asp.net pdf viewer user control : Thumbnail view in for pdf files Library application component asp.net html winforms mvc PIP_Teens_Social_Media_Final.pdf2-part639

Part 1.  
Teens and Social Media 
- 13 - 
Pew Internet & American Life Project 
Half of online teens post photos online.  
Often one of the anchoring elements of online profiles and blogs, digital photos are 
widely posted online by teens. With the proliferation of digital cameras and cell phone 
cameras in particular, many teens have the means to document the most mundane and 
profound moments of their lives through images and share those photos with family, 
friends, or the world at large by posting them online. About half of wired teens (47%) say 
they upload photos online where others can see them. Among adult internet users, a 
smaller portion (36%) of them say they upload photos.
13
Girls eclipse boys in photo posting. 
Online girls are far more likely to have posted photos online when compared with boys 
(54% vs. 40%). Older teens are also more active posters, with 58% of online teens ages 
15-17 posting photos, vs. 36% of younger teens ages 12-14. Older girls are the mega 
posters, with 67% of them uploading photos, compared with 48% of older boys. Younger 
girls and boys are equally as likely to upload photos; 39% of younger girls ages 12-14 
upload photos while 33% of younger boys do so.  
Teens who live in homes with high-speed internet access are better positioned to upload 
content, and it shows. While 51% of broadband teens upload photos online, just 39% of 
dial-up teens post photos. Likewise, teens who are online frequently are more engaged 
with photo posting; while 59% of those who go online daily post photos, just 29% of 
teens who go online several times per week or less often have uploaded photos. 
Teens who go online most often from home are considerably more likely to post photos 
when compared with those who are primarily at-school users. About half (51%) of online 
teens who access the internet mostly from home have uploaded photos, compared with 
36% of those with primary access at school. 
Most teens restrict access to their posted photos – at least some of the 
time. Girls are more restrictive photo posters. 
In recent years, much attention has been paid to how teens share information online. 
Parents  and  policymakers  shared  concerns  that  teens  were  revealing  too  much 
information online, putting them at risk for predation or reputational harm, now and in 
the future. Previously released Pew Internet & American Life Project research
14
suggests 
that teens are cognizant of the risks of placing personal information online. Two-thirds 
(66%) of teens with an online profile say they restrict access to it in some way, while just 
50% of online adults with profiles restrict access. And 56% of teens with online profiles 
13
Madden, Mary et al (2007) 
Digital Footprints: Online identity management and search in the age of  
transparency
http://www.pewinternet.org/PPF/r/229/report_display.asp
, pg 19. 
14
Lenhart, Amanda, & Madden., Mary. (2007) 
Teens, Privacy and Online Social Networks
, available at 
http://www.pewinternet.org/PPF/r/211/report_display.asp
Thumbnail view in for pdf files - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
cannot view pdf thumbnails in; html display pdf thumbnail
Thumbnail view in for pdf files - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
pdf preview thumbnail; thumbnail view in for pdf files
Part 1.  
Teens and Social Media 
- 14 - 
Pew Internet & American Life Project 
say they post false information of some kind on their profile. Teens also limit the type of 
real information they share about themselves online – only 11% of teens with profiles 
share both a first name and a last name online, and even fewer profile-owners (5%) share 
their full name, photos and city or state.
15
But beyond just sharing personal information, teens are savvy about how they share 
images and video as well. Few teens who upload photos online consistently share them 
without any restrictions. While 39% say they restrict access to their photos “most of the 
time,” another 38% report restricting access “only sometimes.” Just 21% of teens who 
post photos say they “never” restrict access to the images they upload. Online adults are 
more lax in restricting access to their online photos; 34% restrict access most of the time, 
24% some of the time, and 39% say they never restrict access to online photos. 
Girls are more likely to restrict access to their photos (“most of the time”) when 
compared with boys; 44% of girls who post photos regularly restrict access, while 33% 
of photo-posting boys do so. Older girls are even more protective of their images, with 
49% of photo-posting girls ages 15-17 restricting access most of the time vs. 29% of 
photo-posting older boys.  
One in seven online teens has posted video files on the internet. Boys 
lead the video-posting pack. 
Some 14% of all online teens say they have uploaded a video file online where others can 
watch it. In contrast, just 8% of online adults have uploaded a video.
16
In a striking 
departure from the trends observed with photo posting, online teen boys are nearly twice 
as likely as online teen girls to post video files (19% vs. 10%). Not even older girls – a 
highly-wired and active segment of the online teen population – can compete with boys 
in this instance; 21% of older boys post video, while just 10% of older girls do so.   
Videos are not restricted as often as photos. 
For the most part, teens who post video files want them to be seen. Just 19% of video 
posters say they restrict access to their videos “most of the time.” As previously 
mentioned, that compares to 39% of photo posting teens who usually set limits on who 
can view the photos they post.  
More than one-third of teens who post videos (35%) say they restrict access to their 
videos “only sometimes,” and 46% say they “never” limit who can watch their videos. 
Adult internet video posters have a similar profile of restrictiveness; 23% limit access to 
15
Different social networking websites have different requirements regarding information that can be or must 
be shared as well as tools each site offers to protect privacy, so as teens migrate to new sites, the kinds of 
information they share may change. 
16
Madden, Mary et al (2007) 
Digital Footprints: Online identity management and search in the age of  
transparency
http://www.pewinternet.org/PPF/r/229/report_display.asp
, pg 19. 
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
from other file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete using which VB.NET developers can redact, delete, view and save PDF Thumbnail Edit.
pdf thumbnail html; pdf first page thumbnail
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.PowerPoint
Tell C# users how to: create a new PowerPoint file and load PowerPoint; merge, append, and split PowerPoint files; insert, delete, move, rotate Create Thumbnail.
pdf thumbnail generator online; print pdf thumbnails
Part 1.  
Teens and Social Media 
- 15 - 
Pew Internet & American Life Project 
videos they post “most of the time,” 30% do so “some of the time,” and 42% never 
restrict who can watch videos they have posted. 
The group of teens who post videos (n=124) is too small to note any significant variations 
in privacy restrictions according to gender, age, or other demographic characteristics. 
Posting photos and videos starts a conversation. Most teens receive 
some feedback on the content they post online. 
The posting of content does not happen in a vacuum. Content is posted so that it might be 
seen by an audience, regardless of how that audience is limited by restrictions set on the 
content by the content poster. And often that audience responds to the content posted 
online, making the content as much about interaction with others as it is about sharing 
with them. About half (52%) of teens who post photos online say that people comment or 
respond to their photos “sometimes.” Another third (37%) say that their audience 
comments on their posted photos “most of the time.” Only 10% of teens who post photos 
online say that people “never” comment on what they’ve posted.  
Video posters report a similar incidence of commenting on the videos they post online – a 
little under half (48%) say that people “sometimes” comment on their video postings. 
Another quarter (24%) say that people comment on their online videos “most of the 
time.” A similar number (27%) say that they “never” get comments on posted videos.  
Comments and online conversation around content are not limited to images or videos 
posted online. As mentioned above, three-quarters (76%) of teens who use social 
networks report commenting on blog posts written by others. 
Content creators are not devoting their lives exclusively to virtual 
participation. They are just as likely as other teens to engage in most 
offline activities and more likely to have jobs.   
One of the persistent concerns that arises in policy circles, among parent advocates, and 
among health professionals is that teens might be too wrapped up in virtual life and that 
might turn them away from engagement in real-world social and academic activities. Our 
survey shows that content creators are just as likely as non-creators to participate in a 
most offline extracurricular activities and more likely to participate in certain specific 
offline activities.  
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.Word
Tell C# users how to: create a new Word file and load Word from pdf; merge, append, and split Word files; insert, delete, move, rotate Create Thumbnail.
create pdf thumbnails; can't view pdf thumbnails
Create Thumbnail in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
Web Image Viewer Installation; View and Display Images; Annotate & Redact Documents or Images; Create Thumbnail; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode & Decode
generate thumbnail from pdf; pdf thumbnail fix
Part 1.  
Online Content Creators Are More Active Offline than Non-
Creators 
Do you currently  participate in 
any of the following…? 
% of content 
creators who 
participate 
% of non-content 
creators who 
participate 
A club not affiliated with school 
like recreation league or church 
or youth group 
60% 
54% 
School sports program 
52 
51 
Other extracurricular like band 
42 
42 
School club like drama or 
language 
42* 
26 
Pew Internet & American Life Project Survey of Parents and Teens, October-November 2006. 
Content creators n=572, Non-content creators n=312. Margin of error for teens is ±4% 
Compared with non-content-creating teens, those who create content are more likely to 
report participating in school clubs, with 42% of content creators participating compared 
with 26% of non-creators. Content creators are also more likely to have a part-time job 
than  non-content-creators.  Twenty-four  percent  of  creators  have  a  part-time  job, 
compared with 18% of non-creators.   
Content creators are just as likely as non-creators to participate in a club or sports 
program that is not affiliated with their school, like a church youth group, recreation 
league, or community volunteer organization (60% of creators compared to 54% of non-
creators), a school sports program (52% compared to 51% of non-creators), or some 
other extracurricular activity like band (42% of both creators and non-creators).   
The “broadband effect” is waning among teens. 
Broadband access does not seem to be as significant a factor with regard to online teen 
content  creation.   In  2004,  the  difference  in  broadband  access  was  much  more 
pronounced between online teens that created content and those who did not.  At that 
time, over half of content creators (54%) had broadband access, compared with 46% of 
other online teens.  However, in our most recent survey, 76% of teen content creators 
report having a broadband internet connection at home, while 71% of teens who are not 
content creators say they connect to the internet using a high-speed connection.  The 
evening out of broadband access between content creator teens and other online teens is 
likely due to the wholesale increase of broadband penetration in households with 
teenagers.  Three-fourths (75%) of online teens reported having broadband internet 
connections at home in 2006, compared with 51% of online teens in 2004.
Teens and Social Media 
- 16 - 
Pew Internet & American Life Project 
Create Thumbnail Winforms | Online Tutorials
Winforms Image Viewer Installation; View and Display Create Thumbnail; Generate Barcodes on Your Documents; Processing; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode
thumbnail pdf preview; show pdf thumbnail in
VB.NET Image: Image and Doc Windows, Web & Mobile Viewers of
for users to do image displaying, thumbnail creation and compatible mobile phone or tablet to view, navigate, zoom are JPEG, PNG, BMP, GIF, TIFF, PDF, Word and
create thumbnail jpg from pdf; create pdf thumbnail
Part 2. 
Communications and social media 
Teens  inhabit  a  highly  social  world,  one  teeming  with  communications  options; 
nevertheless, teens generally default to more traditional media – telephones (either 
landline or cell) and face-to-face communication.  However, communication patterns are 
different among three groups of teens:  content creators, social networkers, and “multi-
channel teens” who use the internet, instant messaging, text messaging cell phones, 
and
social networks. 
Despite the influx of digital media into their lives, teens continue to rely 
on telephones to keep in touch with their friends. 
While text-based digital communication technologies are increasingly prevalent, the 
telephone continues to reign as the instrument of choice when teenagers want to interact 
with their friends. However, those who have cell phones and those who are avid internet 
users have different communications profiles from the entire teen population.  
Rank Order of Teen Daily Social Communications Choices 
The most popular methods of communicating with friends every  day 
Rank 
All Teens 
(n=935) 
Cell-using 
teens 
(n=618) 
Internet-using 
teens 
(n=886) 
Teens who use 
the internet 
and have
cell 
phones 
(n=601) 
Teens who use 
social network 
sites 
(n=493) 
Landline 
Cell phone 
Landline 
Cell phone 
Cell phone 
Cell Phone 
Landline 
Cell phone 
Landline 
Landline 
Face to face 
Text 
Face to face 
Text 
IM 
IM 
IM 
IM 
IM 
SNS 
Text 
Face to face 
Text 
Face to face 
Face to face 
SNS 
SNS 
SNS 
SNS 
Text 
Email 
Email 
Email 
Email 
Email 
Source:  Pew Internet & American Life Project Survey of Parents and Teens, October-November 2006.  Margin of error for 
teens is ±4%.
Teens and Social Media 
- 17 - 
Pew Internet & American Life Project 
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
Microsoft PowerPoint: PPT, PPTX, PPS, PPSX; PDF: Portable Document you to easily load and view web document fast speed with the help of thumbnail, page navigate
view pdf image thumbnail; generate pdf thumbnail c#
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
PDF Viewer provides C# users abilities to view, annotate, convert file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete C#.NET: Edit PDF Thumbnail.
show pdf thumbnails in; create pdf thumbnail image
Part 2. Communications and social media 
Teens and Social Media 
- 18 - 
Pew Internet & American Life Project 
Looking at how the average teen communicates with friends outside of school, phone, 
and face-to-face encounters are more common than online encounters. Nearly four in ten 
teens (39%) talk with their friends via landline every day, 35% talk by cell phone with 
friends, and 31% see their friends in person in settings outside of school. 
It is important to note, too, that text-based, face-to-face, and telephonic communications 
with friends are not mutually exclusive. Fully 74% of teens engage in two or more of 
these communications activities on a regular basis (defined here as more than once a 
week). 
Daily Social Communications Choices
The percent of teens who communicate with their friends every day via these methods 
Thinking about all the 
different ways you socialize 
and communicate with your 
friends...about how often do 
you…? 
All Teens 
(n=935) 
Cell-
using 
teens 
(n=618) 
Internet-
using 
teens 
(n=886) 
Teens who use 
the internet and 
have
cell phones 
(n=601) 
Teens who 
use social 
network sites 
(n=493) 
Talk to friends on landline 
telephone 
39% 
41% 
40% 
41% 
44% 
Talk on cell phone 
35 
55 
36 
55 
48 
Spend time with friends in 
person  
31 
34 
32 
34 
38 
Instant message 
28 
35 
30 
36 
42 
Send text messages 
27 
38 
28 
38 
36 
Send messages over social 
network sites 
21 
26 
23 
27 
41 
Send email  
14 
15 
15 
16 
21 
Source:  Pew Internet & American Life Project Survey of Teens and Parents, October-November 2006. n=935. Margin of error is ±4%.
Once different subpopulations of teens are considered, communication preferences do 
shift. Youth who own cell phones are considerably more likely to use their mobile 
phones to talk to friends daily than they are to pick any other option, with 55% of this 
group saying they use their cell phones everyday to talk to friends.  
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You can generate thumbnail image(s) from PDF file for quick viewing and further This class provides APIs for converting PDF files to other file formats.
pdf file thumbnail preview; how to make a thumbnail of a pdf
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.Excel
Tell C# users how to: create a new Excel file and load Excel; merge, append, and split Excel files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy and Create Thumbnail.
.pdf printing in thumbnail size; program to create thumbnail from pdf
Part 2. Communications and social media 
Teens and Social Media 
- 19 - 
Pew Internet & American Life Project 
“Multi-channel teens” who have many communications options are a 
breed apart. 
The youth ages 12-17 who say they are active in all the communications realms we 
probed have a distinctly different profile from other teens. Multi-channel teens – those 
who have mobile phones and internet access, send text messages and instant-messages, 
and use social network sites – have many pathways to contact their friends. This group 
constitutes a bit more than a quarter (28%) of all the teens in our sample. They are older 
than the full sample and more likely to be girls. Socioeconomic status and race or 
ethnicity differences are not statistically significant for this group. 
Multi-Channel Teens Are the Most Communicative 
The percent of teens who communicate with their friends every day via these 
methods 
All teens 
(n=935) 
Multi-channel teens 
(n=265) 
Talk to friends on landline telephone 
39% 
46% 
Talk on cell phone 
35 
70 
Spend time with friends in person  
31 
35 
Instant message 
28 
54 
Send text messages 
27 
60 
Send messages over social network sites 
21 
47 
Send email  
14 
22 
Source:  Pew Internet & American Life Project Survey of Parents and Teens, October-November 2006. 
Margin of error for teens is ±4%. Note: Multi-channel teens are defined as teens who use the internet, 
instant messaging, text messaging, social networks and have a mobile phone.
These highly wired and connected teens are notable for the intensity with which they use 
connective technologies, layering new technologies over old, while sustaining an overall 
higher likelihood of daily use of all technologies. Multi-channel teens are most likely to 
use their cell phones to reach out to friends and then turn to internet tools – instant 
messaging and social networking site tools. They are even more likely to use email than 
the general population of teens, though for them, as for the rest of the online teen 
population, email is the least popular communications choice. 
Part 2. Communications and social media 
Teens and Social Media 
- 20 - 
Pew Internet & American Life Project 
Face-to-face contact still matters.  
All of these technology-based communication methods still do not replace face-to-face 
communication for many teenagers.
17
In the general teen population, 31% of the teens in 
this survey reported that they spent time with friends in person doing social activities 
outside of school every day, 34% of teens reported that they did so several times a week, 
and 24% of teens reported that they spent time in-person with friends after school at least 
once a week. Older teens – the very people who are more often using other forms of 
communication like cell phones or instant messaging – are more likely to report spending 
time with friends in person doing social activities outside of school every day or several 
times a week than younger teens.  
Across the spectrum, the communication activity that changes the least is the frequency 
of face-to-face encounters; 31% of all teens have this kind of interaction with friends 
every day outside of school; 34% of cell phone owners do so; 35% of multi-channel teens 
have such encounters; and 38% of social network site users have in-person meetings with 
friends every day. 
Email continues to lose its luster among teens. 
Despite the power that email holds among adults as a major mode of personal and 
professional communication, it is not a particularly important part of the communication 
arsenal of today’s teens when they are dealing with their friends. According to focus 
group findings, email is falling into disfavor because teens have so many other options 
that allow immediate contact when they are away from computers, and because when 
they are on computers there are particular features of instant messaging and social 
network sites that make them more appealing ways to communicate. Said one high-
school-aged girl, “Email is becoming obsolete. MySpace is so much quicker. It’s like text 
messaging on your phone. You can send pictures.” 
Just 14% of all teens report sending emails to their friends every day, making it the least 
popular form of daily social communication.  Younger online girls are the exception; 
22% of girls ages 12-14 email friends daily, compared with 11% of younger boys and 
13% of older teens. When compared with the number of teens who report talking to their 
friends every day by instant message (28%) and with a cell phone (35%), the amount of 
daily email use is small.  
Girls and older teens are more frequent communicators. 
Girls engage in a wider array of communication activities when compared with boys, and 
do so with greater frequency.  Fully 95% of teenage girls participate several times a week 
in at least one communication activity, compared with 84% of boys. Similarly, older 
17
Note: Our question asked about face-to-face communication taking place outside of school. 
Part 2. Communications and social media 
Teens and Social Media 
- 21 - 
Pew Internet & American Life Project 
teens (ages 15-17) are more likely to engage in a large number of communications 
activities than are younger teens (ages 12-14).   
In particular, older teens are more likely than younger teens to communicate with their 
friends using a cell phone; 81% of teens ages 15-17 send text messages or talk to their 
friends on a cell phone, compared with 56% of teens ages 12-14. This discrepancy is 
largely due to higher levels of cell phone ownership among older teens; 77% of teens 
ages 15-17 own a cell phone, compared with 49% of teens ages 12-14.   
Teens Participate in an Abundance of Communications Activities**
% within each group who participate 
in the following number of 
communications activities several 
times a week or more:
Communications  
Activities 
1-2 
Activities 
3-4 
Activities 
5-7  
Activities 
All teens
10% 
31% 
31% 
28% 
Sex
Male
16 
35 
30 
19 
Female
26 
33 
36 
Age
12-14
16 
37 
28 
19 
15-17
24 
34 
37 
Source: Pew Internet & American Life Project Survey of Parents and Teens, October-November 2006. n=935. Margin of error for teens is 
±4%.**The communications activities referred to above are: spending time in person with friends, talking to friends on a landline, talking 
to friends on a cell phone, sending text messages to friends, emailing friends, instant messaging and sending messages to friends using 
social networking sites.
Content creators are more active communicators than non-creators. 
Overall, teens who create content are more likely than other teens to use text-based 
communication tools.  Sending messages through social networking sites is their most 
popular method for communicating with friends; 94% of content creators who use social 
network sites have sent a message to friend through a social network site, compared with 
86% of non-content-creators. Even though email is on the decline among teens in 
general, email is the surprise second most popular way of communicating with friends, 
with 79% of content creators saying that they’ve sent email to friends, compared with a 
little more than half (56%) of non-content-creators.  Instant messaging is nearly as 
popular as email, with 77% of content creators saying that they have sent and received 
instant messages, compared with just 53% of non-creators. Text messaging is another 
frequently cited communication tool, with 61% of content creators text messaging 
friends, compared with just 40% of non-creators. Voice-based communication tools – 
landline telephones and calls made on a cell phone –  are communication choices made 
equally by content creators and those who do not create content.   
Part 2. Communications and social media 
Teens and Social Media 
- 22 - 
Pew Internet & American Life Project 
Content creators are more likely than other teens to report communicating with their 
friends daily using all of the various means listed in this survey.  Content creators are 
more likely to spend time with their friends every day, to talk to their friends either on a 
landline or cell phone every day, to send texts to their friends every day, to instant 
message with their friends on a daily basis, to send emails, and to send social networking 
site messages to their friends than non-content-creators.   
Content creators stand out from non-content-creators in their intense daily use of instant 
messaging and social networking sites to communicate with friends. Fully 36% of 
content creators say they IM their friends every day compared with just 20% of non-
content-creators, and 30% of content creators say they send messages to friends over 
social networking sites daily compared with only 10% of non-content-creators. There is 
significant overlap in the content creator and multi-channel teens populations – 36% of 
content creators are also multi-channel teens, compared with just 13% of non-creators. 
Content Creators Have Plenty to Say 
Thinking about all the different ways you socialize or communicate with 
friends…About how often do you…? 
Content 
creators 
(n=572) 
Non-
content-
creators 
(n=312) 
Talk on cell phone every day † 
58% 
48% 
Talk to friends on landline every day 
45 
32 
Spend time with friends in person every day 
36 
25 
Instant Message 
36 
20 
Send texts every day 
33 
19 
Send messages over SNS sites every day 
30 
10 
Send email every day 
18 
Source:  Pew Internet & American Life Project Survey of Parents and Teens, October-November 
2006. Margin of error is ±4.  All differences between the percentages in each row are 
statistically significant. 
† 
of teens that have a cell phone (n=618). 
Social network users are intense communicators, too. 
Overall, social network users are also “super-communicators,” utilizing all types and 
methods of communication to stay in touch with their friends with a frequency 
unmatched by other teens. Nearly two-thirds (63%) of cell-phone-owning social 
network users make cell phone calls to their friends on a daily basis, while 41% of 
cell phone owners who do not use social networks report calling friends with a cell 
phone daily. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested