asp.net pdf viewer user control : Generate pdf thumbnail c# SDK Library API .net asp.net html sharepoint popsiclebridge0-part706

Popsicle Bridge                                    
Page 1 of 12
Developed by IEEE as part of TryEngineering 
www.tryengineering.org
Popsicle Bridge 
Provided by TryEngineering - www.tryengineering.org 
Lesson Focus 
Lesson focuses on how bridges are engineered to withstand weight, while being durable, 
and in some cases aesthetically pleasing.  Students work in teams to design and build 
their own bridge out of up to 200 popsicle sticks and glue.  Bridges must have a span of at 
least 14 inches and be able to hold a five pound weight (younger students) or a twenty 
pound weight (older students). Students are encouraged to be frugal, and use the fewest 
number of popsicle sticks while still achieving their goals. Students then evaluate the 
effectiveness of their own bridge designs and those of other teams, and present their 
findings to the class.   
Lesson Synopsis  
The "Popsicle Bridge" lesson explores how engineering has 
impacted the development of bridges over time, including 
innovative designs and the challenge of creating bridges 
that become landmarks for a city.  Students work in teams 
of "engineers" to design and build their own bridge out of 
glue and popsicle sticks. They test their bridges using 
weights, evaluate their results, and present their findings to 
the class.  
Age Levels 
8-18. 
Objectives  
Learn about civil engineering. 
Learn about engineering design. 
Learn about planning and construction. 
Learn about teamwork and working in groups. 
Anticipated Learner Outcomes 
As a result of this activity, students should develop an understanding of:  
structural engineering and design 
problem solving 
teamwork 
Lesson Activities  
Students learn how bridges are designed to meet load, stress, and aesthetic challenges. 
Students work in teams to design and build a bridge out of up to 200 popsicle sticks and 
glue that can hold a standard weight based on the age of the students. Teams test their 
bridge, evaluate their own results and those of other students, and present their findings 
to the class. 
Generate pdf thumbnail c# - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
view pdf image thumbnail; program to create thumbnail from pdf
Generate pdf thumbnail c# - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
create pdf thumbnails; create pdf thumbnail
Popsicle Bridge                                    
Page 2 of 12
Developed by IEEE as part of TryEngineering 
www.tryengineering.org
Resources/Materials 
Teacher Resource Documents (attached) 
Student Worksheets (attached) 
Student Resource Sheets (attached) 
Alignment to Curriculum Frameworks 
See attached curriculum alignment sheet. 
Internet Connections 
TryEngineering (www.tryengineering.org) 
Sydney Harbor Bridge History 
(www.cultureandrecreation.gov.au/articles/harbourbridge) 
Building Big - Bridges (www.pbs.org/wgbh/buildingbig/bridge) 
ITEA Standards for Technological Literacy: Content for the Study of Technology 
(www.iteaconnect.org/TAA) 
National Science Education Standards (www.nsta.org/publications/nses.aspx) 
Supplemental Reading 
Bridges of the World: Their Design and Construction (ISBN: 0486429954) 
Bridges: Amazing Structures to Design, Build & Test (ISBN: 1885593309) 
Optional Writing Activity  
Write an essay or a paragraph about how new engineered materials have impacted 
the design of bridges over the past century. 
Extension Ideas  
Challenge advanced students to design and build a bridge out of popsicle sticks and 
glue that can hold the weight of three students. 
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Word
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB.NET How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Word.
show pdf thumbnail in html; pdf no thumbnail
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for PowerPoint
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for PowerPoint
enable pdf thumbnails in; generate pdf thumbnails
Popsicle Bridge                                    
Page 3 of 12
Developed by IEEE as part of TryEngineering 
www.tryengineering.org
Popsicle Bridge 
For Teachers: 
Teacher Resource 
Lesson Goal  
Lesson focuses on how bridges are engineered to withstand weight, while being durable, 
and in some cases aesthetically pleasing.  Students work in teams to design and build 
their own bridge out of up to 200 popsicle sticks and glue.  Bridges must have a span of at 
least 14 inches and be able to hold a five pound weight (younger students) or a twenty 
pound weight (older students). Students are encouraged to be frugal, and use the fewest 
number of popsicle sticks while still achieving their goals. Students then evaluate the 
effectiveness of their own bridge designs and those of other teams, and present their 
findings to the class.   
Lesson Objectives  
Learn about civil engineering. 
Learn about engineering design. 
Learn about planning and construction. 
Learn about teamwork and working in groups. 
Materials 
Student Resource Sheet 
Student Worksheets 
One set of materials for each group of students: 
 200 popsicle sticks, hot glue gun (or craft glue for younger students) 
 Standard 5 and 20 pound weight (box of sugar, exercise weight, or another 
weight that can be standardized) 
Procedure 
1.  Show students the various Student Reference Sheets.  These may be read in class, 
or provided as reading material for the prior night's homework.   
2.  Divide students into groups of 2-3 students, providing a set of materials per group.   
3.  Explain that students must develop their own bridge from up to 200 popsicle sticks 
and glue.  Bridges must be able to hold a five pound weight for younger students 
and a twenty pound weight for older students. The bridge must span at least 14 
inches (so it must be longer than 14 inches).  When the bridge has been 
constructed, it will be placed at least one foot above the floor (place it between two 
chairs, as an example) and tested with a weight bearing test. In addition to 
meeting the structural and weight bearing requirements, the bridge will also be 
judged on its aesthetics, so students should be encouraged to be creative.  
Students will be encouraged to use the fewest number of popsicles possible to 
achieve their goal. 
4.  Students meet and develop a plan for their bridge.  They draw their plan, and then 
present their plan to the class.   
5.  Student groups next execute their plans.  They may need to rethink their design, or 
even start over.   
6.  Next….teams will test their bridge's weight capacity by placing it at least one foot 
above the floor (try using blocks or a chair supporting each end of the bridge).  The 
bridge must be able to bear the assigned weight (depending upon student age) for 
a full minute. 
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Raster
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Raster.
create thumbnail from pdf; pdf first page thumbnail
How to C#: Overview of Using XImage.Raster
See this C# guide to learn how to use RasterEdge XImage SDK for .NET to perform quick file navigation. You may easily generate thumbnail image from image file.
pdf file thumbnail preview; show pdf thumbnails
Popsicle Bridge                                    
Page 4 of 12
Developed by IEEE as part of TryEngineering 
www.tryengineering.org
Popsicle Bridge 
For Teachers: 
Teacher Resource (continued) 
7.  Each bridge should be judged by the class in terms of its aesthetic value on a scale 
of 1-5 (1: not at all appealing; 2: not appealing; 3: neutral/average;  4: somewhat 
appealing; 5: very appealing).  This is of course subjective. 
8.  Teams then complete an evaluation/reflection worksheet, and present their findings 
to the class. 
Time Needed 
Two to three 45 minute sessions 
Tips 
For older students, increase the load the bridge must bear….bridges of this type 
made with hot glue can bear the weight of several students if well executed. 
A glue gun works best for this project, but for safety reasons, we suggest you use 
craft glue for younger students. 
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Excel
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB.NET How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Excel.
create pdf thumbnail; no pdf thumbnails in
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
Visual C#. VB.NET. RasterEdge provides this VB.NET image processor control SDK which owns the APIs for developers to create image thumbnail, resize, crop, scale
how to view pdf thumbnails in; enable pdf thumbnail preview
Popsicle Bridge                                    
Page 5 of 12
Developed by IEEE as part of TryEngineering 
www.tryengineering.org
Popsicle Bridge 
Student Resource: 
Types of Bridges 
There are six main types of bridges: arch, beam, cable-stayed, cantilever, suspension, 
and truss. 
Arch 
Arch bridges are arch-shaped and have abutments at each end. The 
earliest known arch bridges were built by the Greeks and include the 
Arkadiko Bridge. The weight of the bridge is thrusted into the 
abutments at either side. The largest arch bridge in the world, 
scheduled for completion in 2012, is planned for the Sixth Crossing 
at Dubai Creek in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.   
Beam 
Beam bridges are horizontal beams supported at each end by piers. 
The earliest beam bridges were simple logs that sat across streams 
and similar simple structures. In modern times, beam bridges are 
large box steel girder bridges. Weight on top of the beam pushes 
straight down on the piers at either end of the bridge.  
Cable-stayed  
Like suspension bridges, cable-stayed bridges are held up by cables. 
However, in a cable-stayed bridge, less cable is required and the 
towers holding the cables are proportionately shorter.. The longest 
cable-stayed bridge is the Tatara Bridge in the Seto Inland Sea, 
Japan. 
Cantilever 
Cantilever bridges are built using cantilevers — horizontal beams that 
are supported on only one end. Most cantilever bridges use two 
cantilever arms extending from opposite sides of the obstacle to be 
crossed, meeting at the center. The largest cantilever bridge is the 
549 m (1800 ft.) Quebec Bridge in Quebec, Canada. 
Suspension  
Suspension bridges are suspended from cables. The earliest 
suspension bridges were made of ropes or vines covered with pieces 
of bamboo. In modern bridges, the cables hang from towers that are 
attached to caissons or cofferdams which are embedded deep in the 
floor of a lake or river. The longest suspension bridge in the world is 
the 3911 m (12,831ft.) Akashi Kaikyo Bridge in Japan. 
Truss  
Truss bridges are composed of connected elements. They have a 
solid deck and a lattice of pin-jointed girders for the sides. Early truss 
bridges were made of wood, but modern truss bridges are made of 
metals such as wrought iron and steel. The Quebec Bridge, 
mentioned above as a cantilever bridge, is also the world's longest 
truss bridge. 
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.PowerPoint
See this C# guide to learn how to use RasterEdge PowerPoint SDK for .NET to perform quick file navigation. You may easily generate thumbnail image from
pdf reader thumbnails; pdf thumbnail generator online
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.Word
Tell C# users how to: create a new Word file and load Word from pdf; merge, append, and split Create Thumbnail. You may easily generate thumbnail image from Word
thumbnail pdf preview; pdf thumbnails
Popsicle Bridge                                    
Page 6 of 12
Developed by IEEE as part of TryEngineering 
www.tryengineering.org
Popsicle Bridge 
Student Resource: 
Famous Bridges 
Firth of Forth Bridge, Scotland 
The Forth Bridge is a cantilever, railway bridge over the 
Firth of Forth in the east of Scotland. The bridge is, 
even today, regarded as an engineering marvel. It is 
2.5 km (1.5 miles) in length, and the double track is 
elevated 46 m (approx. 150 ft) above high tide. It 
consists of two main spans of 1,710 ft (520 m), two 
side spans of 675 ft, 15 approach spans of 168 ft (51 
m), and five of 25 ft (7.6 m). Each main span 
comprises two 680 ft (210 m) cantilever arms 
supporting a central 350 ft (110 m) span girder bridge. 
The three great four-tower cantilever structures are 
340 ft (104 m) tall, each 70 ft (21 m) diameter foot 
resting on a separate foundation. The southern group 
of foundations had to be constructed as caissons under 
compressed air, to a depth of 90 ft (27 m). At its peak, 
approximately 4,600 workers were employed in its 
construction. 
Sydney Harbour Bridge, Australia 
The Sydney Harbour Bridge is a steel arch bridge 
across Sydney Harbour that carries trains, vehicles, and 
pedestrian traffic between the Sydney central business 
district and the North Shore area. The dramatic view of 
the bridge, the harbour, and the nearby Sydney Opera 
House is an iconic image of both Sydney and Australia. 
The bridge was designed and built by Dorman Long and 
Co Ltd, from Middlesbrough, Teesside, U.K., and was 
the city's tallest structure until 1967. According to 
Guinness World Records, it is the world's widest long-
span bridge and its tallest steel arch bridge, measuring 
134 metres (429.6 ft) from top to water level. It is also 
the fourth-longest spanning-arch bridge in the world. 
The arch is composed of two 28-panel arch trusses. 
Their heights vary from 18 m (55.8 ft) at the center of 
the arch to 57 m (176.7 ft) (beside the pylons). 
Popsicle Bridge                                    
Page 7 of 12
Developed by IEEE as part of TryEngineering 
www.tryengineering.org
Popsicle Bridge 
Student Worksheet: 
Design Your Own Bridge 
You are part of a team of engineers who have been given the challenge to design a bridge 
out of up to 200 popsicle sticks and glue. Bridges must be able to hold a specific weight 
(your teacher will decide what the weight goal will be for your class). The bridge must 
span at least 14 inches in length.  But, it must be longer than 14 inches because when it 
has been constructed, it will be placed between two chairs so it is at least one foot above 
the floor for a weight bearing test. In addition to meeting the structural and weight 
bearing requirements, the bridge will be judged on its aesthetics as well, so be creative!  
And, you are encouraged to use the fewest number of popsicles possible to achieve your 
goal. 
Planning Stage 
Meet as a team and discuss the problem you need to solve.  Then develop and agree on a 
design for your bridge.  You'll need to determine how many popsicle sticks you will use 
(up to 200) -- and the steps you will take in the manufacturing process. Think about what 
patterns might be the strongest….but you are also being judged on the aesthetics of your 
bridge! Draw your design in the box below, and be sure to indicate the number of sticks 
you anticipate using. Present your design to the class. You may choose to revise your 
teams' plan after you receive feedback from class.   
Number of popsicle sticks you anticipate using: 
Popsicle Bridge                                    
Page 8 of 12
Developed by IEEE as part of TryEngineering 
www.tryengineering.org
Popsicle Bridge 
Student Worksheet (continued):  
Construction Phase 
Build your bridge.  During construction you may decide 
you need additional sticks (up to 200) or that your 
design needs to change.  This is ok -- just make a new 
sketch and revise your materials list.  
Aesthetic Vote 
Each student will cast a vote about the look of each 
bridge.  The scale is 1 - 5 -- (1: not at all appealing; 2: 
not appealing; 3: neutral/average; 4: somewhat 
appealing; 5: very appealing).  This number is averaged to generate a score for each 
bridge.  This score is not based on how well the bridge might hold weight, but on how it 
looks. 
Testing Phase 
Each team will test their bridge to see if it can withstand the required weight for at least 
one full minute.  Be sure to watch the tests of the other teams and observe how their 
different designs worked. 
Evaluation Phase 
Evaluate your teams' results, complete the evaluation worksheet, and present your 
findings to the class. 
Use this worksheet to evaluate your team's results: 
1. Did you succeed in creating a bridge that held the required weight for a full minute?  If 
not, why did it fail? 
2. Did you decide to revise your original design while in the construction phase?  Why? 
3. How many popsicle sticks did you end up using?  Did this number differ from your plan?  
If so, what changed?  
Popsicle Bridge                                    
Page 9 of 12
Developed by IEEE as part of TryEngineering 
www.tryengineering.org
Popsicle Bridge 
Student Worksheet (continued):  
4.  What was the average aesthetic score for your bridge?  How 
did this compare to the rest of the class?  What design elements of other bridges did you 
like the best? 
5. Do you think that engineers have to adapt their original plans during the construction 
of systems or products?  Why might they? 
6. If you had to do it all over again, how would your planned design change?  Why? 
7.  What designs or methods did you see other teams try that you thought worked well? 
8.  Do you think you would have been able to complete this project easier if you were 
working alone?  Explain… 
9.  What sort of trade-offs do you think engineers make between functionality, safety, and 
aesthetics when building a real bridge?   
Popsicle Bridge                                    
Page 10 of 12
Developed by IEEE as part of TryEngineering 
www.tryengineering.org
Popsicle Bridge 
For Teachers: 
Alignment to Curriculum Frameworks 
Note: Lesson plans in this series are aligned to one or more of the following sets of standards:   
U.S. Science Education Standards (http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=4962
U.S. Next Generation Science Standards (http://www.nextgenscience.org/)  
International Technology Education Association's Standards for Technological Literacy 
(http://www.iteea.org/TAA/PDFs/xstnd.pdf
U.S. National Council of Teachers of Mathematics' Principles and Standards for School 
Mathematics (http://www.nctm.org/standards/content.aspx?id=16909) 
U.S. Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (http://www.corestandards.org/Math
Computer Science Teachers Association K-12 Computer Science Standards 
(http://csta.acm.org/Curriculum/sub/K12Standards.html
National Science Education Standards Grades K-4 (ages 4 - 9) 
CONTENT STANDARD A: Science as Inquiry 
As a result of activities, all students should develop 
Abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry  
CONTENT STANDARD B: Physical Science 
As a result of the activities, all students should develop an understanding of 
Properties of objects and materials  
CONTENT STANDARD E: Science and Technology  
As a result of activities, all students should develop 
Abilities of technological design  
Understanding about science and technology  
CONTENT STANDARD G: History and Nature of Science 
As a result of activities, all students should develop understanding of 
Science as a human endeavor  
National Science Education Standards Grades 5-8 (ages 10 - 14) 
CONTENT STANDARD A: Science as Inquiry 
As a result of activities, all students should develop 
Abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry  
CONTENT STANDARD B: Physical Science 
As a result of their activities, all students should develop an understanding of 
Motions and forces  
CONTENT STANDARD E: Science and Technology 
As a result of activities in grades 5-8, all students should develop 
Abilities of technological design  
Understandings about science and technology  
CONTENT STANDARD F: Science in Personal and Social Perspectives 
As a result of activities, all students should develop understanding of 
Risks and benefits  
Science and technology in society  
CONTENT STANDARD G: History and Nature of Science 
As a result of activities, all students should develop understanding of 
History of science  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested