asp.net pdf viewer user control c# : View pdf thumbnails control SDK platform web page winforms html web browser pub40714-part834

3-1
CHAPTER 3 
Land Transport 
The quality of land transport infrastructure is correlated with output, productivity, growth 
rates, land value, and market development.
1
High-quality land transport infrastructure 
facilitates economic activity, improves access to health care and education, raises social 
welfare by bringing consumer goods to rural areas, and facilitates social integration. In 
SSA, long distances, border delays, underinvestment in infrastructure, and inefficient 
trade and transport policies result in high land transport costs and low land transport 
quality.  This  impedes  the  movement  of  labor  and  goods,  reduces  transmission  of 
knowledge and technology, and reduces export competitiveness by raising both the prices 
of imported inputs and the costs of transporting final goods to market. To reduce land 
transport  infrastructure  deficiencies,  SSA  countries  are  engaged  in  reforming 
management and finance, increasing investment, and promoting regional cooperation.  
Conditions of the Land Transport Sector  
Land Transport Infrastructure  
SSA roads and railways are in poor overall condition. Over the last several decades, SSA 
has lagged behind other regions of the world in quantity and quality of land transport 
infrastructure and has made slower progress in improving maintenance and management 
of infrastructure. In some respects, SSA’s infrastructure quality has worsened in absolute 
terms.
2
Geographically,  SSA  countries  vary  widely  in  size,  and  many  countries  have  low 
population densities and low levels of urbanization. Many SSA countries are small and/or 
landlocked,  with  landlocked  countries  accounting  for  40  percent  of  SSA’s  total 
population.
3
Seventy percent of SSA’s rural population lives more than 2 km from an all-
weather road,
4
so bicycles and walking constitute a greater percentage of transport needs 
in many rural areas than motorized vehicles.
5
Some SSA countries have topographical 
features (such as Rwanda’s hills, or erosion-susceptible coasts in Togo and Benin) that 
add to the expense of building and maintaining land transport infrastructure. Weather is 
also a problem, with heavy rains flooding main roads and long dry seasons rendering 
rivers unnavigable. For example, the Central African Republic (CAR) has two primary 
transit corridors: one, through Cameroon, is often impassable in the rainy season, and the 
other, involving transit down the Oubangui River, is unnavigable in the dry season.
6
Land transport in SSA is not only time consuming and expensive but highly variable, 
both in trip length and in the condition of cargo upon arrival. Roads are sometimes 
flooded, and trains often do not leave on time. In addition, political instability increases 
1
Calderon and Serven, “Infrastructure and Economic Development,” September 2008, 2. 
2
Ibid., 15. 
3
Ibid., 2. 
4
Raballand and Teravaninthorn, Transport Prices and Costs in Africa, 2009, xi. 
5
Pedersen, “Freight Transport under Globalization,” 2001, 96. 
6
Faye, et al., “The Challenges Facing Landlocked Developing Countries,” March 2004, 44. 
View pdf thumbnails - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
program to create thumbnail from pdf; how to view pdf thumbnails in
View pdf thumbnails - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
enable pdf thumbnails; thumbnail view in for pdf files
3-2
the likelihood of corruption or robbery, and customs officials may delay or deny entrance 
or confiscate goods. Trucks in Ghana traveling from Paga (on the northern border with 
Burkina Faso) to Tema (on the Gulf of Guinea) take two to four days under normal 
conditions, but an estimated 10–20 percent of trucks are delayed by a week or more; 
moreover, if a truck breaks down on this route, it can take up to three weeks to procure a 
mechanic  from  Kumasi  in  south-central  Ghana.
7
Unreliable  supply  chains  force 
producers to invest in supply chain redundancy and hold large inventories as hedges (one 
beer  wholesaler  in  rural  Cameroon  stockpiled  up  to  five  months’  inventory  at  the 
beginning of each rainy season).
8
These costs discourage investment in modern services, 
including  those that  would  make  supply chains more  reliable (such as warehousing 
infrastructure and information technology).
9
Most land transport in SSA takes place along various transnational corridors or routes 
that link economic centers with each other and with ports (table 3.1 and figure 3.1). 
Transport practices, prices, and costs tend to be corridor specific. Many SSA corridors 
are  formally  designated  as  such  and  are  overseen  by  agencies  established  through 
multilateral treaty or memoranda of understanding; oversight agencies attempt to reduce 
transit times  and costs by  coordinating member  country policies and investments.
10
Producers find  it  advantageous to have  multiple  corridor  alternatives.  For  example, 
copper mining companies in Zambia have an explicit policy of maintaining alternative 
corridor  routes  in  order  to  receive  competitive  shipping  service.
11
Investments  that 
improve average infrastructure quality on a transit corridor may not be effective if they 
do not improve conditions in the transit country with the worst infrastructure conditions, 
as business managers considering overland shipments base their decisions on the riskiest 
and most time-consuming portion of the trip.
12
Roads 
There are about 2 million km of roads in SSA, with a replacement cost estimated in 2001 
to be $170 billion.
13
SSA has the lowest road density, measured by kilometers of road per 
1,000 square kilometers of land, of any developing region in the world: 49 km/km
2
of 
paved roads (compared with 482 km/km
2
of paved roads in the Middle East and North 
Africa), and 152 km/km
2
of total paved and unpaved roads (compared with 740 km/km
2
in Latin America and the Caribbean).
14
Roads are the primary link between dense urban 
areas and agriculturally productive rural areas and account for more than 80 percent of 
total freight and passenger movement in SSA.
15
Roads in SSA have lost nearly one-third of their value  due to underinvestment and 
continuous deferral of maintenance,
16
and there are fewer kilometers of roads in Africa
7
Industry officials, interview by Commission staff, Accra, Ghana, October 28, 2008. 
8
Economist, “The Road to Hell is Unpaved,” December 19, 2002. 
9
Raballand, “The Cost of Being Landlocked in Africa,” February 21, 2008. 
10
Key performance indicators for corridor management include traffic volumes, transport prices, 
turnaround time for trucks, port dwell time, and border post transit times. 
11
Raballand, Kunaka, and Giersing, “The Impact of Regional Liberalization,” January 2008, 5. 
12
Buys, Deichmann, and Wheeler, “Road Network Upgrading,” December 2006, 12. 
13
Simuyemba, “Linking Africa Through Regional Infrastructure,” 2000, 12; Nyangaga, “Reforming 
Road Management,” March 2001, 1. 
14
Foster, et al., “Building Bridges,” 2008, 24. 
15
Dierks, “A Case for Namibian Roads Conservation,” December 28, 2000. 
16
Nyangaga, “Reforming Road Management,” March 2001, 1. 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Ability to show PDF page thumbnails for quick navigation. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. C# HTML5 PDF Viewer: View PDF Online.
create thumbnail jpeg from pdf; pdf file thumbnail preview
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Ability to show PDF page thumbnails for quick navigation. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: View PDF Online.
how to show pdf thumbnails in; pdf thumbnail generator
3-3
TABLE 3.1  Select land transport corridors in sub-Saharan Africa 
Corridor 
Countries involved 
Culminating port  Institutional arrangements for trade facilitation 
Northern 
Corridor 
Democratic Republic of the 
Congo (DRC), Burundi, 
Rwanda, Uganda, Kenya 
Mombasa, Kenya  Northern Corridor Transit Transport 
Coordination Authority (NCTTCA) (1985) 
Central Corridor  DRC, Burundi, Rwanda, 
Tanzania 
Dar es Salaam, 
Tanzania 
Central Corridor Transit Transport Facilitation 
Agency (2006), modeled on NCTTCA 
Dar es Salaam 
Corridor 
Zambia, Malawi, Tanzania  Dar es Salaam, 
Tanzania 
Dar es Salaam Corridor Coordinating 
Committee (2003), based on transport 
coordinating committee founded in 1960s 
Walvis Bay 
Corridors  
(3 branches) 
South Africa, Botswana, 
Namibia (Trans-Kalahari); 
Zambia, Angola, Namibia 
(Trans-Caprivi); Angola, 
Namibia (Trans-Cunene) 
Walvis Bay, 
Namibia 
Walvis Bay Corridor Group (2000), a public-
private partnership; and Trans-Kalahari Corridor 
Management Committee (2003) 
Maputo Corridor  South Africa, Mozambique  Maputo, 
Mozambique 
Maputo Corridor Logistics Initiative (2004), 
incorporated as a nonprofit in South Africa 
Abidjan-Lagos 
Corridor 
Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, Togo, 
Benin, Nigeria (branches 
linking Mali, Burkina Faso, 
Niger) 
Multiple West 
African ports 
Bilateral proposals for cross-border corridor 
management committees facilitated by the 
Economic Community of West African States 
North-South 
Corridor 
DRC, Zambia, Zimbabwe, 
Botswana, South Africa 
(branches linking Tanzania 
and Malawi) 
Durban, South 
Africa 
Various domestic, bilateral, and regional 
arrangements (including involvement by 
COMESA, EAC, and SADC) 
Sources: Adzibgey, Kunaka, and Mitiku, “Institutional Arrangements for Transport Corridor Management in Sub-
Saharan Africa,” October 2007; Pearson, “The North-South Corridor,” October 11, 2008. 
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document in VB.NET WPF program. PDF thumbnails for navigation in .NET project. VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer: View PDF Document.
pdf thumbnail viewer; view pdf thumbnails
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
Users can view any page by using view page button. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. PDF thumbnails for navigation in .NET WPF Console application.
pdf thumbnails in; create pdf thumbnail
3-4
FIGURE 3.1  Major land transport routes and ports in sub-Saharan Africa 
Sources: Adapted from OECD, A frica Economic Outlook 2007/2008 2008, 12; and Degerlund, ed., Containerization 
International Yearbook 2008, 2008, 157–69. 
Note: TEU refers to a twenty-foot equivalent unit, the cargo capacity of a standard shipping container 20 feet long and 
eight feet wide. 
Dakar, Senegal 
Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire 
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Support of converting from any single one PDF page and multiple pages. Thumbnails can be created from PDF pages. Support for customizing image size.
pdf preview thumbnail; enable pdf thumbnail preview
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Embedded page thumbnails.
thumbnail pdf preview; generate pdf thumbnail c#
3-5
today  than  there  were  30  years  ago.
17
By  one  estimate,  $12  billion  of  preventive 
maintenance in the 1970s and 1980s could have prevented $45 billion in SSA road value 
loss.
18
The absence or poor enforcement of axle-load regulations contributes to overuse of 
roads: the relationship between axle weight and inflicted damage to pavement is not 
linear but exponential, and overloading trucks (which maximizes revenue given a limited 
number of trips) raises the maintenance costs and shortens the life expectancy of roads. In 
turn, poor roads damage vehicles, reduce tire lifespan and vehicle utilization, and reduce 
fuel efficiency to as little as 100 km per 50 liters (4.7 miles per gallon) for vehicles that 
often are already old and poorly maintained.
19
Maximum driving speeds are low, as 
vehicles need to slow down to avoid potholes or navigate uneven terrain. The average 
daily speed of a freight-hauling truck in France is 69 km per hour, compared with 30 km 
per hour in Central Africa.
20
A fully laden truck requires up to three days to travel 485 
km from Nairobi to Mombasa in Kenya,
21
and up to four days to travel 500 km from 
Douala to Bertoua in Cameroon.
22
Even adequate SSA roads are not necessarily able to deal with large increases in traffic 
volumes. Economic development in South Africa has rapidly increased the use of the N3 
Johannesburg-Durban road, which carried the same amount of traffic over the past 3 
years as it had in the previous 20.
23
Plans to construct and maintain roads are based upon 
traffic forecasts that may quickly become outdated during periods of rapid growth in 
freight movement. 
When road infrastructure is sufficiently poor, drivers take  alternate routes that often 
require longer travel times. For example, Burundi’s most direct route to the coast is 
through neighboring Tanzania, but infrastructure along this route is so poor that the 
primary Burundian transit route to Mombasa is via Rwanda, Uganda, and Kenya, an 
additional 600 km.
24
Due to bridges washing out in Togo, many freight shipments from 
northern Togo must travel to Tema, Ghana, via Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, a detour of 
an estimated 1,750 km that contributes to overuse of and damages to Burkinabé roads.
25
Railways  
Rail  capacity  in  SSA  has  declined  due  to  infrastructure  deterioration  and  endemic 
unreliability in operations (breakdowns and delays are frequent). In the 1980s, there were 
20,000 km of rail lines in southern Africa, but only 10,000 km were in use in 2002.
26
In 
Zambia, total freight carried by rail fell from 6 million tons per year in 1975 to less than 
1.5 million tons per year in 1998.
27
Swaziland’s Swazi Rail currently moves less than 1 
million tons of import and export rail traffic per year, less than when the rail line was 
built in 1964 (it carried large volumes of iron ore at that time), and Swazi trains are not
17
Raballand and Teravaninthorn, Transport Prices and Costs in Africa, 2009, xi. 
18
Brushett, “Management and Financing of Road Transport Infrastructure in Africa,” March 2005, 4. 
19
Raballand and Teravaninthorn, Transport Prices and Costs in Africa, 2009, 69. 
20
Raballand and Macchi, “Transport Prices and Costs,” September 27, 2008, 5. 
21
Faye, et al., “The Challenges Facing Landlocked Developing Countries,” March 2004, 58. 
22
Economist, “The Road to Hell is Unpaved,” December 19, 2002. 
23
Industry officials, interview by Commission staff, Johannesburg, South Africa, October 15, 2008. 
24
Faye, et al., “The Challenges Facing Landlocked Developing Countries,” March 2004, 44. 
25
Industry officials, interview by Commission staff, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, October 23, 2008. 
26
De Jong, “South Africa: Railway Heritage At Risk,” 2002. 
27
Raballand, Kunaka, and Giersing, “The Impact of Regional Liberalization and Harmonization,” 
January 2008, 4. All tons are metric tons. One metric ton is approximately equal to 1.1 net tons. 
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
by large enterprises and organizations to distribute and view documents. size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size Embedded page thumbnails.
pdf thumbnail generator online; pdf thumbnail fix
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Converter control easy to create thumbnails from PDF pages. Selection for compressing to multiple image formats. Cut and paste any areas in PDF pages to images.
can't view pdf thumbnails; no pdf thumbnails in
3-6
always able to meet minimal load requirements at ports.
28
Even in South Africa, the SSA 
country with the most developed rail sector, current capacity on the railway connecting 
manganese mines to Port Elizabeth is 3.5 million tons per year, whereas demand is 
approximately 4.2 million tons per year.
29
The Johannesburg-Durban rail line is currently 
operating at about 25 percent capacity due to operational inefficiencies and congestion.
30
As with road transport, rail transport in SSA can be protracted and unreliable: the 1,145 
km train trip from Kampala, Uganda, to Mombasa, Kenya can take from 14 to 21 days.
31
While SSA roads are often inadequate, railways can present even more challenges to 
shippers, and in most SSA countries railways are losing market share to truck traffic. Due 
to low top speeds and unreliability on the narrow-gauge Kenyan railway, only 6 percent 
of the cargo entering and leaving Mombasa is now carried by train (down from 20 
percent in 2006).
32
Rail traffic in South Africa, which had a 9 percent freight market 
share in 2005 worth $1.2 billion annually, has decreased over the last decade (except for 
coal  and  iron  export  lines),  while  road  traffic  has  steadily  increased.
33
Ghana  has 
experienced a long and severe decline in rail traffic, and most of its goods (and all of its 
containers) now travel by truck, leaving manganese and bauxite (which can only feasibly 
be moved by rail due to their weight) to make up 83 percent of Ghana’s rail traffic.
34
The absence of high-quality rail lines also reduces competitive pressure and incentives 
for innovation and quality improvement in the trucking sector. This situation puts even 
more pressure on road use, increasing traffic and wear. Railways have suffered from 
continent-wide underinvestment in SSA, and even if countries reform their rail policies 
and make coordinated investments in regional rail networks, a critical mass of users has 
already shifted to roads. Some have invested in trucking fleets or otherwise made serious 
commitments to road use, and in such cases significant improvements in rail lines would 
be necessary to recapture this traffic.
35
Intermodal Transitions  
Intermodal transitions (in which freight is transferred from trucks to trains, trains to ships, 
or other modal combinations) are particularly time consuming and inefficient throughout 
SSA; in many cases, intermodal links are the main bottleneck for freight movement. In 
2003, Ghana’s freight forwarding industry was entirely reliant on manual loading and 
unloading for intermodal transitions.
36
Upgrading intermodal links is a priority in South 
Africa, where shippers are overusing the Johannesburg-Durban N3 road largely to avoid 
congested  intermodal  transfers  required  by  rail  shipments.  Actual  travel  time  from 
Durban to Johannesburg by train is estimated to be 18–21 hours (comparable to trucking 
28
Industry officials, interview by Commission staff, Mbabane, Swaziland, October 23, 2008. Some 
port management agencies or other authorities require that incoming trains meet minimum load thresholds 
before entering ports and unloading their freight, in order to ensure profitability. Swazi Railways has argued 
that it could bypass shunting yards in Kings Rest and Bayhead, South Africa and gain direct access to the 
Durban port if it could consistently achieve minimum train lengths of 20 railcars. Mpata, Giersing, and 
Kaombwe, “Improving Transportation Logistics for Competitiveness of Swaziland,” April 2004, 18. 
29
Ford, “Investment, Not Rebranding, Is the Key,” December 2008. 
30
Industry officials, interview by Commission staff, Johannesburg, South Africa, October 15, 2008. 
31
Faye, et al., “The Challenges Facing Landlocked Developing Countries,” March 2004, 48. 
32
Industry official, interview by Commission staff, Mombasa, Kenya, October 27, 2008. 
33
Van der Muelen, “Transnet’s Turnaround Strategy,” September 2005. Converted from 11 billion 
rand, 2005 exchange rate. 
34
Pedersen, “Development of Freight Transport and Logistics,” 2003, 288. 
35
Industry officials, interview by Commission staff, Durban, South Africa, October 21, 2008. 
36
Pedersen, “Development of Freight Transport and Logistics,” 2003, 291. 
3-7
time) but containers are not available for pickup at the City Deep container terminal in 
Johannesburg for an estimated seven days, as it reportedly takes three days to load a 
container onto a train and another three days to unload it.
37
Intermodal connections facilitate the vertical integration of commodity chains. Logistics 
sectors typically evolve from a three-stage system of transporting commodities (from 
rural hinterlands to marketplaces, from marketplaces to ports, and then from ports to 
overseas markets) to integrated door-to-door supply chains.
38
By comparison, improving 
intermodal links was a major factor in the export-driven development of Southeast Asian 
countries. Starting in the 1980s, these countries restructured their transport sectors into 
multimodal supply chain management sectors that took advantage of containerization and 
the internationalization of production.
39
Improvements in intermodal links in Southeast 
Asia  were  correlated with increased  trade  flows  (especially of intermediate goods), 
increased  integration  into  global  production  networks,  and  growth  in  domestic 
manufacturing sectors. 
Service Providers 
Ownership Structure 
Some large manufacturing, mining, beverage, and agricultural firms in SSA maintain 
their own in-house shipping capacity to achieve self-sufficiency (such as the Magadi soda 
mine in Kenya, which operates its own railway lines).
40
Most producers, though, hire 
outside parties to transport their products, ranging from single owner-operator trucks to 
large third-party logistics providers (3PLs). The division of trucking ownership varies. In 
Ghana, the majority of the 10–11 percent annual growth in trucks since 1986 was driven 
by operator-owned  trucks; only  a few  operators  have large fleets.
41
Owner-operator 
enterprises tend to be less efficient than large-scale 3PLs, but some countries maintain 
many owner-operators due to policies that promote entrepreneurship (such as poverty 
reduction plans that provide funding for small- to medium-sized enterprises).
42
Larger 
operators have  broader  customer  portfolios,  more flexible  operating  conditions,  and 
greater ability to back-haul cargo.
43
For example, Zambian operators with at least 50 
trucks have a back-haul rate of almost 100 percent in spite of freight imbalances (partly 
due to high demand for transport services in the region).
44
Larger operators are also more 
able  to enter into long-term contracts with producers, whereas many owner-operator 
transport services are purchased in truck (lorry) parks on spot markets.
45
The  majority  of  SSA  railways  are  operated  by  public  or  parastatal  entities.  Some 
parastatals operate effectively and independently; for example, South Africa’s parastatal 
rail and port operator Transnet funds itself without receiving any general tax revenues 
and is using its earnings to fund a $6.4 billion expansion plan.
46
However, many public 
37
Industry officials, interview by Commission staff, Durban, South Africa, October 21, 2008. 
38
Pedersen, “Freight Transport under Globalization,” 2001, 96. 
39
Ibid., 87. 
40
Ibid., 96. 
41
Pedersen, “Development of Freight Transport and Logistics,” 2003, 290–91. 
42
Pedersen, “Freight Transport under Globalization,” 2001, 94. 
43
Back-haul refers to a vehicle carrying cargo on a return journey.   
44
Raballand, Kunaka, and Giersing, “The Impact of Regional Liberalization and Harmonization,” 
January 2008, 5. 
45
Pedersen, “Development of Freight Transport and Logistics,” 2003, 290–91. 
46
Industry officials, interview by Commission staff, Johannesburg, South Africa, October 15, 2008. 
3-8
railway agencies in SSA constitute a combination of asset managers, operators, and 
regulators, which leads to problems stemming from self-regulation and makes it difficult 
for private operators to enter the market.
47
Nevertheless, some SSA railways are operated 
by  private  companies.  The  railway  between  Côte  d’Ivoire  and  Burkina  Faso  was 
privatized in 1994 with major shipping companies and forwarders—SAGA, SDV, and 
Maersk—as the controlling shareholders.
48
Market Conditions  
Although vehicle damage inflicted by poor-quality roads, high fuel costs, and the use of 
old fuel-inefficient truck fleets can make some operating costs in SSA’s land transport 
sector higher than in other world regions according to the World Bank, lower wages and 
the lower capital costs of purchasing secondhand trucks can result in lower fixed costs.
49
(The median monthly wage for truckers in 2008 was $160 in Zambia, $189 in Chad, and 
$269 in Kenya, compared to $3,129 in France and $3,937 in Germany.
50
) By comparison, 
variable costs and fixed costs for operators in Central Africa are $1.31 per km and $0.57 
per km respectively, whereas in France they are $0.72 per km and $0.87 per km.
51
Costs 
also vary among SSA countries because of specific policies; for example, operators in 
Tanzania can  afford better, more expensive vehicles  or spend less  acquiring similar 
vehicles than operators in Kenya, as Kenya imposes high import duties on vehicles while 
Tanzania exempts vehicles from import taxes.
52
Similarly, South Africa prohibits the 
import  of  secondhand  vehicles  in  order  to  benefit  its  domestic  motor  vehicle 
manufacturing industry, which imposes higher finance, depreciation, and insurance costs 
on truck owners.
53
From the standpoint of producers who hire shippers, transport costs take the form of 
prices charged by transport service providers. Although poor infrastructure raises variable 
costs in SSA, there should be a countervailing effect on transport prices from lower fixed 
costs. But in parts of SSA, particularly Central Africa, transport prices are higher than 
would  be  expected  after  accounting  for  this  effect  because  land  transport  service 
providers are often able to mark up the prices of their services and maintain high price-
cost margins.
54
This is partly because strong market regulations, such as fleet quotas and 
queuing systems for allocating freight, impose barriers for new entrants and provide 
opportunities for rent-seeking behavior on the part of truckers.
55
47
Van der Muelen, “Transnet’s Turnaround Strategy,” September 2005. 
48
Pedersen, “Development of Freight Transport and Logistics,” 2003, 287. 
49
Arvis, et al., “The Cost of Being Landlocked: Logistics Costs and Supply Chain Reliability,” June 
2007, 21. In this analysis, wages and the capital costs of trucks are considered fixed costs, and fuel and 
maintenance costs are considered variable costs. 
50
World Bank, cited in Portugal-Perez and Wilson, “Trade Costs in Africa,” September 2008, 27. 
51
Raballand and Macchi, “Transport Prices and Costs,” September 27, 2008, 5. 
52
Industry official, interview by Commission staff, Mombasa, Kenya, October 28, 2008. 
53
Raballand, Kunaka, and Giersing, “The Impact of Regional Liberalization and Harmonization,” 
January 2008, 17. 
54
Raballand and Teravaninthorn, Transport Prices and Costs in Africa, 2009, 4. 
55
Queuing systems centralize and coordinate supply and demand for freight transport. In one 
illustrative system (the “tour de rôle”), all carriers register with a regional freight bureau, and anyone who 
needs freight transport submits their demands through brokers to the bureau. The bureau then allocates 
shipments to carriers, partly based on which carrier claims the freight first and partly pursuant to the goal of 
ensuring that even small shippers have opportunities to haul freight and are not shut out of the market. Such 
systems reduce incentives for shippers to become more competitive or provide better service because all 
carriers are entitled to transport at least some freight on a regular basis; they also facilitate corruption, as 
bribing the freight bureau is often the only way to increase business. Raballand and Macchi, “Transport 
Prices and Costs,” September 27, 2008, 22. 
3-9
Improvements in land transport infrastructure will not necessarily lower transport prices 
in  regions  where  regulations  render  logistics  markets  uncompetitive;  shipping  firms 
capable of exercising monopolistic power may maintain high transport prices and avoid 
passing along savings to end-users. Market regulation is strong in West and Central 
Africa. In Central Africa especially, there are high barriers to market entry, and freight 
bureaus and transport associations have great influence, resulting in disproportionately 
high transport prices.
56
The result is that freight transport services in Central Africa can 
be more expensive than in developed countries. In the United States, freight transport 
prices  average  $0.04  per  ton-km,  compared  to  $0.11  per  ton-km  on  the  Douala, 
Cameroon–N’djamena, Chad corridor.
57
Although the barriers to entry in West Africa are not as high as in Central Africa, many 
West African countries impose freight quotas, allocation schemes, and queuing systems, 
resulting in high cost, low-quality transport.
58
For example, in Burkina Faso, a regulation 
designed to protect domestic truck companies reserves two-thirds of all transit freight for 
carriage by Burkinabé trucks.
59
In Niger, where trucks are on average 29 years old, 
operating costs per vehicle-km are 30 percent higher than in Beninese and Togolese 
fleets, but shippers in Niger are required to use local fleets, resulting in higher prices, 
lower  quality  shipping  services,  and  increased  requests  for  informal  payments  (the 
trucking association in charge of enforcing quotas has reportedly sold market shares or 
freight to companies ready to offer the largest bribes).
60
Corruption in countries like Mali 
and Ghana reportedly also generates market inefficiencies.
61
Compared to other SSA 
regions, East Africa has a less regulated and more competitive trucking environment, 
resulting in relatively low transport prices. Southern Africa, which has the least regulated 
trucking sector in SSA, has the lowest transport prices and highest transport efficiency 
among SSA regions.
62
The inefficiency of transport sectors can be seen in the annual distances driven by trucks. 
Operators in some developed countries drive  around  121,000  km  per  year, whereas 
operators in East Africa drive 100,000 km per year, and operators in Central Africa drive 
only  65,000  km  per  year.
63
This  difference  is  attributed  partly  to  strong  market 
regulations  and partly to heavy  reliance  on  poorly  maintained trucks  that are  often 
sidelined for repair.
64
The profit margins on different SSA corridors are correlated with 
the level of truck utilization (which reflects cartel systems that keep inefficient trucking 
firms operating).
65
For example, southern Africa uses vehicles at a rate of 10,000 to 
12,000  km  per  month  (similar  to  Europe),  and  operators  on  the  Lusaka,  Zambia–
Johannesburg,  South  Africa  corridor  have  a  profit  margin  of  about  18  percent; 
conversely, Central and West African countries, which have trucking cartels, use vehicles 
at 2,000 km per month, and the profit margin on the Ngaundere, Cameroon–Moundou, 
Chad corridor (which is shorter than the Lusaka-Johannesburg corridor) is about 163 
56
Arvis, et al., “The Cost of Being Landlocked: Logistics Costs and Supply Chain Reliability,” June 
2007, 68. 
57
Raballand and Macchi, “Transport Prices and Costs,” September 27, 2008, 4. 
58
Arvis, et al., “The Cost of Being Landlocked: Logistics Costs and Supply Chain Reliability,” June 
2007, 22. 
59
Faye, et al., “The Challenges Facing Landlocked Developing Countries,” March 2004, 48. 
60
Raballand and Teravaninthorn, Transport Prices and Costs in Africa, 2009, 53. 
61
Pedersen, “Development of Freight Transport and Logistics,” 2003, 291. 
62
Portugal-Perez and Wilson, “Trade Costs in Africa,” September 2008, 11. 
63
Raballand and Macchi, “Transport Prices and Costs,” September 27, 2008, 5. 
64
Ibid., 9. 
65
Raballand and Teravaninthorn, Transport Prices and Costs in Africa, 2009, 55. 
3-10
percent.
66
Average trucking rates in SSA declined during the 1990s, but rates are still 
high for the quality of service provided. 
Soft Infrastructure: Borders 
In  many  SSA  corridors,  the  harshest  constraints  on  improving  transport  time  are 
administrative procedures at borders. On the Northern Corridor, trucks reportedly lose up 
to four hours of travel time on some corridor segments due to road conditions, but often 
lose more than one day at Malaba, the Uganda–Kenya border post.
67
One study found 
that trucks carrying imports into Rwanda waited an average of two days at Malaba and 
one  day  at  Gotuma  (the  Uganda–Rwanda  border  post).
68
Casa  Gulu,  the  Zambia–
Botswana bridge link, regularly has queues up to 3 or 4 km long.
69
In 2004, a truck 
required an average of between three weeks to a month to travel 985 km from Bangui, 
CAR, to Douala, Cameroon, with CAR–Cameroon border procedures taking up to two 
weeks.
70
The Maputo port in Mozambique would be a logical source of imports and 
destination for exports for industries in South Africa’s Gauteng province (which includes 
the city of Johannesburg) because it is much closer than ports in Durban or Cape Town, 
but  industry  officials  indicate  that  crossing  the  South  Africa–Mozambique  border 
introduces so much cost and uncertainty that the majority of Gauteng businesses rely on 
the port in Durban.
71
Administrative procedures and delays at borders account for an 
estimated 20 percent of freight costs in East Africa, and delays at southern African border 
posts cost an estimated $48 million in 2001 (about 0.1 percent of the value of southern 
African exports that year).
72
Government agencies that operate at borders include customs, immigration, agriculture, 
and health ministries. Among global regions, SSA has the highest number of export 
procedures  and  the  second-highest  number  of  import  procedures.
73
There  are  15 
government agencies enforcing duplicative laws on either side of the Chirundu Border 
Post (the main gateway for commercial traffic between Zambia and Zimbabwe), resulting 
in average border crossing times ranging from 26 to 46 hours northbound into Zambia, 
and from 6 to 17 hours southbound into Zimbabwe.
74
The administrative costs of crossing 
borders  include  documentation  time  and  fees,  customs  clearance  fees,  and  terminal 
handling charges. A Mozambican company entering Zimbabwe must pay a road-user 
charge of $25 per 100 km, an entry visa charge of $30, an insurance charge of $300 for 
three months, a carbon tax of $30 for one month, and a guarantee of $120 per year.
75
The 
World Bank’s Doing Business Online Database indicates that, measured as absolute fees 
levied on a 20-foot container, SSA has the highest average costs for both export and 
import procedures of any world region, roughly twice as high as in high-income countries 
(figure  1.1  in  chapter 1).
76
One  factor  that increases  complexity in border crossing 
procedures  is the  desire of  transit  countries to secure  revenues from tariff duties.
77
66
Ibid., 40. 
67
Raballand and Macchi, “Transport Prices and Costs,” September 27, 2008, 12. 
68
Subramanian, “Building Competitive Trade Logistics for Global Markets,” May 5, 2008. 
69
Industry officials, interview by Commission staff, Durban, South Africa, October 21, 2008. 
70
Faye, et al., “The Challenges Facing Landlocked Developing Countries,” March 2004, 48. 
71
Industry officials, interview by Commission staff, Johannesburg, South Africa, October 24, 2008. 
72
Faye, et al., “The Challenges Facing Landlocked Developing Countries,” March 2004, 48–57. 
73
Portugal-Perez and Wilson, “Trade Costs in Africa,” September 2008, 6. 
74
Department for International Development, “Modern and Efficient Border Controls,” February 19–
29, 2008. 
75
Raballand and Teravaninthorn, Transport Prices and Costs in Africa, 2009, 71. 
76
Portugal-Perez and Wilson, “Trade Costs in Africa,” September 2008, 7. 
77
Raballand, “The Cost of Being Landlocked in Africa,” February 21, 2008. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested