the value should be set as high as the usual-
ly used exposure resolution in order to recognise unin-
tentionally down-calculated Copydot scans in time.
Create Thumbnail in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
and documents thumbnail creating in HTML Document Image Image Viewer Installation; View and Display Images; Customize RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode &
html display pdf thumbnail; how to view pdf thumbnails in
C# Raster - Image Process in C#.NET
PDF in VB.NET, VB.NET convert PDF to HTML, VB.NET VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel Modify current image properties and display it more smoothly
generate pdf thumbnail c#; thumbnail pdf preview
© 2004 bvdm, Ifra, Ugra
17
6 Farbmanagement und PDF/X-3
bvdm Informationen  •  Ifra Special Report 2.36  •  Ugra Bericht 122/4
ing colour proof. But which output profiles should ideal-
ly be used?
The impression could very quickly arise that every
printing operation should produce an ICC output profile
for its printing process with the most common types of pa-
per to present to the data providers. However, this starts to
get difficult if, at the time of preparing the printing copy,
it is not yet certain at which printing site the printing will
be done, or if several printing sites are supposed to pro-
duce the same object with the same content and colour. It
has become very clear in the last years that it makes more
sense overall from both the economical and technical
point of view for a printing site to align its processes with
the specifications of ISO 12647 and print in accordance
with this ISO standard. Detailed information is contained
in “Medienstandard Druck" published by bvdm, or the in-
formation published by Ifra on the “Newspaper Printing
Quality Initiative (QUIZ)”. In this case, it is fully sufficient
to use ICC output profiles that correspond to the ISO stan-
dard and that match the desired printing process, such as
are supplied with the PDF/X-3 inspector. In addition, this
saves complicated conversion processes while retaining the
possibility to carry out corresponding conversion processes
if, for example, it is desired at short notice to produce an
offset print object in a short printing run on a digital press.
6.3 Treatment of device-independent 
colour spaces in PDF/X-3 files at in-RIP
separation
There are two aspects here that require special atten-
tion:
> PDF/X files can either use device-dependent colours
(CMYK and spot colours) only, or device-independent
colours, such as ICC-based RGB (usually in addition as,
for example, black for text will always be coded as de-
vice-dependent black).
> the target colour space for printing defined by Out-
putIntent either matches the actual printing conditions,
or it does not.
(a)if the PDF/X-3 files use exclusively device-dependent
colours and the OutputIntent matches the actual print
colour space, the in-RIP separation will be correct on
every modern PostScript 3 RIP; no further steps be-
yond activating the in-RIP separation are necessary in
order to output content and colour correctly.
(b)if the PDF/X-3 file exclusively uses device-dependent
colours and the OutputIntent does not match the ac-
tual print colour space, the device-dependent colours
must be converted to the device-dependent colours
that correspond to the actual printing process. Con-
version can be done either during the in-RIP separa-
tion in the RIP, by setting the ICC profile in the Out-
putIntent as accepted source profile (”UseCIE" in
PostScript 3), and in addition by loading the ICC out-
put profile that characterises the actual printing
process as target profile (as Color Rendering Dictio-
nary, or CRD) into the RIP. Another possibility is to
use a so-called Colorserver, such as the GretagMac-
beth iQueue, and after conversion carry out the in-
RIP separation.
(c) if the PDF/X-3 file also uses device-independent
colours and the OutputIntent matches the actual print
colour space, then the ICC profile that characterises the
ICC profile must be loaded into the RIP as target profile
(as Color Rendering Dictionary, or CRD) and activated
before the in-RIP separation can be carried out.
(d)if the PDF/X-3 file also uses device-independent
colours and the OutputIntent does not match the actu-
al print colour space, then both the contained device-
dependent colours must be converted into the device-
independent colours of the actual colour space as well
as firstly the device-independent colours into the
colour space given in the OutputIntent and from there
into the colour space of the actual printing process.
The latter process in particular cannot usually be done
with today's PostScript 3 RIPs. Instead, it essential here
to use a Colorserver, e.g. the GretagMacbeht iQueue, in
order to be able to do the conversions in a suitable dif-
ferentiated way. Because a Colorserver can carry out
the conversion, in part in several stages, in a single
step, there is minimum risk of inaccuracies in the con-
version and corresponding colour faults, or tonal dif-
ferentiation respectively.
Items (a) to (d) clearly demonstrate that it is vital to use
exactly the ICC profile for the OutputIntent that charac-
terises the actual printing process. Whereas it is possible to
adapt to a different target colour space, this involves con-
siderably more work.
18
7 Use of PDF/X-3 files
bvdm Informationen  •  Ifra Special Report 2.36  •  Ugra Bericht 122/4
© 2004 bvdm, Ifra, Ugra
7 Use of PDF/X-3 files
7.1 How do I check PDF/X-3?
It is recommended always to check whether data that is
to be supplied or is received is genuinely in accordance
with the PDF/X-3 standard. For this purpose, the same
tools are used as in the above “How do I produce PDF/X-
3?"
7.2 How do I proof PDF/X-3?
Every PDF/X-3 file should be proofed before transmis-
sion as well as on reception. This is the only way to guar-
antee both content and colour correctness. In individual
cases, a proof that is produced at the transmitting end in a
preceding production step – e.g. from the layout or graph-
ic program – can deviate significantly from what is re-
quired and is not sufficient guarantee for the correctness
of content and colour of the PDF/X-3 file.
Because proofing systems produce in part very differ-
ent results – both in relation to content and colour – it is
worthwhile to check the proofing system intended for use
for its suitability for PDF/X-3. This can be done using the
“Altona Test Suite" of the European Color Initiative (ECI)
that can be downloaded free of charge as a set of three
PDF/X-3 files, together with detailed information on how
to use and evaluate the test pages, from the ECI web site
(www.eci.org).
7.3 How do I process PDF/X-3?
PDF/X-3 is a standard for unseparated printing copy.
Separation should be done exclusively via an in-RIP sepa-
ration in a modern PostScript 3 RIP (in the case of RIPs
based on Adobe technology from Revision 3015, or Harle-
quin-based RIPs from ScriptWorks 5.5). 
Older RIP software does not offer sufficient production
safety. It is strongly advised against so-called host-based
separating out of QuarkXPress, likewise out of many
newspaper systems – the processes used are not sufficient-
ly powerful to separate reliably in regular PostScript 3 or
PDF 1.3 set-ups – e.g. DeviceN (for duplex images or spe-
cial colour gradations) or “smooth shades" (gradations de-
fined independently of resolution). The PDF workflow sys-
tems of various manufacturers also work with in-RIP sepa-
ration, even though the user often does not notice this as
such. When using such workflow systems, however, care
should also be taken to ensure that sufficiently recent ver-
sions (see above) of the RIP software concerned are used.
7.4 How do I incorporate PDF/X-3 into my
working environment?
Many companies currently work with software that is
not optimally prepared for the latest PostScript and PDF
developments. The information stated in the above chapter
applies with regard to separating. In order to be able to in-
corporate PDF/X-3 files into programs, especially ones that
are not optimally prepared for PDF – including programs
in such widespread use as QuarkXPress that, even in its
current Version 5 uses an outdated PDF import filter –
PDF/X-3 frequently must be converted to PostScript or
EPS respectively. This can be done, for example, with
Adobe Acrobat. However, care must be taken to ensure
that the PDF/X-3 files is stored in the PostScript 3 format,
as otherwise reliable conversion cannot be guaranteed.
Storing a PDF/X-3 file (likewise any PDF 1.3 file) as Post-
Script Level 1 or PostScript Level 2 involves a high degree
of risk, as corruptions must frequently be expected when-
ever PDF 1.3 structures are translated into PostScript Level
1 or 2.
EPS files produced in this way can be imported into
nearly all regular programs. It should be borne in mind,
however, that in the later output host-based separations
from out of the programs do not produce the desired re-
sults – instead it is essential to use an in-RIP separation in
a modern PostScript RIP (see above).
7.5 Separating and integrating
7.5.1 I separate my complete pages out of 
QuarkXPress – can I integrate PDF/X-3 
files into my pages?
It is not possible to reliably separate pages from
XPress, where PDF/X-3 data – previously converted to
PostScript 3 EPS files – were imported into the Xpress doc-
ument. Nor is import via the PDF Import Filter an option,
as this is already unreliable as it is. The only sensible way
to produce reliable separations out of XPress is to use in-
RIP separation. This can be done from XPress by driving a
suitable PostScript 3 RIP with activated in-RIP separation.
Theoretically, the in-RIP separation can be activated also
via a XPress XTension of a third manufacturer from the
workplace computer.
7.5.2 I separate my complete pages out of Adobe 
InDesign – can I integrate PDF/X-3 files into
my pages?
Although the host-based separation integrated into In-
Design is much more powerful than those of other applica-
tions, a sufficient reliability does not exist here. Just as
with QuarkXPress, the in-RIP separation of a suitable RIP
should be used. It is beneficial here that, in InDesign, it is
possible to activate the in-RIP separation of a suitable
PostScript 3 RIP from out of Indesign.
7.5.3 I separate my complete pages out of Adobe 
Acrobat – can I integrate PDF/X-3 files into my
pages?
Whereas Acrobat, also in Version 5, offers no support
for the production of separations, other manufacturer soft-
ware extensions (plug-ins) provide the corresponding
functions. The most common of these are Crackerjack from
© 2004 bvdm, Ifra, Ugra
19
bvdm Informationen  •  Ifra Special Report 2.36  •  Ugra Bericht 122/4
Lantana (www.lantanarips.com), pdfOutput Pro and
MadeToPrint from callas software (www.callassoftware.com).
Not suited for separating PDF/X-3 files are pdfOutput
Pro as well as host-based separating in Crackerjack. In
contrast, driving in-RIP separation in Crackerjack, exactly
like the corresponding function in MadeToPrint, are also
suited for correctly separating PDF/X-3 files, but both pre-
suppose a suitable, modern PostScript 3-RIP. 
7.5.4 Are separations from different RIPs really al-
ways identical?
Sometimes different exposure results will be obtained
if different RIPs are used. This is usually due to special set-
tings in the RIP. Thus many RIPs offer a setting “Always
overprint black" or “Ignore overprint settings in the Post-
Script/PDF". Although these settings may be justified in
some production contexts, they should always be deacti-
vated in a PDF/X-3-conform workflow. As a general rule,
it should be ensured that the RIP is used in a mode that is
totally compatible with the PostScript 3 specification from
Adobe. If necessary, the manufacturer of the RIP must be
contacted in order to establish how the RIP should be set-
up to work in this mode.
7.5.5 How can I check in-RIPseparations without
having access to a RIP?
A constantly growing number of senders of digital
printing copy no longer has access to imaging systems.
This eliminates the common practice in the analogue film
sector of carrying out a final check before dispatching the
printing copy. In this way, it is often very easily possible to
see on the exposed separation films whether, for example,
elements were correctly imprinted or left blank. A possible
alternative, justifiable at least from the cost point of view,
would be to use PostScript laser printers that support an
in-RIP separation. At present the only known laser printers
with corresponding functionality are the Apple LaserWriter
8500, no longer manufactured, and Xante laser printers.
Using the Crackerjack plug-ins from Lantana or MadeTo-
Print from callas software, it is possible to realise an in-
RIP separation from PDF/X-3 documents out of Adobe Ac-
robat on these laser printers. For a visual check, it is most-
ly of no consequence that these laser printers cannot out-
put in the final resolution – the most important aspects,
such as imprinting, leaving blank or outputting an element
on the correct colour separation can be thus checked both
effectively and economically.
In addition, there are several RIPs capable of out-
putting in TIFF bitmaps and that include a viewer for these
bitmaps. With the aid of this functionality , it is possible –
also without connected imager – to evaluate the quality of
the separations. It is only important that, as for the later
exposure, a modern PostScript 3 RIP should be used.
7 Use of PDF/X-3 files / 8 How do I know whether my workflow is PDF/X-3-compatible?
8
How do I know whether my workflow is PDF/X-3-compatible?
Because in every workflow – whether at the print copy
originator or receiver end – there are many components
with countless configuration possibilities that interact to
obtain the desired result, it is often rather difficult to es-
tablish whether a workflow as a whole is PDF/X-3-com-
patible. Helpful for purposes of a corresponding evaluation
– as well as identification of possible weaknesses – is the
aforementioned ECI. “Altona Test Suite". If it proves possi-
ble to run especially pages 2 and 3 of this test suite
through the entire workflow without causing errors in the
output, then a workflow can be considered PDF/X-3-com-
patible.
20
Appendix A: The PDF/X variations
bvdm Informationen  •  Ifra Special Report 2.36  •  Ugra Bericht 122/4
© 2004 bvdm, Ifra, Ugra
Appendix A: the PDF/X variations / Appendix B: PDF/X Plus, Certified PDF
Other initiatives aimed at assuring the quality of PDF
printing copy have emerged in connection with standar-
dising PDF for print copy transmission. At present, PDF/X
Plus is more a concept than concrete guidelines. PDF/X
Plus is understood to be a combination of a PDF/X stan-
dard with additional specifications. Thus it is possible to
imagine, for example, specifying the exclusive use of
CMYK colours for printing copy supplied for the gravure
process and stipulating an image resolution of 300 dots/in.
However, for now the development of concrete, industry-
specific recommendations is still pending.
In contrast to standardisation in the strict sense as well
as industry-specific recommendations that could still come
about under the PDF/X Plus label, Certified PDF is a pro-
prietory technology that is not linked to a specific stan-
dard but intended instead to generally support the imple-
mentation of any desired specifications. Stephan Jaeggi
(www.prepress.ch) wrote in early 2002: 
“PDF/X and Certified PDF: In some countries (Belgium,
France, the Netherlands, Switzerland), industry associa-
tions (in Switzerland, only VSD) recommend using Certi-
fied PDF from Enfocus. This has caused some confusion, as
Certified PDF is not a quality standard such as PDF/X but
a proprietory method of defining rules (so-called profiles)
for producing and checking PDF files. This technique can
be used to define profiles for totally different applications
(Internet, archives, prepress). For this reason, the use of
Certified PDF does not guarantee perfect printing copy.
However, it is possible to define profiles that correspond to
the rules of the PDF/X standard. More exacting criteria
(e.g. minimum resolution) can also be defined for certain
print products. Therefore Certified PDF is a complement to
and not a competitor of PDF/X. The drawback of Certified
PDF is that it is essential for all parties concerned to use
the software components of Enfocus (PitStop plug-in 5.0,
PitStop server 2.0, InstantPDF 2.0)."
Appendix B: PDF/X Plus, Certified PDF
PDF/X- 1: 1999
(ANSI)
PDF/X-1: 2001
15930-1: 2001
PDF/X-1a: 2001
15930-1a: 2001
PDF/X-3: 2002
15930-3: 2002
PDF/X-2: 2003
(under prepara-
tion)
Basic PDF version
1.2
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.4
Embedded pixel images
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
Embedded fonts
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
OPI comments
No
No
No
No
Yes
Referenced PDF
No
No
No
No
Yes
2-Byte fonts
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
ICC colour spaces
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
ICC output profile
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Version
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested