asp.net pdf viewer user control : Create pdf thumbnails control Library platform web page asp.net windows web browser Plone%20-%20A%20Model%20of%20a%20Mature%20Open%20Source%20Project3-part683

The model
Integrating these factors, a model of  a mature open source project is proposed. The following 
diagrams shows the most important elements to be considered
Community
High
Life cycle
Mature
Decline
Growth
Back office
End user 
application
Business 
application
System/
specialised
User orientation
Business orientation
Low
High
Low
Dif
fusion
Culture
History
Stories
Values
Ideology
Events
Artefacts
Identity
Core + governance
Community of practice
LPP*
* Legitimate 
peripheral
participation
Learning
Environment
Firm
Contributor
Firm
Contributor
Institution
Figure 3: Model of a mature open source project
17
A community of practice is presented as the canvas on which the community is painted. A two-tier 
task structure emerges from loose separation between core developers and peripheral participants, 
whilst informal learning systems are in place to aid peripheral contributors in gaining expertise and 
identity as part of the community. Knowledge is embedded in the software artefact, and processes of 
reflection-in-action, critique and experimental variation support the continual evolution of  the 
Plone: A model of a mature open source project
31/90
17 The author would like to thank Alexander Limi for assisting with the visual layout of this diagram
Create pdf thumbnails - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
can't see pdf thumbnails; how to create a thumbnail of a pdf document
Create pdf thumbnails - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
pdf thumbnail html; enable pdf thumbnail preview
software and the community. Individuals and business interests intersect the community of practice, 
exhibiting different degrees of alignment with the community itself. Complex social processes and 
culture are supported by an emergent governance structure, underpinning the functioning of the 
project at an  operational  and  decision-making  level,  whilst  ideology  and  business/end-user 
orientation define the project at a strategic level. Finally, the position of the project in its life-cycle is 
an aggregate measure of community cohesion, strength and vibrancy, and ultimately the viability of 
the project.
As for Plone, it is a project at the beginning stages of maturity. Governance is mostly well-defined, 
though steps have been taken to improve the scalability of the governance model for the future as 
there are areas of the project where it is a cause for concern. Informal learning systems are a key 
part of Plone’s culture, with new developers being groomed by more experienced ones on a regular 
basis, and more formal “boot camps”, “sprints” and other events being organised regularly. As 
“host”, the community is welcoming to new participants, but at the core, identity is defined through 
rich off-line and online social relationships. Community cohesion is high, with few public disputes. A 
variety of  stake-holders and interests are represented at all levels of the project. The project is 
strongly oriented towards business end users, and business interests are tightly aligned with the 
project, as most core developers earn at least part of their living from Plone consultancy. 
Plone: A model of a mature open source project
32/90
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. Page: Replace
pdf thumbnails in; pdf files thumbnails
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. Page: Replace
pdf thumbnail creator; generate pdf thumbnail c#
Conclusion
As with any model inferred from interpretive case studies, the model proposed in this paper needs 
further empirical testing. The specific elements of  the model are deliberately vaguely defined, 
precisely because every community is different.  In other cases, other unique aspects may be crucial 
in  defining  the  community.  Perhaps  more  important  than  the  specifics,  however,  is  the 
demonstration that mature open source communities are not so different from communities in the 
real world: they are socially complex, playing host to rich interactions between real human beings. 
Any account of motivation, organisation, governance, business models or other aspects of the open 
source movement which reduces participants to purely technically or economically rational actors 
inevitably betrays this complexity, ultimately limiting our ability to understand these communities. 
For researchers, this is an interesting problematic in itself. For businesses, such an understanding 
may be vital in attempting to deal with an open source project. For open source participants, self-
reflection upon these issues may help evaluate their own role in their communities. For open source 
leaders, an appreciation of how the projects they are shepherding function is vital in community-
building.
That is not to  say that the  proposed  model will  give  all  the  answers.  In  addition  to  the 
aforementioned problems of  generalisability and  completeness,  the model does not offer  any 
explanation as to how an open source project in the early stages of its life cycle begins to accumulate 
the kinds of  processes and structures proposed. Nor does it adequately address evolution of the 
aspects presented over time.
In  terms of  future research, there are a multitude of  avenues that could be  explored. The 
overarching aim, however, should be to deepen the understanding of how open source communities 
are composed and operate through in-depth, interpretive research, to counter-balance the current 
proliferation of positivistic and overly rational accounts.
The communities-of-practice literature has already been shown to be highly relevant to open source 
communities. Lee and Cole (2003) apply this concept to understanding the evolution of  Linux, 
linking it to knowledge creation through discourse and dialectics. Analysing an open source project’s 
community of practice, for example through a longitudinal case study, would likely yield further 
insights into its social processes and underpinning structures.
Additionally, the descriptions of the community as a system with a boundary, interacting with other 
communities and  being composed  of  distinct but interacting sub-groups, has alluded  to the 
Plone: A model of a mature open source project
33/90
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Embedded page thumbnails. Program.RootPath + "\\" 3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; 'create optimizing options Dim
show pdf thumbnail in html; enable pdf thumbnails in
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Support of converting from any single one PDF page and multiple pages. Thumbnails can be created from PDF pages. Support for customizing image size.
generate thumbnail from pdf; no pdf thumbnails in
possibility of using social systems theory as a vehicle for further exploration. In particular, systems 
theory holds promise for building a holistic account of  an open source community, as well as 
explaining its evolution and life-cycle.
Further, the dynamics and evolution of open source can be examined using the language of actor-
network theory. For example, Tuomi (2000) uses the concepts of translation and black-boxing to 
show how social structures become embedded in software modules in Linux. The ability of actor-
network theory to “zoom” in and out between levels of complexity in analysis may also help gain an 
appreciation of the ecology of groups and sub-groups that form inside open source projects.
Finally, Giddens’ theory of structuration as applied by Orlikowski (1992; 2000) to technology, could 
yield deeper theoretical insight into how the social structures of the community are embedded in 
and  influenced  by the  open  source  software  artefact itself.  Orlikowski’s theory rests on  the 
presumption of  infinite malleability of  the “technology-in-practice”. This proposition has been 
criticised in general, but for a certain group of user-developers in open source, the ability to modify 
the source code may at least increase the realistic malleability of the artefact.
These suggestions are intentionally superficial. More research is needed even to understand how 
these meta-theories could be useful in studying open source. The more important point however, is 
this: Open source is a well-established, complex and intriguing phenomenon. The IS research 
community would do well to apply the same rigour and depth it has shown in analysing information 
systems in traditional organisational settings, to developing a deeper understanding of open source 
communities.
Plone: A model of a mature open source project
34/90
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Embedded page thumbnails. Program.RootPath + "\\" 3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; // create optimizing options
how to view pdf thumbnails in; can't view pdf thumbnails
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. Page: Replace
program to create thumbnail from pdf; pdf thumbnail generator online
References
Ardichvili, A. et. al. (2003). Motivation and Barriers to Participation In Virtual Knowledge-Sharing Communities of 
Practice. Journal of Knowledge Management, 7 (1), 64-77.
Bensbasat, I. et. al. (1987). The Case Research Strategy in Studies of Information Systems. MIS Quarterly, September.
Bitzer, J. and Schröder, J. H. (2005). Bug-fixing and Code-writing: The Private Provision of Open Source Software. 
Information Economics and Policy, 17 (3), 389-406.
Bonaccorsi, A. and Ross, C. (2003a). Altruistic Individuals, Selfish Firms? The Structure of Motivation in Open Source 
Software. Available from http://opensource.mit.edu/papers/bnaccorsirossimotivationshort.pdf
(verified August 
31st 2005).
Bonaccorsi, A. and Rossi, C. (2003b). Why Open Source Software Can Succeed. Research Policy, 32, 1243-1258.
Brown, J. S. and Duguid, P. (1991). Organizational learning and communities-of-practice: Toward a unified view of 
working, learning, and innovation. Organization Science, 2, 40-57.
Butler, B. et. al. (2002). Community Effort in Online Groups:  Who Does the Work and Why? In Atwater, L. and 
Weisband, S., Leadership at a Distance.
Chen W. and Hirschheim, R. (2004). A Paradigmatic and Methodological Examination of Information Systems 
Research from 1991 to 2001. Information Systems Journal, 14, 197-235.
Croston, K. et. al. (2004b). Towards a Portfolio of FLOSS Project Success Measures. ICSE Open Source Workshop.
Crowston, K. and Howison, J. (2004). The Social Structure of Free and Open Source Software Development. First 
Monday, 10 (2). 
Crowston, K. et. al. (2003). Defining Open Source Software Project Success. ICIS 24.
Crowston, K. et. al. (2004a). Effective Work Practices for Software Engineering: Free/Libre Open Source Software 
Development. Proceedings of ACM WISER.
Cummings, J. N. et. al. (2002). The Quality of Online Social Relationships. Communications of the ACM, 45 (7), 103-108.
Dahlander, L. (2004). Approprating the Commons: Firms in Open Source Software. Available from http://
opensource.mit.edu/papers/dahlander2.pdf
(verified August 31st 2005).
Dahlander, L. and Magnusson, M. G. (2005). Relationships Between Open Source Software Companies and 
Communities: Observations from Nordic Firms. Research Policy, 34, 481-493.
Daniel, B. et. al. (2002). A Process Model for Building Social Capital in Virtual Learning Communities. International 
Conference on Computers in Education.
Demil, B. and Lecocq, X. (2003). Neither Market nor Hierarchy or Network: The Emerging Bazaar Governance. 
Available from http://opensource.mit.edu/papers/demillecocq.pdf
(verified August 31st 2005).
Eisenhardt, K. M. (1989). Building Theories from Case Study Research. Academy of Management Review, 14 (4), 532-550.
Feller, J. and Fitzgerald, B. (2000). A Framework Analysis of the Open Source Software Development Paradigm. ICIS, 
58-69.
Plone: A model of a mature open source project
35/90
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. Page: Replace
html display pdf thumbnail; create pdf thumbnail image
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. Page: Replace
how to make a thumbnail of a pdf; view pdf image thumbnail
Fleming, L. and Waguespack, D. (2005). Penguins, Camels, and Other Birds of a Feather: Brokerage, Boundary 
Spanning, and Leadership in Open Innovation Communities. Available from http://ssrn.com/abstract=710641
(verified August 31st 2005)
Franck, E. and Jungwirth, C. (2002). Reconciling Investors and Donators - The Governance Structure of Open Source, 
Working paper. http://opensource.mit.edu/papers/jungwirth.pdf
(verified August 31st 2005).
Fugetta, A. (2003). Open Source Software - An Evaluation.  The Journal of Systems and Software, 66, 77-90.
Galliers, R. D. (1991). Choosing Appropriate Information Systems Research Approaches: A Revised Taxonomy. In, 
Nissen, H. E. et. al. Information Systems Research: Contemporary Approaches and Emergent Traditions. Elsevier Science 
Publishers B.V, North-Holland.
Ginsburg, M. and Weisband, S. (2002). Social Capital and Volunteerism in Virtual Communities: The Case of the 
Internet Chess Club. HICSS-35.
Giuri et. al. (2004). Skills and Openness of OSS Projects: Implications for Performance. Available from http://
opensource.mit.edu/papers/giuri_etal.pdf
(verified August 31st 2005).
Gutwin et. al. (2004). Group Awareness in Distrubted Software Development. Proceedings of the ACM CSCW. 
Hannemyr, G. (1998). The Art and Craft of Hacking. Scandinavian Journal of Information Systems, 10 (1&2).
Hemetsberger, A. and Reinhardt, C. (2004). Sharing and Creating Knowledge in Open-Source Communities: The case 
of KDE. Fifth European Conference on Organizational Knowledge, Learning and Capabilities. Available from 
http://opensource.mit.edu/papers/hemreinh.pdf
(verified August 31st 2005).
Henkel, J. (2004). Patterns of Free Revealing - Balancing Code Sharing and Protection in Commercial Open Source 
Development. Available from http://opensource.mit.edu/papers/henkel2.pdf
(verified August 31st 2005).
Johnon, C. M. (2001). A Survey of Current Research on Online Communities of Practice. Internet and Higher Education, 4, 
45-60.
K Healy, A Schussman (2003). The Ecology of Open-Source Software Development. Unpublished manuscript. http://
opensource.mit.edu/papers/healyschussman.pdf
(verified August 31st 2005).
von Hippel, E. and von Krogh, G. (2003). Open Source Software and the Private-Collective Innovation Model: Issues 
for Organization Science. Organization Science, 14 (2), 209-223. 
Karels, M. J. (2003). Commercializing Open Source Software. ACM Queue, Jul./Aug.
Kimble, C. et. al. (2000). Effective Virtual Teams Through Communities of Practice. Available from http://www-
users.cs.york.ac.uk/~kimble/teaching/hi-2/wp0009.pdf
(verified August 31st 2005).
Kimble, C., et. al. (2001). Communities of Practice: Going Virtual. In Malhotra, Y. (ed), Knowledge Management and 
Business Innovation, pp. 220-234. Hershey, PA: Idea Group.
Klein, H. K. and Myers, M. D. (1999). A Set of Principles for Conducting and Evaluating Interpretive Field Studies in 
Information Systems. MIS Quarterly, 23 (1), 67-94.
Kraut, R. E. and Streeter, L. A. (1995). Coordination in Software Development. Communications of the ACM, 38 (3), 
69-81.
Krishnamurthy, S. (2002). Cave or Community: An Empirical Examination of 100 Mature Open Source Projects. First 
Monday, 7 (2). 
Plone: A model of a mature open source project
36/90
Krishnamurthy (2003). A Managerial Overview of Open Source Software. Business Horizons, Sep.-Oct. 2003, 47-56.
von Krogh, G. et. al. (2003). Community, Joining and Specialization in Open Source Software innovation: A Case 
Study. Research Policy, 32, 1217-1241. 
Lakhani, K. R. and von Hippel, E. (2002). How Open Source Software Works: "Free" User-to-User Assistance. Research 
Policy, 32, 923-943.
Lee, A. S. and Baskerville, R. L. (2003). Generalizing Generalizability in Information Systems Research. Information 
Systems Research, 14 (3), 221-243.
Lee, G. K. and Cole, R. E. (2003). From a Firm-Based to a Community-Based Model of Knowledge Creation: The 
Case of the Linux Kernel Development. Organization Science, 14 (6), 633-649.
Lerne, J. and Tirole, J. (2001). The Open Source Movement: Key Research Questions. European Economic Review, 45, 
819-826.
Lerner, J. and Tirole, J. (2002). Some Simple Economics of Open Source. Journal of Industrial Economics, 46 (2), 125-156.
Lueg, C. (2000).Where is the Action in Virtual Communities of Practice? Presentation at the Workshop Communication 
and Cooperation in Knowledge Communities, at the German Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 
Conference (D-CSCW), Munich, Germany. Available from http://www-staff.it.uts.edu.au/~lueg/papers/
commdcscw00.pdf
(verified August 31st 2005).
Madanmohan, T.R. and Navelkar, S. (2002). Roles and Knowledge Management in Online Technology Communities: 
An Ethnographiy Study. Available from http://opensource.mit.edu/papers/madanmohan2.pdf
(verified August 
31st 2005).
Markus, M. L. et. al. (2000). What Makes a Virtual Organization Work? Sloan Management Review, Fall 2000, 13-26.
Michmayr, M. (2004). Managing Volunteer Activity in Free Software Projects. Proceedings of USENIX Conference. 
Mocks et. al. (2002). Two Case Studies of Open Source Software Development: Apache and Mozilla, ACM Transactions 
on Software Engineering and Methodology, 11 (3), 309-346.
O'Mahony, S. and Ferraro, F. (2004). Hacking Alone? The Effects of Online and Offline Participation on Open Source 
Community Leadership. Available from http://opensource.mit.edu/papers/omahonyferraro2.pdf
(verified 
August 31st 2005)
Orlikowski, W. J. (1992). The Duality of Technology: Rethinking the Concept of Technology in Organisations. 
Organization Science, 3 (3), 398-427.
Orlikowski, W. J. (2000). Using Technology and Constituting Structures: A Practice Lens for Studying Technology in 
Organizations. Organization Science, 11 (4), 404-428.
Orlikowski, W. J. and Baroudi, J. J. (1991). Studying Information Technology in Organizations: Research Approaches 
and Assumptions. Information Systems Research, 2 (1), 1-28.
Paccagnella, L. (1997). Getting the Seats of YourPants Dirty: Strategies for Ethnographic Research on Virtual 
Communities. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 3 (1).
Raymond, E. S. (1999). The Cathedral and the Bazaar. Available from http://www.catb.org/~esr/writings/cathedral-
bazaar/
(verified August 31st. 2005).
Reagle, J. M. (2003). Socialization in Open Technical Communities. Available from http://reagle.org/joseph/2003/
socialization/voluntary.html
(verified August 31st 2005).
Plone: A model of a mature open source project
37/90
Rosen, M. (1991). Coming to Terms with the Field: Understanding and Doing Organizational Ethnography. Journal of 
Management Studies, 28 (1), 1-24.
Schwen, T. M. and Hara, N. (2003). Community of Practice: A Metaphor for Online Design? The Information Society, 19, 
257-270.
Stewart, D. (2004). Status Inertia: The Speed Imperative in the Attainment of Community Status. Available from 
http://opensource.mit.edu/papers/stewart1.pdf
(verified August 31st. 2005).
Tuomi, I. (2000). Internet, Innovation and Open Source: Actors in the Network. Available from http://
opensource.mit.edu/papers/Ilkka%20Tuomi%20-%20Actors%20in%20the%20Network.pdf
(verified August 
31st 2005).
Tuomi, I. (2005), The Future of Open Source. In: Wynants, M. & J. Cornelis (eds.) How Open is the Future?, VUB Brussels 
University Press, pp. 429-59.
Walsham, G. (1995). Interpretive Case Studies In IS Research: Nature and Method. European Journal of Information 
Systems, 4, 74, 81.
Walther, J. B. (1995). Relational Aspects of Computer-mediated Communication: Experimental Observations over 
Time. Organization Science, 6 (2), 196-203.
Watson, R. T. et. al. (2004). Governance and Global Communities. Journal of International Management, 11 (2), 125-142.
Wenger, E. (2000). Communities of Practice and Social Learning Systems. Organization, 7 (2), 225-256.
West, J. and O'Mahony, S. (2005). Contrasting Community Building in Sponsored and Community Founded Open 
Source Projects. Proceedings of the 38th Annual Hawai'i International Conference on System Sciences.
Yamauchi, Y. et. al. (2000). Collaboration with Lean Media: How Open-Soruce Software Suceeds. Proceedings of ACM 
CSCW.
Zeityln, D. (2003). Gift Economies in the Development of Open Source Software: Anthropological Reflections. Research 
Policy, 32, 1287-1291.
Zhang, W. and Stock, J. (2001). Peripheral Members in Online Communities. Proceedings of the Americas Conference on 
Information Systems.
Plone: A model of a mature open source project
38/90
Appendix A: Survey and interview responses
As part of this research, a combined survey/interview e-mail was sent to the several members of the 
Plone community, containing six general and three or more subject-specific questions. In addition, 
one email was sent to Beatrice During of the PyPy project with questions about “sprint”-based 
development, following a talk she gave on the subject at the EuroPython 2005 conference.
The full, unedited responses received are included below. The respondents are:
Alexander Limi, co-founder, UI leader and chief architect of Plone Solutions A/S
Alan Runyan, co-founder and architectural leader, owner of Enfold Systems LLC
Paul Everitt, chief executive of the Plone Foundation and founder of the Zope Europe Association
Joel Burton, president of the Plone Foundation
Helge Tesdal, chief executive of Plone Solutions A/S
Geir Bækholt, founding partner of Plone Solutions A/S
Stefan H. Holek, current Plone release manager, employee of Plone Solutions A/S
Alec Mitchell, independent IT consultant and core Plone contributor
Florian Schulze, student, independent IT consultant and core Plone contributor
Hanno C. Schlichting, IT consultant and core Plone contributor
Jens Klein, IT consultant and Archetypes release manager
Matt Hamilton, Technical Director of Netsight Internet Solutions Ltd.
Matt Lee, Senior Developer at NHS Connecting for Health
“Mr. X” (anonymous) of a large organisation using Plone as part of a product offering
“Mr. Y” (anonymous) of a large organisation using Plone as part of an internal initiative
Beatrice During, of the PyPy project, researching “sprint”-based development
Plone: A model of a mature open source project
39/90
Alexander Limi
Plone co-founder, UI leader and chief architect of Plone Solutions A/S
A. About you
1. Briefly, for the record, who are you?
My name is Alexander Limi, I work as the Chief Architect and Interaction Designer at Plone 
Solutions in Norway. I am 30 years old, and have an educational background in psychology and 
computer science.
2. What is your relationship with Plone and the Plone project? How and how long ago did you become involved in 
Plone?
I started the project back in 2000 with Alan Runyan from Houston, Texas. My current role in the 
project is user interface design, project management and community communication and 
coordination. In parallel, I'm part of Plone Solutions, a company that I own along with a few 
friends and fellow Plone developers. I do Plone-related work full-time, although I am occasionally 
part of projects where I do pure user interface and interaction design.
B. About Plone in General
3. What do you think are the most positive aspects of Plone as a technology?
Plone is built on a very agile stack of software, and we can adapt very quickly to meet new 
challenges or implement new ideas. Plone is very light on process, and getting something 
implemented and being a part of the core framework is easy as long as people agree that it makes 
sense to have such a component as part of the system.
A major part is also that we have strong multilingual support. At this time, Plone has more than 50 
translations, and has a unique and powerful way of handling internationalization and localization 
as well as maintaining content in multiple languages. This gives us the upper hand in a market like 
Europe, where multiple language support is pretty much mandatory - but it is also starting to 
matter in markets that have traditionally been monolingual, like the US. The rise of Spanish as a 
second language has a lot of companies seriously looking at software that can handle more than 
one language.
Interestingly, I think the strongest part of Plone as a technology is that most of it's value lies in 
Plone's vision, goals and approach to solving challenges. The most positive aspect of Plone is 
actually that the technology is less important - it's not technology for technology's sake. If Plone 
were to switch out all of its underlying infrastructure with something else - it would still be Plone, it 
would still be a strong community with a strong vision and direction. The technology was chosen 
because it was what solved our problems in the best possible way when we started - but we are agile 
enough as a community to adjust the underlying infrastructure to what we need to solve our 
problems. That's the most positive thing about Plone and its community - its versatility and agility. 
I firmly believe that this attitude affects both the software and the people involved.
4. What are the greatest problems with, or threats to, Plone?
As with most open source projects, documentation is a major hurdle. Introducing new developers 
to Plone could be a much more streamlined process, but it's also made more complex by the 
Plone: A model of a mature open source project
40/90
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested