asp.net pdf viewer user control c# : Thumbnail pdf preview Library application class asp.net html windows ajax pub407112-part825

6-21 
produce  from  another farm only 70 km from the  same  port.
97
If  the fruit is being 
transported in cold storage, then the additional transport time may not affect the fruit 
quality as dramatically, but entire truckloads of produce can be lost because of poor road 
conditions. One producer reportedly lost two truckloads of pineapples during a three-
month period when his trucks overturned as a result of unstable road conditions.
98
In 
contrast, road access in Costa Rica is reportedly more reliable and direct to the port, 
resulting in lower transport times and fewer vehicular accidents.
99
Port  operations  throughout  West  Africa  affect  fruit  shipment  quality  and  the 
competitiveness of tropical fruit exports. Tropical fruit exports from West Africa are at a 
disadvantage  in  export  markets  compared  to  other  global  competitors  because  of 
inefficient or infrequent shipping routes. Poor handling at the port can damage the fruit 
and lead to higher rejection rates than those experienced by Latin American exporters. 
Despite being a comparable distance by sea from the EU, tropical fruit shipped from the 
largest exporters in Latin America spends less time in transit between ports than tropical 
fruit shipped from West Africa.
100
Most of the produce exported from Latin America is 
shipped on dedicated fruit vessels operated by the major global produce companies, such 
as Dole and Del Monte. Dedicated fruit vessels are available less frequently in West 
Africa than in Latin America because of limited regular quantities of SSA tropical fruit 
exports. Therefore, most fruit exports from West Africa are shipped on container vessels, 
which are less costly than dedicated fruit vessels.
101
Latin American producers reportedly 
benefit from efficient shipping route options to all of the major ports in the EU, with 
produce often reaching its final EU destination, such as Antwerp, Belgium, in 12 or 13 
days.
102
In contrast, some produce exported from West Africa is shipped on container 
vessels that make other port calls en route and can take around 20 days to arrive at its 
final EU destination. The additional days in transit lower the fruit’s value to a retailer.
103
In  addition,  the  mishandling  of  containers  can  cause  damage  to  the  fruit  prior  to 
departure. Between 2 and 3 percent of fruit exports from West Africa are reportedly 
damaged as a result of poor handling at West African ports, compared to an approximate 
1 percent damage rate in Latin America.
104
In an attempt to improve fruit quality and compete with other global exporters, West 
African industry and port operators are constructing portside tropical fruit cold storage 
facilities.  For  example,  a  new  fruit  handling  terminal  with  expanded  cold  storage 
facilities at the port of Tema was completed in October 2008, although it is not yet 
operational because of delays in concluding an agreement on its operations among the 
Ghanaian Ministry of Agriculture, the Sea-Freight Pineapple Exporters of Ghana, and the 
Ports Authority. The expanded facility is expected to increase cold storage capacity and 
97
Industry official, interview by Commission staff, Accra, Ghana, October 27, 2008. 
98
Industry official, interview by Commission staff, Awutu Efutu Senya, Ghana, October 28, 2008. 
99
Industry official, interview by Commission staff, Awutu Efutu Senya, Ghana, October 28, 2008. 
100
For more information on maritime infrastructure in SSA, see chap. 4 of this report. 
101
Whereas shipping a reefer container from West Africa to northern Europe can cost approximately 
$3,300, shipping the same quantity of tropical fruits in palettes on a dedicated fruit vessel can cost almost 
twice as much. Industry official, e-mail message to Commission staff, November 20, 2008. 
102
Hapag-Lloyd, “Schedules,” undated (accessed December 3, 2008); Dole Ocean Cargo Express, 
“Sailing Schedules,” undated (accessed November 14, 2008). 
103
Currently, sailing times from Tema, Ghana, to Antwerp, Belgium, can take more than 20 days due 
to additional port calls in Senegal, Morocco, and Spain. Maersk Line, “Route Schedules by Map-Africa,” 
October 3, 2008. 
104
Industry official, telephone interview by Commission staff, December 22, 2008. 
Thumbnail pdf preview - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
show pdf thumbnail in; print pdf thumbnails
Thumbnail pdf preview - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
.pdf printing in thumbnail size; can't see pdf thumbnails
6-22 
decrease cold storage costs compared to the high rates charged to tropical fruit exporters 
for storing refrigerated containers at the port.
105
105
Industry official, e-mail message to Commission staff, September 25, 2008. 
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
With the SDK, you can preview the document content according to the preview thumbnail by the ways as following. C# DLLs for Word File Preview. Add references:
enable pdf thumbnails in; create pdf thumbnails
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
With the SDK, you can preview the document content according to the preview thumbnail by the ways as following. C# DLLs: Preview PowerPoint Document.
thumbnail view in for pdf files; pdf file thumbnail preview
6-23 
Natural Rubber  
Summary of Findings  
Poor infrastructure conditions and high electricity costs increase production costs and 
have a negative effect on the competitiveness of SSA exports of natural rubber. They also 
hinder the ability of SSA countries to expand production and exports of natural rubber 
and rubber products. With the exception of South Africa, SSA countries have not been 
successful in manufacturing goods from natural rubber for their domestic or regional 
export  markets.  The high price of electricity is the major obstacle to  manufacturing 
downstream rubber  products that  are cost  competitive with  imports. However, SSA 
countries do have some advantages over their primary competitors in Southeast Asia, 
including abundant, inexpensive land suitable for rubber planting and high productivity 
of newly planted areas. 
Introduction  
Industry Overview 
Natural rubber is a commodity product collected from the Hevea brasiliensis tree, which 
grows well in warm, wet climates.
106
It is most often collected by small land holders who 
harvest unprocessed rubber from an area of about 2 to 20 hectares and sell it to nearby 
processors. Natural rubber is also produced on estates or plantations, usually covering 
thousands of hectares, where the company owning the land manages the entire rubber 
production process. An estimated 75 percent of solid rubber is used for the production of 
tires.
107
Other products made from solid rubber include hoses, seals, conveyor belts, and 
foam rubber. 
Natural rubber  production in SSA is concentrated in the equatorial regions of West 
Africa.
108
Côte d’Ivoire, Liberia, Cameroon, and Nigeria are the largest natural rubber 
producers and exporters in SSA, together accounting for about 91 percent of SSA natural 
rubber production and exports.
109
In Côte d’Ivoire, small land holders account for about 
61  percent  of  the  area  dedicated  to  rubber  production.
110
In  Liberia,  production  is 
dominated by a large estate that has been owned by Firestone Natural Rubber Co., LLC, 
since 1924.
111
In Nigeria, small holders account for about 60 percent of the area dedicated 
to natural rubber production.
112
106
Baker and Fulton, “Rubber, Natural,” 1997, 2. For more information on natural rubber production 
and factors affecting SSA trade in natural rubber in recent years, see USITC, Sub-Saharan Africa, 2008, 3-
17–3-30. 
107
USITC, Sub-Saharan Africa, 2008, 3-19. 
108
Historically, the DRC was a major exporter of natural rubber. Recently, the DRC’s natural rubber 
production has been greatly reduced because of internal conflict. The DRC’s dilapidated transportation 
infrastructure also hinders the development of natural rubber production. See OECD and AfDB, African 
Economic Outlook 2007/2008, 2008, 244. 
109
IRSG, Rubber Statistics Bulletin, table 7, January–February 2008. 
110
USITC, Sub-Saharan Africa, 2008, 3-20; IRSG, Rubber Statistics Bulletin, table 46, January–
February 2008. 
111
Africa News, “Liberia: President Issues Executive Order,” November 22, 2008. Firestone recently 
renegotiated the concession for the estate with the Liberian government and has rights to the concession until 
2041. Rubber & Plastic News, “Houses of Liberian Legislature Ratify Pact,” April 14, 2008. 
112
IRSG, Rubber Statistics Bulletin, table 46, January–February 2008. 
How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET. To Preview Images in WinForm Application.
pdf first page thumbnail; generate pdf thumbnails
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
document in memory. With the SDK, you can preview the document content according to the preview thumbnail by the ways as following.
enable thumbnail preview for pdf files; how to make a thumbnail of a pdf
6-24 
Estate production is typically more efficient than small-holder production because estate 
employees often have better technical knowledge that enables them to produce more 
natural rubber per hectare.
113
However, government policies in both SSA and Southeast 
Asia, SSA’s closest competitor, tend to favor small holders over large estates.
114
Small 
holders also have more flexibility to switch to different crops or different sources of 
income when the price of rubber falls because they do not have as much capital invested 
as the estates.
115
International Trade  
SSA exports of natural rubber topped $912 million in 2007, or about 6 percent of global 
exports that year (figure 6.7). Côte d’Ivoire, Liberia, Cameroon, and Nigeria together 
accounted for almost 90 percent of SSA exports. In comparison, the world’s three largest 
exporters of natural rubber, all based in Southeast Asia, accounted for 84 percent of 
global exports that year—more than 13 times the amount of SSA natural rubber exports.  
The EU and the United States are the largest markets for SSA natural rubber, together 
accounting for 88 percent of SSA exports (figure 6.8). About 66 percent of SSA natural 
rubber  exports are for  the production of  tires in the EU and  United States.
116
SSA 
countries shipped little natural rubber to China, the world’s largest importer of natural 
rubber.
117
Although SSA lags behind Asian countries in terms of total production and exports of 
natural rubber, production per hectare in some SSA countries is on par with or exceeds 
that of Southeast Asian countries. Production per hectare in Côte d’Ivoire and Liberia is 
higher than or similar to the production levels in the three top Southeast Asian countries 
(table 6.2). Côte d’Ivoire’s productivity advantage over producers in Southeast Asia is 
attributable to a higher proportion of estate production and the use of superior rubber tree 
clones.
118
Nigeria’s production per hectare is substantially lower. Government policies 
that have focused more on crude petroleum production than on natural rubber production 
have resulted in a lack of investment to replace old, less productive trees with new 
seedlings.
119
Some of the advantages that West African countries have over Southeast 
Asian producers are abundant land suitable for plantation development, lower plantation 
land acquisition cost, higher natural rubber yields, lower corporate taxes, and proximity 
to European and U.S. markets.
120
113
IRSG, “The African Rubber Industry,” 2002, 8. 
114
Industry official, interview by Commission staff, Anguedou, Côte d’Ivoire, October 31, 2008; 
IRSG, “The African Rubber Industry,” 2002, 14. 
115
IRSG, “The African Rubber Industry,” 2002, 14. 
116
Ibid. 
117
However, a Singaporean company, GMG, which owns 90 percent of the Hevecam plantation in 
Cameroon, wants to expand production at this plantation to supply the Chinese state-owned company 
Sinochem. Tumanjong, “Sinochem Intl To Be Major Consumer,” November 10, 2008. 
118
Industry official, interview by Commission staff, Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire, October 31, 2008. 
119
IRSG, “The African Rubber Industry,” 2002, 11–12. 
120
Business Times (Singapore), “Olam, Wilmar in 50:50 African Joint Venture,” November 16, 2007; 
Jones, “Vietnam Mulls Africa Rubber Plantations,” July 15, 2008. 
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Word
Preview Document. Conversion. Convert Word to PDF. Convert Word Convert Word to ODT. Convert PDF to Word. Text Search. Insert Image. Thumbnail Create. Thumbnail Create
view pdf thumbnails; show pdf thumbnails
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for PowerPoint
Preview Document. Conversion. Convert PowerPoint to PDF. Convert PowerPoint to Pages. Annotate PowerPoint. Text Search. Insert Image. Thumbnail Create.
pdf files thumbnails; create pdf thumbnail
6-25 
Thailand
34.0%
Indonesia
32.9%
Malaysia
17.4%
SSA
6.2%
Vietnam
4.7%
Other
4.9%
Côte d’Ivoire
43.7%
Liberia
24.7%
Cameroon
12.2%
Nigeria
8.7%
Ghana
3.4%
Gabon
2.9%
Guinea
2.8%
Other
1.6%
FIGURE 6.7  
Leading global and SSA exporters of natural rubber, 2007
SSA exporters
Global exporters
$14,693.5 million
$912.1 million
Source: GTIS, Global Trade Atlas Database. Annual data compiled from reporting countries’ official
statistics, including EU external trade.
Note: Data may not equal 100 percent due to rounding.
China
22.2%
EU27
21.1%
U.S.
14.4%
Japan
12.3%
Malaysia
5.5%
South Korea
5.4%
Brazil
3.3%
Singapore
2.2%
Other
13.7%
EU27
72.5%
U.S.
15.6%
SSA
3.6%
Canada
3.3%
Ukraine
2.0%
Other
3.0%
FIGURE 6.8  
Leading markets for global and SSA exports of natural rubber, 2007
SSA export markets
Global export markets
$14,693.5 million
$912.1 million
Source: GTIS, Global Trade Atlas Database. Annual data compiled from reporting countries’ official
statistics, including EU external trade.
Note: Data may not equal 100 percent due to rounding.
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Excel
Preview Document. Conversion. Convert Excel to PDF. Convert Excel to Insert Image. Thumbnail Create. Thumbnail Create. |. Home ›› XDoc.Excel ›› C# Excel
how to create a thumbnail of a pdf document; view pdf image thumbnail
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.PowerPoint
document (ODP). Empower to navigate PowerPoint document content quickly via thumbnail. Able to you want. Create Thumbnail. See this
pdf preview thumbnail; how to view pdf thumbnails in
6-26 
TABLE 6.2  Natural rubber industry statistics for select West African countries and their major competitors, 2006 
SSA 
Southeast Asia 
Statistic 
Côte 
d’Ivoire 
Liberia 
Nigeria 
Thailand 
Indonesia 
Malaysia 
Production of natural rubber
(mt) 
178,300 
100,500 
44,000 
3,137,000 
2,637,000 
1,283,000 
Rubber producing land area 
(hectares) 
121,700 
108,900  150,000 
2,294,700  3,309,000 
1,225,000 
Small landholders (%) 
60.7 
44.5 
60.0 
(
b
84.5 
95.5 
Productivity (kg per  
hectare) 
1,465 
923 
293 
1,367 
797 
1,047 
Domestic consumption of  
natural rubber (mt) 
(
c
(
c
17,000 
320,900 
355,000 
383,300 
Source: IRSG, Rubber Statistical Bulletin, January–February 2008. 
a
Last full year for which data are available. 
b
Not available. 
c
Not available. Total domestic consumption by natural rubber producers in Africa other than Nigeria was estimated 
to be 5,000 mt in 2006. Côte d’Ivoire is known to have some domestic consumption of natural rubber to make rubber 
gloves. Liberia has no known domestic consumption. 
Effects of Infrastructure Conditions on the Competitiveness of SSA 
Exports of Natural Rubber 
Natural rubber producing countries in SSA are primarily hindered by a poor road network 
for transporting raw rubber to the processing plant and by high electricity costs. These 
factors raise the cost of both processing natural rubber and making consumer goods from 
locally produced rubber. Moreover, the unreliability of the electricity supply causes many 
SSA factories to use on-site electric generators, which increase factory costs compared 
with competitors outside the region. As a result, natural rubber producing countries in 
SSA  cannot make  goods from  locally produced natural  rubber  that are  competitive 
outside the domestic market. 
Collection of Unprocessed Rubber  
The lack of road infrastructure in SSA affects the ability of the industry to expand 
production.  In  Côte  d’Ivoire,  there  is  available,  arable  land  considered suitable  for 
planting more rubber trees, but the rubber industry is unable to expand because of the 
lack of an adequate road network connecting the rubber tappers
121
to the processing 
facilities, and the high costs of laying paved roads in these areas.
122
For areas harvested 
by small land holders, processing plants collect natural rubber from many individual 
farmers at distances of 50–100 km from the plant.
123
In the past, the plant owners covered 
the cost of transportation from the small farms to the plant. Many processors are now 
implementing  a  system  whereby  they  pay  the  farmer  a  set  transportation  price  for 
delivering the unprocessed rubber. Processors anticipate that this program will give small 
land holders an incentive to find the most efficient means of transporting their rubber.
124
The transportation price provided by the processing plant generally varies by the distance 
that the farmer ships the rubber. Some farmers may be able to earn an extra $0.04 per 
121
Workers that collect natural rubber from the tree. 
122
Industry official, interview by Commission staff, Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire, October 31, 2008. 
123
Industry official, interview by Commission staff, Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire, October 31, 2008. 
124
Industry official, interview by Commission staff, Anguedou, Côte d’Ivoire, October 31, 2008. 
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.Word
Tell C# users how to: create a new Word file and load Word from pdf; merge, append, and split Word files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy Create Thumbnail.
cannot view pdf thumbnails in; create thumbnail from pdf c#
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.Excel
Empower to navigate Excel document content quickly via thumbnail. Able to support text search in Excel document, as well as text extraction. Create Thumbnail.
html display pdf thumbnail; pdf reader thumbnails
6-27 
kilogram (kg) of unprocessed rubber if they secure efficient transportation.
125
This money 
could be invested in expanding or improving their farms.
126
Processing Natural Rubber and Products Made of Natural Rubber  
Power outages and high electricity costs are a major hindrance to competitive production 
of  natural rubber  and  rubber  products.
127
Electricity powers  equipment that  washes, 
masticates, and presses the water out of the collected, unprocessed rubber. Many natural 
rubber factories invest in their own generating facilities even if they have access to the 
local electricity grid, as on-site generation provides more reliable power than the grid.
128
Factories in Côte d’Ivoire that use the grid typically only use less reliable grid electricity 
for lighting and in offices, while production equipment runs using on-site generators.
129
Producers in Côte d’Ivoire typically use diesel generators, in part because government 
subsidies  are  highest  for  heavy  fuels.
130
However,  increases  in  the  price  of  crude 
petroleum have prompted some producers to switch from diesel to cheaper natural gas to 
reduce power generation costs.
131
With a few exceptions, SSA countries do not produce manufactured items from locally 
produced natural rubber. The ability to produce downstream products in many of the 
natural  rubber  producing  countries  is  hampered  by  inadequate  infrastructure  and/or 
political instability. For example, Michelin shut down its tire plant in Nigeria in 2007 
because it was no longer cost competitive.
132
The chief executive officer of Dunlop 
Nigeria stated that decaying infrastructure, especially electrical power, makes production 
of tires in Nigeria about 40 percent more expensive than elsewhere.
133
A survey of 
manufacturers  in  Nigeria reported  that over  90 percent  of  the rubber and chemical 
producers in the country cited electricity as the biggest infrastructure problem.
134
More 
than 93 percent of those surveyed experienced more than five power outages per week.
135
In 2005, the mean cost per outage to rubber and chemical producers was $312,000.
136
Exporting Processed Natural Rubber  
Most natural rubber processing plants and rubber growing areas in SSA are located along 
the Atlantic coast near ports. Even though the distances are relatively short, the cost of 
transporting containers to the ports is high.
137
Natural rubber producers in Côte d’Ivoire 
ship their products out of the ports of Abidjan and San Pedro; Abidjan is the larger port 
and  handles most of  the  cargo. One producer in Côte d’Ivoire stated  that  costs  of 
transporting  containers  to  the  port  and  terminal  charges  are  high,  due  in  part  to 
125
The price that a farmer receives for raw rubber reached as high as $0.90 per kg when petroleum 
prices were high, but the price in October 2008 in Côte d’Ivoire was closer to $0.65 per kg. The price of 
natural rubber changes with the price of crude petroleum because a competing product, synthetic rubber, is 
made from petroleum. Industry official, interview by Commission staff, Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire, October 31, 
2008. 
126
Industry official, interview by Commission staff, Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire, October 31, 2008. 
127
Africa News, “Nigeria: Common Tariff Will Kill Manufacturing Effort,” July 29, 2007. 
128
Industry officials, interviews by Commission staff, Anguedou and Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire, 
October 31, 2008. 
129
Industry official, interview by Commission staff, Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire, October 31, 2008. 
130
Industry official, interview by Commission staff, Anguedou, Côte d’Ivoire, October 31, 2008. 
131
Industry official, interview by Commission staff, Anguedou, Côte d’Ivoire, October 31, 2008. 
132
BBC News, “Michelin to Close Nigerian Plant,” January 18, 2007. 
133
Business Times (Singapore), “Olam, Wilmar in 50:50 African Joint Venture,” November 16, 2007. 
134
Adenikinju, “Analysis of the Cost of Infrastructure Failures,” table 8, February 2005, 21. 
135
Ibid., table 12, 23. 
136
Ibid., table 18, 26. 
137
Industry official, interview by Commission staff, Anguedou, Côte d’Ivoire, October 31, 2008. 
6-28 
insufficient competition among freight carriers. However, the port of Abidjan is still 
considered by exporters to be one of the best ports in the region in terms of infrastructure 
and  computerization,  which  reduces  the  delay  and  cost  of  customs  clearance.
138
According to the World Bank, the customs clearance and technical control portion of the 
export procedure take three days and cost $81 in Côte d’Ivoire, compared to six days and 
$355 in Liberia and 3 days and $300 in Nigeria.
139
However, the high costs of port and 
terminal handling and inland transportation lead to a higher overall cost of export from 
Côte d’Ivoire than from Liberia or Nigeria (table 6.3). SSA countries rank much lower in 
the  World  Bank’s  Trading Across  Borders  ranking  than  their major competitors  in 
Southeast Asia.  
TABLE 6.3  Exporting costs for natural rubber–producing countries in West Africa and their major competitors 
SSA 
Southeast Asia 
Indicator 
Côte d’Ivoire 
Liberia 
Nigeria 
Thailand  Indonesia  Malaysia 
Documents required 
to export  
(number)
a
10 
10 
Time to export  
(days)
b
23 
20 
25 
14 
21 
18 
Cost to export 
($/container)
SSA rank
d
1,904 
32 
1,232 
13 
1,179 
23 
625 
(
e
704 
(
e
450 
(
e
Overall rank
155 
115 
144 
10 
37 
29 
Source: World Bank, Doing Business Online Database (accessed January 15, 2009). 
Note: Container refers to a 20-foot-long container for bulk commodities. 
a
Includes bank documents, customs clearance documents, port and terminal handling documents, and 
transport documents. 
b
Includes the time for obtaining all documents, inland transport, customs clearance and inspections, and 
port and terminal handling. Does not include ocean transport time.
c
Includes the cost of obtaining all documents, inland transport, customs clearance and inspection, and 
port and terminal handling. Includes official costs only; no bribes or tariffs. 
d
Rankings are based on a simple average of trading across borders indicators, out of 46 SSA economies 
(Djibouti and Somalia are not included). 
e
Not applicable. 
f
Rankings are based on a simple average of trading across borders indicators, out of 181 economies. 
138
U.S. Department of State, U.S. Embassy, Abidjan, “Response to Request for Information,” 
October 2, 2008. 
139
World Bank, Doing Business Online Database (accessed February 24, 2009). 
6-29 
Textiles and Apparel 
Summary of Findings  
Infrastructure conditions are one of the many constraints affecting the competitiveness of 
textile and apparel exports among SSA producers, as well as between SSA producers and 
global competitors. Inadequate infrastructure, such as unreliable electricity, poor road 
quality, and limited access to international shipping, increases production costs and limits 
speed to market. As a result, most SSA manufacturers produce lower-value, basic apparel 
products. Additional constraints include, but are not limited to, geographic distances to 
major markets, lack of access to affordable capital, and political instability. 
Introduction  
Industry Overview  
The textile and apparel industries
140
are important sources of employment and foreign 
exchange earnings in several SSA countries. Textile production in SSA is limited and 
most apparel produced for export is manufactured using fabric and trim from third-
country sources such as China, Taiwan, India, and Indonesia. For example, in 2007, 
approximately 86 percent of U.S. apparel sourced from SSA was imported free of duty 
from lesser-developed AGOA beneficiary countries
141
using fabric imported from a third 
country.
142
SSA apparel producers generally supply foreign retailers in the United States 
and the EU on a contract basis with products such as basic T-shirts, jeans, and other 
commodity-type apparel that generally do not change in response to fashion trends. 
International Trade  
SSA accounted for less than 1 percent of global exports of textiles and apparel in 2007 
(figure 6.9). In that year, SSA exports of textiles and apparel amounted to $3.2 billion, 
the majority of which (82 percent, or $2.6 billion)  were apparel.
143
SSA  exports of 
textiles and apparel combined are primarily destined for the U.S. and EU markets (figure 
6.10). Ninety percent ($2.35 billion) of all SSA apparel exports were shipped to these 
markets in 2007. In contrast, most SSA textile exports (40 percent, or $225 million) were 
destined for other SSA markets.
144
SSA textile and apparel exports originate from a few 
large  suppliers,  namely  Mauritius,  Madagascar,  South  Africa,  Lesotho,  Kenya,  and 
Swaziland.  These  countries  accounted  for  93  percent  of  SSA  apparel  exports  and 
77 percent of SSA textile exports in 2007.
145
140
The textile industry covers a wide range of products, including intermediate inputs (yarns and 
fabrics), as well as finished products of cotton, wool, other natural fibers, and manmade fibers (i.e., made-up 
textile articles, including carpeting, bedding sheets, and towels). The apparel industry also covers a wide 
range of products, including woven, knit, or nonwoven garments such as shirts, trousers, gloves, headwear, 
and neckwear. 
141
Lesser-developed AGOA beneficiary countries are those AGOA countries having a per-capita GDP 
of less than $1,500 in 1998, as measured by the World Bank. In addition, AGOA also grants lesser-developed 
beneficiary country status to Botswana, Namibia, and most recently to Mauritius.  
142
USDOC, OTEXA, “Trade Preference Programs,” November 2008. Lesser-developed AGOA 
beneficiary countries eligible to export apparel to the United States are permitted to use fabric and yarn inputs 
sourced from third countries and maintain duty-free status. Industry sources indicate that U.S. customers 
often designate fabric from specific textile mills (often in Asia) for use in apparel production.  
143
GTIS, Global Trade Atlas Database (accessed October 1, 2008 and January 12, 2009). 
144
Ibid. 
145
Ibid. 
6-30 
China
39.6%
Turkey
5.6%
India
4.9%
Italy
3.2%
U.S.
3.1%
Bangladesh
2.9%
Hong Kong
2.8%
Pakistan
2.5%
SSA
0.8%
Other
34.5%
Mauritius
28.4%
Madagascar
21.3%
South Africa
14.7%
Lesotho
13.0%
Kenya
8.7%
Swaziland
4.3%
Other
9.5%
FIGURE 6.9 
Leading global and SSA exporters of textiles and apparel, 2007
SSA exporters
Global exporters
$376.3 billion
$3.2 billion
Source: GTIS, Global Trade Atlas Database. Annual data compiled from reporting countries’ official
statistics, including EU external trade.
Note: Data may not equal 100 percent due to rounding.
EU27
27.8%
U.S.
25.7%
Hong Kong
8.2%
Japan
7.5%
China
4.4%
Canada
2.9%
South Korea
2.0%
Mexico
2.0%
Switzerland
1.8%
Other
17.7%
U.S.
41.7%
EU27
39.7%
SSA
12.5%
Other
6.1%
FIGURE 6.10  
Leading markets for global and SSA exports of textiles and apparel, 2007
SSA export markets
Global export markets
$376.3 billion
$3.2 billion
Source: GTIS, Global Trade Atlas Database. Annual data compiled from reporting countries’ official
statistics, including EU external trade.
Note: Data may not equal 100 percent due to rounding.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested