asp.net pdf viewer free : Generate thumbnail from pdf control software system web page windows asp.net console Online_Statistics_Education48-part59

Confidence Interval for the Slope
The method for computing a confidence interval for the population slope is very 
similar to methods for computing other confidence intervals. For the 95% 
confidence interval, the formula is:
lower limit: b - (t
.95
)(s
b
)
upper limit: b + (t
.95
)(s
b
)
where t
.95
is the value of t to use for the 95% confidence interval.
The values of t to be used in a confidence interval can be looked up in a table 
of the t distribution. A small version of such a table is shown in Table 2. The first 
column, df, stands for degrees of freedom.
Table 2. Abbreviated t table.
df
0.95
0.99
2
4.303
9.925
3
3.182
5.841
4
2.776
4.604
5
2.571
4.032
8
2.306
3.355
10
2.228
3.169
20
2.086
2.845
50
2.009
2.678
100
1.984
2.626
You can also use the “inverse t distribution” calculator (external link
; requires 
Java) to find the t values to use in a confidence interval.
Applying these formulas to the example data,
lower limit: 0.425 - (3.182)(0.305) = -0.55
upper limit: 0.425 + (3.182)(0.305) = 1.40
Significance Test for the Correlation
The formula for a significance test of Pearson's correlation is shown below:
481
Generate thumbnail from pdf - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
create thumbnail from pdf c#; create pdf thumbnails
Generate thumbnail from pdf - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
pdf thumbnail preview; view pdf thumbnails
=
 2
1
where N is the number of pairs of scores. For the example data,
=
0.627 52
10.627
=1.39 
Notice that this is the same t value obtained in the t test of b. As in that test, the 
degrees of freedom is N-2 = 5-2 = 3.
482
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Word
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB.NET How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Word.
create pdf thumbnail image; show pdf thumbnail in html
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for PowerPoint
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for PowerPoint
how to create a thumbnail of a pdf document; can't see pdf thumbnails
Influential Observations
by David M. Lane
Prerequisites
Chapter 14: Introduction to Linear Regression
Learning Objectives
1. Define “influence”
2. Describe what makes a point influential
3. Define “leverage”
4. Define “distance”
It is possible for a single observation to have a great influence on the results of a 
regression analysis. It is therefore important to be alert to the possibility of 
influential observations and to take them into consideration when interpreting the 
results.
Influence
The influence of an observation can be thought of in terms of how much the 
predicted scores for other observations would differ if the observation in question 
were not included. Cook's D is a good measure of the influence of an observation 
and is proportional to the sum of the squared differences between predictions made 
with all observations in the analysis and predictions made leaving out the 
observation in question. If the predictions are the same with or without the 
observation in question, then the observation has no influence on the regression 
model. If the predictions differ greatly when the observation is not included in the 
analysis, then the observation is influential.
A common rule of thumb is that an observation with a value of Cook's D 
over 1.0 has too much influence. As with all rules of thumb, this rule should be 
applied judiciously and not thoughtlessly.
An observation's influence is a function of two factors: (1) how much the 
observation's value on the predictor variable differs from the mean of the predictor 
variable and (2) the difference between the predicted score for the observation and 
its actual score. The former factor is called the observation's leverage. The latter 
factor is called the observation's distance.
483
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Raster
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Raster.
how to make a thumbnail from pdf; enable pdf thumbnails in
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Excel
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB.NET How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Excel.
show pdf thumbnail in; pdf thumbnail fix
Calculation of Cook's D (Optional)
The first step in calculating the value of Cook's D for an observation is to predict 
all the scores in the data once using a regression equation based on all the 
observations and once using all the observations except the observation in 
question. The second step is to compute the sum of the squared differences 
between these two sets of predictions. The final step is to divide this result by 2 
times the MSE (see the section on partitioning the variance).
Leverage
The leverage of an observation is based on how much the observation's value on 
the predictor variable differs from the mean of the predictor variable. The greater 
an observation's leverage, the more potential it has to be an influential observation. 
For example, an observation with the mean on the predictor variable has no 
influence on the slope of the regression line regardless of its value on the criterion 
variable. On the other hand, an observation that is extreme on the predictor 
variable has, depending on its distance, the potential to affect the slope greatly.
Calculation of Leverage (h)
The first step is to standardize the predictor variable so that it has a mean of 0 and a 
standard deviation of 1. Then, the leverage (h) is computed by squaring the 
observation's value on the standardized predictor variable, adding 1, and dividing 
by the number of observations.
Distance
The distance of an observation is based on the error of prediction for the 
observation: The greater the error of prediction, the greater the distance. The most 
commonly used measure of distance is the studentized residual. The studentized 
residual for an observation is closely related to the error of prediction for that 
observation divided by the standard deviation of the errors of prediction. However, 
the predicted score is derived from a regression equation in which the observation 
in question is not counted. The details of the computation of a studentized residual 
are a bit complex and are beyond the scope of this work.
An observation with a large distance will not have that much influence if its 
leverage is low. It is the combination of an observation's leverage and distance that 
determines its influence.
484
How to C#: Overview of Using XImage.Raster
You may easily generate thumbnail image from image file. Annotate XImage page. You may easily generate thumbnail image from image file.
show pdf thumbnails; html display pdf thumbnail
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.PowerPoint
navigation. You may easily generate thumbnail image from PowerPoint. Copyright © <2000-2015> by <RasterEdge.com>. All Rights Reserved.
pdf thumbnail generator online; disable pdf thumbnails
Example
Table 1 shows the leverage, studentized residual, and influence for each of the five 
observations in a small dataset.
Table 1. Example Data.
ID
X
Y
h
R
D
A
1
2
0.39
-1.02
0.40
B
2
3
0.27
-0.56
0.06
C
3
5
0.21
0.89
0.11
D
4
6
0.20
1.22
0.19
E
8
7
0.73
-1.68
8.86
h is the leverage, R is the studentized residual, and D is Cook's measure of influence.
verage, R is the studentized residual, and D is Cook's measure of influence.
R is the studentized residual, and D is Cook's measure of influence.
studentized residual, and D is Cook's measure of influence.
and D is Cook's measure of influence.
e of influence.
Observation A has fairly high leverage, a relatively high residual, and 
moderately high influence.
Observation B has small leverage and a relatively small residual. It has very 
little influence.
Observation C has small leverage and a relatively high residual. The 
influence is relatively low.
Observation D has the lowest leverage and the second highest residual. 
Although its residual is much higher than Observation A, its influence 
is much less because of its low leverage.
Observation E has by far the largest leverage and the largest residual. This 
combination of high leverage and high residual makes this 
observation extremely influential.
Figure 1 shows the regression line for the whole dataset (blue) and the regression 
line if the observation in question is not included (red) for all observations. The 
observation in question is circled. Naturally, the regression line for the whole 
dataset is the same in all panels. The residual is calculated relative to the line for 
which the observation in question is not included in the analysis. This can be seen 
most clearly for Observation E which lies very close to the regression line 
485
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.Word
Tell C# users how to: create a new Word file and load Word from pdf; merge, append, and split Word files You may easily generate thumbnail image from Word.
pdf first page thumbnail; view pdf thumbnails in
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.Excel
See this C# guide to learn how to use RasterEdge Excel SDK for .NET to perform quick file navigation. You may easily generate thumbnail image from Excel.
how to view pdf thumbnails in; show pdf thumbnails in
computed when it is included but very far from the regression line when it is 
excluded from the calculation of the line.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Y
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
X
Leverage: 0.39
Residual:  -1.02
Inuence: 0.40
A
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Y
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
X
Leverage: 0.21
Residual: 0.89
Inuence: 0.11
C
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Y
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
X
Leverage: 0.73
Residual: -1.68
Inuence: 8.86
E
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Y
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
X
Leverage: 0.27
Residual:  -0.56
Inuence: 0.06
B
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Y
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
X
Leverage: 0.20
Residual: 1.22
Inuence: 0.19
D
Figure 1. Illustration of leverage, residual, and influence. 
486
The circled points are not included in the calculation of the red regression line. All 
points are included in the calculation of the blue regression line.
487
Regression Toward the Mean
by David M. Lane
Prerequisites
Chapter 14: Regression Introduction
Learning Objectives
1. Explain what regression towards the mean is
2. State the conditions under which regression toward the mean occurs
3. Identify situations in which neglect of regression toward the mean leads to 
incorrect conclusions
4. Explain how regression toward the mean relates to a regression equation.
Regression toward the mean involves outcomes that are at least partly due to 
chance. We begin with an example of a task that is entirely chance: Imagine an 
experiment in which a group of 25 people each predicted the outcomes of flips of a 
fair coin. For each subject in the experiment, a coin is flipped 12 times and the 
subject predicts the outcome of each flip. Figure 1 shows the results of a simulation 
of this “experiment.” Although most subjects were correct from 5 to 8 times out of 
12, one simulated subject was correct 10 times. Clearly, this subject was very lucky 
and probably would not do as well if he or she performed the task a second time. In 
fact, the best prediction of the number of times this subject would be correct on the 
retest is 6 since the probability of being correct on a given trial is 0.5 and there are 
12 trials.
488
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
Figure 1. Histogram of results of a simulated experiment.
More technically, the best prediction for the subject's result on the retest is the 
mean of the binomial distribution with N = 12 and p = 0.50. This distribution is 
shown in Figure 2 and has a mean of 6.
0
0.05
0.1
0.15
0.2
0.25
0
1
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Figure 2. Binomial Distribution for N = 12 and p = .50.
The point here is that no matter how many coin flips a subject predicted correctly, 
the best prediction of their score on a retest is 6.
489
Now we consider a test we will call “Test A” that is partly chance and partly 
skill: Instead of predicting the outcomes of 12 coin flips, each subject predicts the 
outcomes of 6 coin flips and answers 6 true/false questions about world history. 
Assume that the mean score on the 6 history questions is 4. A subject's score on 
Test A has a large chance component but also depends on history knowledge. If a 
subject scored very high on this test (such as a score of 10/12), it is likely that they 
did well on both the history questions and the coin flips. For example, if they only 
got four of the history questions correct, they would have had to have gotten all six 
of the coin predictions correct, and this would have required exceptionally good 
luck. If given a second test (Test B) that also included coin predictions and history 
questions, their knowledge of history would be helpful and they would again be 
expected to score above the mean. However, since their high performance on the 
coin portion of Test A would not be predictive of their coin performance on Test B, 
they would not be expected to fare as well on Test B as on Test A. Therefore, the 
best prediction of their score on Test B would be somewhere between their score 
on Test A and the mean of Test B. This tendency of subjects with high values on a 
measure that includes chance and skill to score closer to the mean on a retest is 
called “regression toward the mean.”
The essence of the regression-toward-the-mean phenomenon is that people 
with high scores tend to be above average in skill and in luck, and that only the 
skill portion is relevant to future performance. Similarly, people with low scores 
tend to be below average in skill and luck and their bad luck is not relevant to 
future performance. This does not mean that all people who score high have above 
average luck. However, on average they do.
Almost every measure of behavior has a chance and a skill component to it. 
Take a student's grade on a final exam as an example. Certainly, the student's 
knowledge of the subject will be a major determinant of his or her grade. However, 
there are aspects of performance that are due to chance. The exam cannot cover 
everything in the course and therefore must represent a subset of the material. 
Maybe the student was lucky in that the one aspect of the course the student did 
not understand well was not well represented on the test. Or, maybe, the student 
was not sure which of two approaches to a problem would be better but, more or 
less by chance, chose the right one. Other chance elements come into play as well. 
Perhaps the student was awakened early in the morning by a random phone call, 
490
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested