asp.net pdf viewer user control c# : Show pdf thumbnail in application SDK tool html wpf .net online pub40716-part836

3-21
Dierks, Klaus. “A Case for Namibian Roads Conservation: Agenda for Reform.” Namibia Ministry of 
Works, Transport and Communication Position Paper, December 28, 2000. 
East African Community (EAC). “Major New Infrastructure Initiative to Transform Southern and Eastern 
African Trading Opportunities.” Press release, March 26, 2009. 
Economist. “The Road to Hell is Unpaved,” December 19, 2002. 
Faye, Michael, John W. McArthur, Jeffrey D. Sachs, and Thomas Snow. “The Challenges Facing 
Landlocked Developing Countries.” Journal of Human Development 5, no. 1 (March 2004): 31–
68. 
Ford, Neil. “Investment, Not Rebranding, Is the Key.” African Business, December 2008. 
Foster, Vivien. “Overhauling the Engine of Growth: Infrastructure in Africa.” Africa Infrastructure 
Country Diagnostic, September 2008. 
Foster, Vivien, William Butterfield, Chuan Chen, and Nataliya Pushak. “Building Bridges: China’s 
Growing Role as Infrastructure Financier for Africa.” World Bank Public-Private Infrastructure 
Advisory Facility, 2008. 
Hertel, Thomas, Terrie Walmsley, and Ken Itakura. “Dynamic Effect of the ‘New Age’ Free Trade 
Agreement between Japan and Singapore.” Journal of Economic Integration 16, no. 4 (December 
2001): 446–84. 
Khandelwal, Padamja. “COMESA and SADC: Prospects and Challenges for Regional Trade Integration.” 
IMF Working Paper WP/04/227, December 2004. 
Kumar, Ajay. “A Contrasting Approach to Road Reforms: The Case Study of Uganda Experience.” 
World Bank SSATP Discussion Paper no. 1, March 2002. 
Limão, Nuno, and Anthony J. Venables. “Infrastructure, Geographical Disadvantage and Transport 
Costs.” World Bank Economic Review 15, no. 3 (2001): 451–79. 
Marteau, Jean-François, and Gaël Raballand. “Support to Effectiveness of Regional Transit.” Presented at 
the World Bank Sustainable Development Network Week, Washington, DC, February 21, 2008.  
Mpata, Stallard, Bo Giersing, and Smak Kaombwe. “Improving Transportation Logistics for 
Competitiveness of Swaziland.” Prepared by Chemonics International, Inc., for U.S. Agency for 
International Development, Regional Center for Southern Africa. Gaborone, Botswana, April 
2004. 
Naudé, Wim, and Marianne Matthee. “The Significance of Transport Costs in Africa.” United Nations 
University World Institute for Development Economics Research. Policy Brief no. 5, 2007. 
Nyangaga, Francis. “Reforming Road Management in Sub-Saharan Africa.” World Bank SSATP 
Technical Note 32, March 2001. 
Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD). Africa Economic Outlook 
2007/2008. Paris, France: OECD, 2008. 
Show pdf thumbnail in - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
pdf no thumbnail; create thumbnail from pdf c#
Show pdf thumbnail in - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
print pdf thumbnails; generate thumbnail from pdf
3-22
Pearson, Mark. “The North-South Corridor: An Aid for Trade Initiative.” Presented at Regional Trade 
Facilitation Programme Meeting of Stakeholders, Washington, DC, October 11, 2008. 
Pedersen, Poul O. “Development of Freight Transport and Logistics in SSA: Taaffe, Morrill and Gould 
Revisited.” Transport Reviews 23, no. 3 (2003): 275–97. 
———. “Freight Transport under Globalization and its Impact on Africa.” Journal of Transport 
Geography 9, (2001): 85–99. 
Portugal-Perez, Alberto, and John S. Wilson. “Trade Costs in Africa: Barriers and Opportunities for 
Reform.” World Bank Development Research Group. Policy Research Working Paper no. 4619, 
September 2008. 
Raballand, Gaël. “The Cost of Being Landlocked in Africa.” Presented at World Bank Sustainable 
Development Network Week, Washington, DC, February 21, 2008. 
Raballand, Gaël, Charles Kunaka, and Bo Giersing. “The Impact of Regional Liberalization and 
Harmonization in Road Transport Services: A Focus on Zambia and Lessons for Landlocked 
Countries.” World Bank Africa Sustainable Development Division. Policy Research Working 
Paper no. 4482, January 2008. 
Raballand, Gaël, and Patricia Macchi. “Transport Prices and Costs: The Need to Revisit Donors’ Policies 
in Transport in Africa.” Presented at BREAD Conference on Development Economics, Chicago, 
IL, September 27, 2008. 
Raballand, Gaël, and Supee Teravaninthorn. Transport Prices and Costs in Africa: A Review of the Main 
International Corridors. Washington, DC: World Bank, 2009. 
Simuyemba, Shemmy. “Linking Africa Through Regional Infrastructure.” Africa Development Bank 
Economic Research Paper no. 64, 2000. 
Subramanian, Uma. “Building Competitive Trade Logistics for Global Markets.” Presented at Trade 
Logistics Advisory Program, Washington, DC, May 5, 2008. 
Ter-Minassian, Teresa, Richard Hughes, and Alejandro Hajdenberg. “Creating Sustainable Fiscal Space 
for Infrastructure: The Case of Tanzania.” IMF Working Paper WP/08/256, November 2008. 
United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA). “Assessment of Progress on Regional 
Integration in Africa.” Fifth Session of the Committee on Trade, Regional Cooperation and 
Integration, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, October 8–10, 2007. 
United States Trade and Development Agency (USTDA). “Remarks of Larry W. Walther.” U.S.-African 
Growth and Opportunity Transportation and Trade Forum Opening Plenary, Cape Town, South 
Africa April 14, 2008. 
Van der Muelen, Dave. “Transnet’s Turnaround Strategy: Remarks by Pradeep Maharaj, Group Executive 
for Strategy and Transformation at Transnet.” CILT World, September 2005. 
Wood, Jonathan. “Road to New Market.” Project Finance, September 2008. 
World Bank. Can Africa Claim the 21
st
Century? Washington, DC: World Bank, 2000. 
How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB Thumbnail item. Make the ToolBox view show.
show pdf thumbnail in html; how to make a thumbnail from pdf
C# Word - Header & Footer Processing in C#.NET
using RasterEdge.XDoc.Word; Create Footer & Header. The following C# sample code will show you how to create a header and footer in section.
create pdf thumbnail image; thumbnail view in for pdf files
3-23
———. Doing Business 2008. Washington, DC: World Bank, 2007. 
———. Public-Private Infrastructure Advisory Facility (PPIAF). Private Participation in Infrastructure 
Database, updated October 2008. http://ppi.worldbank.org
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
How to Process Image Using VB.NET. In this section, we will show you all VB.NET Image Cropping Assembly to Crop Image, VB.NET Image Thumbnail Creator Control SDK
pdf thumbnail generator online; html display pdf thumbnail
How to C#: File Format Support
PowerPoint Pages. Annotate PowerPoint. Text Search. Insert Image. Thumbnail Create. VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB Microsoft Office 2003 PowerPoint Show
cannot view pdf thumbnails in; pdf thumbnail preview
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
By clicking a thumbnail, you are redirect to a to search text-based documents, like PDF, Microsoft Office Word In addition, you may customize to show or hide
pdf file thumbnail preview; thumbnail pdf preview
VB.NET Image: VB.NET DLL for Image Basic Transforming in .NET
VB.NET demo code below will show you how to crop a local image by We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff files
pdf thumbnail viewer; create thumbnail from pdf
4-1
CHAPTER 4 
Maritime Transport  
Over 90 percent of international trade between SSA and foreign countries is conducted 
via maritime transport.
1
The region accounts for 2–3 percent of global merchandise trade 
by value, and slightly more than 2 percent of worldwide maritime cargo originates in or is 
destined for an SSA port.
2
Despite SSA’s heavy reliance on maritime transport, many 
ports  face  inadequate  physical  capacity  to  handle  maritime  trade  volumes.  The 
approximately 90 maritime ports in Africa
3
include coastal ports and those located on 
inland lakes and rivers.
4
The transport of goods between coastal and inland ports relies 
primarily on access to road and rail networks. By international standards, most SSA ports 
are small, even when compared with other ports in the developing world (table 4.1).
5
Among the region’s coastal ports, the South African port of Durban is by far the largest 
in terms of annual throughput, processing nearly three times the volume of containerized 
cargo as the next largest port, Cape Town, also in South Africa.
6
Although most SSA 
ports  are  state owned,  the majority  of shipping firms serving the region’s  ports are 
private-sector entities.
7
Despite  the  relatively  small  size  of  the  SSA  maritime  market,  several  ports  have 
undergone  recent  reforms  and  are  attracting  new  investment.  Reforms  are  aimed 
primarily at improving the operational efficiency of ports, which historically has been 
hampered  by  inadequate  infrastructure,  poor  management,  and  a  lack  of  financial 
resources. Reform has largely been achieved through public-private partnerships  (PPPs), 
in which a private-sector entity is granted a concession to operate a port while the port 
remains under state ownership. In many cases, the private-sector entity also invests in 
port  infrastructure  and  equipment.  Mozambique  was  the  first  to  adopt  this  model, 
transferring the management of all three of its coastal ports to private terminal operators 
1
UNCTAD, Review of Maritime Transport 2006, 2007, 102; USAID, “Port Congestion in Africa,” 
September 2005, 1. Maritime trade volumes between SSA and foreign countries are in line with the world 
average. According to one source, 90 percent of globally traded merchandise is transported by ship. 
2
UNCTAD, Review of Maritime Transport 2006, 2007, 104. Approximately 87 percent of the total 
volume of cargo exported from SSA ports is crude petroleum, with the remaining 13 percent divided evenly 
between minerals and metals (primarily bauxite and iron ore) and general cargo (including agricultural goods 
and textiles and apparel). By contrast, 90 percent of maritime cargo destined for SSA ports consists of 
general cargo. Crude petroleum is transported by tankers, minerals and metals are transported by break bulk 
carriers, and general cargo is transported by both break bulk carriers and container ships. This chapter focuses 
on container ship traffic, which is a growing proportion of maritime traffic in SSA. 
3
Radebe, “The State of Transport in Africa,” May 16, 2005. This estimate includes ports in North 
Africa, but the majority of these ports are located in SSA. 
4
Harding, Pálsson, and Raballand, “Port and Maritime Transport Challenges in West and Central 
Africa,” May 2007, 33; Ford, “East African Waterways Offer Cheap and Easy Transport,” August–
September 2007. The term “inland waterways” refers to lakes and rivers. At present, barge traffic largely 
comprises inland waterway transport in SSA. Efforts to promote inland waterway transport have been 
pursued by regional trading blocs within SSA such as COMESA and SADC. 
5
UNCTAD, “African Ports,” March 31, 2003, 10. Overall, African ports reportedly handle one-half of 
the volume of cargo traffic by container ship processed through Latin American ports and one-seventh of the 
volume processed through Asian ports. 
6
UNCTAD, Review of Maritime Transport 2006, 2007, 102. 
7
UNCTAD, “African Ports,” March 31, 2003, 19. 
VB.NET Image: Sharpen Images with DocImage SDK for .NET
This guiding page will show you how to sharpen an image in a Visual Basic .NET image processing application. Besides, we would like
pdf thumbnail; program to create thumbnail from pdf
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Code to Create Watermark on Images in .NET
Add Watermark to Image. In the code tab below we will show you the We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff files
disable pdf thumbnails; how to make a thumbnail from pdf
4-2
TABLE 4.1  Select leading ports in the developing world by volume of containerized 
cargo, 2006 
Global 
rank
a
Port 
Country 
Region 
Volume in TEUs
b
Singapore 
Singapore 
Asia 
24,792,000 
Hong Kong 
China 
Asia 
23,539,000 
Shanghai 
China 
Asia 
21,710,000 
Busan 
South Korea 
Asia 
12,039,000 
15 
Guangzhou 
China 
Asia 
6,600,000 
24 
Jawaharal Nehru  India 
Asia 
3,298,000 
34 
Manila 
Philippines 
Asia 
2,772,000 
37 
Santos 
Brazil 
South America 
2,446,000 
41 
Durban
c
South Africa 
Africa 
2,335,000 
47 
Kingston 
Jamaica 
Caribbean Basin 
2,150,000 
Sources: AAPA, “World Port Ranking: 2006,” undated (accessed January 5, 2009); 
Aldrick, “The Global Container Port Industry,” February 28, 2008. 
a
Based on AAPA’s ranking of the 50 largest ports worldwide.  
b
TEUs = Twenty-foot equivalent units. 
c
Durban is the only port in SSA that ranks among the top 50 global ports. Total 
containerized cargo volume for all of Africa is estimated at just over 15 million TEUs. 
beginning in 1998. By 2000, 70 percent of SSA ports had some form of private-sector 
participation.
8
While  private-sector  management  of  SSA  ports,  as  well  as  investment  in  physical 
infrastructure, has led to modest improvements in port productivity, problems remain. In 
particular,  the  region’s  maritime  operations  continue  to  be  adversely  affected  by 
burdensome  customs  procedures,  inadequate  access  to  land  transport  networks,  and 
corruption, and the primary constraints facing SSA ports—inefficient operations and lack 
of sufficient capacity—have yet to be fully resolved.
9
As a result, freight rates to and 
from SSA remain substantially higher than in other parts of the world, reducing the 
region’s export competitiveness.  
Conditions of the Maritime Transport Sector  
Port Infrastructure  
The top 10 ports in SSA account for nearly three-quarters of the cargo transported to and 
from the region. Among the region’s largest and/or most active ports are Abidjan, Côte 
d’Ivoire, and Tema, Ghana, in West Africa; Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, and Mombasa, 
Kenya, in East Africa; and Durban, South Africa, and Maputo, Mozambique, in southern 
Africa (figure 3.1 in chapter 3 and table 4.2). Together, in 2000, these six ports accounted 
for almost one-half of containerized cargo transiting SSA.
10
These ports also serve, and at 
8
Ibid., 11. 
9
Ibid., 29; U.S. Department of State, U.S. Embassy, Nairobi, “GOK Advances Pro-Business Agenda,” 
August 28, 2008. 
10
UNCTAD, “African Ports,” March 31, 2003, 36–37. Ratios are estimated using data from year 2000. 
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Create Windows TIFF Viewer | Online
400; option.DocViewerHeight = 400; // Show the thumbnail ThumbDock.Left; // Set the thumbnail height option & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
can't view pdf thumbnails; view pdf thumbnails in
C# Word: How to Create C# Word Windows Viewer with .NET DLLs
400; option.DocViewerHeight = 400; // Show the thumbnail ThumbDock.Left; // Set the thumbnail height option & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
print pdf thumbnails; no pdf thumbnails in
4-3
TABLE 4.2  Leading ports in sub-Saharan Africa by volume of 
containerized cargo, 2006 
Port 
Region/country 
Volume in TEUs
a
West  and Central Africa 
Abidjan 
Côte d’Ivoire      
507,119 
Tema    
Ghana 
425,409
b
Dakar     
Senegal 
309,000
c
Lagos     
Nigeria 
226,571 
Lome      
Togo 
203,372 
Cotonou 
Benin 
158,201
Douala 
Cameroon 
148,433 
East Africa 
Mombasa     
Kenya 
479,355
d
Dar es Salaam 
Tanzania 
352,548 
Port Sudan 
Sudan 
326,721 
Djibouti 
Djibouti 
221,330 
Southern Africa 
Durban 
South Africa 
2,334,999
e
Cape Town 
South Africa 
764,753 
Port Elizabeth       South Africa 
407,278 
Luanda 
Angola 
316,396
c
Walvis Bay 
Namibia 
83,263 
Maputo 
Mozambique 
62,516 
Sources: Degerlund, ed., Containerization International 
Yearbook, 2008, 157–69; CargoSystems, “South Africa: Coping 
With Growth,” May 2003, 49. 
a
TEUs = Twenty-foot equivalent units. 
b
Initial planned capacity = 500,000 TEUs. 
c
Figures are for 2005. 
d
Initial planned capacity = 250,000 TEUs. 
e
Initial planned capacity = 950,000 TEUs. 
times compete with one another, as transshipment points for inland destinations. For 
example, maritime cargo ultimately destined for the landlocked countries of Burkina Faso 
and Mali may be conveyed through either the ports of Abidjan or Tema, whereas cargo 
destined for Swaziland or Zimbabwe may transit the ports of Durban or Maputo.
11
In general, those SSA ports that function as the region’s major transshipment ports are 
characterized  by  relatively  modern  infrastructure,  including  deepwater  berths  to 
accommodate container ships, an adequate number of quays, or docks, to facilitate cargo 
movement, and dockside cranes to load and unload cargo from large vessels.
12
Other 
11
Ibid., 17.  
12
Ibid., 13. In a 2001 UNCTAD survey of 50 African ports, 59 percent of responding ports stated that 
they have terminals to accommodate container ships.   
4-4
physical characteristics common among the region’s highest functioning ports include the 
establishment  of  dedicated  terminal  facilities  for  containerized  cargo,  the  use  of 
information technology systems for the tracking and tracing of cargo as well as customs 
processing, and access to inland road and rail networks.
13
The physical infrastructure of most SSA ports is inadequate, partly due to historical 
factors. Although many SSA ports were developed to accommodate the transport of 
specific types of raw materials, growth in the region’s merchandise trade has expanded 
their use. For example, the port of Richards Bay, South Africa, was originally built in the 
1970s to facilitate the shipment of South African coal, but by the 1990s, the port was 
processing nearly one-half of all cargo transiting South Africa. Similarly, the port of 
Durban grew, by necessity, from a general cargo port to a major regional transshipment 
hub.
14
In response to increases in merchandise traffic, certain SSA ports, such as Walvis 
Bay, Namibia, have updated their master plans to account for changing trade patterns.
15
However,  despite  such  planning,  SSA  ports  continue  to  face  physical  capacity 
constraints, especially with regard to container ship trade (box 4.1).
16
These capacity 
constraints are exacerbated by inefficient, and at times corrupt, customs administrations.
17
Service Providers  
Large international shipping firms such as Danish-based Maersk and French-based CMA-
CGM account for the bulk of maritime transport service between SSA and non-SSA 
markets.
18
In particular, these two firms transport the majority of containerized cargo 
between SSA and Europe, the largest market for SSA exports.
19
Other foreign-based 
shipping firms that have a substantial presence in the region include the German firm 
Hapag-Lloyd,  the  Italian  firm  Grimaldi  Lines,  and  the  Swiss  firm  Mediterranean 
Shipping Co. In recent years, the maritime transport market in SSA has become more 
concentrated,  as  many  large  shipping  firms  have  been  absorbed  through  corporate 
consolidations. For example, in 2005, Maersk purchased the liner shipping business of 
British-based P&O Nedlloyd, and Hapag-Lloyd merged its operations with the Canadian 
firm CP Ships.
20
Earlier, in 1999, Maersk also purchased the South African shipping firm 
Safmarine, one of the largest regional shipping lines providing service between SSA and 
foreign countries.
21
13
Ghana Ports and Harbour Authority Web site. http://www.ghanaports.gov.gh
(accessed September 
18, 2008); Kenya Port Authority Web site. http://www.kpa.co.ke
(accessed September 18, 2008); and the 
Maputo Port Development Company Web site. http://www.portmaputo.com
(accessed September 18, 2008). 
14
Byrne, ed., “Ports and Shipping,” May 1996. 
15
U.S. Department of State, U.S. Embassy, Port Louis, “USITC Study on Sub-Saharan Africa,” 
October 2, 2008. 
16
USAID, “Port Congestion in Africa,” September 2005, 1. 
17
Industry official, interview by Commission staff, Accra, Ghana, October 24, 2008. 
18
UNCTAD, Review of Maritime Transport 2006, 2007, 103; CMA-CGM Web site. 
http://www.cmacgm.com
(accessed September 24, 2008). In 2005, CMA-CGM purchased the liner shipping 
business of French firm Bolloré, which included two of Bolloré’s subsidiaries, Delmas and OT Africa Line, 
which provide service between Europe and countries in SSA.  
19
UNCTAD, Review of Maritime Transport 2006, 2007, 103. In 2004, 40 percent by value of African 
exports were destined for Europe, compared to less than 20 percent for North America.  
20
FMC, 45th Annual Report, 2006, 25.  
21
Safmarine Web site. http://safmarine.mbendi.com
(accessed September 18, 2008); 
A.P.-Moller/Maersk Group, “The A.P. Moller/Maersk Group Confirms Announcement,” November 2, 1999.  
4-5
BOX 4.1  Containerization Trends in Sub-Saharan Africa 
During the period 1995–2005, the transport of SSA imports and exports by container ship doubled, with the largest 
increase in containerized traffic occurring in West Africa.
a
Containerized traffic between SSA and foreign countries 
is expected to double again by 2015, creating new demand in the region for port infrastructure to accommodate 
container ship trade.
b
In broad terms, the increase in containerized traffic is due to a shift in the transport of certain 
SSA exports, including coffee and cotton, from bulk to containerized cargo, and to the region’s growing trade with 
countries such as China that transport a large proportion of their goods by container ship.
c
At present, however, 
the capacity of even the largest SSA ports to handle a rising volume of containerized cargo is insufficient. For 
example, at the port of Durban, through which two-thirds of South Africa’s containerized imports and exports are 
transported, container ships reportedly experience delays of several days to dock at the port.
d
Similar delays are 
encountered by container ships at the ports of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, and Mombasa, Kenya.
e
Delays caused 
by insufficient docking capacity, or by long wait times for loading and unloading of cargo from ships, lead to higher 
freight rates. For example, a small container ship may potentially incur an operating cost of $43,000 for each day 
that it is delayed from docking at a port.
f
To mitigate such costs, some shipping firms have imposed ‘vessel delay 
surcharges’ of as high as $100 for each container that transits certain SSA ports; these charges are in turn passed 
on to importers.
g
Nonetheless, certain ports in the region have been successful in addressing capacity issues for 
containerized  traffic  by  attracting  outside  investment  in  infrastructure  and  improving  port  management.  For 
example, at the port of Mombasa, the Kenya Ports Authority has established dedicated berths for one of the area’s 
largest shipping firms and now permits cargo to be processed on a 24-hour basis.
h
In addition, the port has 
attracted new investment from the Japanese Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC) to underwrite construction 
of a second container terminal to be completed in 2013.
i
In Durban, port upgrades have led to a sevenfold increase 
in the number of containers processed through the port.
j
Ultimately, like Mombasa and Durban, other SSA ports 
that increasingly serve as regional hubs, or transshipment ports, are investing in the infrastructure and managerial 
expertise to handle growing containerized trade.
_____________________ 
Mike Mundy Associates and Ocean Shipping Consultants, “Africa Infrastructure Diagnostic Study,” February 
28, 2008. 
Osler, “African Ambition,” April 25, 2008; UNCTAD, “African Ports,” March 31, 2003, 13.    
UNCTAD, Review of Maritime Transport 2006 , 2007,107; Pedersen, “Freight Transport under Globalization,” 
2001, 88; and USITC, Hearing transcript, October 28, 2008, 71 (testimony of Paul Kent, Nathan Associates). 
Growth in the region’s container ship traffic has also been influenced by a trend toward the deployment of 
increasingly larger vessels in the world’s busiest ports, allowing shippers to transport higher volumes of cargo with 
less frequent voyages. One result of this trend is that smaller container ships are being redeployed in markets with 
relatively low volumes of containerized traffic, such as those in SSA.  
Lloyd’s List, “Durban Bursting at the Seams,” October 19, 2007; industry official, interview by Commission staff, 
Durban, South Africa, October 17, 2008. 
Sambu, “Tanzania: Dar Port Delays Strain Cargo Clearance,” December 5, 2007; Osler, “African Ambition,” 
April 25, 2008. 
SITC, Hearing transcript, October 28, 2008, 70 (testimony of Dr. Paul Kent, Nathan Associates). This figure 
pertains to a vessel with a capacity of 1,500 TEUs, assumed to have a daily operating cost of $1,800 per hour. 
Esnor, “Lurching from One Crisis to Another,” November 6, 2006.  
KPA, 2008–09 Handbook, 2008, 7. According to the Kenya Ports Authority, the introduction of a 24-hour 
operating schedule has decreased ship turnaround times at the port from seven to two days, reduced the average 
time for a ship to wait for a berth from nearly three days to one day, and increased the number of containers 
moved by crane per hour from 10 to 15. 
Industry official, interview by Commission staff, Mombasa, Kenya, October 27, 2008. 
Sambu, “Tanzania: Dar Port Delays Strain Cargo Clearance,” December 5, 2007; Osler “African Ambition,” 
April  25, 2008. 
Government official, interview by Commission staff, Durban, South Africa, October 17, 2008. 
4-6
Apart from Safmarine, there are currently few regionally based shipping firms in SSA.
22
Most regionally based carriers, which were historically state owned, were dismantled in 
the  1990s  following  the  entry  of  European  and  other  foreign  shipping  lines  into 
previously protected maritime markets.
23
These firms included Sitram in Côte d’Ivoire, 
Black  Star  Line in Ghana,  and NNSL in Nigeria.
24
At present,  the remaining SSA 
shipping lines primarily provide intraregional service, either along inland waterways or 
between  two  or  more  coastal  ports.
25
For  example,  the  Togo-based  maritime  firm 
Ecomarine  provides  container  shipping services between  the  West  African  ports  of 
Dakar,  Abidjan,  Lagos-Apapa,  and  Tema.
26
Similarly,  Safmarine  transports  goods 
between the South African ports of Durban and East London, as well as between these 
cities and Maputo, Mozambique.
27
In Angola, state-owned shipping company Cabotang 
provides maritime transport between domestic coastal locations, while in Tanzania the 
partially  privatized  TRC  Marine  transports  cargo  on  lakes  linking  Tanzania  with 
neighboring countries.
28
Soft Infrastructure: Customs  
Port operations remain adversely affected by customs delays and corruption. Customs-
related issues that most commonly hamper portside operations include multiple clearance 
procedures, delays in the release of imported and exported cargo from the port, and in 
some cases, corrupt customs  officials.  For  example, goods processed at the  port  of 
Mombasa must be  cleared by  three separate  government  agencies:  the  Kenya  Ports 
Authority, the Kenya Revenue Authority, and the Kenya Bureau of Standards.
29
At the 
port of Tema, delays in the release of imported cargo may increase port storage fees for 
importers, and in extreme cases, an importer may choose to abandon cargo at the port 
rather than to accrue such charges. In addition, although the port of Tema has been 
successful  in reducing corruption, largely by  the  introduction  of automated customs 
technology, importers and exporters may still bribe customs officials in return for an 
expedited clearance of goods.
30
Not surprisingly, goods that are destined for landlocked countries generally experience 
more clearance procedures and longer delays at the port of entry than do goods destined 
for the local market. For instance, it reportedly takes five additional days for the port of 
Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, to clear cargo that is en route to the neighboring countries of 
Burundi, Rwanda, or Uganda.
31
Similarly, in 2005, goods that arrived at the port of 
Mombasa, Kenya, bound for Uganda spent an average of 13 days longer at the port than 
22
Government official, interview by Commission staff, Mombasa, Kenya, October 27, 2008. 
23
Pedersen, “Freight Transport under Globalization,” 2001, 90. Prior to the 1990s, shipping firms 
serving Africa participated in a “liner conference” system that divided major shipping routes to and from the 
region into three protected markets: those served by African shippers (40 percent), those served by European 
shippers (40 percent), and those served by other foreign shippers (20 percent). In 1992, the European Court of 
Justice determined that this arrangement was anticompetitive, hence opening the market to direct competition 
between African and non-African shipping firms.  
24
Harding, Pálsson, and Raballand, “Port and Maritime Transport Challenges,” May 2007, 9.  
25
Osler, “African Ambition,” April 25, 2008.  
26
Africa News, “Ghana; ECOWAS Has Done Well,” September 18, 2008. 
27
Safmarine Web site. http://www.safmarine.mbendi.com
(accessed September 18, 2008).  
28
The Banker, “Angola: The Slow and Steady Road to Prosperity,” August 1, 2008; Tanzania National 
Web site. http://www.tanzania.go.tz/transportf.html
(accessed October 8, 2008). 
29
U.S. Department of State, U.S. Embassy, Nairobi, “GOK Advances Pro-Business Agenda,” 
August  28, 2008. These organizations are reportedly working towards harmonizing their clearance 
procedures through the establishment of common accreditation and computerized clearance systems.  
30
Industry official, interview by Commission staff, Accra, Ghana, October 24, 2008. 
31
Lloyd’s List, “The Maritime Route to Prosperity,” June 18, 2008. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested