asp.net pdf viewer user control : Enable pdf thumbnails in software control project winforms azure asp.net UWP Online_Statistics_Education50-part62

In simple regression, the proportion of variance explained is equal to r
2
; in multiple 
regression, the proportion of variance explained is equal to R
2
.
In multiple regression, it is often informative to partition the sums of squares 
explained among the predictor variables. For example, the sum of squares 
explained for these data is 12.96. How is this value divided between HSGPA and 
SAT? One approach that, as will be seen, does not work is to predict UGPA in 
separate simple regressions for HSGPA and SAT. As can be seen in Table 2, the 
sum of squares in these separate simple regressions is 12.64 for HSGPA and 9.75 
for SAT. If we add these two sums of squares we get 22.39, a value much larger 
than the sum of squares explained of 12.96 in the multiple regression analysis. The 
explanation is that HSGPA and SAT are highly correlated (r = .78) and therefore 
much of the variance in UGPA is confounded between HSGPA or SAT. That is, it 
could be explained by either HSGPA or SAT and is counted twice if the sums of 
squares for HSGPA and SAT are simply added.
Table 2. Sums of Squares for Various Predictors
Predictors
Sum of Squares
HSGPA
12.64
SAT
9.75
HSGPA and SAT
12.96
Table 3 shows the partitioning of the sums of squares into the sum of squares 
uniquely explained by each predictor variable, the sum of squares confounded 
between the two predictor variables, and the sum of squares error. It is clear from 
this table that most of the sum of squares explained is confounded between 
HSGPA and SAT. Note that the sum of squares uniquely explained by a predictor 
variable is analogous to the partial slope of the variable in that both involve the 
relationship between the variable and the criterion with the other variable(s) 
controlled.
501
Enable pdf thumbnails in - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
create thumbnail from pdf; program to create thumbnail from pdf
Enable pdf thumbnails in - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
pdf thumbnail generator; print pdf thumbnails
Table 3. Partitioning the Sum of Squares
Source
Sum of Squares
Proportion
HSGPA (unique)
3.21
0.15
SAT (unique)
0.32
0.02
HSGPA and SAT 
(Confounded)
9.43
0.45
Error
7.84
0.38
Total
20.80
1.00
The sum of squares uniquely attributable to a variable is computed by comparing 
two regression models: the complete model and a reduced model. The complete 
model is the multiple regression with all the predictor variables included (HSGPA 
and SAT in this example). A reduced model is a model that leaves out one of the 
predictor variables. The sum of squares uniquely attributable to a variable is the 
sum of squares for the complete model minus the sum of squares for the reduced 
model in which the variable of interest is omitted. As shown in Table 2, the sum of 
squares for the complete model (HSGPA and SAT) is 12.96. The sum of squares 
for the reduced model in which HSGPA is omitted is simply the sum of squares 
explained using SAT as the predictor variable and is 9.75. Therefore, the sum of 
squares uniquely attributable to HSGPA is 12.96 - 9.75 = 3.21. Similarly, the sum 
of squares uniquely attributable to SAT is 12.96 - 12.64 = 0.32. The confounded 
sum of squares in this example is computed by subtracting the sum of squares 
uniquely attributable to the predictor variables from the sum of squares for the 
complete model: 12.96 - 3.21 - 0.32 = 9.43. The computation of the confounded 
sums of squares in analyses with more than two predictors is more complex and 
beyond the scope of this text.
Since the variance is simply the sum of squares divided by the degrees of 
freedom, it is possible to refer to the proportion of variance explained in the same 
way as the proportion of the sum of squares explained. It is slightly more common 
to refer to the proportion of variance explained than the proportion of the sum of 
squares explained and, therefore, that terminology will be adopted frequently here.
When variables are highly correlated, the variance explained uniquely by the 
individual variables can be small even though the variance explained by the 
variables taken together is large. For example, although the proportions of variance 
502
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Embedded page thumbnails. outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; 'create optimizing for Monochrome Image 'to enable dowmsampling for
create thumbnails from pdf files; show pdf thumbnail in html
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Embedded page thumbnails. outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; // create optimizing Monochrome Image -- // to enable downsampling for
how to make a thumbnail of a pdf; .pdf printing in thumbnail size
explained uniquely by HSGPA and SAT are only 0.15 and 0.02 respectively, 
together these two variables explain 0.62 of the variance. Therefore, you could 
easily underestimate the importance of variables if only the variance explained 
uniquely by each variable is considered. Consequently, it is often useful to consider 
a set of related variables. For example, assume you were interested in predicting 
job performance from a large number of variables some of which reflect cognitive 
ability. It is likely that these measures of cognitive ability would be highly 
correlated among themselves and therefore no one of them would explain much of 
the variance independent of the other variables. However, you could avoid this 
problem by determining the proportion of variance explained by all of the 
cognitive ability variables considered together as a set. The variance explained by 
the set would include all the variance explained uniquely by the variables in the set 
as well as all the variance confounded among variables in the set. It would not 
include variance confounded with variables outside the set. In short, you would be 
computing the variance explained by the set of variables that is independent of the 
variables not in the set.
Inferential Statistics
We begin by presenting the formula for testing the significance of the contribution 
of a set of variables. We will then show how special cases of this formula can be 
used to test the significance of R
2
as well as to test the significance of the unique 
contribution of individual variables.
The first step is to compute two regression analyses: (1) an analysis in which 
all the predictor variables are included and (2) an analysis in which the variables in 
the set of variables being tested are excluded. The former regression model is 
called the “complete model” and the latter is called the “reduced model.” The basic 
idea is that if the reduced model explains much less than the complete model, then 
the set of variables excluded from the reduced model is important.
The formula for testing the contribution of a group of variables is:
=






 1
=


where:
503
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
framework class. An advanced PDF editor enable C# users to edit PDF text, image and pages in Visual Studio .NET project. Support to
enable pdf thumbnails in; pdf no thumbnail
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK deployment on IIS in .NET
and set the “Physical path” to the place where you store XDoc.PDF.HTML5 Viewer Demo. Pool Defaults…" in the right panel, and set the value "Enable 32-Bit
create thumbnail jpg from pdf; generate pdf thumbnail c#
SSQ
C
is the sum of squares for the complete model,
SSQ
R
is the sum of squares for the reduced model,
p
C
is the number of predictors in the complete 
model,
p
R
is the number of predictors in the reduced 
model,
SSQ
T
is the sum of squares total (the sum of 
squared deviations of the criterion variable 
from its mean), and
N is the total number of observations
The degrees of freedom for the numerator is p
c
- p
r
and the degrees of freedom for 
the denominator is N - p
C
-1. If the F is significant, then it can be concluded that 
the variables excluded in the reduced set contribute to the prediction of the 
criterion variable independently of the other variables.
This formula can be used to test the significance of R
2
by defining the 
reduced model as having no predictor variables. In this application, SSQ
R
and p
R
0. The formula is then simplified as follows:
F
(pc,Npc−1)
=
SSQ
C
p
C
SSQ
T
SSQ
C
Np
C
−1
=
MS
explained
MS
error
which for this example becomes:
F=
12.96
2
20.80−12.96
105−2−1
=
6.48
0.08
=84.35.
504
VB.NET PDF - VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer Deployment on IIS
and set the “Physical path” to the place where you store XDoc.PDF.HTML5 Viewer Demo. Pool Defaults…" in the right panel, and set the value "Enable 32-Bit
pdf thumbnail viewer; create pdf thumbnail image
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
Enable batch changing PDF page orientation without other PDF reader control. Support to overwrite PDF and save rotation changes to original PDF file.
enable pdf thumbnail preview; thumbnail view in for pdf files
The degrees of freedom are 2 and 102. The F distribution calculator shows that p < 
0.001.
The reduced model used to test the variance explained uniquely by a single 
predictor consists of all the variables except the predictor variable in question. For 
example, the reduced model for a test of the unique contribution of HSGPA 
contains only the variable SAT. Therefore, the sum of squares for the reduced 
model is the sum of squares when UGPA is predicted by SAT. This sum of squares 
is 9.75. The calculations for F are shown below:
F
(1,102)
=
12.96−9.75
2−1
20.80−12.96
105−2−1
=
3.212
0.077
=41.80.
The degrees of freedom are 1 and 102. The F distribution calculator shows that p < 
0.001.
Similarly, the reduced model in the test for the unique contribution of SAT 
consists of HSGPA.
F=
12.96−12.64
2−1
20.80−12.96
105−2−1
=
0.322
0.077
=4.19.
!
The degrees of freedom are 1 and 102. The F distribution calculator shows that p = 
0.0432.
The significance test of the variance explained uniquely by a variable is 
identical to a significance test of the regression coefficient for that variable. A 
regression coefficient and the variance explained uniquely by a variable both 
reflect the relationship between a variable and the criterion independent of the 
other variables. If the variance explained uniquely by a variable is not zero, then 
the regression coefficient cannot be zero. Clearly, a variable with a regression 
coefficient of zero would explain no variance.
505
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
with XDoc.PDF SDK. Enable C#.NET Users to Create PDF OpenOffice Document (Odt, Ods, Odp) from PDF with .NET PDF Library in C# Class.
pdf file thumbnail preview; how to view pdf thumbnails in
VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in
VB.NET PDF - Read and Write PDF Metadata in VB.NET. Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata in Visual Basic .NET.
view pdf image thumbnail; generate pdf thumbnails
Other inferential statistics associated with multiple regression that are 
beyond the scope of this text. Two of particular importance are (1) confidence 
intervals on regression slopes and (2) confidence intervals on predictions for 
specific observations. These inferential statistics can be computed by standard 
statistical analysis packages such as R, SPSS, STATA, SAS, and JMP.
Assumptions
No assumptions are necessary for computing the regression coefficients or for 
partitioning the sums of squares. However, there are several assumptions made 
when interpreting inferential statistics. Moderate violations of Assumptions 1-3 do 
not pose a serious problem for testing the significance of predictor variables. 
However, even small violations of these assumptions pose problems for confidence 
intervals on predictions for specific observations.
1. Residuals are normally distributed:
As in the case of simple linear regression, the residuals are the errors of 
prediction. Specifically, they are the differences between the actual scores on 
the criterion and the predicted scores. A Q-Q plot for the residuals for the 
example data is shown below. This plot reveals that the actual data values at the 
lower end of the distribution do not increase as much as would be expected for 
a normal distribution. It also reveals that the highest value in the data is higher 
than would be expected for the highest value in a sample of this size from a 
normal distribution. Nonetheless, the distribution does not deviate greatly from 
506
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Enable extracting PDF text to another PDF file, and other formats such as TXT and SVG form. OCR text from scanned PDF by working with XImage.OCR SDK.
pdf files thumbnail preview; pdf thumbnail generator online
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Enable extracting PDF text to another PDF file, TXT and SVG formats. Support extracting OCR text from PDF by working with XImage.OCR SDK.
create pdf thumbnail; pdf thumbnail preview
normality.
!2
!1
0
1
2
!0.5
0.0
0.5
Normal'Q)Q'Plot
Theoretical1Quantiles
Sample1Quantiles
2. Homoscedasticity:
It is assumed that the variance of the errors of prediction are the same for all 
predicted values. As can be seen below, this assumption is violated in the 
example data because the errors of prediction are much larger for observations 
with low-to-medium predicted scores than for observations with high predicted 
scores. Clearly, a confidence interval on a low predicted UGPA would 
507
underestimate the uncertainty.
3. Linearity:
It is assumed that the relationship between each predictor variable and the 
criterion variable is linear. If this assumption is not met, then the predictions 
may systematically overestimate the actual values for one range of values on a 
predictor variable and underestimate them for another. 
508
Statistical Literacy
by David M. Lane
Prerequisites
Chapter 14: Regression Toward the Mean
In a discussion about the Dallas Cowboy football team, there was a comment that 
the quarterback threw far more interceptions in the first two games than is typical 
(there were two interceptions per game). The author correctly pointed out that, 
because of regression toward the mean, performance in the future is expected to 
improve. However, the author defined regression toward the mean as, "In nerd 
land, that basically means that things tend to even out over the long run."
What do you think?
Comment on that definition.
That definition is sort of correct, but it could be stated more 
precisely. Things don't always tend to even out in the long run. 
If a great player has an average game, then things wouldn't 
even out (to the average of all players) but would regress toward 
that player's high mean performance.
509
References
Schall, T., & Smith, G. (2000) Do Baseball Players Regress Toward the Mean? The 
American Statistician, 54, 231-235.
510
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested