*Earlier versions of this paper have been presented at the 1996 Workshop on
Comparative Issues in Romanian Syntax held at the University of New Brunswick, Saint John,
Canada; at the 1996 Going Romance conference held in Utrecht, the Netherlands; at the 1997
Linguistic Symposium  on Romance Languages  held  at UC Irvine, and at  the  1997  Hopkins
Optimality Theory Workshop & University of Maryland Mayfest in Baltimore. I would like to
thank audiences at these meetings for their comments, criticisms, and suggestions. I am very
grateful to my consultants who patiently dealt with all my data questions: Lidia Mangu, Ciprian
Chelba, Donka Farkas, and Virginia  Motapanyane for Romanian; Boris Nikolov and Marina
Todorova for Bulgarian and and Olga Tomiƒ for Macedonian. Thanks also to Luigi Burzio and
Paul Smolensky for their comments and suggestions. 
Optimal Romanian clitics:A cross-linguistic perspective
*
Géraldine Legendre
1. Introduction
Romanian  shares  with  other  Balkan  languages  a  very  rich  clitic
inventory. This inventory includes nominal clitics, such as the definite article
and possessive adjectives which encliticize to the first word of a noun phrase,
and clausal clitics which typically procliticize to the verb. Romanian clausal
clitics  --  the  focus  of  this  paper  --  include  not  only  familiar  pronominal
elements, but also tense/aspect auxiliaries, modal particles, and even intensity
adverbs (Mallinson 1986; Rivero 1994; Dobrovie-Sorin 1994). These elements
are commonly referred to as clitics because they are phonologically dependent
on a  host and they display word order properties that distinguish them from
their non-clitic counterparts, as discussed further below. 
One enduring feature of generative grammar is syntactic movement.
For example, elements which by virtue of their thematic properties occupy a
right periphery position in a  clause may instead surface at the left periphery
because they have undergone movement to a higher (leftward) position. This
is the case for wh-phrases in many languages. This has also been claimed for
object clitics in Romance following Kayne (1975). While some scholars have
since  argued  against  a  movement  analysis  of  object  clitics,  one  important
assumption behind Kayne’s original analysis has gone virtually unchallenged
among generative syntacticians. It is the view that clitic elements are generated
in the syntax and as such obey syntactic constraints.
The  present  paper  challenges  this  assumption, arguing  instead  that
clitics instantiate functional features which are are realized morphologically as
phrasal affixes. On  a par  with lexical affixes  -- an alternative  way in  which
functional  features  may  be  instantiated  --  phrasal  affixes  are  subject  to
Pdf thumbnail preview - software SDK dll:C# PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
www.rasteredge.com
Pdf thumbnail preview - software SDK dll:VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
www.rasteredge.com
Comparative studies in Romanian syntax
2
alignment  constraints  which  favors  their  realization  at  the  edge  of  some
domain. 
The  empirical  starting  point  of  the  analysis  is  the  existence  of  a
Romanian puzzle from the point of view of current standard assumptions about
clitics, functional categories, and verb movement. This puzzle has four parts.
First,  Romanian  questions  do  not  undergo  subject-auxiliary
(henceforth SA) inversion:
(1)
a.
Ce      a           spus Ion?
what aux3
SG
said John
‘What has John said?’
b. 
Cu   cine     te   -ai         dus la litoral?  
with whom refl aux2
SG
go the coast
‘With whom did you go to the coast?’
Rather, the subject follows the auxiliary-verb sequence. SA in English (What
has John said?) is standardly analyzed as I to C movement of the auxiliary has
across the subject NP in SpecIP. What blocks such an analysis in Romanian
(*ce a Ion spus) is unclear, apart from the fact that a clitic auxiliary is involved.
It is all the more puzzling because Romanian has relatively free word order; in
particular,  subjects  may  freely  occur  in  pre-  or  post-verbal  position
(Motapanyane 1989, 1991).
Secondly, examples like (1a,b) also raise the issue of the number and
type of landing sites for verbal elements. If the lexical verb is in C, where is the
auxiliary? One could entertain the view that the subject is in specVP and the
auxiliary in C. The question then becomes: Where is the past participle? Note
that it couldn’t be under Tense or Agr, given its non-finite status.
Third, positive imperatives show encliticization while questions and
declarative statements show proclitization. Compare (2) with (1) and (3).
(2)
Las| m
|
!
leave me-
IMP
‘Leave me!’
(3)
(Nu)   l-   am-       v|zut. 
neg  him aux1
SG
seen     
‘I have (not) seen him.’
Why  do positive  imperatives differ from wh-questions with  respect  to clitic
placement if they also involve V movement to C, as proposed in Rivero (1994),
software SDK dll:How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
With the SDK, you can preview the document content according to the preview thumbnail by the ways as following. C# DLLs for Word File Preview. Add references:
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK dll:How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
With the SDK, you can preview the document content according to the preview thumbnail by the ways as following. C# DLLs: Preview PowerPoint Document.
www.rasteredge.com
Optimal Romanian clitics
3
Rivero and Terzi (1995), and Dobrovie-Sorin (1994, 1995)?  If, on the other
hand,  imperatives  do  not  involve  V  movement,  why  do  they  differ  from
declarative structures like (3), where clitics precede V? 
Fourth  and  last,  negative  imperatives,  in  contrast  to  positive
imperatives, show procliticization.
(4)
Nu m
|
l|sa!
neg me leave-
IMP
'Don’t leave me!'
What,  if  anything,  is  common  to  negative  imperatives,  questions,  and
declarative  statements  (including  negative  ones)?  Romanian  negative
imperatives  do  exhibit  a  change  in  morphology,  from  imperative  in  (2)  to
infinitive in (4). What does this have to do with the change in clitic position?
In other words, are the two properties -- change of clitic position and change
in morphology -- related or independent of each other?
I  will  propose  the  following  answers  framed  in  Optimality  Theory
(Prince and Smolensky 1993). One, Romanian clitic auxiliaries do not allow
SA inversion in questions because these clitics do not have the status of head
which is required for SA inversion; rather they are phrasal affixes instantiating
functional features which might in some other language be realized as lexical
affixes. Using the usual terminology, V itself moves to C with the result that
overt subjects appear postverbally. Two, a consequence of removing clausal
clitics from the syntax is that the question of landing sites for the auxiliary and
the  past  participle  does  not  even  arise.  Three,  clitic  placement  differs  in
questions  and  positive  imperatives  for  two  reasons:  (a)  questions  but  not
imperatives  involve  verb  movement;  (b)  the  position  of  clitic  pronouns  is
regulated by the ranking of a set of alignment constraints which favor realizing
all features at the left edge of a domain which provisionally can be assumed to
be  the  clause.  A  competition  for  this  very  spot  ensues  among  the  various
features, which is resolved by ranking the constraints in a language-particular
order.  Hence,  alignment  constraints  are  violable.  Four,  Romanian  negative
imperatives exhibit procliticization rather than encliticization because of the
constraint ranking. The difference between positive and negative imperatives
lies in which constraints are fatal. Briefly, the presence of [neg], which more
than any other feature needs to be at the left edge of the clause, changes the
character of the competition.  Finally, the morphology of Romanian negative
imperatives is non-finite rather than finite because, among other things, the top-
ranking of the constraint on [neg] forces the feature [finite] of the input to be
software SDK dll:How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET. To Preview Images in WinForm Application.
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK dll:How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
document in memory. With the SDK, you can preview the document content according to the preview thumbnail by the ways as following.
www.rasteredge.com
Comparative studies in Romanian syntax
4
unparsed. 
The view defended here shares the late- and post-GB claim that word
order phenomena are to a large extent grounded in morphology. One important
difference  lies  in  the  present  claim  that  the  influence  of  morphology  is  not
mediated by syntax but rather is direct. As we shall see, some crucial aspects
of word order in individual languages result from the interaction of syntactic
constraints with morphological constraints rather than from a syntacticization
of inflectional morphology. The second difference is that constraint satisfaction
crucially involves optimization. Its present implementation follows the basic
tenets of Optimality Theory (OT, Prince and Smolensky 1993). In OT, cross-
linguistically, variation is predicted to be the norm since the constraints are re-
rankable. In the limited scope of this paper, I will demonstrate how reranking
of  the  constraints  proposed  in  the  Romanian  analysis  yields  the  different
patterns observed in two Balkan languages, Macedonian and Bulgarian, and
one Romance language, Italian. Overall, the view of cliticization defended here
bears strong affinity with the view that clitics are phrasal affixes inserted post-
syntactically in the morphological component of the grammar (Klavans 1985;
Anderson 1992, 1993). The Optimality Theory (OT) framework adopted here
makes  it  possible  however,  to  dispense  with  the  standard  serial  view  and
instead focus on the interaction between the morphological properties of clitics
and the syntactic properties of other elements they interact with.
The rest of the paper is organized as follows. Section 2 is devoted to
a  comparative analysis of Romanian clitics. Section  2.1  argues  for  the non-
syntactic status of clitic auxiliaries and informally introduces the basic idea of
optimization. Section 2.2 summarizes the basic claims of OT.  Section 2.3 has
two foci. One is clitic clustering, a defining property of clitics which forms the
core of the present proposal. The other is finiteness, which interacts with clitic
placement  in  Balkan.  Finiteness  is  argued  to  behave  like  a  clitic;  hence  it
naturally falls under the same analysis. Language-internal variation is discussed
in section 2.4 and cross-linguistic variation in section 2.5. Section 3 focuses on
verb movement in Romanian questions and the interaction between structural
and morphological constraints. Section 4 focuses on Romanian imperatives; it
includes a comparative study of Italian imperatives. Section 5 closes the paper
with a detailed summary of the proposal.
2. A comparative study of Romanian clitics
2.1. Clitic vs. non-clitic auxiliaries
software SDK dll:How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Word
Preview Document. Conversion. Convert Word to PDF. Convert Word Convert Word to ODT. Convert PDF to Word. Text Search. Insert Image. Thumbnail Create. Thumbnail Create
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK dll:How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for PowerPoint
Preview Document. Conversion. Convert PowerPoint to PDF. Convert PowerPoint to Pages. Annotate PowerPoint. Text Search. Insert Image. Thumbnail Create.
www.rasteredge.com
Optimal Romanian clitics
5
In Romanian, possibility is expressed by means of the modal auxiliary
a  putea  ‘can,  may’  followed  by  an  infinitival  lexical  verb.  In  declarative
sentences, the subject typically precedes an inflected form of a putea.
(5)
a.
Ion   putuse      veni.
John could3
SG
come
'John had been able to come.'
b. 
Poate       Ion    veni   mîine? 
can3
SG
John come tomorrow
‘Can John come tomorrow?’
Romanian questions follow various strategies, including  purely intonational
means. One strategy of particular interest here involves SA inversion, as shown
in (5b). Under standard assumptions, SA inversion is analyzed as movement
of the  auxiliary to C (the issue  of  where the auxiliary is generated need not
concern us here). In this respect, a putea behaves like main verbs which also
move to C in questions. 
(6)
a.
Vine         Ion?
come3
SG
John
‘Is John coming?’
b.
De     ce     atîrn|       sl|nina? 
(Mallinson 1986,10)
from what hang3
SG
bacon-det?
‘What is the bacon hanging from?’
There are (at least) two additional distributional arguments in favor of
assigning  the  same  syntactic  status  to  main  verbs  and  a  putea.  First,  the
pronominal feminine singular clitic o must precede the lexical verb in simple
tenses (i.e. in the absence of a clitic auxiliary), as shown in (7a). O must also
precede putea (7b).
(7)
a. 
Ion    o    apreciaz|.  (*Ion  apreciaz| o).
John her appreciate3
SG
‘John appreciates her.’
b. 
  pot        vedea.   (*pot vedea-o).
her can1
SG
see 
‘(I) can see her.’ 
The  remaining  evidence  lies  in  the  distribution  of  the  adverb  mai
software SDK dll:C# Image: View & Operate Web Page Using .NET Doc Image Web Viewer
Support multiple document and image formats, like PDF and TIFF; Thumbnail images order of source document file using mouse dragging in thumbnail preview section;
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK dll:How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Excel
Preview Document. Conversion. Convert Excel to PDF. Convert Excel to Insert Image. Thumbnail Create. Thumbnail Create. |. Home ›› XDoc.Excel ›› C# Excel
www.rasteredge.com
Comparative studies in Romanian syntax
6
1 In Rivero (1994) poate is generated under AuxP and moves to T/Agr. An account
consistent with her assumptions might alternatively base-generate mai on Auxo in (8c), but it
would fail to explain why mai fails to be base-generated on Auxo in (9b). Alternatively, one might
incorporate PF movement of mai to the analysis, perhaps along the lines of Halpern (1995). Under
Halpern’s  Prosodic  Inversion  analysis,  clitics  in  Balkan  languages  such  as  Serbo-Croatian,
Bulgarian are generated in leftmost clausal position in the syntax and moved to the right at PF the
minimum distance necessary to allow them to satisfy their phonological dependency. Extending
this analysis to Romanian, however, is problematic in several ways. First, there is no evidence in
Romanian verbal clitics for the type of phonological dependency (Wackernagel’s second position
effects) that underlies the Prosodic Inversion analysis. Hence, a clitic adverb like mai would have
to be moved to various degrees of distance away from its syntactic position, depending on which
auxiliaries are present in the structure. Second, there is no syntactic evidence independent of the
pattern to be explained for generating clitic adverbs like mai at the left edge of the clause, the left
edge of AuxP, or the left edge of VP. Third, PF movement would have to be idiosyncratically
restricted to a subclass of clitics.  I conclude that PF movement is not a viable solution to the
problem posed by the distribution of mai in the context of clitic and non-clitic auxiliaries.
'again' (or 'no longer' when used with the negative particle nu). According to
Mallinson (1986), Dobrovie-Sorin (1994), and Rivero (1994),  mai  ‘again’ is
one of a small class of monosyllabic VP adverbs which have the status of clitic.
Evidence for its clitic status comes from the fact that the distribution of mai is
different  from that of regular VP adverbs. The standard position in  a simple
tense for a  VP adverb  like des  ‘often’ is postverbal, as shown in (8a).  Mai
always precedes the main verb, as shown in (8b). As expected, mai must also
precede putea, as shown in (8c). 
(8)
a.
Elevii    mei  v|d       des   filme bune.
students my see3
PL
often movies good
‘My students see often good films.’
b. 
Ion     îl   mai viziteaz|.
John him still  visit3
SG
‘John is still visiting him.’
c.
Nu mai  poate      scrie.
neg still can3
SG
write
‘(He) cannot write again.’
As independently noted in Dobrovie-Sorin (1994, 26), the distribution of mai
is especially problematic for Rivero (1994)'s approach. Based on the fact that
mai  immediately precedes  the  main verb  in  simple (and  compound)  tenses,
Rivero proposes to base-generate mai on the lexical verb and have the complex
clitic+V
o
move to T/Agr. This account, however, cannot be extended to (8c) in
which mai precedes the modal auxiliary rather than the lexical verb.
1
software SDK dll:How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.PowerPoint
document (ODP). Empower to navigate PowerPoint document content quickly via thumbnail. Able to you want. Create Thumbnail. See this
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK dll:How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.Word
Tell C# users how to: create a new Word file and load Word from pdf; merge, append, and split Word files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy Create Thumbnail.
www.rasteredge.com
Optimal Romanian clitics
7
Romanian makes use of perfect, future, and conditional auxiliaries in
compound tenses. They systematically differ from a putea and main verbs with
respect to the distribution of o, mai, and SA inversion. In (9a), o follows the
main  verb.  Many  speakers  consider the alternative  order  (o  a  v
|
zut) with  o
preceding the perfect auxiliary ungrammatical while some scholars characterize
it  as  archaic  (de  Kok  1989).  Mai  follows  the  perfect  auxiliary  instead  of
preceding it,  as shown in  (9b).  (9b) suggests that  mai is the  last clitic  in the
Romanian  cluster  which  includes  the  negative  particle,  clitic  pronouns,
auxiliaries,  and  mai,  in  that  order.  This  is,  in  fact,  the  position  taken  in
Dobrovie-Sorin (1994).
(9)
a.
           v|zut-o.
aux3
SG
seen her
‘(He) has seen her.’ 
b.
Nu    l-     am       mai v|zut.
neg him   aux1
SG
still seen
‘(I) have not seen him anymore.’
Finally, these auxiliaries may not undergo SA inversion, as shown in (10) for
the perfect auxiliary.
(10)
a.
A           venit copilul     de    la magazin?  ( Mallinson 1986,
5)
aux3
SG
come child-the  from the shop
'Has the child come from the shop?'
b.
Ce     a          spus Ion?
what aux3
SG
said John
‘What has John said?’
Placing  the  subject  between  the  auxiliary  and  the  main  verb  leads  to
ungrammaticality.  Note,  however,  that  there  is  SA  inversion  in  (10),  albeit
between  the  non-finite  main  verb  (appearing  as  a  past  participle)  and  the
subject. This shows that inversion is not conditioned by the mere presence of
a finite verbal element. 
Another way of characterizing the phenomenon is to say that the clitic
auxiliary is completely inactive in (10): whether it is present or absent in the
structure does not affect other elements. This amounts to claiming that the clitic
auxiliary is not present in the syntax. Put another way, it is not a head -- not a
node in the tree -- but merely a phrasal affix. One approach is to stipulate the
Comparative studies in Romanian syntax
8
2 See Everett (1996) for an independent claim that the lexicon contains phi-features.
3 Under the traditional view of morphology and phonology as post-syntactic
components, clitics would be morpho-phonological spell-outs of the functional features contained
in the lexicon or phrasal affixes (and hence differ from word-level affixes merely in terms of the
domain of affixation). Such a proposal is in fact worked out in Klavans (1985) and Anderson
(1992).  From  the  perspective  of  OT,  optimization  is  global  (i.e. across  components  of  the
grammar) rather than serial. Thus, the present account will focus on the interaction between
morphological constraints on clitics and syntactic constraints on syntactic elements they interact
with.
4 The view that clitics occupy syntactic positions historically derives from the fact that
in some Romance languages, clitic pronouns satisfy case properties (Kayne, 1975). As is well-
known, this view is not without problems. Several Balkan languages, including Romanian and
status  (clitic  or  head)  of  each  functional  feature  in  the  lexicon  of  a  given
language.  An  alternative solution  more  in  the  spirit  of  OT  goes  roughly as
follows. Functional features like [perfect], [future], [conditional], [potential],
etc. are listed in the lexicon
2
. Their status is derived from a competition among
constraints on realizing features as separate syntactic heads, as lexical affixes
(inflection)  on  existing  syntactic  heads,  or  as  phrasal  affixes  (clitics)  on
existing phrases. To take an example, in Romanian the constraint on realizing
the  feature  [potential]as  a  separate  head  is  higher  ranked  that  constraints
realizing it as affixes (lexical and phrasal). Hence putea is realized as a node
in the tree. For the feature [perfect], however, the constraint realizing it as a
phrasal affix outranks the other two constraints. Hence, [perfect] is realized as
a  clitic.  Nothing  in  the  present  analysis  hinges  on  choosing  among  these
alternatives,  hence  I  take  up  the  analysis  at  the  point  where  the  status  of
particular features has been determined
3
.
There is considerable pre-theoretical evidence for the view that clitics
are phrasal affixes and need to be differentiated both from words and lexical
affixes (though some cases of clitics may in fact be lexical affixes; this is the
case for Romanian negative ne- ‘un-’ and some adverbs). To mention only a
few taken from the work of Zwicky  and Pullum (1983)  and Zwicky (1985),
lexical  affixes  show  a  high  degree  of  selection  with  respect  to  their  hosts;
clitics,  in  particular  second-position  varieties,  don’t.  Clitics  can  attach  to
material  already  containing  clitics;  lexical  affixes  can’t.  Syntactic  rules can
affect  affixed  words  but  not  clitic  groups  nor  clitics  themselves  (see  also
Klavans  1985;  Anderson  1992,  1993;  and  Miller  1992).  Moreover,  clitic
pronouns do not display any of the standard structural properties of nominal
categories: they do not take a  specifier or any complements;  they cannot be
modified nor conjoined.
4
In addition, clitics obey word-order restrictions not
Optimal Romanian clitics
9
Macedonian, require clitic doubling in some contexts, casting doubts on a simple case connection.
In  the  context  of  an  analysis  of  French  Complex  Inversion,  Legendre  (1998a)  provides  a
preliminary account of case that incorporates case visibility, case agreement, and case economy.
constraining  their non-clitic counterparts. A particularly challenging class is
second-position clitics,  where second-position  must be  prosodically  defined
(e.g. Serbo-Croatian). Anderson (1993), Halpern (1995), among others, have
explicitly argued that Serbo-Croatian clitics cannot be handled in the syntax.
To return to Romanian, the basic claim here is that the auxiliary putea
heads a syntactic projection while perfect, future, and conditional auxiliaries
do not. SA inversion requires a verbal head (in C). In Romanian, auxiliaries
other  than  putea  are  not  syntactic  heads.  Hence,  they  do  not  trigger  SA
inversion.  
The specific morphological proposal made here is that phrasal affixes,
on  a  par  with  lexical  affixes,  are  subject  to  alignment  constraints,  a  claim
previously made in Anderson (1996) and Legendre (1996). Applied to features,
alignment  constraints  like  E
DGEMOST
(Prince  and  Smolensky  1993)  favor
aligning their phonological realization at the (left) edge of a  particular domain.
(11) states that  the  domain is the  extended V' projection of V.  This will  be
motivated in the course of the analysis.
(11)
E
DGE
M
OST
(F,
L
EFT
)
= E(F): The PF realization of a feature [F] is left-
aligned with the edge of the extended V’ projection of the head [F] is
associated with.
Such  edge-alignment constraints  are entirely  familiar  from the  OT  morpho-
phonology  literature.  They  are  created  by  a  generalized  constraint  schema
called  A
LIGN
(Category
1
,  Edge
1
;  Category
2
,  Edge
2
)  (McCarthy  and  Prince
1993a,b).  Alignment  constraints  have  recently  been  extended  to  focus
constructions (Samek-Lodovici 1996, 1998; Legendre 1998a; Costa to appear).
Their  relevance  to  clitics  has  been  amply  demonstrated  in  Klavans  (1985),
albeit in a completely different framework.
As  is  well-known,  one  trait  shared  by  Balkan  languages  is  the
existence of clitic auxiliaries. In this respect, it is interesting to note that their
position  in the  clause  is subject  to variation. (12) shows  a  minimal  contrast
between Romanian and Bulgarian, two null-subject languages which make use
of clitic auxiliaries in compound tenses.
(12)
a. R
Am         plecat.
Comparative studies in Romanian syntax
10
aux1
SG
left
‘(I) have left.’
b. B
Pro…el s
ß
     knigata.
read   aux1
SG
book-the
‘I have read the book.’
In  the  absence  of  any  other  clitics,  the  perfect  auxiliary  is  clause-initial  in
Romanian  but  in  second  position  in  Bulgarian.    At  first  glance,
E
DGEMOST
(
PERF
)  seems simply  to  be  satisfied in  Romanian but  violated  in
Bulgarian.  It’s  not  that  simple,  however,  because  some  clitic auxiliaries  do
appear clause-initially in Bulgarian. This is the case for the future auxiliary šte.
(13)
a. R
Va          mai  vedea-o.
will1
SG
again see    her
‘(I) will see her again.’
b. B
Šte   mu     go  dadete.
will to=him it   gave2
SG
‘(You) will give it to him.’
On  the  one  hand,  (13b)  shows  that  Bulgarian  is  not  a  strict  Wackernagel
language.  On  the  other,  it  shows  the  effect of  E
DGEMOST
(
FUT
), completely
parallel to its role in Romanian. We can make sense of the contrast between
Romanian and  Bulgarian  in (12)  and the contrast  within Bulgarian between
(12b) and (13b) in exactly the same terms. First, the position of auxiliary clitics
derives from the interaction of two constraints rather than the effect of a single
constraint  like  E
DGEMOST
(F). The  second  constraint,  N
ON
I
NITIAL
(F),  has  a
long history in Romance linguistics where it is known as the Tobler-Mussafia
Law.  In  our  terms,  it  is  simply  a  constraint  which  disfavors  clitics  in
intonational phrase-initial position.  Cross-linguistic evidence that the domain
is prosodic rather clausal or phrasal is discussed in details in Legendre (in press
a).
(14)
N
ON
I
NITIAL
(F):  [F]  is  not  realized    in  intonational phrase-initial
position.
Second, consider how the interaction of constraints (11) and (14) results in the
pattern in (12). Note that the two constraints can never be satisfied at once.  If
a structure violates N
ON
I
NITIAL
(F), E
DGEMOST
(
PERF
) will be satisfied; this is
the  case in  Romanian.  Conversely,  if  a  structure violates  E
DGEMOST
(
PERF
),
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested