asp.net pdf viewer user control c# : How to create a thumbnail of a pdf document software application project winforms html windows UWP pub40717-part837

4-7
goods remaining in the local market (table 4.3). Ultimately, burdensome customs and 
inspection procedures at SSA ports lead to higher costs for goods transiting the region.
32
As  such, without  commensurate  improvements  in  customs administration,  efforts  to 
physically improve SSA ports will likely have less impact on the region’s ability to 
compete in international trade. 
TABLE 4.3  Comparison of container clearance and truck transit times from select SSA ports to inland 
locations 
Route 
Location of final 
destination for 
cargo 
Distance in 
kilometers  
Number of days for 
clearance at the 
port of origin 
Total transit time  
(including port 
clearance) 
Mombasa 
(Kenya) to 
Nairobi (Kenya) 
Within country 
485  
5–6 days
a
> 10 days 
Mombasa 
(Kenya) to 
Kampala 
(Uganda)
Neighboring 
country 
1,150  
13 days
a
> 2 weeks 
Durban (South 
Africa) to 
Johannesburg 
(South Africa) 
Within country 
500  
2–4 days 
3–7 days
b
Durban (South 
Africa) to 
Mbabane 
(Swaziland) 
Neighboring 
country 
400  
2–4 days 
5–7 days 
Sources: Industry officials, interviews by Commission staff, Durban, South Africa, October, 21, 2008, 
Mombasa, Kenya, October 27, 2008, and Matsapha, Swaziland, October 23, 2008; Arvis, Raballand, and 
Marteau, “The Cost of Being Landlocked,” June 2007, 28. 
a
Data from 2005. 
b
It takes approximately 18–21 hours for cargo to be transported between Durban and Johannesburg, and 
three additional days for such cargo to be offloaded and deposited in an inland container depot in 
Johannesburg. 
Effects of Port Infrastructure Conditions on Export 
Competitiveness  
Because port infrastructure in SSA was not built to support the region’s diverse and 
growing  volume of merchandise  trade,  infrastructure  deficiencies currently  result in 
substantial time delays and high costs for goods moving both into and out of the region.
33
For example, in 2004, lack of sufficient berthing capacity in the port of Durban led to 
32
Arvis, Raballand, and Marteau, “The Cost of Being Landlocked,” June 2007, 28–29. 
33
USAID, “Port Congestion in Africa,” September 2005, 1; Aldrick, Drewry Shipping Consultants, 
Ltd., “The Global Container Port Industry,” February 28, 2008. Although, on average, the capacity utilization 
ratio for all African ports is estimated at slightly below 80 percent, certain ports in the region have already 
exceeded their planned capacity design, including the ports of Durban, South Africa, and Mombasa, Kenya 
(table 4.2). Further, by 2012, the capacity utilization ratio of African ports is forecast to increase to nearly 
100 percent. 
How to create a thumbnail of a pdf document - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
pdf thumbnail fix; create thumbnail jpg from pdf
How to create a thumbnail of a pdf document - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
pdf no thumbnail; create thumbnail from pdf c#
4-8
vessel wait times of up to 66 hours.
34
Similarly, at the port of Mombasa, inadequate rail 
capacity has resulted in a backlog of more than 10,000 containers awaiting transport to 
inland  destinations.
35
Finally,  at  the  port  of  Tema,  insufficient  crane  capacity  has 
hampered port productivity. Illustratively, although the port of Tema uses two cranes per 
ship to load and unload containerized cargo, the port of Singapore uses as many as eight 
cranes to unload cargo from a single ship (table 4.4).
36
As a result of the infrastructure issues faced by SSA ports, maritime freight costs in the 
region surpass those in other countries. For example, it is estimated that manufacturers 
shipping from SSA pay nearly three times more in container handling charges at African 
ports than manufacturers shipping from Europe.
37
In some SSA countries, the cost of 
importing a standard-sized container is reportedly more than twice the world average.
38
Added to these charges are the indirect costs associated with time delays at the port of 
entry  and in the transport  of goods  to inland destinations. Overall, in 2004,  it was 
estimated that freight costs as a ratio of import value were approximately 10 percent for 
SSA,  compared  with  an  average  of  nearly  6  percent  for  all  developing  countries, 
including those in SSA. For certain landlocked countries such as Mali and Rwanda, this 
ratio was as high as 24 percent.
39
SSA’s high transport costs have a negative impact on the region’s ability to compete in 
global export markets. One study concludes that transport costs in Africa are a higher 
trade barrier than trade-partner tariffs on African goods.
40
For instance, although apparel 
from SSA benefit from lower tariffs in the United States vis-à-vis similar products from 
Cambodia and Bangladesh, the relatively higher transport costs associated with shipping 
apparel from SSA can render the product uncompetitive in the U.S. market.
41
Therefore, 
further reform of, and investment in, SSA’s ports is necessary to reduce maritime freight 
costs in the region and, in turn, improve export competitiveness.
42
Efforts to Improve the Maritime Transport Sector 
In the past two decades, SSA countries have pursued varied efforts to upgrade port 
infrastructure and achieve regulatory  reform  of their maritime  sectors.  Although the 
physical improvement of certain SSA ports has enabled these ports to handle increasing 
34
Good, “South Africa Still Stalled Over Ports,” April 27, 2004.  
35
U.S. Department of State, U.S. Embassy, Nairobi, “GOK Advances Pro-Business Agenda,” 
August  28, 2008.  
36
Industry official, interview by Commission staff, Tema, Ghana, October 25, 2008. Average vessel 
size in Singapore is larger, however.    
37
Osler, “African Ambition,” April 25, 2008. 
38
Lloyd’s List, “Singapore’s Connections Put It on Top of the World,” November 12, 2007; UNCTAD, 
Review of Maritime Transport 2006, 2007, 118, 123. This trend, however, may be reversing. Between 2001 
and 2004, the ratio of freight costs to import value decreased by 3.5 percentage points in SSA, compared to 
2.0 percentage points among all developing countries and 2.5 percentage points among all countries in the 
world. 
39
UNCTAD, Review of Maritime Transport 2006, 2007, 123–24. Import values as reported by 
UNCTAD are based on freight and insurance data from the IMF Balance of Payments Statistics (January 
2006). 
40
World Bank, Can Africa Claim the 21st Century?, 2000, 138. 
41
USITC, Hearing transcript, October 28, 2008, 121 (testimony of Paul Ryberg, African Coalition for 
Trade, Inc.). 
42
USAID, “Port Congestion in Africa,” September 2005, 3–4. 
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Word
Word to ODT. Convert PDF to Word. Document Builder. Document Pages Processing. Document Processing. Text Search. Insert Image. Thumbnail Create. Thumbnail Create.
pdf thumbnails; .pdf printing in thumbnail size
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for PowerPoint
Conversion. Convert PowerPoint to PDF. Convert PowerPoint PowerPoint Files. File: Split PowerPoint Document. PowerPoint. Text Search. Insert Image. Thumbnail Create
show pdf thumbnails in; pdf preview thumbnail
4-9
TABLE 4.4  Comparison of port productivity in select SSA and non-SSA ports 
Region 
Port 
Country 
Productivity 
measure (crane 
moves per hour
a
Africa 
Abidjan 
Côte d’Ivoire 
20   
Cape Town 
South Africa 
12 
Dar es Salaam 
Tanzania 
20 
Durban 
South Africa 
15 
Maputo 
Mozambique 
10 
Mombasa 
Kenya 
15   
Tema 
Ghana 
15
Asia Pacific 
Hong Kong 
China 
40 
Manila 
Philippines 
30 
Shanghai 
China 
30 
Singapore 
Singapore 
35 
Sydney 
Australia 
27 
Europe/North 
America 
Baltimore, MD 
United States 
37 
Felixstowe 
United Kingdom 
20 
Los Angeles, CA  United States 
25 
Rotterdam 
Netherlands 
30 
Vancouver 
Canada 
25 
Wilmington, NC 
United States 
39 
Sources: Kunaka, “Ports and Corridor Performance,” September 26, 2008; 
“Intermodal Transportation and Terminal Operations,” spring 2008; North 
Carolina State Ports, Port of Wilmington, “Container Productivity Increases,” 
June 23, 2005; and industry official, e-mail message to Commission staff, 
September 30, 2008. 
a
Indicates the number of containers moved each hour by quay cranes. 
b
At a new container terminal completed at the port of Tema, productivity has 
reportedly increased from 15 to 30 crane moves per hour. 
volumes  of  merchandise  trade,  most  ports  in  the  region  remain  uncompetitive  by 
international standards. In broad terms, the poor performance of SSA ports is due to the 
sporadic nature of investment in port infrastructure and the lack of effective institutional 
reform  of  ports  by national  governments.
43
The latter in  particular  has  undermined 
regional competition in the provision of maritime services.
44
43
Osler, “African Ambition,” April 25, 2008; Pedersen, “Freight Transport under Globalization,” 2001, 
93. 
44
USAID, “Port Congestion in Africa,” September 2005, 3–4. 
VB.NET Image: Program for Creating Thumbnail from Documents and
language. It empowers VB developers to create thumbnail from multiple document and image formats, such as PDF, TIFF, GIF, BMP, etc. It
how to show pdf thumbnails in; how to view pdf thumbnails in
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
Tell C# users how to: create a new PDF file and load PDF from other file You may easily generate thumbnail image from PDF. C#.NET: Protect Your PDF Document.
generate pdf thumbnails; enable pdf thumbnail preview
4-10
Port Governance  
In the 1990s, many SSA countries commenced initiatives to improve the efficiency of 
their maritime transport sectors.
45
These efforts centered on the institutional reform of 
ports, which was broadly achieved through the separation of the ports’ regulatory and 
commercial  functions.  Under  reform,  national  port  authorities  retained  regulatory 
oversight over of the activities of the port, while private-sector entities were granted 
concessions by port authorities to perform warehousing, container handling, and other 
commercial operations.
46
By enlisting the private sector to invest in port infrastructure 
and provide expertise in port operations and management, national authorities aimed to 
increase the productivity of their ports. Improved port productivity, in turn, would enable 
SSA ports to compete more effectively with one another to handle the region’s growing 
merchandise trade volumes.
47
Regulatory reform of ports in SSA has not been accompanied by ownership reform—that 
is, most ports in the region remain under state ownership.
48
Nonetheless, reform has 
shifted the number of ports previously classified as “operating” ports to “landlord” status.
Under  an  operating  port,  the  ownership  and  management  of  port  assets,  including 
terminal facilities and equipment, remain with the port authority, but the port authority 
may lease these facilities to private-sector entities.
49
By contrast, under a landlord port, 
the port authority also retains ownership of port infrastructure, but permits private-sector 
firms to carry out cargo handling and other port functions using their own equipment, and 
to invest in the building of new facilities.
50
At present, some of the most active ports in SSA function under the landlord model, 
including Dar es Salaam, Maputo, and Tema.
51
In general, these and other ports in the 
region  followed  a  similar  path  toward  private-sector participation:  port restructuring 
followed by long-term concessions to private entities. For example, after disaggregating 
its commercial operations from the port authority in 2000, Dar es Salaam established a 
two-member consortium led by Filipino-based International Container Terminal Services 
to operate the port.
52
The consortium was granted a 10-year concession, during which 
time it was charged with improving port productivity and upgrading port equipment and 
terminal infrastructure. Similarly, also in 2000, the port of Maputo granted a 15-year 
45
UNCTAD, “Comparative Analysis of Deregulation,” May 24, 1995, 16. Efficiency measures in the 
maritime transport sector include such parameters as vessel turnaround times, container dwell times in a port, 
cargo handling charges, and port call charges. 
46
UNCTAD, “African Ports,” March 31, 2003, 19. The arrangement is commonly termed a public-
private partnership (PPP).  
47
UNCTAD, “Comparative Analysis of Deregulation,” May 24, 1995, 5.  
48
Osler, “African Ambition,” April 25, 2008. 
49
UNCTAD, “African Ports,” March 31, 2003, 9; World Bank, “Module 3,” 2007, 83–84; and USITC, 
Hearing transcript, October 28, 2008, 136 (testimony of Paul Kent, Nathan Associates). Under an operating 
port, private-sector participation is limited, particularly with regard to cargo handling services, which are 
often carried out by the port authority. However, in many countries, such as Argentina, Chile, the 
Netherlands, and Singapore, the landlord port has become the standard institutional framework for port 
governance. In particular, the landlord port is seen as the most effective model for involving the private 
sector in port management and investment while still maintaining public-sector oversight of port activities. 
50
UNCTAD, “African Ports,” March 31, 2003, 12, 15. Private-sector entities may build new port 
infrastructure under a build-operate-transfer arrangement, under which newly constructed assets revert to the 
ownership of the national port authority once the term of a concession has expired.  
51
Ibid., 12–16. 
52
Hutchinson Whampoa Limited, “Hutchinson Port Holdings Acquires Overseas Assets,” May 28, 
2001. In May 2001, the overseas port development operations of International Container Terminal Services 
were acquired by Hong Kong-based Hutchinson Holdings. 
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Raster
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET And generating thumbnail for Raster Image is an easy work. How to Create Thumbnail for Raster in C#.
enable pdf thumbnails in; pdf reader thumbnails
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
XDoc.PDF SDK allows users to perform PDF document security settings in In addition, you can easily create, modify, and delete PDF annotations PDF Thumbnail Edit.
show pdf thumbnail in; generate thumbnail from pdf
4-11
concession to a private-sector consortium that later formed the Maputo Port Development 
Company (MPDC).
53
MPDC is currently responsible for managing the operations of the 
port, including those of newly privatized terminals developed for niche markets, such as 
coal  and fresh produce.
54
Finally, in 2002, the Ghana Ports and Harbours Authority 
converted the port of Tema to landlord status, while maintaining regulatory authority 
over the port, and permitted private firms to engage in cargo-handling services through 
concessions.
55
Elsewhere,  SSA  countries  have  pursued  slightly  different  forms  of  private-sector 
participation in port activities. For instance, in June 2000, global terminal operator Dubai 
Ports Worldwide (DPW) signed a 20-year management contract with the Djibouti Port 
Authority to oversee the entire operation of the port.
56
In South Africa, institutional 
reform has resulted in the establishment of two new entities to regulate and manage the 
country’s  seven  ports:  the  Transnet  National  Ports  Authority  and  Transnet  Port 
Terminals. The Transnet National Ports Authority serves as the port regulator, whereas 
private  firms  engage  in  portside  operations  through  either  leasing  contracts  or 
concessions.
57
By contrast, Kenya’s port of Mombasa has not yet undergone regulatory 
reform,  but  nonetheless  permits  private-sector  participation  in  60  percent  of  port 
operations.
58
Investment in Port Infrastructure 
Regulatory reform of SSA ports and private-sector participation in port operations has 
brought new investment in port infrastructure (table 4.5). Many of the infrastructure 
projects are designed to position SSA ports to accommodate growing container ship trade 
in the region. For example, in 2007, private terminal operator APM, a subsidiary of the 
Danish shipping  firm Maersk, invested $75 million  to upgrade the  Nigerian port of 
Lagos-Apapa. APM’s investment included the refurbishment of gantry cranes used to 
load and unload cargo from container ships. The project reportedly resulted in an average 
monthly increase  in container throughput of nearly 50 percent,  and helped alleviate 
congestion  at  the  port.
59
In  Djibouti,  terminal  operator  DPW  has  invested  in  the 
construction of a container terminal. The new terminal will enable the port to serve as a 
primary entry point for goods destined for East Africa.
60
At the same time, several other 
SSA ports plan to increase their container terminal capacity with funding from the private 
sector, including Dakar, Douala, Durban, and Mombasa.
61
53
Furlonger, “Harbors—1. Grinding Out Growth,” December 21, 2007; UNCTAD, “African Ports,” 
March 31, 2003, 12–16; and PMAESA, “Maputo: Meeting Expectations,” 2008, 46. Shareholders in the 
Maputo Port Development Company currently include Portuguese firm Portus Indico, Mozambican railway 
operator CFM, and the government of Mozambique. 
54
Lloyd’s List, “Peel Strips its Activity with Sale of Maputo Stake,” January 3, 2008. 
55
UNCTAD, “African Ports,” March 31, 2003, 19; industry official, e-mail message to Commission 
staff, September 30, 2008. 
56
Port of Djibouti—DP World Web site. http://www.dpworld-djiboutiport.com/sublevel.asp?pageid=8
(accessed October 2, 2008). 
57
UNCTAD, “African Ports,” March 31, 2003, 31. 
58
Lloyd’s List, “Privatisation on Cards for Mombasa,” July 23, 2008; Lloyd’s List, “Mombasa Gets 
Box Jam Lifeline from Andersen,” August 12, 2008; and government official, interview by Commission 
staff, Mombasa, Kenya, October 27, 2008. The Kenya Ports Authority reportedly has plans to convert the 
port to landlord status. 
59
Lloyd’s List, “Success Story of Apapa,” July 17, 2008. 
60
Lloyd’s List, “World Bank Guarantee for Djibouti Box Terminal,” July 17, 2008.  
61
Mike Mundy Associates and Ocean Shipping Consultants, “Africa Infrastructure Diagnostic Study,” 
February 28, 2008. 
Create Thumbnail in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
guides for AJAX Zero-Footprint Document Viewer You Wish; Annotate & Redact Documents or Images; Create Thumbnail; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode & Decode
pdf thumbnails in; pdf thumbnail html
How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET. With XImage.Raster SDK library, you can create an image viewer and
create thumbnail jpeg from pdf; enable pdf thumbnails
4-12
TABLE 4.5  Select infrastructure investments in SSA ports 
Port 
Investment 
Major stakeholder(s) 
Dakar, Senegal 
Expansion of existing container 
terminal, building of new terminal 
Dubai Ports Worldwide (United Arab 
Emirates) 
Dar es Salaam, Tanzania 
Gantry cranes, computer systems 
Hutchinson Whampoa (Hong Kong) 
Douala, Cameroon 
Deep-sea port construction, new 
container terminal 
A.P.-Moller/Maersk Group 
(Denmark); Bolloré Group (France) 
Djibouti, Djibouti 
New container terminal  
Dubai Ports Worldwide (United Arab 
Emirates) 
Durban, South Africa 
New container terminal 
Transnet National Port Authority 
(South Africa) 
Lagos-Apapa, Nigeria 
Gantry cranes 
A.P.-Moller/Maersk Group (Denmark) 
Maputo, Mozambique 
New terminals for granite and 
metals, expansion of container 
terminal capacity, dredging of water 
channel to port  
Dubai Ports Worldwide (United Arab 
Emirates); Government of 
Mozambique 
Mombasa, Kenya 
Construction of a second container 
terminal, the first phase scheduled 
for completion in 2013  
Japanese Bank for International 
Cooperation (Japan) 
Tema, Ghana 
New container terminal 
Ghana Ports and Harbours Authority 
(Ghana); A.P.-Moller/Maersk Group 
(Denmark) 
Sources: Industry officials, interviews by Commission staff, Johannesburg, South Africa, October 23, 2008, and 
Mombasa, Kenya, October 27, 2008; Dickenson, “Tanzanian Port Has Big Aspirations,” April 1, 2003; Lloyd’s 
List, “Success Story of Apapa,” July 17, 2008; Mike Mundy Associates and Ocean Shipping Consultants, “Africa 
Infrastructure Diagnostic Study,” February 28, 2008; Port of Djibouti Web site. http://www.dpworld-
djiboutiport.com
(accessed January 13, 2009); Port of Maputo Web site. http://www.portmaputo.com
(accessed 
January 13, 2009); Port of Douala Web site. http://www.otal.com/cameroon/index.htm#psi
(accessed January 
13, 2009); and Ghana Ports and Harbours Authority Web site. http://www.ghanaports.gov.gh
(accessed 
January 13, 2009). 
Competition among SSA ports for transshipped cargo has also led them to improve their 
own infrastructure.
62
For instance, the port of Dar es Salaam plans to compete with 
Mombasa as the primary transshipment hub for goods in East Africa. Consequently, with 
the  aid  of  Hong  Kong-based  terminal  operator  Hutchison-Whampoa,  the  port  has 
invested in new cranes and computer systems to increase cargo throughput.
63
In southern 
Africa, the port of Maputo is upgrading terminal equipment and warehousing facilities, as 
well as expanding the harbor to accommodate Panamax vessels—all with the goal of 
62
Pringle, “African Ports Lack Capacity,” June 4, 2008; USITC, Hearing Transcript, October 28, 2008, 
135 (testimony of Paul Kent, Nathan Associates). In transshipment, containerized cargo is offloaded from a 
“mother” vessel at a port and placed on a “feeder” vessel that transports the cargo to its final destination. 
63
Dickenson, “Tanzanian Port Has Big Aspirations,” April 1, 2003; government official, interview by 
Commission staff, Mombasa, Kenya, October 27, 2008. 
4-13
attracting traffic from the area’s largest port, Durban.
64
Finally, the port of Tema now 
competes, to some extent, with Abidjan as a major transshipment hub in West Africa.
65
The port recently completed improvements to its docks to facilitate the loading of cargo 
onto ships, thus decreasing vessel turnaround time and port productivity. In addition, the 
Ghanaian port authority has established an offsite cargo processing center in the town of 
Kumasi to expedite the movement of goods from the coastal ports of Tema and Takoradi 
to inland locations.
66
As an additional means of handling increasing volumes of containerized cargo, some 
ports in SSA have developed inland container freight stations (CFS). The CFS, which 
may be located within export processing zones (EPZs) and some distance from the port, 
are built and managed by private-sector firms. These facilities are not only responsible 
for the  unloading  and storage of  containerized cargo,  but  also  for the retrieval  and 
transport  of  such  cargo  inland  from  the  port  and  for  the  submission  of  customs 
documentation to port authorities. Although the purpose of CFS is to relieve congestion 
at coastal ports, some  CFS facilities,  such as  those located  outside Mombasa, have 
ultimately  added  to  such  congestion.  In  particular,  these  facilities  reportedly  lack 
adequate equipment to unload containers from ships, as well as a sufficient number of 
trucks  to  transport  containers  to  CFS  inland  warehouses.  Moreover,  because  CFS 
operators receive revenue  for storing  containers,  they  have  little  incentive  to move 
containers out of storage in a timely manner.
67
Another important segment of port infrastructure investment among SSA countries is 
customs  processing  technology.  For  example,  the  Kenya  Ports  Authority  (KPA) 
implemented an Electronic Data Interchange system that enables shipping lines to submit 
cargo data electronically to the port authority.
68
As a result, customs clearance time at the 
port of Mombasa was reduced from six to two days. KPA ultimately hopes to reduce 
clearance time to less than one day.
69
Similarly, the port of Durban has adopted the use of 
electronic manifests, which allows South African customs agents to clear incoming cargo 
before arrival at the port.
70
64
World Bank, “Module 2,” 2007, 38, 41; Furlonger, “Harbors—1. Grinding Out Growth,” 
December 21, 2007. Panamax vessels are one of the largest classes of container ship and were introduced in 
the 1970s to transit the Panama Canal. In the 1990s, construction began on “post-Panamax” container ships, 
so named because the dimensions of these vessels were too large to permit them to pass through the Panama 
Canal. At present, a Panamax vessel can carry containerized cargo of up to 4,800 TEUs in volume, whereas a 
post-Panamax vessel may transport as much as 10,000 TEUs of cargo. Designs are underway for the 
construction of “mega-container ships,” that will have cargo-carrying capacity of up to 18,000 TEUs.  
65
UNCTAD, Review of Maritime Transport 2006, 2007, 116; industry official, e-mail message to 
Commission staff, September 30, 2008.  
66
EIU, “Resources and Infrastructure,” September 7, 2007; Pedersen, “Freight Transport under 
Globalization,” 2001, 93; and government official, interview by Commission staff, Mombasa, Kenya, 
October 27, 2008. Aside from Ghana, other SSA countries such as Kenya and Tanzania have developed 
inland cargo handling and storage facilities, also known as container freight stations, as a means of alleviating 
congestion at coastal ports. 
67
Government official, interview by Commission staff, Mombasa, Kenya, October 27, 2008. 
68
PMAESA, “KPA Reaps from ICT Advantages,” 2008, 46. 
69
Government official, interview by Commission staff, Mombasa, Kenya, October 27, 2008. 
70
Government official, interview by Commission staff, Durban, South Africa, October 17, 2008. 
4-14
Bibliography 
Africa News. “Ghana: ECOWAS Has Done Well, Says Minister,” September 18, 2008.  
Aldrick, Katy. Drewry Shipping Consultants, Ltd. “The Global Container Port Industry: Implications for 
Africa?” Presented at the 6th Intermodal Africa 2008 Conference, Accra, Ghana, February 28, 
2008. 
American Association of Port Authorities (AAPA). “World Port Ranking: 2006,” undated. 
http://www.aapa.org
(accessed January 5, 2009). 
A.P.-Moller/Maersk Group. “The A.P. Moller/Maersk Group Confirms Announcement by Safmarine.” 
News release, November 2, 1999. 
http://media.maersk.com/en/PressReleases/1999/Pages/TheAPMollerMaerskGroupconfirmsanno
uncementbySafmarine.asp
 
Arvis, Jean-François, Gaël Raballand, and Jean-François Marteau. “The Cost of Being Landlocked: 
Logistics Costs and Supply Chain Reliability.” World Bank Policy Research Working Paper no. 
4258, June 2007. 
Banker. “Angola: The Slow and Steady Road to Prosperity,” August 1, 2008.  
Byrnes, Rita M., ed. “Ports and Shipping.” South Africa: A Country Study. Federal Research Division. 
Library of Congress, May 1996. http://www.country-data.com/frd/cs/zatoc.html#za0094
CargoSystems. “South Africa: Coping With Growth,” May 2003. 
Degerlund, Jane, ed. Containerization International Yearbook, 2008. London: Lloyd’s MIU, 2008. 
Dickenson, Daniel. “Tanzanian Port Has Big Aspirations.” BBC News, April 1, 2003.  
Esnor, Linda. “Lurching from One Crisis to Another.” Business Day (South Africa), November 6, 2006.  
Federal Maritime Commission (FMC). 45th Annual Report, Fiscal Year 2006. Washington, DC: FMC, 
2006. 
Ford, Neil. “East African Waterways Offer Cheap and Easy Transport.” African Business via BNET.com 
August–September 2007. http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa5327/is_/ai_n29371028
Furlonger, David. “Harbors—1. Grinding Out Growth.” Financial Mail (South Africa), December 21, 
2007.  
Good, Nicola. “South Africa Still Stalled Over Ports.” Lloyd’s List, April 27, 2004.  
Harding, Alan, Gylfi Pálsson, and Gaël Raballand. “Port and Maritime Transport Challenges in West and 
Central Africa.” Appendix 1: Geographical Classification of African Countries. World Bank Sub-
Saharan Africa Transport Policy Program (SSATP) Working Paper no. 84, May 2007. 
Hutchinson Whampoa Limited. “Hutchinson Port Holdings Acquires Overseas Assets of International 
Container Terminal Services, Inc.” News release, May 28, 2001. http://www.irasia.com
4-15
“Intermodal Transportation and Terminal Operations.” Transportation Logistics course presentation, 
University of Washington, spring 2008.  
Kenya Ports Authority (KPA). 2008–09 Handbook. Mombasa, Kenya: KPA, 2008. 
Kunaka, Charles. World Bank Sub-Saharan Africa Transport Policy Program (SSATP). “Ports and 
Corridor Performance.” Presented at the Port Congestion Workshop sponsored by the Port 
Management Association of East and Southern Africa (PMAESA), Mombasa, Kenya, 
September  26, 2008.  
Lloyd’s List. “Durban Bursting at the Seams; Congestion Is a Major Issue As Peak Season Looms at 
Africa’s Busiest Port,” October 19, 2007.  
———. “The Maritime Route to Prosperity: Study Links Port Access to Economic Welfare,” June 18, 
2008.  
———. “Mombasa Gets Box Jam Lifeline from Andersen,” August 12, 2008.  
———“Peel Strips its Activity with Sale of Maputo Stake,” January 3, 2008.  
———“Privatisation on Cards for Mombasa: Maersk Chief’s Talks with Kenyan Vice-President Fuel 
Local Speculation,” July 23, 2008.  
———. “Singapore’s Connections Put It on Top of the World: Asian Maritime and Logistics Hub Wins 
World Bank’s Vote after Survey of 150 Countries,” November 12, 2007.  
———. “Success Story of Apapa,” July 17, 2008.  
———. “World Bank Guarantee for Djibouti Box Terminal,” July 17, 2008. 
Mike Mundy Associates and Ocean Shipping Consultants. “Africa Infrastructure Diagnostic Study: Port 
Sector.” Presented at the 6th Intermodal Africa 2008 Conference, Accra, Ghana, February 28, 
2008. 
North Carolina State Ports. Port of Wilmington. “Container Productivity Increases.” News release, 
June  23, 2005. http://ncports.com
Osler, David. “African Ambition: With Many African Economies Now Growing at a Steady Rate, What 
Role Can the Maritime Industries Have in Ensuring the Often Volatile Continent Reaches Its Full 
Potential?” Lloyd’s List, April 25, 2008.  
Pedersen, Poul Ove. “Freight Transport under Globalization and Its Impact on Africa.” Journal of 
Transport Geography 9 (2001): 85–99. 
Port Management Association of Eastern & Southern Africa (PMAESA). “Maputo: Meeting 
Expectations.” Our Ports 4, no. 1, 2008. 
———. “KPA Reaps from ICT Advantages.” Our Ports 4, no. 1, 2008. 
Pringle, Chanel. “African Ports Lack Capacity to Meet Growing Demand.” Engineering News Online, 
June 4, 2008. http://www.engineeringnews.co.za
4-16
Radebe, Jeff. “The State of Transport in Africa.” Presented at the International Transport Convention 
2005, Limpopo Province, South Africa, May 16, 2005.  
Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU). “Resources and Infrastructure: Transport, Communications and the 
Internet.” Country Profile Select, September 7, 2007.  
Sambu, Zeddy. “Tanzania: Dar Port Delays Strain Cargo Clearance.” Business Daily (Kenya), 
December  5, 2007. http://www.afrika.no/noop/page.php?p=Detailed/15571&print=1
UNCTAD. “African Ports: Reform and the Role of the Private Sector.” UNCTAD/SDTE/TLB/5, 
March  31, 2003. 
———. “Comparative Analysis of Deregulation, Commercialization and Privatization of  Ports.” 
UNCTAD/SDD/PORT/3, May 24, 1995. 
———. Review of Maritime Transport 2006. New York and Geneva: UNCTAD, 2007. 
U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). “Port Congestion in Africa: Implications for 
Competitiveness and Economic Growth.” Trade Developments, September 2005. 
U.S. Department of State. U.S. Embassy, Nairobi. “GOK Advances Pro-Business Agenda (Nairobi 
002039),” August 28, 2008. 
U.S. Department of State. U.S. Embassy, Port Louis. “USITC Study on Sub-Saharan Africa: Effects of 
Infrastructure Conditions on Export Competitiveness (Port Louis 00346),” October 2, 2008. 
U.S. International Trade Commission (USITC). Hearing transcript in connection with inv. no. 332-477, 
Sub-Saharan Africa: Effects of Infrastructure Conditions on Export Competitiveness, Third 
Annual Report, October 28, 2008. 
World Bank. Can Africa Claim the 21st Century? Washington, DC: World Bank, 2000. 
———. “Module 2: The Evolution of Ports in a Competitive World.” Port Reform Toolkit, Second 
Edition, 2007. Washington, DC: World Bank, 2007. 
———. “Module 3: Alternative Port Management Structures and Ownership Models.” Port Reform 
Toolkit, Second Edition, 2007. Washington, DC: World Bank, 2007. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested