asp.net pdf viewer free : Thumbnail pdf preview SDK software service wpf windows web page dnn PDF_study0-part573

The Australian Government’s study into  
the Accessibility of the Portable Document  
Format for people with a disability
November 2010
AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT INFORMATION MANAGEMENT OFFICE
Thumbnail pdf preview - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
thumbnail pdf preview; can't see pdf thumbnails
Thumbnail pdf preview - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
pdf thumbnail generator online; pdf files thumbnail preview
ii
ISBN 978-1-921600-57-9 
The Australian Government’s study into the Accessibility of the Portable 
Document Format for people with a disability (Online)
ISBN 978-1-921600-58-6   The Australian Government’s study into the Accessibility of the Portable 
Document Format for people with a disability: Supplementary Report 
(Online) 
Creative Commons
With the exception of the Commonwealth Coat of Arms, the Vision Australia logo, and where  
otherwise noted, this report is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Australia licence  
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au/
The report and its associated Supplementary Report must be attributed as the Australian Government 
Portable Document Format Accessibility Study. 
Use of the Coat of Arms
The terms under which the Coat of Arms can be used are detailed on the It’s an Honour website  
http://www.itsanhonour.gov.au/coat-arms/index.cfm.
Inquiries regarding the licence and any use of the report are welcome at:
Assistant Secretary 
Online Services Branch 
Australian Government Information Management Office 
Department of Finance and Deregulation 
John Gorton Building  
King Edward Terrace Parkes ACT 2600 
Email: WCAG2@finance.gov.au
Acknowledgement
The Australian Government would like to acknowledge Adobe Systems Incorporated, which extended its 
PDF Test Suite to incorporate the common assistive technologies used in Australia, the results of which 
are published in this Study. Thanks also to members of the Australian Human Rights Commission who 
ensured a collaborative process for the finalisation of this Study. Special thanks to Vision Australia’s Online 
Accessibility Team whose ongoing dedication, both professional and personal, help to make online content 
available to people with a disability. 
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
With the SDK, you can preview the document content according to the preview thumbnail by the ways as following. C# DLLs for Word File Preview. Add references:
pdf thumbnail html; pdf first page thumbnail
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
With the SDK, you can preview the document content according to the preview thumbnail by the ways as following. C# DLLs: Preview PowerPoint Document.
can't view pdf thumbnails; how to show pdf thumbnails in
iii
CoNteNts
Contents
one executive summary 
1
Key findings 
4
User consultations (Vision Australia) 
4
Public online consultation (AGIMO) 
4
Technical evaluation 
5
User evaluations 
6
Conclusions 
6
two Introduction 
8
About WCAG 2.0 
10
About the Portable Document Format 
11
The legislative context in Australia 
12
Computer use by people with a disability 
13
three Phase one: user consultation – the user perspective 
16
Focus Groups 
17
Encountering PDF files 
17
Problems using PDF files 
17
Workaround solutions 
18
Assistive technologies and PDF files 
18
Interaction with Adobe Reader 
18
Public online consultation 
19
four Phase two: technical evaluation – the technical perspective 
20
Common assistive technologies used in Australia 
21
Vendor support for assistive technologies 
23
Technical testing 
25
Exclusions 
26
Phase two – technical evaluation results 
28
five Phase three: user evaluations – the lived experience 
31
Participants 
33
The PDF test documents 
33
User evaluation tasks 
35
User evaluation result (measure of effectiveness) 
36
Acceptance of time (measure of efficiency) 
38
Satisfaction ratings (measure of satisfaction) 
38
Problems experienced by users 
38
Overall combined accessibility testing results 
41
How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET. To Preview Images in WinForm Application.
pdf thumbnail creator; view pdf thumbnails
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
document in memory. With the SDK, you can preview the document content according to the preview thumbnail by the ways as following.
generate pdf thumbnails; generate pdf thumbnail c#
iv
CoNteNts
six study approach and methodology 
43
Focus groups 
44
Online consultation 
45
Technical evaluation 
46
User experience evaluations 
47
Appendix 
48
Submissions to the public consultation 
49
Organisations providing assistive technology data 
50
Glossary 
51
List of tables 
Table 1: Common assistive technologies in Australia 
21
Table 2: Responses from assistive technology vendors and resellers 
24
Table 3: Assistive technology testing requirement  
27
Table 4: Assistive technology support for PDF finding 
28
Table 5: Task success rates for each user group  
37
Table 6: Factors affecting PDF files and their impact 
39
Table 7: Success rates for navigating by page number 
40
Table 8: Combined summary results 
42
Table 9: Adaptive strategies and assistive technologies used 
45
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Word
Preview Document. Conversion. Convert Word to PDF. Convert Word Convert Word to ODT. Convert PDF to Word. Text Search. Insert Image. Thumbnail Create. Thumbnail Create
thumbnail view in for pdf files; create pdf thumbnails
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for PowerPoint
Preview Document. Conversion. Convert PowerPoint to PDF. Convert PowerPoint to Pages. Annotate PowerPoint. Text Search. Insert Image. Thumbnail Create.
view pdf image thumbnail; disable pdf thumbnails
one Executive Summary
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Excel
Preview Document. Conversion. Convert Excel to PDF. Convert Excel to Insert Image. Thumbnail Create. Thumbnail Create. |. Home ›› XDoc.Excel ›› C# Excel
pdf file thumbnail preview; pdf thumbnail preview
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.PowerPoint
document (ODP). Empower to navigate PowerPoint document content quickly via thumbnail. Able to you want. Create Thumbnail. See this
create thumbnails from pdf files; how to create a thumbnail of a pdf document
2
oNe exeCUtIve sUmmAry
one Executive summary 
People with disabilities face challenges in dealing with the online world. In order to 
participate in the online world they employ many adaptive strategies and use a range of 
tools commonly known as assistive technologies. These include text to speech software 
and screen magnifiers to name a few.  The way information is presented online by 
government and others can make it difficult for assistive technology to do what it needs 
to.  Many technologies have accessibility issues but the Portable Document Format (PDF) 
is the one most often the subject of web accessibility complaints. 
The Australian Human Rights Commission (AHRC) considers Portable Document Format 
(PDF) files to be generally inaccessible to people with a disability. Since 2000, the AHRC 
has maintained this strong position and their Disability Discrimination Act: Advisory Notes 
recommend alternatives be provided when PDF files are used
1
. To date, the Australian 
Government has supported this position. 
Internationally, perspectives on the accessibility of PDF files are unclear and there is 
no agreed definition about what constitutes an ‘accessible PDF’. Notwithstanding this,  
technical advances in the Portable Document Format and improvements in the assistive 
technologies used by people with a disability are having a major impact on the policy 
debate.
The Australian Government’s recent endorsement of the World Wide Web Consortium’s 
(W3C) Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) version 2.0 provides a renewed 
commitment by the Government to web accessibility. To enable the Government to 
conform to WCAG 2.0 and meet its obligations, particularly in relation to the Disability 
Discrimination Act 1992 (Cwlth) (DDA) and the United Nations Convention on the Rights of 
Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD), a clearer understanding of the implications of using 
PDF files is required. 
It is clear that there is a need for a greater understanding of the way PDF files are 
accessed by commonly used assistive technologies and the implications in using the 
Portable Document Format, via various adaptive strategies, by people with a disability.
To address the need for greater clarity on the issue, Vision Australia was commissioned 
by the Australian Government to undertake this study (the Study). It included a series 
of user consultations to understand the situational context in using PDF files, followed 
by technical evaluations assessing the functionality of the most commonly used 
assistive technologies when interacting with PDF files. The outcome of the consultation 
and results of the technical evaluations were then tested by people with a disability 
employing various adaptive strategies to gain an understanding of their experience 
when interacting with a selection of PDF documents. 
1
Australian Human Rights Commission, 2009, World Wide Web Access: Disability Discrimination Act Advisory 
Notes, viewed 5 April 2010, http://www.hreoc.gov.au/disability_rights/standards/www_3/www_3.html.
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.Word
Tell C# users how to: create a new Word file and load Word from pdf; merge, append, and split Word files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy Create Thumbnail.
enable thumbnail preview for pdf files; cannot view pdf thumbnails in
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.Excel
Empower to navigate Excel document content quickly via thumbnail. Able to support text search in Excel document, as well as text extraction. Create Thumbnail.
show pdf thumbnails in; no pdf thumbnails in
3
oNe exeCUtIve sUmmAry
It is important to note that accessibility is largely based on situational context. The Study 
showed there are a number of drawbacks in relying on technical evaluations as the 
sole determinant of accessibility. While technical evaluation might indicate a product is 
accessible, the user’s experience in whether they can achieve their specified goals with 
effectiveness, efficiency and satisfaction is the most important measure of accessibility. 
Overall, the Study found that there is insufficient evidence to establish that the 
development of the Portable Document Format and improvements in assistive 
technologies have advanced enough for PDF files to be considered accessible for people 
with a disability, particularly for those who are blind or have low vision. 
Importantly, the Study also highlighted that the issues contributing to the inaccessibility 
of PDF files, when used with assistive technologies, are not in general directly 
attributable to the Portable Document Format itself. The issues that result in an 
inaccessible PDF file are, in order of impact: 
•  the design of the PDF file by the document author to incorporate the correct 
presentation, structure, tags and elements that maximise accessibility;
•  the technical ability of the assistive technology to interact with the PDF file (via the 
relevant PDF Reader); and
•  the skill of the user and their familiarity with using their assistive technology to 
interact with a PDF file. 
It should be noted that access to information in any file format, not only PDF, is 
significantly diminished for assistive technology users if there is no consideration given 
to these three issues. This Study focused solely on the Portable Document Format as this 
format is most often the subject of web accessibility complaints. 
Furthermore, other than WCAG 2.0 Success Criteria, the Study could not identify an 
agreed definition on what constitutes an accessible PDF file to enable its accessibility 
across a wide range of assistive technologies. While the Study identified a body of work 
being undertaken to establish a set of guidelines for the creation of accessible PDF files 
by the PDF Universal Access Committee (PDF/UA), the guideline is in draft and not due  
for release until at least 2011.
As the Government recently endorsed WCAG 2.0, the Study used a number of WCAG 2.0 
Success Criteria in the technical evaluations to determine if the use of PDF files with 
assistive technologies could claim conformance against the Guidelines. Until further 
data is available on the characteristics of an accessible PDF file and there are Sufficient 
Techniques available to support the conformance of the PDF technology to WCAG 2.0, the 
Australian Government position recommending that alternative file formats be provided 
whenever PDF files are used should remain unchanged.
4
oNe exeCUtIve sUmmAry
Key findings
User consultations (Vision Australia)
•  PDF files are used by a wide variety of organisations and are commonly 
encountered. People who are blind or have low vision experience a high number of 
problems when accessing and interacting with PDF files, particularly with PDF files 
using multi-column designs;
•  Users did not understand the need or reason for information to be provided in PDF, 
particularly given the difficulties they experience using these files (i.e. supplying 
newsletters in PDF files was considered unnecessary); 
•  Users have no way of knowing if a file had been created in an accessible way before 
downloading and opening it; 
•  Screen readers are unable to interact with a document saved as an image only PDF 
file because images are not accessible to people who are blind. Poor quality scanned 
documents are also inaccessible to users who have low vision, as the ability to view 
and read a scanned PDF deteriorates when magnified;
•  To overcome problems using PDF files, a range of alternate methods are often 
employed, all of which require additional software, more time and extra effort and 
often have limited success; 
•  Employing workaround methods to access inaccessible PDF files results in a 
degraded experience when compared to accessing equivalent documents in other 
formats; and
•  PDF support in some assistive technologies was perceived as nonexistent  
(Braille Notetakers and DAISY player). 
Public online consultation (AGIMO) 
•  80% of respondents do not support the use of PDF files without alternate formats; 
•  Submissions made by people working in the field of web accessibility provide 
conditional support for the use of PDF files providing they are used appropriately, 
created accessibly and properly tested; 
•  Government submissions revealed that the use of PDF files was prolific and not 
always appropriate, but noted the Portable Document Format was still preferred 
over other formats;
•  Misinformation about the accessibility of the Portable Document Format exists  
and there is a significant lack of awareness on: 
–  when it is appropriate to use the Portable Document Format; 
–  how to author or create more accessible PDF documents; 
–  how to validate the accessibility of a PDF file; and 
–  the impact that poorly created PDF files have on people trying to access them. 
•  There is a need for updated, specific guidance on the use of PDF files and how to 
create them more accessibly;
•  The responsibility of document creators to consider accessibility was a strong 
theme in most submissions; and
•  The importance of the user experience confirmed the critical role that user testing 
must play in the development of accessible web content.
5
oNe exeCUtIve sUmmAry
Technical evaluation 
Common assistive technologies 
•  Limited statistical data is available about the number of people using  assistive 
technologies, and the type and versions they are using; 
•  The number of assistive technology users in Australia reported is relatively low 
compared to the number of people who are blind or have low vision;
•  Vendors and disability organisations indicate that ZoomText is the most commonly 
used screen magnification software and JAWS is the most commonly used screen 
reader; 
•  The usage of portable Braille Notetakers (BrailleNote and PAC Mate) is relatively 
low; and
•  Australian and international research shows the emergence of several free or 
low-cost screen reader options (NVDA, VoiceOver and SATOGO) that are starting to 
penetrate the market. 
vendor support 
•  Most vendors claimed to provide support or functionality in line with other formats 
(e.g. HTML or Microsoft Word); 
•  Assistive technology development is guided by emerging technologies and industry 
trends, and the core focus for research and development is now moving towards 
Web 2.0, Accessible Rich Internet Applications (ARIA and HTML 5);
•  Most vendors felt that the responsibility for PDF accessibility lies with document 
authors;
•  More accessible PDF files are required before vendors justify further research and 
development time for PDF over other emerging technologies; 
•  Adobe Reader is the most commonly-used PDF reader; developments to this 
application have enabled better support for  assistive technologies ; and
•  Support for PDF files was limited in earlier versions of assistive technologies 
(e.g. prior to JAWS version 8).
technical evaluation
•  The limitations of assistive technologies in interacting with PDF files,  were not well 
documented prior to this Study; 
•  Based upon the Adobe Test Suite evaluation and statements provided by vendors : 
–  33% of the most common assistive technologies used in Australia provide 
sufficient technical capability to interact with a PDF file (demonstrated through 
technical testing and vendors claims); these assistive technologies are JAWS, 
MAGic and ZoomText;  it is estimated that these products are used by 89% of 
the assistive technology user population; and
–  66% of the most common assistive technologies used in Australia provide 
partially sufficient or not sufficient technical capability to interact with a 
PDF file (i.e. partially or completely failed technical testing); these assistive 
technologies are PAC Mate, BrailleNote, NVDA, SATOGO, Voice Over and Window-
Eyes; it is estimated that these products  are used by 11% of the user population;
•  Of the assistive technologies that provided sufficient technical capability, JAWS 
(version 8 onward), was the only screen reader that successfully completed 
technical testing; 
6
oNe exeCUtIve sUmmAry
•  The magnification component of ZoomText (versions 8 & 9) and MAGic (versions 
9.5 – 11) provided sufficient technical capability based upon the Adobe Test Suite 
evaluation and vendor statements; 
•  No portable assistive technology devices commonly used in Australia currently 
provide sufficient support for PDF files; and
•  As at August 2010, there are no Sufficient Techniques available for the Portable 
Document Format to support WCAG 2.0 conformance.
User evaluations 
•  PDF files that have been optimised for accessibility provide an enhanced user 
experience;
•  Assistive technologies that provided sufficient technical capability (in interacting 
with a PDF file) still present usability issues that impact on a user’s ability to 
interact with PDF files; 
•  Issues encountered by the participants during the user experience were not, in 
general, directly related to the Portable Document Format itself. The issues that 
result in an inaccessible PDF file are, in order of impact: the design of the PDF file, 
the technical ability of the assistive technology, and the skill of the user; 
•  Participants achieved a 90% success rate for tasks completed on the documents 
optimised for accessibility (collection A) and a 60% success rate for tasks completed 
on PDF files representative of government documents (collection B); 
•  The time taken to complete the tasks was more acceptable when using the 
documents optimised for accessibility;
•  People who are blind and use screen readers experience the greatest difficulty 
in accessing and interacting with PDF files and this group also experienced on 
average, a higher number of issues compared to all the other disability groups; and
•  Some functionality provided by JAWS for other formats was not available for the 
Portable Document Format, e.g. users were unable to navigate the PDF files by 
paragraph. 
Conclusions
The findings of the Study raise the need for:
•  An updated position on the use of PDF files on government websites; including a 
review of the use of PDF files when the PDF/UA standard is released and Sufficient 
Techniques become available to satisfy WCAG 2.0 conformance;
•  An internationally-agreed position on the characteristics a PDF file must have for 
optimal accessibility and a transparent indication of the time and skill required to 
create such files; 
•  A study into the impact (cost and resource implications) in creating accessible  
PDF files; 
•  Better resources and tools to support people in the creation of accessible PDF files, 
including clear and centralised guidance for government agencies on: 
–  appropriate use of the Portable Document Format;
–  how to optimise PDF files for greater accessibility;
–  the importance of testing PDF files for accessibility; 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested