18 
REFERENCES 
Abowd, John and Francis Kramarz. 1999. “The Analysis of Labor Markets Using 
Matched Employer-Employee Data.” In O. Ashenfelter and D. Card eds. Handbook of 
Labor Economics, Volume 3A.  
Acemoglu, Daron and Jorn-Steffen Pischke. 1999. “Beyond Becker: Training in 
Imperfect Labor Markets.” Economic Journal, Vol. 109, 112-42. 
Appelbaum, Eileen; Annette Bernhardt and Richard Murnane. 2003. Low-Wage 
America: How Employers are Reshaping Opportunity in the Workplace. New York: 
Russell Sage Foundation. 
Bailey, Thomas; Timothy Leinbach and Davis Jenkins. 2005. “Graduation Rates, Student 
Goals and Measuring Community College Effectiveness.” Working Paper, Community 
College Research Center, Columbia University. 
Bartik, Timothy. 2010. “How Federal Policy Can Target Job Creation for Economically 
Distressed Areas.” Hamilton Project Discussion Paper, Brookings Institution, 
Washington DC. 
Becker, Gary. 1975. Human Capital. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, Second 
Edition. 
Belfield, Clive and Henry Levin eds. 2007. The Price We Pay. Washington DC: 
Brookings Institution. 
Besharov, Douglas and Phoebe Cottingham. 2011. The Workforce Investment Act: 
Implementation Experiences and Evaluation Findings. Kalamazoo MI: W.E. Upjohn 
Institute for Employment Research.  
Bishop, John and Shani Carter. 1991. “How accurate are recent BLS occupational 
projections?”Monthly Labor Review, 114(10), 37-43. 
Blank, Rebecca; Sheldon Danziger and Robert Schoeni eds. 2007. Working and Poor: 
How Economic and Policy Changes are Affecting Low-Wage Workers. New York: 
Russell Sage Foundation.  
Blinder, Alan. 2006. “Offshoring: The Second Industrial Revolution?” Foreign Affairs
Vol. 85, No. 2, 113-28. 
Bowen, William  et al. 2004. Equity and Excellence in American Higher Education
Charlottesville VA: University of Virginia Press. 
Pdf thumbnails - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
.pdf printing in thumbnail size; no pdf thumbnails in
Pdf thumbnails - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
how to view pdf thumbnails in; create thumbnails from pdf files
19 
Carnevale, Anthony et al. 2010. Help Wanted: Projections of Jobs and Education 
Requirements Through 2018. Washington DC: Georgetown Center on Education and the 
Workforce.   
Carnevale, Anthony and Stephen Rose. 2011.The Undereducated American. Washington 
DC: Georgetown Center on Education and the Workforce. 
Center for Best Practices, 2009. State Sector Strategies: Regional Solutions to Worker 
and Employer Needs. National Governors’ Association, Washington DC. 
Decision Information Resources. 2008. “Evaluation of Youth Opportunities Program.” 
Report to the Employment and Training Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. 
Elsby, Michael; et al. 2010. “The Labor Market in the Great Recession.” NBER Working 
Paper.  
Fletcher, Michael. 2011.”Why does Fresno have Thousands of Job Openings – and High 
Unemployment?” Washington Post, February 2. 
Freeman, Richard. 2007. “Is a Great Labor Shortage Coming? Replacement Demand in 
the Global Economy.” In H. Holzer and D. Nightingale eds. Reshaping the American 
Workforce in a Changing Economy. Washington DC: Urban Institute Press. 
Goldin, Claudia and Lawrence Katz. 2008. The Race Between Education and 
Technology. Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press. 
Heckman, James and Paul Lafontaine. 2007. “The American High School Graduation 
Rate: Trends and Levels.” National Bureau of Economic Research Working Paper. 
Heinrich, Carolyn; et al. 2009. “New Estimates of Public Employment and Training 
Program Net Impacts: A Nonexperimental Evaluation of the Workforce Investment Act 
Program.” IZA Discussion Paper.  
Heinrich, Carolyn and Christopher King. 2010. “How Effective are Workforce 
Development Programs?” Paper presented at the 40
th
Anniversary Conference of the Ray 
Marshall Center, University of Texas at Austin, October 19 2010.  
Hoffman, Nancy. 2011. “A Fresh Look at Career and Technical Education.” Boston: Jobs 
for the Future. Unpublished paper. 
Hollenbeck, Kevin.2008. “Is There a Role for Public Support in Incumbent Worker On-
the-Job Training?” W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, Kalamazoo MI.  
Holzer, Harry. 2010. Penny Wise, Pound Foolish: Why Tackling Child Poverty During 
the Great Recession Makes Economic Sense. Washington DC: Center for American 
Progress.  
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Ability to show PDF page thumbnails for quick navigation. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. Navigate PDF document with thumbnails. 14. Text Search.
pdf reader thumbnails; enable thumbnail preview for pdf files
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Ability to show PDF page thumbnails for quick navigation. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. Navigate PDF document with thumbnails. 14. Text Search.
can't see pdf thumbnails; .pdf printing in thumbnail size
20 
Holzer, Harry. 2009. “Workforce Development Programs as an Antipoverty Strategy: 
What Do We Know? What Should We Do?” In M. Cancian and S. Danziger eds. 
Changing Poverty, Changing Policies. New York: Russell Sage Foundation. 
Holzer, Harry; Julia Lane, David Rosenblum and Fredrik Andersson. 2011. Where Are 
All the Good Jobs Going? What National and Local Job Quality and Dynamics Mean for 
US Workers. New York: Russell Sage Foundation. 
Holzer, Harry; Diane Schanzenbach, Greg Duncan and Jens Ludwig. 2007. The 
Economic Costs of Poverty: Subsequent Effects of Children Growing Up Poor. 
Washington DC: Center for American Progress. 
Jacobson, Louis; Robert Lalonde and Daniel Sullivan. 2003. “Should We Teach Old 
Dogs New Tricks? The Impact of Community College Retraining on Older Workers.” 
Working Paper, IZA.  
Jacobson, Louis and Christine Mokher. 2009. “Pathways to Boosting the Earnings of 
Low-Income Students by Increasing their Educational Attainment.” Arlington VA: CNA.   
Jenkins, Davis; Matthew Zeidenberg and Gregory Kienzl. 2009. “Building Bridges to 
Postsecondary Training for Low-Skill Adults: Outcomes of Washington State’s I-BEST 
Porgram. New York: Center for Research on Community Colleges, Columbia University.  
Kemple, James. 2008. Career Academies: Long-Term Impacts on Earnings, Educational 
Atainment and the Transition to Adulthood. New York: MDRC. 
Krueger, Alan and Lawrence Summers. 1987. “Reflections on the Inter-Industry Wage 
Structure. “ In K. Lang and J. Leonard eds. The Structure of Labor Markets. Basil 
Blackwell. 
Lerman, Robert. 2010. “Expanding Apprenticeship: A Way To Extend Skills and 
Careers.” Urban Institute, Washington DC. 
Maguire, Sheila; Joshua Freely, Carol Clymer, Maureen Conway and Deena Schwartz. 
2010. “Tuning In to Local Labor Markets: Findings from the Sectoral Employment 
Impact Study.” Philadelphia: PPV. 
McGahey, Richard and Jennifer Vey. 2009. Retooling for Growth: Building a 21
st
Century Economy in America’s Older Industrial Areas. Washington DC: Brookings 
Institution.  
McKinsey Global Institute. 2011. An Economy that Works: Job Creation and America’s 
Future. New York. 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Embedded page thumbnails.
cannot view pdf thumbnails in; create thumbnail from pdf
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Support of converting from any single one PDF page and multiple pages. Thumbnails can be created from PDF pages. Support for customizing image size.
pdf files thumbnails; program to create thumbnail from pdf
21 
O’Leary, Christopher et al. 2004. “Public Job Training: Experience and Prospects.” In C. 
O’Leary, R. Straits and S. Wandner eds. Job Training Policy in the United States
Kalamazoo MI: W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.    
Reardon, Sean. 2011. “The widening socioeconomic status achievement gap: new 
evidence and possible explanations.”  In Richard Murnane & Greg Duncan eds. Social 
and Inequality and Economic Disadvantage. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution. 
Richburg-Hayes, LaShawn. 2008. “Helping Low-Wage Workers Persist in Community 
College.” New York: MDRC. 
Roder, Anne and Mark Elliott. 2011. A Promising StartYear Up's Initial Impacts on. 
Low-Income Young Adults' Careers. New York: Economic Mobility Corporation. 
Soares, Louis. 2010. “Community College 2.0.” Washington DC: Center for American 
Progress.  
Symonds, William; Robert Schwartz and Ronald Ferguson. 2011. Pathways to 
Prosperity: Meeting the Challenge of Preparing Young Americans for the 21
st
Century
Cambridge MA: Graduate School of Education, Harvard University.  
Uchitelle, Louis. 2009. “Despite Recession, Demand for Skilled Labor is High.” New  
York Times, June 23. 
United States Government Accountability Office. 2011. Multiple Employment and 
Training Programs: Providing Information on Colocating Services and Consolidating 
Administrative Structures Could Promote Efficiencies. Washington DC: U.S. 
Government Printing Office.  
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Embedded page thumbnails.
thumbnail view in for pdf files; show pdf thumbnails
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. PDF thumbnails for navigation in .NET project.
generate pdf thumbnails; create thumbnails from pdf files
22 
Table 1
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
Worker Skills Quintile
1
63,6
26,3
8,0
1,9
0,3
67,7
22,4
7,6
1,8
0,6
2
25,8
34,1
23,2
13,0
3,9
24,9
38,6
24,4
9,9
2,2
3
9,3
25,7
33,7
21,9
9,4
10,5
25,6
33,7
22,4
7,8
4
2,4
12,6
25,5
37,9
21,6
3,7
6,8
24,2
40,0
25,4
5
0,2
1,6
10,2
26,8
61,1
2,4
2,5
7,8
27,2
60,1
Distribution of Employment (Percentages) across Job Quality Quintiles, 1992 versus 2003
1992
2003
Job Quality Quintile (1=Highest)
Job Quality Quintile (1=Highest)
Note: Rows sum to 100%. Job Quality and Worker Skills are measured as firm and worker fixed effects using longitudinal data from the 
LEHD program, US Census Bureau. From Holzer et al. 2011 
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Converter control easy to create thumbnails from PDF pages. Selection for compressing to multiple image formats. Cut and paste any areas in PDF pages to images.
html display pdf thumbnail; create thumbnail jpg from pdf
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. PDF thumbnails for navigation in .NET WPF Console application
pdf thumbnail html; show pdf thumbnail in html
23 
Table 2
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
Industry
Agriculture
0,2
0,6
0,8
1,2
6,0
0,2
0,5
0,7
1,1
Mining
0,9
0,3
0,2
0,2
0,1
0,5
0,2
0,1
0,1
Utilities
3,2
1,4
0,3
0,1
0,0
2,3
1,0
0,2
0,1
Construction
5,9
4,9
3,1
2,2
1,7
6,7
5,6
3,9
2,7
Non-Durable Manufacturing
12,5
13,7
9,4
5,9
6,4
9,2
9,9
6,3
4,1
Durable Manufacturing
24,0
12,6
7,7
5,5
3,4
15,2
9,3
6,0
4,1
Wholesale Trade
7,0
5,6
4,4
2,7
2,1
7,8
5,7
4,8
2,6
Retail Trade
4,3
4,7
12,4
21,4
15,5
5,8
5,8
14,7
21,4
Transportation
2,4
4,9
4,2
3,3
3,1
2,6
4,5
4,2
3,5
Services
Information
7,9
2,4
1,7
1,6
1,6
7,8
3,1
1,4
1,2
Finance
6,2
9,6
6,3
3,2
0,5
8,1
9,6
4,4
2,4
Real Estate
1,1
0,9
1,1
1,0
1,3
1,4
1,1
1,3
1,2
Professional Services
11,0
3,5
2,1
1,2
2,1
13,5
3,8
2,1
1,5
Management
1,6
1,1
0,4
0,3
0,2
1,5
1,3
0,5
0,2
Administrative
2,5
2,2
3,3
6,9
10,3
4,2
3,6
4,8
9,0
Education
0,2
2,8
12,3
19,7
12,5
0,6
2,7
12,9
21,2
Health Care
2,8
15,8
17,5
8,0
6,8
4,5
16,7
18,4
8,5
Entertainment
0,4
0,4
0,8
1,8
2,8
0,6
1,0
1,2
2,0
Accommodation & Food
0,6
1,1
3,3
9,4
18,9
1,1
1,6
3,1
8,3
Other
1,5
1,3
1,4
2,0
3,0
1,5
1,5
1,6
1,8
Public Administration
3,7
10,2
7,1
2,6
1,7
5,0
11,5
7,4
2,8
Distribution of Employment (Percentages) within Job Quality Quintiles, 1992 versus 2003
Job Quality Quintile (1=Highest)
Job Quality Quintile (1=Highest)
1992
2003
Note: Columns sum to 100%. Job Quality is measured on the basis of firm fixed effects using longitudinal data from the LEHD program, US Census Bureau. 
Source: Holzer et al., 2011.
24 
Figure 1: Earnings of US Workers by Educational Attainment Within 
Occupation/Industry Groups 
Source: A. Carnevale et al. (2010)  
$49.320  
$50.940  
$37.858  
$27.677  
$28.950    $31.333  
$27.138  
$23.664  
$19.772  
$54.472  
$55.179  
$38.220  
$35.550  
$39.648    $36.601  
$24.727  
$25.815  
$23.432  
$60.649  
$59.743  
$42.389  
$39.106  
$45.211  
$41.703  
$30.973  
$26.948  
$26.356  
$59.619  
$61.438  
$51.680  
$40.424  
$48.080  
$43.768  
$30.349  
$30.865  
$28.566  
$87.523  
$77.031  
$63.204  
$63.738  
$52.201  
$49.842  
$41.891  
$33.047  
$34.790  
$120.436  
$90.948  
$141.571  
$85.409  
$67.601  
$54.658  
$60.415  
$48.472  
$37.307  
Managerial
and
Professiona…
Stem +
Healthcare
and
professiona…
Sales and
office
support
Blue collar
Community
services and
arts
Education
Healthcare
support
occupations
Food and
personal
services
Master's or
better
Bachelor's
Associate
Degree
$49.320  
$50.940  
$37.858  
$27.677  
$28.950    $31.333  
$27.138  
$23.664  
$19.772  
$54.472    $55.179  
$38.220  
$35.550  
$39.648    $36.601  
$24.727  
$25.815  
$23.432  
$60.649  
$59.743  
$42.389  
$39.106  
$45.211  
$41.703  
$30.973  
$26.948  
$26.356  
$59.619  
$61.438  
$51.680  
$40.424  
$48.080  
$43.768  
$30.349  
$30.865  
$28.566  
$87.523  
$77.031  
$63.204  
$63.738  
$52.201  
$49.842  
$41.891  
$33.047  
$34.790  
$120.436  
$90.948  
$141.571  
$85.409  
$67.601  
$54.658  
$60.415  
$48.472  
$37.307  
Managerial
and
Professiona…
Stem +
Healthcare
and
professiona…
Sales and
office
support
Blue collar
Community
services and
arts
Education
Healthcare
support
occupations
Food and
personal
services
Master's or
better
Bachelor's
Associate
Degree
25 
.
Table 3 
Predicted Costs and Benefits of the Proposal 
5% Annual Fade-Out 
10% Annual Fade-Out 
20% Annual Fade-Out 
Program Completion Rate 
50% 
75% 
50% 
75% 
50% 
75% 
Benefit For Each Program 
Completer (Net Present 
Value) 
$45,817 
$45,817 
$26,360 
$26,360 
$15,143 
$15,143 
Total Program Benefit (Net 
Present Value) 
$5,746,971,760  $8,600,645,139  $3,314,823,012  $4,952,422,018  $1,912,729,969  $2,849,282,454 
Annual Cost 
$1,500,000,000  $1,500,000,000  $1,500,000,000  $1,500,000,000  $1,500,000,000  $1,500,000,000 
Benefit-to-Cost Ratio 
3.8 
5.7 
2.2 
3.3 
1.3 
1.9 
Note: The program is estimated to cost $6000 per participant.  Assuming that $1.5 million will be used for sectoral training programs, 
the program can serve 250,000 participants.     
26 
Technical Appendix 
The estimates in Table 3 assume that most of the grant money (i.e., $1.5 out of $2B) is 
spent directly on training services for individuals, and estimates the costs and benefits of 
this spending based on the Sectoral Employment Impact Study (SEIS). Since these 
estimates include no impacts (on costs or benefits) associated with broader changes to the 
education and workforce systems of the relevant states, and since it uses many 
conservative assumptions, the estimates should be regarded as lower bounds to the likely 
effects. For example, these estimates do not take into account the benefits to students 
from community college support services or reforms in the college financing or 
workforce development systems, which could provide significant spillovers to students 
and are much cheaper to provide on a per-student basis.  
The other estimates in the cost-benefit section use an alternative approach: instead of 
focusing on individuals who are trained, it estimates the total effects of systemic changes 
as reflected in higher credential completion rates (which we assume will be 10% due to 
the program) among community college students or Pell grant recipients respectively in 
those states.          
The cost of the training program in Table 3 is assumed to be $6000 per participant, which 
is the average cost of the 3 programs in SEIS. For the $1.5B spent on these services, 
250,000 individuals could be served annually. We look at total benefits assuming that 
75% of individuals finish the program, the completion rate in SEIS.  We also provide a 
more conservative estimate, assuming that 50% of individuals served finish the program 
and receive a credential, well below the completion rate of SEIS.  We also assume that 
those who do not finish the program obtain no benefit from it.  
On the other hand, we transform the second-year individual impact estimate reported for 
SEIS so that it only applies to program completers. The impact on annual earnings per 
program participant reported in SEIS is $4,011.
23
This is an “intent-to-treat” (or ITT) 
estimate, based on all participants randomly assigned to receive services from the 
training program (treatment group) relative to those not receiving them (control group). 
This estimate thus applies to anyone offered treatment, even if they did not complete the 
program or earn the certification. To apply it only to program completers, we transform it 
into the “treatment effect on the treated” (or TOT) estimate of $5348 (i.e., 4011/.75) for 
SEIS, which we now apply only to the smaller percentage of trainees whom we expect to 
finish treatment in our broader program. 
To predict the impact of larger changes to the community college system, we must 
estimate the numbers of individuals who might benefit from systemic changes rather than 
those receiving treatment directly. Nationally, the number of students who attending 
community college (12.4 million) or the total number of Pell Grant recipients in 2010-11 
(8.9 million) serve as the target populations. Assuming that ten states of average 
23
This was the average positive impact of 3 sectoral employment training programs analyzed in the 
Sectoral Employment Impact Study - the Jewish Vocational Service in Boston, Wisconsin Regional 
Training Program in Milwaukee, and Per Scholas in New York City.
27 
population size might receive grants, one-fifth of these relevant student populations (2.48 
million community college attendees and 1.78 million Pell Grant recipients) could be 
affected by this competitive program. And, if 10% of these groups can gain additional 
certification through the job training programs, a total of 248,000 community college 
attendees or 178,000 Pell Grant recipients could acquire additional relevant job 
certification. Note that both estimates fall short or approximate the 250,000 individuals 
whom we assume to be directly serviced in the table, but with much higher completion 
rates here (as we assume that all of these individuals will gain new certifications). I apply 
the same TOT estimate of earnings gains (based on SEIS) to all such individuals in these 
examples as in the earlier one.  
In all of these examples, I assume that all spending outlays are realized at the beginning 
of the first year and that earnings gains for program completers are realized towards the 
end of that year (in Table 3) or at the start of the second year (i.e. after program 
completion).
24
The costs of foregone earnings (based on SEIS estimates) are also 
included in the first year estimates in Table 3 but not in the estimates based on 
community college or Pell Grant populations, as the latter examples assume that students 
are already enrolled in college before the program is implemented and there is no further 
loss of earnings.
25
Once the earnings gains appear, I assume that they decay over time at 
an annual rate of 5% until they disappear, and I discount future earnings using a real rate 
of 3%.
26
The estimates presented in Table 3 based on all of these assumptions show the benefits 
and costs associated with expenditures for just one year. Assuming the program operates 
for each of five or ten years, one could simply multiply the listed costs and net benefits 
by five or ten to derive expected total impacts.    
24
The training in the SEIS programs lasted six months or less, and thus benefits began to accrue to trainees 
in the second half of the first year. In contrast, we assume that those in community college will need the 
full year to complete their programs or degrees.     
25
Since these calculations focus on the existing college population, they also ignore disadvantaged or 
dislocated individuals who would benefit by new entrance to college or other training programs. This is one 
more very conservative assumption that I have made. 
26
Some program evaluation studies, like that of the Job Corps or the Job Training Partnership Act, show 
significant fadeout over time of program impacts (Holzer, 2009), while others (e.g., Heinrich et al., 2009) 
do not find them. Assuming a 5% annual rate of decay is a reasonable compromise based on the findings of 
these studies. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested