asp.net pdf viewer user control : Disable pdf thumbnails software Library dll winforms asp.net wpf web forms Online_Statistics_Education6-part72

Statistical Literacy
by Denise Harvey and David M. Lane
Prerequisites
Chapter 1: Levels of Measurement
The Board of Trustees at a university commissioned a top management-consulting 
firm to address the admission processes for academic and athletic programs. The 
consulting firm wrote a report discussing the trade-off between maintaining 
academic and athletic excellence. One of their key findings was:
The standard for an athlete’s admission, as reflected in SAT 
scores alone, is lower than the standard for non-athletes by as 
much as 20 percent, with the weight of this difference being 
carried by the so-called “revenue sports” of football and 
basketball. Athletes are also admitted through a different 
process than the one used to admit non-athlete students.
What do you think?
Based on what you have learned in this chapter about measurement scales, does it 
make sense to compare SAT scores using percentages? Why or why not?
Think about this before continuing:
As you may know, the SAT has an arbitrarily-determined lower 
limit on test scores of 200. Therefore, SAT is measured on 
either an ordinal scale or, at most, an interval scale. However, it 
is clearly not measured on a ratio scale. Therefore, it is not 
meaningful to report SAT score differences in terms of 
percentages. For example, consider the effect of subtracting 200 
from every student's score so that the lowest possible score is 0. 
How would that affect the difference as expressed in 
percentages?
61
Disable pdf thumbnails - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
create thumbnails from pdf files; enable pdf thumbnails
Disable pdf thumbnails - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
create thumbnail from pdf; create pdf thumbnails
Exercises
Prerequisites
All material presented in Chapter: “Introduction”
1. A teacher wishes to know whether the males in his/her class have more 
conservative attitudes than the females. A questionnaire is distributed assessing 
attitudes and the males and the females are compared. Is this an example of 
descriptive or inferential statistics?
2. A cognitive psychologist is interested in comparing two ways of presenting 
stimuli on sub- sequent memory. Twelve subjects are presented with each method 
and a memory test is given. What would be the roles of descriptive and 
inferential statistics in the analysis of these data?
3. If you are told only that you scored in the 80th percentile, do you know from 
that description exactly how it was calculated? Explain.
4. A study is conducted to determine whether people learn better with spaced or 
massed practice. Subjects volunteer from an introductory psychology class. At 
the beginning of the semester 12 subjects volunteer and are assigned to the 
massed-practice condition. At the end of the semester 12 subjects volunteer and 
are assigned to the spaced-practice condition. This experiment involves two 
kinds of non-random sampling: (1) Subjects are not randomly sampled from 
some specified population and (2) subjects are not randomly assigned to 
conditions. Which of the problems relates to the generality of the results? Which 
of the problems relates to the validity of the results? Which problem is more 
serious?
5. Give an example of an independent and a dependent variable.
6. Categorize the following variables as being qualitative or quantitative:
Rating of the quality of a movie on a 7-point scale
Age
Country you were born in 
Favorite Color
Time to respond to a question
62
C# PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file
File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Choose to offer PDF annotation and content extraction Enable or disable copying and form filling
view pdf thumbnails; create thumbnail jpg from pdf
VB.NET PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file
File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Choose to offer PDF annotation and content extraction Enable or disable copying and form filling
enable pdf thumbnail preview; generate thumbnail from pdf
7. Specify the level of measurement used for the items in Question 6.
8. Which of the following are linear transformations?
Converting from meters to kilometers 
Squaring each side to find the area
Converting from ounces to pounds
Taking the square root of each person's height.
Multiplying all numbers by 2 and then adding 5
Converting temperature from Fahrenheit to Centigrade
9. The formula for finding each student’s test grade (g) from his or her raw score 
(s) on a test is as follows: g = 16 + 3s
Is this a linear transformation?
If a student got a raw score of 20, what is his test grade?
10. For the numbers 1, 2, 4, 16, compute the following:
ΣX
ΣX
2
(ΣX)
2
11. Which of the frequency polygons has a large positive skew? Which has a large 
negative skew?
12. What is more likely to have a skewed distribution: time to solve an anagram 
problem (where the letters of a word or phrase are rearranged into another 
63
word or phrase like “dear” and “read” or “funeral” and “real fun”) or scores on 
a vocabulary test?
Questions from Case Studies
Angry Moods (AM) case study
13. (AM) Which variables are the participant variables? (They act as independent 
variables in this study.)
14. (AM) What are the dependent variables?
15. (AM) Is Anger-Out a quantitative or qualitative variable?
Teacher Ratings (TR) case study
16. (TR) What is the independent variable in this study?
ADHD Treatment (AT) case study
17. (AT) What is the independent variable of this experiment? How many levels 
does it have?
18. (AT) What is the dependent variable? On what scale (nominal, ordinal, interval, 
ratio) was it measured?
64
2. Graphing Distributions
A.Qualitative Variables
B.Quantitative Variables
1. Stem and Leaf Displays
2. Histograms
3. Frequency Polygons
4. Box Plots
5. Bar Charts
6. Line Graphs
7. Dot Plots
C.Exercises
Graphing data is the first and often most important step in data analysis. In this day 
of computers, researchers all too often see only the results of complex computer 
analyses without ever taking a close look at the data themselves. This is all the 
more unfortunate because computers can create many types of graphs quickly and 
easily.
This chapter covers some classic types of graphs such bar charts that were 
invented by William Playfair in the 18th century as well as graphs such as box 
plots invented by John Tukey in the 20th century.
65
Graphing Qualitative Variables
by David M. Lane
Prerequisites
Chapter 1
Variables 
Learning Objectives
1. Create a frequency table
2. Determine when pie charts are valuable and when they are not
3. Create and interpret bar charts
4. Identify common graphical mistakes
When Apple Computer introduced the iMac computer in August 1998, the 
company wanted to learn whether the iMac was expanding Apple’s market share. 
Was the iMac just attracting previous Macintosh owners? Or was it purchased by 
newcomers to the computer market and by previous Windows users who were 
switching over? To find out, 500 iMac customers were interviewed. Each customer 
was categorized as a previous Macintosh owner, a previous Windows owner, or a 
new computer purchaser.
This section examines graphical methods for displaying the results of the 
interviews. We’ll learn some general lessons about how to graph data that fall into 
a small number of categories. A later section will consider how to graph numerical 
data in which each observation is represented by a number in some range. The key 
point about the qualitative data that occupy us in the present section is that they do 
not come with a pre-established ordering (the way numbers are ordered). For 
example, there is no natural sense in which the category of previous Windows 
users comes before or after the category of previous Macintosh  users. This 
situation may be contrasted with quantitative data, such as a person’s weight. 
People of one weight are naturally ordered with respect to people of a different 
weight.
Frequency Tables
All of the graphical methods shown in this section are derived from frequency 
tables. Table 1 shows a frequency table for the results of the iMac study; it shows 
the frequencies of the various response categories. It also shows the relative 
66
frequencies, which are the proportion of responses in each category. For example, 
the relative frequency for “none” of 0.17 = 85/500.
Table 1. Frequency Table for the iMac Data.
Previous Ownership
Frequency
Relative Frequency
None
85
0.17
Windows
60
0.12
Macintosh
355
0.71
Total
500
1.00
Pie Charts
The pie chart in Figure 1 shows the results of the iMac study. In a pie chart, each 
category is represented by a slice of the pie. The area of the slice is proportional to 
the percentage of responses in the category. This is simply the relative frequency 
multiplied by 100. Although most iMac purchasers were Macintosh owners, Apple 
was encouraged by the 12% of purchasers who were former Windows users, and 
by the 17% of purchasers who were buying a computer for the first time.
71%
12%
17%
Macintosh
None
Windows
Figure 1. Pie chart of iMac purchases illustrating frequencies of previous 
computer ownership.
67
Pie charts are effective for displaying the relative frequencies of a small number of 
categories. They are not recommended, however, when you have a large number of 
categories. Pie charts can also be confusing when they are used to compare the 
outcomes of two different surveys or experiments. In an influential book on the use 
of graphs, Edward Tufte asserted “The only worse design than a pie chart is several 
of them.”
Here is another important point about pie charts. If they are based on a small 
number of observations, it can be misleading to label the pie slices with 
percentages. For example, if just 5 people had been interviewed by Apple 
Computers, and 3 were former Windows users, it would be misleading to display a 
pie chart with the Windows slice showing 60%. With so few people interviewed, 
such a large percentage of Windows users might easily have occurred  since chance 
can cause large errors with small samples. In this case, it is better to alert the user 
of the pie chart to the actual numbers involved. The slices should therefore be 
labeled with the actual frequencies observed (e.g., 3) instead of with percentages.
Bar charts
Bar charts can also be used to represent frequencies of different categories. A bar 
chart of the iMac purchases is shown in Figure 2. Frequencies are shown on the Y-
axis and the type of computer previously owned is shown on the X-axis. Typically, 
the Y-axis shows the number of observations in each category rather than the 
percentage of observations in each category as is typical in pie charts. 
68
0
100
200
300
400
None
Windows
Macintosh
Number of Buyers
Previous Computer
Figure 2. Bar chart of iMac purchases as a function of previous computer 
ownership.
Comparing Distributions
Often we need to compare the results of different surveys, or of different 
conditions within the same overall survey. In this case, we are comparing the 
“distributions” of responses between the surveys or conditions. Bar charts are often 
excellent for illustrating differences between two distributions. Figure 3 shows the 
number of people playing card games at the Yahoo web site on a Sunday and on a 
Wednesday in the spring of 2001. We see that there were more players overall on 
Wednesday compared to Sunday. The number of people playing Pinochle was 
nonetheless the same on these two days. In contrast, there were about twice as 
many people playing hearts on Wednesday as on Sunday. Facts like these emerge 
clearly from a well-designed bar chart.
69
Poker
Blackjack
Bridge
Gin
Cribbage
Hearts
Canasta
Pinochle
Euchre
Spades
0
2000
4000
6000
Wednesday
Sunday
Figure 3. A bar chart of the number of people playing different card games 
on Sunday and Wednesday.
The bars in Figure 3 are oriented horizontally rather than vertically. The horizontal 
format is useful when you have many categories because there is more room for 
the category labels. We’ll have more to say about bar charts when we consider 
numerical quantities later in this chapter.
Some graphical mistakes to avoid
Don’t get fancy! People sometimes add features to graphs that don’t help to convey 
their information. For example, 3-dimensional bar charts such as the one shown in 
Figure 4 are usually not as effective as their two-dimensional counterparts.
70
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested