Optimal Romanian clitics
11
N
ON
I
NITIAL
(F) will be satisfied; this is the case in Bulgarian. In other words,
(12a) and (12b) can be  simply derived  from alternative rankings  of two
constraints  on  phrasal  affixes:    E
DGEMOST
(
PERF
)
>>
N
ON
I
NITIAL
(F)  in
Romanian versus N
ON
I
NITIAL
(F)
>>
E
DGEMOST
(
PERF
) in Bulgarian. In other
words,  constraints  are  violable  and  hierarchically  ranked  --    the  most
fundamental claim made by OT.
(13) involves a different functional feature: [future]. In both languages,
the feature is realized as a phrasal affix in domain-initial position. Hence,
E
DGEMOST
(
FUT
) must outrank N
ON
I
NITIAL
(F). 
(15)
Preliminary Rankings:
a. Romanian:
E
DGEMOST
(
FUT
),
E
DGEMOST
(
PERF
)
>>
N
ON
I
NITIAL
(F)
b. Bulgarian: E
DGEMOST
(
FUT
)
>>
N
ON
I
NITIAL
(F)
>>
E
DGEMOST
(
PERF
)
The symbol >> signals strict ranking. The use of a comma, as in the Romanian
ranking, signals that the two E
DGEMOST 
constraints are unranked with respect
to each other. The future and the perfect auxiliary do not co-occur, hence there
is no evidence for their relative ranking. 
In summary, I have argued that Romanian clitic auxiliaries differ from
non-clitic auxiliaries in that the former do not head syntactic projections. As
phrasal affixes, their insertion into a clause is regulated by a hierarchy of
alignment constraints which compete for the left clausal edge. This renders
them syntactically inactive; hence they do not participate in SA inversion. Non-
clitic auxiliaries head syntactic projections of their own, and as such, do
participate in SA inversion. Romanian clitics appear in clause-initial position
while many of their Bulgarian counterparts show Wackernagel effects. This
follows from alternative rankings of two types of PF alignment constraints,
E
DGEMOST
(F)
and N
ON
I
NITIAL
(F).
2.2. Basic claims of Optimality Theory
The  analysis  of  two  clitic  auxiliary  patterns  in  Romanian  and
Bulgarian in section 2.1 illustrates some basic claims of  OT (Prince and
Smolensky 1993):
(i) Constraints are universal and violable in well-formed structures.
This is possible because constraints are ranked with respect to one another. A
Pdf thumbnails - application Library tool:C# PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
www.rasteredge.com
Pdf thumbnails - application Library tool:VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
www.rasteredge.com
Comparative studies in Romanian syntax
12
5 Faithfulness constraints are unique to OT (Prince and Smolensky, 1993). They include
P
ARSE
(all input material should be present in the output) and F
ILL
(all output material should be
present in the input). Legendre et al. (1995, 1998) document cross-linguistic effects of these two
constraints in the context of wh-movement. P
ARSE
also plays a role in the present analysis of
imperatives (see section 4).
6 The present candidate sets are clearly a subset of the universal set because they satisfy
some basic principles of X’-theory such as the presence of a head position in each projection and
XPs restricted to complement or specifier position. The present analysis assumes that X’-theory
principles are in Gen; hence, they are satisfied by all candidates. Ultimately, an OT theory of X’
principles must be added.
lower-ranked constraint may be violated so that a higher-ranked one may be
satisfied. One further aspect will be demonstrated below: a given constraint
violated  by  a  grammatical  sentence  in  one  context  may  be  fatal  to  an
ungrammatical  one  in  another  because  this  constraint  may  interact  with
constraints that are relevant in one context but not to another. 
(ii)  The  optimal  candidate  (and  only  the  optimal  candidate)  is
grammatical. 
(iii) The relative ranking of constraints is determined on a language-
particular basis. Thus a grammar is a particular ranking of universal constraints.
Constraint re-ranking and violability account for cross-linguistic variation: a
universal constraint may be violated in one language by virtue of being low-
ranked and not violated in another by virtue of being high-ranked (exactly the
case of Romanian vs. Bulgarian above). 
(iv) Markedness is inherent to the model: all constraints other than
faithfulness constraints -- which require that the output be maximally faithful
to the input
5
-- are markedness statements.  For example, the markedness
constraints  that  play  a  central  role  in  the  distribution  of  clitics  include
alignment constraints which form a family of constraints, E
DGEMOST
(F), where
[F] stands for any functional feature. Specific aspects of markedness result
from constraint ranking. Other markedness constraints will be introduced in the
course of the analysis. 
(v)  The  candidate  set  is  universal.  In  practice,  however,  it  is
convenient to limit the evaluation to a subset of the universal set or the ‘best
of the lot’.
6
The candidate set consists of alternative structural descriptions of
the input. For our purposes, we may assume that the input consists of lexical
items, argument structure, and functional features.
2.3. Clustering and finiteness effects
application Library tool:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Ability to show PDF page thumbnails for quick navigation. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. Navigate PDF document with thumbnails. 14. Text Search.
www.rasteredge.com
application Library tool:VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Ability to show PDF page thumbnails for quick navigation. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. Navigate PDF document with thumbnails. 14. Text Search.
www.rasteredge.com
Optimal Romanian clitics
13
Universally, clitics cluster. That is, they typically appear together and
the cluster-internal order is fixed. This clustering behavior is one important
property clitics share with lexical affixes. One way in which languages differ
is with respect to the cluster-internal order of clitics. In Romanian, clitic
pronouns  precede  tense/mood/aspect  auxiliaries,  as  shown  in  (16a).  In
Bulgarian,  it  is,  roughly  speaking,  just  the  reverse:  tense/mood/aspect
auxiliaries precede clitic pronouns.
(16) 
a. R
L-    am       v|zut.
him aux1
SG
seen
'(I) have seen him'.
b. B
Dal    s
ß
      mu       go.
given aux1
SG
to=him it
‘(I) have given it to him.’
Thus, languages differ not only with respect to the respective ranking of a
particular E
DGEMOST
(F) constraint with N
ON
I
NITIAL
(F) -- as illustrated in
section 2.1-- but also with respect to ranking within the E
DGEMOST
(F) family
of  constraints:  E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
)  outranks  E
DGEMOST
(
PERF
)  in  Romanian;
Bulgarian has the reverse order.  Note however, that the relative order of dative
and accusative clitics is shared by Romanian and Bulgarian, as shown in (17).
One important way in which this simple picture of Balkan languages
hides greater complexity is with respect to finiteness. To fully appreciate the
effect of finiteness, it is necessary to bring Macedonian into the picture.
(17)
a. R
Mi-    o          d|.
to me it
FEM
give3
SG
‘(He) gives it to me.’
b. M
Ti        go dade.
to=you it   gave3
SG
‘(She) gave it to you.’
c. B
Pokazax       mu      go pismoto.      (Tomiƒ 1996)
showed1
SG
to=him it the letter
‘(I) showed him the letter.’
All examples in (17) involve finite verbs. Despite the fact that Macedonian is
genetically a South-Slavic language, its basic clitic distribution patterns like
that  of  Romanian:
E
DGEMOST
(
DAT
)  and  E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
)  outrank
application Library tool:VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Embedded page thumbnails.
www.rasteredge.com
application Library tool:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Support of converting from any single one PDF page and multiple pages. Thumbnails can be created from PDF pages. Support for customizing image size.
www.rasteredge.com
Comparative studies in Romanian syntax
14
N
ON
I
NITIAL
(F) with the result that clitic pronouns appear clause-initially.
When non-finite verbs like gerunds are taken into consideration, the pattern
changes for Romanian and Macedonian: clitic pronouns follow the gerund in
clause-initial position. The pattern remains the same in Bulgarian.
(18)
a. R
V|zîndu-l...
‘Seeing him...’
b. M
Davajki mu       go...
giving   to=him it
‘Giving it to him...’
c. B
Davaiki mu        go...
giving    to=him it
‘Giving it to him...’
Finite verbs may in fact appear clause-initially in all three languages, but only
in the absence of clitic pronouns in Romanian and Macedonian (see (17c) for
Bulgarian).
(19)
a. R
Poate     scrie.
can3
SG
write
(He) can write.’
b. M
Barav         edna marka.
looked1
SG
one  stamp
‘(I) was looking for a stamp.’
An important generalization emerges from (17)-(19): bare verbs may appear in
clause-initial position, regardless of finiteness. However, the presence of clitic
pronouns affects the placement of finite verbs, at least  in  Romanian and
Macedonian. This suggests that [tense/finiteness] is an active feature, on a par
with features like [accusative] and [dative], and that alignment constraints
should be extended to [tense/finiteness]  or [T] (to avoid confusion with [F],
which stands for any other functional features). Note that I am abstracting away
from the actual complexity of finiteness (subsuming [tense], [person], and
[number]) which does not affect the point to be made here.
An important source of independent evidence for the existence of
constraint N
ON
I
NITIAL
(T) is provided by Germanic V2 languages. The striking
property of these languages is well known: finite verbs appear in second
position in declarative main clauses. Without going into the details necessary
to determine the proper ranking of N
ON
I
NITIAL
(T) in these languages, it can be
application Library tool:C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Embedded page thumbnails.
www.rasteredge.com
application Library tool:VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. PDF thumbnails for navigation in .NET project.
www.rasteredge.com
Optimal Romanian clitics
15
observed that the Germanic V2 phenomenon can be assimilated to the Balkan
finiteness distinction with respect to clitic placement despite the fact that
N
ON
I
NITIAL
(T) is independent of clitics in Germanic (see Anderson 1993 for
further discussion). This is possible because clitics, like finiteness, are analyzed
as morphological affixes. In some V2 languages, such as Walpiri, finiteness
features  are in  fact realized as a  separate clitic auxiliary verb  in second
position. In other languages, including Balkan, finiteness features are realized
on verbs themselves (unless a clitic realizing a separate feature like [perfect]
is also present).
2.4. Language-internal variation
Returning to Romanian finite structures for the moment, we now face
the  task  of determining  the Romanian  constraint  ranking responsible  for
procliticization to finite verbs. The OT tableau format is used to display the
formal competition among alignment constraints.
T1. Romanian procliticization to finite verbs
I: [dat] [acc] [T]
E(
DAT
)
E(
ACC
)
E(T)
NI
N
(T)
NI
N
(F)
L a. [
V’
mi-o d|]
Ç
ÇÇ
Ç
b. [
V’
mi d| o]
**!
*
*
c. [
V’
d| mi-o ]
*!
**
*
*
d. [
V’
d| o mi] 
**!
*
*
*
e. [
V’
o mi d|]
*!
**
*
f. [
V’
o d| mi]
**!
*
*
T1 illustrates the  graphic conventions of OT. The grammatical output  is
marked optimal (L). Constraint ranking is indicated by leftmost constraints
outranking  rightmost ones.Violations of  constraints  are  recorded  as *  in
individual cells; *! are fatal violations for sub-optimal candidates while Ç are
violations incurred by optimal candidates. To avoid cluttering, it is convenient
to omit constraints which are satisfied by all candidates and to limit the input
specification to relevant functional features..
application Library tool:C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Converter control easy to create thumbnails from PDF pages. Selection for compressing to multiple image formats. Cut and paste any areas in PDF pages to images.
www.rasteredge.com
application Library tool:C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. PDF thumbnails for navigation in .NET WPF Console application
www.rasteredge.com
Comparative studies in Romanian syntax
16
Because OT defines a grammar as an optimization system, any aspect
of grammar may, in principle, be determined by optimization. An important
consequence exploited in the present analysis to the fullest is that phrase
structure itself is optimized: it is built from the properties of the input (Prince
and Smolensky 1993) and any structure not required by the lexical items of the
input can be interpreted as violating *S
TRUCTURE
.
(20)
*S
TRUCTURE 
(*S
TRUC
): Avoid structure (Prince and Smolensky 1993;
Legendre 1996)
Assuming the basic X’-Theory schema, the smallest phrasal projection for V
is V’, the constituent which includes V and its complement(s). The next phrasal
projection is VP, the constituent which includes V’ and its specifier. Under this
‘minimalist’ view of structure, V is the minimal clausal unit (as in Romanian
plou
|
‘(it) rains’).  Following  Samek-Lodovici  (1996) and Grimshaw  and
Samek-Lodovici (1998), I take referential (and expletive) null subjects to be
structurally unrealized. Thus, simple null subject clauses correspond to V’ (if
an object is present) while their counterparts in non-null subject languages are
VPs. This is not independently stipulated for each language but rather is a
consequence of optimization. For a given input, candidate structures of varying
structural  complexity are evaluated.  To anticipate the  discussion  of verb
movement in section 3, *S
TRUCTURE
outranks alignment constraints. Hence,
any candidate containing additional projections fares worse. These sub-optimal
candidates are omitted in all tableaux, except where the competition directly
pertains to *S
TRUCTURE
.  In the first phase of the analysis, we consider only
candidates which include a single projection.
T1 illustrates two ways in which candidate a wins the competition.
One, the highest ranked constraint violated by the optimal candidate a is
outranked by a constraint violated by its competitors; this is the case for
candidates  c-f  --  from  which  we  derive  that
E
DGEMOST
(
DAT
)
>>
E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
). Two, given that closeness to an edge is a matter of degree,
E
DGEMOST
constraints  are gradient: multiple violations of a single E
DGEMOST
constraint occur as a given feature [F] is realized further away from the relevant
edge; degree of violation is measured in terms of the free morphemes which
separate a given clitic from the relevant edge, though nothing depends on this
particular way of evaluating gradiency. Note that gradiency is fatal to candidate
b: unlike a, b violates E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
) twice. In fact, the competition between
candidates a and b yields a second partial constraint ranking: E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
)
>> E
DGEMOST
(T). This is because candidates a  and b violate  these two
Optimal Romanian clitics
17
constraints  but  to  varying  degree:  a  violates  E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
)  once  and
E
DGEMOST
(T) twice;  b violates E
DGEMOST
(T) once  and E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
)
twice. For a to be optimal, its worse violation has to be lower-ranked than b’s
worse violation. This is the case if E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
) outranks E
DGEMOST
(T).
The  three  lexical  items  in  the  candidate  structures  each  instantiate  one
functional feature; as a result, they all violate non-gradient N
ON
I
NITIAL
(F);
these violations cancel out, providing no information about the relative ranking
of N
ON
I
NITIAL
(F). Note that N
ON
I
NITIAL
(T)’s rank is indeterminate as well in
T1. To recover its relative ranking, it is necessary to consider a structure in
which it is surface-violated. This is the case in present tense structures such as
(21).
(21)
Citesc     c|rÛi.
read1
SG
books
‘(I) read books.’
The finite verb is clause-initial, in violation of N
ON
I
NITIAL
(T). However, it
satisfies E
DGEMOST
(T). This indicates that E
DGEMOST
(T) >> N
ON
I
NITIAL
(T).
This partial ranking is incorporated into tableau T2, which underlies (22a).
(22)
a.
Am          plecat.
have1
SG
left
'(I) have left.'
b.
Nu    l-am           v|zut.
neg him-have1
SG
seen
‘(I) have not seen him.’
T2. Romanian clitic auxiliaries
I: [perf] [T]
E(
PERF
)
E(T)
NI
N
(T)
NI
N
(F)
a. L [
V’
am plecat]
Ç
Ç
b.     [
V!
plecat am]
*!
*
In T2, a single clitic combines two features, [finite] and [perfect] -- the phrasal
counterpart of lexical portmanteaux. Corresponding alignment constraints are
either  satisfied  or  violated  at  the  same  time;  hence  the  two  E
DGEMOST
constraints  are unranked with  respect to  each other, and so are the  two
N
ON
I
NITIAL
constraints. One possible ranking, based on the fact that candidate
Comparative studies in Romanian syntax
18
b loses to a, is that both E
DGEMOST 
constraints (violated by candidate b)
outrank both N
ON
I
NITIAL
constraints (violated by candidate a).  In addition,
(22b) shows that accusative clitics precede finite perfect clitics and finite verbs.
Consequently, E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
)
>> E
DGEMOST
(
PERF
) and
E
DGEMOST
(T).
From the present perspective on inflectional morphology, the existence
of gerund morphology (Romanian  ind/înd) is taken to reflect the existence of
a feature which we may refer to as [gerund]. Because gerunds are non-finite,
constraints on [T] are irrelevant. The optimal structure is one in which the non-
finite verbal form precedes the clitic pronouns; hence E
DGEMOST
(
GER
)
>>
E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
), as shown in T3. 
T3. Romanian gerunds
I: [ger] [acc]
E(
GER
)
E(
ACC
)
NI
N
(F)
L a. [
V’
v|zîndu-l]
Ç
Ç
b. [
V’
îl v|zînd]
*!
*
The basic R ranking is summarized in (23).
(23) 
Romanian ranking:
E(
GER
)
>>
E(
DAT
)
>>
E(
ACC
)
>>
E(
PERF
)
>>
(E(T)
>>
NI
N
(T)
>>
NI
N
(F)
Returning  to  non-clitic  auxiliary  structures,  one  aspect  of the
distribution of clitics remains to be addressed. It is the fact that clitic pronouns
procliticize to the auxiliary rather than the lexical verb.The pattern is given in
(24).
(24)
Îl     pot       vedea.
him can1
SG
see
‘(I) can see him.’
This pattern ought to shed light on the domain of E
DGEMOST
constraints. Each
verbal element determines its own V’. If the domain of E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
) is
verbal (V’), then E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
) is satisfied by each candidate: the clitic is
located at the left edge of a (different) V’ in each candidate. This leads to the
wrong outcome  because candidate a (which corresponds to (24)) fares worse
than b: it violates E
DGEMOST
(T) which is satisfied by b. On the other hand, if
the domain of E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
) is clausal, then E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
) is satisfied by
Optimal Romanian clitics
19
7 Only five are actually violated in the Romanian tableaux. The sixth one,
E
DGEMOST
(
PERF
) is violated by optimal candidates whenever a pronominal clitic co-occurs with
a perfect auxiliary, as in (22b). Note that (22b) also shows that E
DGEMOST
(
NEG
) is unviolated.
8 A final complication in the distribution of Romanian clitics concerns the feminine
singular accusative clitic pronoun o. In some contexts, o has the same distribution as its non-
feminine counterparts. This is the case in simple tenses and non-clitic auxiliary structures (where
it shows up as a proclitic) and in gerunds (where it shows up as an enclitic): (i)  O vede ‘(I) see
her’. With conditional and perfect auxiliaries, o, unlike its non-feminine counterparts, encliticizes
to the non-finite verb: (ii)  A
Õ
v
|
zut-o '(I) would see her'. As noted in de Kok (1989), Romanian
dative and accusative clitics typically undergo desyllabification processes including vowel elision
(îmi > mi-; m
|
> m-; îi > i-; îl > l-) and diphthongization (i-am dat [iam]) before a following
vowel. This reduction process appears to be general in the context of proclitics. It looks like
Romanian imposes severe restrictions on the number of non-stressed syllables which can precede
optimal candidate a and violated by sub-optimal candidate b. The problem with
this characterization is that a clausal domain predicts that a clitic will precede
overt subjects in Romanian, which is incorrect (see, for example, 8b). What we
need is a domain which overlaps with the clausal domain in pro-drop contexts,
is  strictly  verbal in  the presence of an overt  subject,  and  includes  what
Grimshaw (1991) calls extended projections of V. This unique domain can be
characterized as the extended V' projection of the verbal head.
T4. Romanian non-clitic auxiliaries
I: [acc] [T]
E(
ACC
)
E(T)
NI
N
(T)
NI
N
(F)
L  a.   [
V’
îl pot [
V’
vedea]]
Ç
Ç
b.  [
V’
pot [
V’
îl vedea]]
*!
*
*
A fundamental claim of OT is that constraints are violable. We may
verify the validity of the claim, based on the few Romanian patterns discussed
so far. Out of the eight constraints listed in (23), six may be violated by optimal
candidates (Ç)
7
. The only constraints not violated are
E
DGEMOST
(
GER
) and
E
DGEMOST
(
NEG
) . Four constraints are active in the sense that their violation
is  fatal  to  some  candidate  (*!):
E
DGEMOST
(
GER
),
E
DGEMOST
(
DAT
),
E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
), and E
DGEMOST
(
PERF
)). A given constraint may be fatal to
one candidate, e.g. E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
) in T4.  The same constraint may also be
violated by an optimal candidate -- in T1 --,  because the two candidates in
question belong to different candidate sets. Thus, competition is local in the
sense that it is determined by a particular input. 
The adverb mai ‘again’ displays idiosyncratic behavior.
8
Recall that
Comparative studies in Romanian syntax
20
a prosodic (verbal) head.  Regardless of what the exact nature of the phonologiccal constraints
may turn out to be, it appears that Romanian economizes on phonological material as long as
morphemes conveying important featural information are recoverable. O is the only Romanian
clitic pronoun which consists of a single vowel. This means that it cannot undergo phonological
reduction without loss of corresponding featural information.
9 A reviewer points out that mai doesn't show a high degree of selection with respect
to its host. In particular, mai may modify adjectives or adverbs, in addition to verbs: (i) copilul mai
mare 'the older child' (ii) vreau s
|
vin
|
mai curînd 'I want him to come sooner'. A similar
observation can be made in French. The lexical affix re- can modify verbs, nouns, and adjectives:
(i)  réélire 'reelect' (ii)  réélection 'reelection'  (iii)  rééligible 'reelectable'. This suggests that a high
degree of host selection is not a reliable criterion for lexical affixes, contrary to the claim made
in  Zwicky and Pullum (1983) and Zwicky (1985).
mai is generally considered to be a clitic for two reasons. One, its preverbal
position differs from that of standard adverbs, which are postverbal. Two, like
pronominal clitics, it precedes lexical verbs in simple and compound tenses
(hence it follows clitic auxiliaries) while it precedes non-clitic auxiliaries. The
relevant data is given in (8) and (9). Its distribution in imperatives differs,
however, from that of pronominal clitics. Mai precedes positive imperative
verbs while pronominal clitics follow it (Dobrovie-Sorin 1994).
(25)
Mai spune-mi!
again tell-
IMP
me
‘tell me again!’
The generalization is clear: mai always immediately precedes the verb. This
strict distribution suggest a prefix rather than a clitic status. In other words, mai
behaves like French re- ‘again’ as in relire ‘read again’.
9
Together, Italian and
Romanian point to the unreliability of the orthographic conventions: Italian lo
and Romanian enclitics are clitics despite the fact that they are graphically
attached to the verb while Romanian mai is a prefix despite the fact that it is
not graphically attached to the verb. As a lexical affix, mai is subject to an
E
DGEMOST
constraint whose domain is lexical rather than phrasal: mai must be
aligned with the left edge of the head it is associated with.
2.5. Cross-linguistic variation
In OT, all cross-linguistic variation results from re-ranking of universal
constraints.  The theory predicts both minimal and wide-ranging re-rankings.
To begin with, consider a minimal change. Romanian finite clitic auxiliary
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested