asp.net pdf viewer free : Thumbnail view in for pdf files SDK software API .net wpf windows sharepoint pdfx_faq_english_nov050-part530

PDF/X Frequently Asked Questions (Nov 2005)
Copyright © Global Graphics Software Limited, 1999-2005. All Rights Reserved 
Page i 
PDF/X 
Frequently Asked Questions 
(Last updated Nov 2005)
Over the last few years many people have talked a lot about PDF/X, and the sources of information on the 
subject have multiplied significantly. Unfortunately it can still be rather difficult to obtain clear and complete 
answers to some of the questions that you might expect to be asked by print buyers, advertisers, publishers and 
print service providers. There is also a certain amount of misinformation being passed on, often based on things 
that may have been true in the past. In other cases a mistaken understanding of the perceived ‘dangers’ of some 
aspects of PDF/X lead people to reject it in favor of specifications and workflows that are far more risky and 
less reliable than PDF/X could provide. 
This document is therefore an attempt to ensure that accurate information is freely and widely available to all. 
Please note that this is not an official CGATS or ISO publication, it is developed and maintained by me, and 
sponsored by my employer, Global Graphics Software. Any recommendations are mine, although I have made 
every attempt to ensure that they align as well as possible as any single opinion can do with industry 
consensus. Any mistakes are also mine; comments and corrections are always welcome, as are suggestions for 
additional information that could usefully be included. More specifically, this cannot be treated as a formal 
interpretation of any aspects of the PDF/X standards. Both CGATS and ISO have procedures to request official 
clarifications and interpretations of their standards which should be followed if you have a need to do so. 
This text is copyright Global Graphics Software. If you’d like to reproduce it in whole or in part; on the web, in 
amagazine or elsewhere; whether in the original English or in translation; please contact me. Permission will 
usually be granted very quickly and easily for any use that will help to spread accurate information throughout 
the graphic arts industry. 
Thanks, and I hope this proves useful to you. 
Martin Bailey 
Senior Technical Consultant, Global Graphics 
Vice Chair, CGATS 
Chair, CGATS SC6/TF1 (PDF/X) 
Chair, ISO/TC130/WG2/TF2 (PDF/X) 
Thumbnail view in for pdf files - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
pdf no thumbnail; generate thumbnail from pdf
Thumbnail view in for pdf files - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
enable pdf thumbnails in; pdf thumbnail html
PDF/X Frequently Asked Questions (Oct 2005) 
Page ii 
Copyright © Global Graphics Software Limited, 1999-2005. All Rights Reserved. 
PDF/X Frequently Asked Questions.....................................................................................................................i
1.
Why do we need another format? Isn’t PDF enough?..............................................................................1
2.
What’s the aim?........................................................................................................................................1
3.
What can I do in PDF/X that I can’t do in PDF?......................................................................................1
4.
So when should PDF/X be used? .............................................................................................................2
5.
Why is PDF/X better than a job options file?...........................................................................................2
6.
Why is PDF/X better than pre-flighting? .................................................................................................3
7.
Why is PDF/X better than TIFF/IT?.........................................................................................................3
8.
Is PDF/X better than electronic delivery software?..................................................................................4
9.
Is there just one PDF/X?...........................................................................................................................4
10.
PDF/X-1a..................................................................................................................................................5
11.
PDF/X-3 ...................................................................................................................................................6
12.
PDF/X-2 ...................................................................................................................................................6
13.
Who’s accepting PDF/X-1a files?............................................................................................................7
14.
Who’s taking PDF/X-3?...........................................................................................................................7
15.
And who’s taking PDF/X-2?....................................................................................................................8
16.
What’s PDF/X Plus?.................................................................................................................................8
17.
Which PDF/X should I use?.....................................................................................................................8
18.
2003 revisions...........................................................................................................................................9
19.
Should I start using the 2003 revisions?.................................................................................................10
20.
Future plans............................................................................................................................................11
21.
Obsolete PDF/X standards .....................................................................................................................12
22.
Which characterized printing condition should I label files as using?...................................................12
23.
How do I get an ICC profile for use with PDF/X?.................................................................................14
24.
Isn’t PDF/X raster only? It’s just a wrapper for TIFF/IT isn’t it?..........................................................14
25.
Can PDF/X do duotones?.......................................................................................................................14
26.
Constructing pre-press workflows with PDF/X .....................................................................................14
27.
What tools should I use for creating and processing PDF/X?................................................................16
28.
Compatibility between validation tools..................................................................................................16
29.
How and when should I proof my files?.................................................................................................17
30.
How can I persuade my customers to send me PDF/X files?.................................................................18
31.
I’m an application developer – what should I develop for? ...................................................................18
32.
Who’s developing these standards?........................................................................................................19
33.
Why don’t  these standards come out faster?.........................................................................................19
34.
How can I get involved?.........................................................................................................................19
35.
Where can I get more information?........................................................................................................20
36.
What are PDF/A, PDF/E and PDF/UA?.................................................................................................20
37.
What do the PDF/X standards restrict? ..................................................................................................20
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
from other file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete using which VB.NET developers can redact, delete, view and save PDF Thumbnail Edit.
create thumbnail jpeg from pdf; pdf thumbnails
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.PowerPoint
Tell C# users how to: create a new PowerPoint file and load PowerPoint; merge, append, and split PowerPoint files; insert, delete, move, rotate Create Thumbnail.
create thumbnail from pdf c#; can't see pdf thumbnails
PDF/X Frequently Asked Questions (Oct 2005)
Copyright © Global Graphics Software Limited, 1999-2005. All Rights Reserved 
Page 1 
1.  Why do we need another format? Isn’t PDF enough? 
PDF/X is not an alternative to PDF, it’s a focused subset of PDF designed specifically for reliable prepress data 
interchange. 
It’s an application standard, as well as a file format standard. In other words, it defines how applications 
creating and reading PDF/X files should behave.  
2.  What’s the aim? 
The aim for designers is to provide a digital content file that they can be confident will be printed predictably 
and correctly by the service provider. That requirement applies equally to a commercial print job printed on 
one site, and to a magazine ad placed in many publications and printed across the world. 
The aim for service providers and publishers is to receive robust digital content files. In this context ‘robust’ 
means that they can be confident that the files will run through prepress without requiring rework or causing 
errors, and will allow them to meet (or exceed) customer expectations on press. 
In both cases the key term is “process control”. Reliable content file delivery is every bit as important as waste 
management and press automation; in fact it’s a key pre-requisite for automation. 
Bad files, errors in prepress and untrustworthy proofs lead to material waste and human intervention, which in 
turn increases costs, errors and delay both within and between the parties involved in a print job. 
The immediately measurable goals of PDF/X are: 
To improve color and content matches from proof to proof, proof to press, and press to press 
To reduce processing errors in proofing and prepress 
To enable rapid, effective and automatable pre-flight of files at the time of receipt from the customer. 
To reduce the complexity and cost of customer education 
All of these apply both on a single site, and when the files are  handled on multiple sites, using different 
equipment, from many vendors 
You’ll notice that having a customer-supplied job print well is not on that list. All of the bullet items above can 
significantly increase the probability that a job will print well. On the other hand, it’s just not possible that a 
single standard can enable jobs to print well on a wide variety of substrates and printing technologies. See 
“What’s PDF/X Plus?” below for more on this. 
3.  What can I do in PDF/X that I can’t do in PDF? 
Strictly speaking, nothing.  
The important point is that you can do a lot of things in PDF that are not appropriate for graphic arts use, and 
that can cause problems when outputting for high quality reproduction. 
“PDF/X” can be thought of as a shorthand way of specifying most of what you need to tell somebody in order 
for them to create a file that’s as likely as possible to print correctly when they send it to you, even if they don’t 
understand the details of what it’s doing for them.  
Phrased slightly differently, think of all file formats used for file transfers as being compromises between 
flexibility and reliability (where reliability is defined as the final printed piece looking like your own proof).  
At one end of the scale are application files like Adobe InDesign or QuarkXPress documents. You can change 
those in whatever way you like if you have the application. Unfortunately the receiver of a file can also change 
them accidentally rather too easily. The results you get when printing are also dependent on many factors in the 
environment in which that copy of the design tool is running, such as operating system, fonts, PPDs and printer 
drivers, not to mention exactly which version of the design tool you have. 
At the other end of the scale are copydot scans. Those will print absolutely as you expect, given the necessary 
provisos about having been prepared for the correct resolution and calibration. It’s because of those cautions 
that I describe them as inflexible. 
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.Word
Tell C# users how to: create a new Word file and load Word from pdf; merge, append, and split Word files; insert, delete, move, rotate Create Thumbnail.
show pdf thumbnails in; how to make a thumbnail from pdf
Create Thumbnail in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
Web Image Viewer Installation; View and Display Images; Annotate & Redact Documents or Images; Create Thumbnail; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode & Decode
view pdf image thumbnail; enable thumbnail preview for pdf files
PDF/X Frequently Asked Questions (Oct 2005) 
Page 2 
Copyright © Global Graphics Software Limited, 1999-2005. All Rights Reserved. 
In between, in order of decreasing flexibility and increasing reliability, other options at other positions on the 
scale include PostScript, EPS, PDF, PDF/X and TIFF/IT. When I use a name like ‘PostScript’ in that list I 
mean the format in an otherwise unspecified way. It’s always possible to push such a format towards the 
reliable end of the scale by using appropriate software to create it. At one stage in northern Europe many 
people used a product called ‘ProScript’, for example, which limits the options used in EPS files. A ‘ProScript 
EPS’ file might be placed on the scale somewhere between PDF and PDF/X. 
Application documents
PostScript
EPS
PDF
PDF/X
TIFF/IT
Copydot
Flexibility
Reliability
Appropriate use of pre-flight tools on PDF can give you a ‘reliable PDF’ much closer to where PDF/X is on 
that scale. The point of PDF/X is that it gives you a convenient and well specified label to use when asking for 
such a ‘reliable PDF’ file. 
4.  So when should PDF/X be used? 
Every transfer of files from one place to another, whether it’s between designers sitting at adjacent desks, or 
from an ad agency to a magazine publisher, has an optimal position on this compromise scale, and there’s a file 
format and workflow appropriate to that optimal compromise. Those two designers at desks next to each other 
would be crazy to use anything but native application documents, for instance. 
In some cases there will be additional selection pressure for a specific format, e.g. for compatibility with other 
processes, but as a general rule the optimal compromise for the supply of print-ready files between 
organizations will be to retain some flexibility, but not at the expense of compromising reliability.  
Copydot files are simply too inflexible for most transfers of ads and other print-ready files, although there are 
some instances where it may be the right thing to do (such as between some publishers and print sites). 
For most inter-company print-ready transfers where the sender and receiver do not have a strong relationship in 
place and where there’s no intention of holding planning meetings for each job submission PDF/X is a very 
good choice. That’s why it’s recommended for digital delivery in the 10
th
edition of the SWOP specification 
(alongside TIFF/IT-P1 – see “Why is PDF/X better than TIFF/IT?”). 
5.  Why is PDF/X better than a job options file? 
Over the last few years a number of people who receive PDF files have developed an approach that sometimes 
works well. They save a set of job options in Acrobat Distiller, and send that to their clients. When files are 
created by relatively unsophisticated users it’s far more likely that they will meet the receiver’s quality 
requirements using such job options than they would otherwise. 
The main drawback of this approach is that it requires all files to be created using Acrobat Distiller, and cannot 
help those people who want to use the increasing number of desktop applications that can export directly to 
PDF (Adobe Illustrator, PhotoShop and InDesign, QuarkXPress, MacroMedia FreeHand, etc.), or alternative 
PostScript to PDF conversion tools, such as Agfa Apogee Create, Apago Piktor or Jaws PDF Creator.  
Adobe’s Creative Suite 2 products all share nominally the same job option files, but each uses a different 
subset of the data that can be stored in such a file. That makes it even harder to construct a configuration that’s 
suitable for all of them, because no tool on its own can create a fully portable file. 
Create Thumbnail Winforms | Online Tutorials
Winforms Image Viewer Installation; View and Display Create Thumbnail; Generate Barcodes on Your Documents; Processing; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode
pdf thumbnail preview; create thumbnail jpeg from pdf
VB.NET Image: Image and Doc Windows, Web & Mobile Viewers of
for users to do image displaying, thumbnail creation and compatible mobile phone or tablet to view, navigate, zoom are JPEG, PNG, BMP, GIF, TIFF, PDF, Word and
pdf thumbnail generator; cannot view pdf thumbnails in
PDF/X Frequently Asked Questions (Oct 2005)
Copyright © Global Graphics Software Limited, 1999-2005. All Rights Reserved 
Page 3 
This approach also cannot be applied to the high-end graphic arts tools that can generate PDF directly, like 
Creo Brisque, Dalim TWiST, or OneVision Solvero. You might expect that the users of such equipment should 
understand the process well enough not to need such help, but everyone makes mistakes occasionally! 
Arather minor further consideration is that a new job options file would probably need to be developed for 
every new version of Distiller. 
The implications of some of the options available in Acrobat Distiller can be quite subtle, making it rather 
difficult for an individual company to develop the best possible configuration. On the other hand PDF/X has 
been developed over a period of several years by a broad-based team of users and vendors, ensuring that a 
consensus of expert opinion is embodied within the standards.  
Recommended Distiller job options files are provided by a number of groups such as the Ghent PDF 
workgroup, alongside their PDF/X Plus specifications (see “What’s PDF/X Plus?”). 
6.  Why is PDF/X better than pre-flighting? 
PDF/X and pre-flighting are not mutually exclusive. Indeed, PDF/X files should be checked to ensure that they 
conform to the standard before transmission. Ideally they should also be checked for all of those issues that 
cannot be addressed in a standard, such as the trim area and image resolutions (see also “What’s PDF/X 
Plus?”). 
Before the introduction of PDF/X some companies receiving PDF files encouraged their customers to apply 
appropriate pre-flight checks before sending files. When the sender and receiver both use the same pre-flight 
tool it is sometimes possible for the receiver to supply a configuration file (e.g. a ground control for Markzware 
FlightCheck or a profile for Enfocus PitStop). With care this can eliminate a large proportion of problem files. 
If the two parties involved are using different pre-flight tools, however, an explanation of the checks that 
should be made by the sender can be very complex. As more and more pre-flight tools are released with pre-
built PDF/X configurations already available these explanations can be significantly simplified. 
7.  Why is PDF/X better than TIFF/IT? 
TITT/IT-P1 has been held up as an example of a bullet-proof delivery format for some time,  but results from 
at least one large prepress company show that PDF/X and TIFF/IT-P1 have very similar failure rates, both 
significantly better than those for generic PDF files. 
PDF/X has a number of advantages over TIFF/IT-P1, such as: 
Better compression, including ZIP and JPEG for CTs, leading to much smaller files. 
Mechanisms for marking trim and bleed areas allowing automatic placement when compositing or 
imposing pages (at least in theory). 
Support for spot colors. 
Afree and widely used file viewer. 
Amechanism for identifying the printing condition that the file was prepared for (e.g. SWOP or ISO 
coated). 
Aflag to state whether the file has been trapped already. 
The opportunity to make small last minute corrections when absolutely necessary (without it being so easy 
to make changes that they can be made accidentally). 
Generally cheaper tool sets with wider availability. 
Anew revision of TIFF/IT was published in 2004, introducing a new conformance level – TIFF/IT-P2. While 
this addresses several of the issues above, adopting it will require upgrades or replacement of existing TIFF/IT-
P1 tools. If you’re going to switch format for that, why not go the whole way and switch to PDF/X? 
Unfortunately, encoding CT/LW data into a PDF or PDF/X file is likely to produce a file that RIPs and traps 
extremely slowly, and can show unwanted imaging artifacts if output at the wrong resolution. That makes it 
hard to convert files from TIFF/IT to PDF/X. Such files are sometimes referred to as “raster/raster” files, as 
opposed to the “raster/vector” files created by other workflows. The most recent position papers from the 
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
Microsoft PowerPoint: PPT, PPTX, PPS, PPSX; PDF: Portable Document you to easily load and view web document fast speed with the help of thumbnail, page navigate
how to make a thumbnail of a pdf; program to create thumbnail from pdf
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
PDF Viewer provides C# users abilities to view, annotate, convert file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete C#.NET: Edit PDF Thumbnail.
html display pdf thumbnail; pdf thumbnail generator online
PDF/X Frequently Asked Questions (Oct 2005) 
Page 4 
Copyright © Global Graphics Software Limited, 1999-2005. All Rights Reserved. 
DDAP therefore recommend that ads created in tools that create a CT/LW format be transmitted as TIFF/IT-P1 
rather than converted to PDF/X if possible. The same advice is probably appropriate for non-advertising 
workflows too. Where a job does not start off as CT/LW, PDF/X is recommended instead. 
8.  Is PDF/X better than electronic delivery software? 
Several vendors have brought out software that can create PDF files and transmit them to a print service 
provider in one step, with all creation parameters under the control of the file recipient. 
In many ways such products are an attempt to address the same issues that PDF/X does, and in many ways they 
are just as successful in doing so. The main difference is that electronic delivery software requires the file 
submitter to obtain specific software matching that used by the recipient (often achieved by the print service 
provider supplying the appropriate software to the print buyer). Where the required client software is expensive 
that’s likely to occur only where there’s an expectation of a long-term relationship between the two parties, 
while PDF/X is designed to be applicable even in one-off exchanges. 
Where such software scores over PDF/X, however, is that at least some such products require even less 
investment of money, and education by the file creator than a PDF/X workflow would. PDF/X is designed to 
be easy and cheap to create, but most products creating it still require the user to set several configuration 
items, often on several different screens. When the client software is inexpensive and a print service provider’s 
customer base is unsophisticated, electronic delivery software may be a better choice. 
Remember, however, that PDF/X and electronic delivery software are not necessarily mutually exclusive; the 
print service provider configuring the client software to supply to his customers may well choose to build his 
settings on PDF/X rather than to develop his own from scratch. 
9.  Is there just one PDF/X? 
The PDF/X standards are designed to be very broadly applicable across as many sectors and geographical areas 
of the print industry as possible. They therefore form a very strong foundation for the development of 
specifications tailored more exactly for a particular sector (see “What’s PDF/X Plus?” below). 
Even so, in the development of the standard it was found that there were two issues that divided requirements 
so deeply that a single PDF/X standard could not address the needs. 
CMYK vs. device independent 
In some print sectors it is expected that the supplier of digital content files to a publisher or print service 
provider will retain absolute control over the final appearance of the piece on the printed sheet; the printer will 
simply follow instructions. Over the years this expectation has led to the exchange of data in CMYK (and/or 
spot color data).  
In other print sectors responsibility for the printed piece looking right is taken by the print service provider. 
Many working in these sectors are creating files in device independent color spaces (usually CIELab or RGB 
tagged with an ICC (International Color Consortium) profile). Several advantages accrue from this approach, 
including reduced file size and more flexibility for re-purposing of jobs. These advantages, especially the ease 
of cross publication of jobs between multiple print formats (newsprint, magazine, commercial print and digital 
print) and also to the web, are encouraging a number of people who currently transfer files entirely in CMYK 
to investigate the use of device independent data as well. 
Those who work in the CMYK world felt that they required an absolute assurance that they would not be 
accidentally provided with device independent color data. It was therefore decided to produce PDF/X standards 
for both use cases. 
Throughout this document the phrase “CMYK-only” is intended to exclude data in RGB, Lab, ICC-based and 
“calibrated” color spaces. It does not exclude spot colors, either singly, or in combination (in, for example, a 
duotone). 
Blind vs. open exchange 
Some print jobs are ideally submitted to a print service provider with little or no technical discussion – all 
negotiations being restricted to business matters. In the PDF/X standards this is referred to as “blind 
exchange”. It’s an important model when a single print buyer is sending work to many service providers, and 
where a single service provider is accepting files from very large numbers of buyers. The archetypal example is 
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You can generate thumbnail image(s) from PDF file for quick viewing and further This class provides APIs for converting PDF files to other file formats.
show pdf thumbnail in; pdf thumbnails in
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.Excel
Tell C# users how to: create a new Excel file and load Excel; merge, append, and split Excel files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy and Create Thumbnail.
pdf thumbnail; enable pdf thumbnails in
PDF/X Frequently Asked Questions (Oct 2005)
Copyright © Global Graphics Software Limited, 1999-2005. All Rights Reserved 
Page 5 
the transmission of publication ads, where the same ad may be placed in many magazines, and every magazine 
obviously includes ads from many sources. A need for detailed, individual discussions around every placement 
would be a significant barrier to increasing efficiency on both sides of the submission. 
There are, however, situations where it’s necessary for the sender and receiver of a file (or file set) to have 
more discussion about how data should be prepared and exchanged, and in many of these cases there can be a 
requirement that the content of a single job is contained within multiple content files, possibly residing at 
different sites. 
The combination of these two divisions led to a decision to create several PDF/X standards: 
PDF/X-1a for CMYK-only blind exchange. 
PDF/X-3 for color-managed blind exchange 
PDF/X-2 for open exchange 
Each of these is a superset of the preceding one, removing restrictions in a staged manner. 
No standard for CMYK-only open exchange was needed because the two parties are in technical discussion 
anyway, and may therefore add their own further restrictions as to the construction of the files. 
Note that this section is a summary of the rational behind the split into three standards. Unfortunately the 
groups involved were not in a position to set out that rationale in advance of PDF/X standards development 
work, and achieving worldwide consensus was not, initially, an easy task. This is also one reason why the 
numerical sequence of the standards does not appear to be as logical as it might be. 
10. PDF/X-1a 
The PDF/X-1a standard addresses blind exchanges where all files should be delivered in CMYK (and/or spot 
colors), with no RGB or device independent (color-managed) data.  
This is a common requirement in many areas around the world and in many print sectors. It’s often tied to an 
environment where the file supplier wants to retain maximum control of the print job; it’s very hard to transmit 
data as RGB or Lab and still to include your own trap definitions, for instance.  
Alternatively, it’s requested by many print service providers and publishers who have had bad experiences with 
color managed data in the past, leading to inconsistent and unacceptable print quality. With the tools in current 
widespread use it tends to be easier to produce consistently reasonable color reproduction when files are 
supplied in CMYK.  
Pre-conversion to CMYK works best where there is a clearly defined CMYK color space to convert into. 
Remember that a set of CMYK values do not specify a particular color until you also define what device it’s 
being printed on; the same CMYK values printed on gravure, flexo, or offset litho presses, or on a laser or ink 
jet printer are likely to look quite different. For an excellent discussion of this see 
http://na.i1color.com/html/toast.htm
.
In the US publication market most printers are attempting to standardize on the SWOP specifications, and 
much of the European newsprint market is converging on IFRA26. Thus an ad prepared for SWOP or IFRA26 
is likely to produce the expected colors in most magazines or newspapers in those areas. Specifications like 
SWOP or IFRA26 are described as “characterized printing conditions”. 
Other sectors of the print market are more difficult to characterize; many commercial printers, for instance, 
claim to squeeze a larger gamut or better print contrast out of their presses than their local competitors. A wide 
range of paper stocks, in different colors, textures and coatings, obviously adds to the kind of color variation 
you’d see from the same CMYK values.  
Several groups such as GRACoL, CGATS SC3, FOGRA, ECI and Printing Across Borders are working on 
characterizations and associated ICC profiles for commercial print but these are not yet in universal use, 
especially outside of continental Europe. In the meantime it’s a little difficult to provide a file in CMYK to 
many commercial printers and have your proof exactly match the final printed piece off their press without 
significant discussion or on-press adjustments. In the absence of such discussion it’s becoming commonplace 
for designers to separate to a form of “generic CMYK”, often either SWOP or the default settings in Adobe 
PhotoShop. They must then simply hope that it will fall near enough to the press behavior to be acceptable, or 
that the print service provider will supply them with a proof that will match the press (see “Which 
characterized printing condition should I label files as using?”). 
PDF/X Frequently Asked Questions (Oct 2005) 
Page 6 
Copyright © Global Graphics Software Limited, 1999-2005. All Rights Reserved. 
The rise of non-impact digital presses, based on either ink jet or laser technology, also makes it difficult to send 
CMYK data without knowing exactly what press it will be run on, because presses from the different 
manufacturers may print the same CMYK values as very different colors. CGATS is investigating the 
possibility of standardized characterizations in this area too (CGATS SC6 TF2). Attacking the same problem 
from the other end, many digital press front ends can color manage incoming CMYK data, producing output 
that is a reasonable emulation of a SWOP press, for instance. 
The first PDF/X-1a standard, better referred to as PDF/X-1a:2001 was published as ISO standard 
15930-1:2001. See below for details of how to obtain a copy (“Where can I get more information?”), and for 
new revisions (“2003 revisions” and “Should I start using the 2003 revisions?”). 
11. PDF/X-3 
While some market sectors require exchanges with all color data already converted to CMYK, others are better 
served by transferring data in other spaces, such as CIELab or RGB with a profile attached.  
The PDF/X-3 standard is a superset of PDF/X-1a; a PDF/X-1a file meets all of the technical requirements of 
PDF/X-3 except for the label that actually says “I’m a PDF/X-3 file”. The primary difference between the two 
is that a PDF/X-3 file can also contain color managed data. 
The same PDF/X-3 file may contain data in color-managed color spaces (such as Lab, CalRGB or using an 
embedded ICC profile), and other data in grayscale, CMYK and spot colors. The combination means that 
images can be included in a defined RGB space (for instance), while solid black text can be guaranteed to print 
in solid black without unexpected color fringing caused by color management spreading the black data to all 
the process separations. 
Different prepress software may handle embedded ICC color profiles, etc, in color-managed jobs, which means 
that some care must be taken to ensure that a proof of device independent colors will accurately predict the 
final presswork. This is not to say that consistent color cannot be achieved in non-CMYK workflows, only that 
you must invest more effort to learn the behavior and capabilities of all equipment involved in your workflow. 
Both of the PDF/X-3 and PDF/X-2 standards are clear as to how a compliant proofing or plate-setter device 
should act on the colors in a file. In many situations, however, a print service provider may need to use a 
mixture of PDF/X-compliant and non-compliant tools. This gets more complicated when a customer expects a 
print company to match their proof; the print company needs to be aware that the customer’s proofing device 
may not be PDF/X-compliant. They also need to watch that other steps in their workflow, such as stand-alone 
imposition or OPI tools, don’t lose the PDF/X data or construct inconsistent files. 
ISO has recommended that all tools designed to read PDF/X-3 should also be able to read PDF/X-1a files. 
Indeed, in the 2003 revision of PDF/X-3 (see “2003 revisions”), a compliant PDF/X-3 reader must be able to 
read PDF/X-1a files as well. A PDF/X-3 file may also be made explicitly for monochrome and RGB 
characterized print conditions, although RGB is likely to be very rare in practice. A PDF/X-1a file may only be 
made for CMYK characterizations. 
The first PDF/X-3 standard, better referred to as PDF/X-3:2002 was published as ISO standard 15930-3:2002. 
See below for details of how to obtain a copy (“Where can I get more information?”), and for new revisions 
(“2003 revisions” and “Should I start using the 2003 revisions?”). 
12. PDF/X-2 
Both PDF/X-1a and PDF/X-3 define file formats for blind exchange. In some workflows that’s not required, or 
asingle file per job is not appropriate, but some additional restrictions on file formatting rather than just saying 
“PDF” would be desirable to increase reliability. 
PDF/X-2 is designed to address exchanges where there is more discussion between the supplier and receiver of 
the file. It enables an “OPI-like” workflow. The OPI specification is not actually used, instead the “reference 
XObject” mechanism defined in PDF version 1.4 has been extended slightly to provide greater confidence that 
the correct subsidiary files have been located. One of the consequences of this is that all of the external files 
must also be in PDF/X. 
There are a number of situations where it is envisaged that PDF/X-2 may prove useful. The only common 
theme between these is the use of a single ‘master’ file referring to others that will be rendered in the final 
output – the business reasons that provide the value in that separation vary from case to case. Maybe the 
PDF/X Frequently Asked Questions (Oct 2005)
Copyright © Global Graphics Software Limited, 1999-2005. All Rights Reserved 
Page 7 
receiver already holds high resolution images to replace proxy images (low resolution previews) in the supplied 
file. 
There are many occasions where an “OPI-like” workflow can provide value (e.g. to increase the response 
speed of design workstations), but which do not automatically lead to a requirement for PDF/X-2. If an OPI 
workflow is resolved entirely within a single company (or a division within a larger company) then PDF/X-2 is 
not necessary. 
PDF/X-2 adds value where a set of several files should be exchanged between companies or divisions. It can 
also add value where the company running a purely internal OPI workflow has little control over the names of 
files used in that workflow, and where the ability to resolve conclusively between files from different sources 
but with the same name can help to avoid the use of the wrong image. 
It is a superset of PDF/X-3, and will therefore allow device independent color spaces, like Lab and those base 
on ICC profiles, to be used, just like PDF/X-3. The rather confusing hierarchy running from PDF/X-1a through 
PDF/X-3 to PDF/X-2 is a historical accident caused by the development process in CGATS and ISO. 
The first PDF/X-2 standard, better referred to as PDF/X-2:2003 was published as ISO standard 15930-2:2003. 
See below for details of how to obtain a copy (“Where can I get more information?”). 
13. Who’s accepting PDF/X-1a files? 
The first known complete test-run of a PDF/X-1a ad was in early August 2001, and by the end of August an ad 
delivered as PDF/X-1a had been printed in a national American magazine (both handled by LTC/Vertis). In 
September 2001 the SWOP calibration test kit was issued in PDF/X-1a. In December 2001 the first known case 
of PDF/X-1a being used for the whole of a magazine transmission from publisher to printer was recorded 
(Wizards of the Coast – Dragon issue 292). The latest SWOP version recommends that all digital ads are 
supplied in either TIFF/IT-P1 or PDF/X-1a. 
PDF/X-1a is now a very common approach to solving problems of production file reliability and customer 
education. 
Amongst the foremost PDF/X-1a evangelists are Time, Inc, who provide a comprehensive guide to creation of 
good files at direct2.time.com
.
Many of the member organizations of the Ghent PDF Working Group (see “What’s PDF/X Plus?”) also 
indirectly recommend that jobs be submitted as PDF/X, because the 2004 and earlier Ghent specifications are 
all based on PDF/X-1a. 
Many PDF/X-1a compliant tools are now available – mainly initially addressed at converting PDF files into 
PDF/X, and in pre-flighting such files. The DDAP constructed a list of available PDF/X applications at 
www.pdf-x.com
,although applications are now so common that it is no longer being maintained. 
14. Who’s taking PDF/X-3? 
There is a general, but very slow, move towards accepting device-independent color data in files for print. To 
date this is most advanced in northern Europe, although many large magazine publishers across North America 
are actively investigating how to move in that direction for submitted advertising. Work intended for output on 
digital presses can also benefit from the color-managed workflows implied by submission of device-
independent color. Obviously PDF/X-3 is the PDF/X standard of choice for all of these cases. 
There is, however, an unfortunate tendency for some companies to require that jobs be submitted as PDF/X-3, 
while simultaneously demanding that all data in them be supplied in CMYK. This approach is driven by 
politics rather than by technical issues. In terms of the standards, very nearly the only reason that a PDF/X-1a 
file is not PDF/X-3 compliant is that it is labeled as PDF/X-1a rather than as PDF/X-3. The PDF/X-3:2003 
standard makes that very clear, and requires that a PDF/X-3-compliant application that reads files must also be 
able to read and process PDF/X-1a files. It is to be hoped that CMYK-only PDF/X-3 file requirements will be 
dropped in the future, and that the companies involved will accept PDF/X-1a as well, or instead. 
Afree PDF/X-3 verifier is available from www.pdfx.info
.
Several tools for creation and verification of PDF/X-3 files are also available – see the list at the same web site. 
PDF/X Frequently Asked Questions (Oct 2005) 
Page 8 
Copyright © Global Graphics Software Limited, 1999-2005. All Rights Reserved. 
15. And who’s taking PDF/X-2? 
At the time of writing there are no known products that can construct or validate files against the PDF/X-2 
standard. Some products will act on reference XObjects in PDF files, and can therefore consume PDF/X-2 file 
sets, but the additional robustness that the standard was written to enable will not be achieved using these tools. 
16. What’s PDF/X Plus? 
The PDF/X standards are each designed to be applicable to broad ranges of the print industry world wide, 
across many geographical regions, print technologies and sectors. That means it’s not possible for them to 
define all the appropriate limitations for any particular usage of PDF, such as minimum image resolution, 
minimum type size, bleeds, etc. The values appropriate for high quality magazine production would be 
completely wrong for newsprint, for instance. 
It’s therefore entirely appropriate that additional specifications be built by industry associations on top of the 
PDF/X standards, each constructed for a particular niche. Because these specifications use PDF/X as a 
foundation they are often called “PDF/X Plus”. 
One interesting observation made after the PDF/X standards were published was that the issues left to be 
addressed in PDF/X Plus specifications are the kind of things that people working in the graphic arts are 
already familiar with: image resolution, type size, bleed size and selection of a print characterization (usually 
guided by tone value increase (dot gain)). The standards themselves cover all the “propeller head” technical 
issues that deal more with the details of the PDF file format, and that most professionals in print could not be 
expected to know in great detail. 
PDF/X
Embedded fonts, no encryption,
TrimBox required, no HalftoneName, 
no threshhold screens, 
no annotations within the page
etc
PDF/X Plus
Min & max image resolutions, min type size
Required bleed, which print characterization
etc.
Trim size, live area,
etc.
Individual title or 
print job
Print sector
Whole print 
industry
At the time of writing much of the development of PDF/X Plus specifications appears to be converging on the 
Ghent PDF Work Group (GWG, www.gwg.org
). This association now comprises many industry associations 
from across northern Europe, plus others from North America, including the IPA and FTA. In addition, a 
number of vendors provide support and assistance. They have published several specifications intended for use 
in advertising delivery to magazines and newspapers and for commercial print.  
In the UK the Periodical Publishers Association (PPA, www.ppa.co.uk
)have also published the Pass4Press and 
Proof4Press specifications, which address some of the same issues as the GWG specifications, but with more 
concentration on the behavior of prepress equipment. This work is converging with the GWG (PPA is a GWG 
member). 
17. Which PDF/X should I use? 
That’s obviously quite a few different PDF/X standards, but it’s expected that any particular market will settle 
on one, or two at the most, of these.  
If you’re a print buyer or advertiser, or anyone else who is generating files to send to a print service provider, 
ask your service providers what they can work with reliably. If they don’t suggest PDF/X but you think it 
would be advantageous to both of you then raise the idea. There’s no point in supplying files that you know 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested