Bibliography 
Activision Blizzard. “Form 10-K.” Annual report for Securities and Exchange Commission, February 22, 
2013. http://www.sec.gov/Archives/edgar/data/718877/000104746913001506/a2213119z10-
k.htm
Bloom, Nicholas, Raffaella Sadun, and John Van Reenen. “Americans Do IT Better: US Multinationals 
and the Productivity Miracle.” American Economic Review 102, no. 1 (2012): 167–201. 
Borga, Maria, and Jennifer Koncz-Bruner. “Trends in Digitally-Enabled Trade in Services.” U.S. 
Department of Commerce. U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, 
2012. http://www.bea.gov/international/pdf/trends_in_digitally_enabled_services.pdf.  
Bureau Van Dijk. Zephyr database (accessed April 2013). 
Cisco, “The Zettabyte Era—Trends and Analysis,” white paper, 
2013, http://www.cisco.com/en/US/solutions/collateral/ns341/ns525/ns537/ns705/ns827/VNI_Hy
perconnectivity_WP.pdf (accessed July 5, 2013). 
Drucker, Jesse. “The Tax Haven That’s Saving Google Billions.” Bloomberg Businessweek, October 21, 
2010. http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/10_44/b4201043146825.htm
Economist. “Alibaba: The World’s Greatest Bazaar; Alibaba, a Trailblazing Chinese Internet Giant, Will 
Soon Go Public,” March 23, 2013. http://www.economist.com/news/briefing/21573980-alibaba-
trailblazing-chinese-internet-giant-will-soon-go-public-worlds-greatest-bazaar
———. “The Alibaba Phenomenon: China’s e-Commerce Giant Could Generate Enormous Wealth—
Provided the Country’s Rulers Leave It Alone,” March 23, 
2013. http://www.economist.com/news/leaders/21573981-chinas-e-commerce-giant-could-
generate-enormous-wealthprovided-countrys-rulers-leave-it
Etsy. Post-hearing brief submitted to the U.S. International Trade Commission in connection with inv. 
nos. TA-332-531 and TA-332-540, Digital Trade in the U.S. and Global Economies: Part 1
March 14, 2013. 
Facebook. “Form 10-K, Usermetrics4.” Annual report for Securities and Exchange Commission, January 
29, 2013. http://www.sec.gov/Archives/edgar/data/1326801/000132680113000003/fb-
12312012x10k.htm
Feenstra, Robert, Robert Lipsey, Lee Branstetter, Fritz Foley, James Harrigan, Bradford Jensen, Lori 
Kletzer, Catherine Mann, Peter Schott, and Greg Wright. Report on the State of Available Data 
for the Study of International Trade and Foreign Direct Investment.” National Bureau of 
Economic Research. NBER Working Papers 16254, 2010http://www.nber.org/papers/w16254
Financial Times fDi Intelligence. “Improving the Quality of Foreign Direct Investment to Northern 
Ireland: Executive Summary.” FT Business. FDiIntelligence, July 2012. 
Financial Times. fDi Markets database. www.fdimarkets.com (accessed various dates). 
4-25 
Pdf thumbnails in - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
pdf reader thumbnails; how to view pdf thumbnails in
Pdf thumbnails in - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
pdf file thumbnail preview; .pdf printing in thumbnail size
Google. “Form 10-K.” Annual report for Securities and Exchange Commission, January 29, 
2013. http://www.sec.gov/Archives/edgar/data/1288776/000119312513028362/d452134d10k.ht
m
Gresser, Edward. “Lines of Light: Data Flows as a Trade Policy Concept.” Progressive Economy, May 8, 
2012. http://www.globalworksfoundation.org/Documents/data.paper.final.pdf.  
Ibarra-Caton, Marilyn, and Charu Sharma. “U.S. International Services: Cross-Border Trade in 2011 and 
Services Supplied through Affiliates in 2010.” U.S. Department of Commerce. Bureau of 
Economic Analysis, October 
2012. http://www.bea.gov/scb/pdf/2012/10%20October/1012_initernational_services.pdf
IBM. “IBM to Acquire Cognos to Accelerate Information on Demand Business Initiative.” Press release, 
November 12, 2007. http://www-03.ibm.com/press/us/en/pressrelease/22572.wss. 
International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI). Digital Music Report 2012: Expanding 
Choice; Going Global, 2012. http://www.ifpi.org/content/library/dmr2012.pdf
International Monetary Fund (IMF). “Balance of Payments and International Investment Position Manual, 
Sixth Edition (BPM6),” August 
2011. http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/bop/2007/bopman6.htm
Jenks, Rochelle.“Domestically Funding International Growth: The Netflix Strategy.” Seeking Alpha, 
March 21, 2013. http://seekingalpha.com/article/1293701-domestically-funding-international-
growth-the-netflix-strategy (accessed April 4, 2013). 
Kleinbard, Edward D. “Stateless Income.” Florida Tax Review 11(2011): 699-783. 
LeDuc, David. Software and Information Industry Association (SIIA). Post-hearing brief, submitted to 
the U.S. International Trade Commission in connection with inv. nos. TA-332-531 and TA-332-
540, Digital Trade in the U.S. and Global Economies: Part 1 and Part 2, March 14, 2013. 
Lee-Makiyama, Hosuk. European Centre for International Political Economy. Post-hearing brief 
submitted to the U.S. International Trade Commission in connection with inv. nos. TA-332-531 
and TA-332-540, Digital Trade in the U.S. and Global Economies: Part 1 and Part 2, March 27, 
2013. 
LinkedIn. “Form 10-K.” Annual report for Securities and Exchange Commission, February 19, 
2013. http://www.sec.gov/Archives/edgar/data/1271024/000127102413000010/lnkd12312012-
10kdoc.htm
Mandel, Michael. “Data, Trade, and Growth.” Progressive Policy Institute, March 28, 
2013. http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2241302
Mann, Catherine. “Globalization of Information Technology Services: Challenges and Opportunities for 
Massachusetts.” Powerpoint presentation for MassEcon, June 2012. 
———. Statement to the United States Senate Committee on Finance. International Trade in the Digital 
Age: Data Analysis and Policy Issues, November 18, 
2010. http://www.finance.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/111810cmtest.pdf
4-26 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Ability to show PDF page thumbnails for quick navigation. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. Navigate PDF document with thumbnails. 14. Text Search.
pdf thumbnail creator; create thumbnail from pdf c#
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Ability to show PDF page thumbnails for quick navigation. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. Navigate PDF document with thumbnails. 14. Text Search.
pdf thumbnail preview; show pdf thumbnail in
Microsoft. “Microsoft to Acquire Skype.” Press release, May 10, 2011. http://www.microsoft.com/en-
us/news/press/2011/may11/05-10CorpNewsPR.aspx.  
Netflix. “Form 10-K.” Annual report for Securities and Exchange Commission, February 1, 
2013. http://www.sec.gov/Archives/edgar/data/1065280/000106528013000008/nflx1231201210k
doc.htm
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Service: 268: Other Business 
Services 
database. http://stats.oecd.org/OECDStat_Metadata/ShowMetadata.ashx?Dataset=TISP&Coords=
%5bSER%5d.%5b268%5d&ShowOnWeb=true&Lang=en (accessed April 2013). 
OECD. Statistics on International Trade in Services database. 2012. http://www.oecd-
ilibrary.org/trade/data/oecd-statistics-on-international-trade-in-services_tis-data-en (accessed 
July 1, 2013). 
Shinal, John. “LinkedIn’s Diverse Revenue Stream Is Its Strength.” USA Today, February 18, 
2013. http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/columnist/2013/02/17/linked-in-facebook-zynga-
groupon/1923379/
Stewart, Steven. IBM. Pre-hearing brief submitted to the U.S. International Trade Commission in 
connection with inv. nos. TA-332-531 and TA-332-540, Digital Trade in the U.S. and Global 
Economies: Part 1 and Part 2, March 7, 2013. 
Symantec. “Symantec to Extend Online Services with Acquisition of MessageLabs,” October 8, 
2008. http://www.symantec.com/about/news/release/article.jsp?prid=20081008_02
United Nations. “Manual on Statistics of International Trade in Services 2010,” 
2012. http://unstats.un.org/unsd/tradeserv/tfsits/msits2010/docs/MSITS%202010%20M86%20(E)
%20web.pdf 
United Nations Committee on Trade and Development (UNCTAD). Information Economy Report 2009: 
Trends and Outlook in Turbulent Times, 2009. http://unctad.org/en/Doc/ier2009_en.pdf
U.S. Department of Commerce (USDOC). Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA). “BE-120 (12-
2006).” https://www.bea.gov/surveys/pdf/be120.pdf (accessed June 2013). 
———. U.S. International Services database. http://bea.gov/international/international_services.htm 
(accessed April 22, 2013). 
U.S. Department of Commerce (USDOC). U.S. Census Bureau. “U.S. Selected Services Revenue—Total 
and E-Commerce: 1998-2010,” Table 4. Released May 10, 
2012. http://www.census.gov/econ/estats/2010/all2010tables.html
U.S. International Trade Commission (USITC). Hearing transcript in connection with inv. nos. TA-332-
531 and TA-332-540, Digital Trade in the U.S. and Global Economies: Part 1 and Part 2
March 7, 2013. 
———. Property and Casualty Insurance Services. USITC Publication 4068. Washington, DC: USITC, 
2009. 
4-27 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Embedded page thumbnails.
create thumbnail jpeg from pdf; no pdf thumbnails in
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Support of converting from any single one PDF page and multiple pages. Thumbnails can be created from PDF pages. Support for customizing image size.
program to create thumbnail from pdf; enable pdf thumbnails in
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Embedded page thumbnails.
create pdf thumbnails; pdf preview thumbnail
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. PDF thumbnails for navigation in .NET project.
print pdf thumbnails; show pdf thumbnails
CHAPTER 5  
Notable Barriers and Impediments to Digital 
Trade  
Industry participants and experts who were consulted at the Commission’s hearing and in 
fieldwork pointed to the following categories of nontariff measures (NTMs) that may 
operate as barriers or impediments to digital trade.  
Localization measures: These are defined as measures that compel companies to 
conduct certain digital trade-related activities within a country’s borders. They include 
policies that require data servers to be located in-country; policies requiring local content; 
and government procurement preferences and technology standards that favor local 
digital companies. These policies limit market access and may result in higher costs and 
sub-optimal processes for U.S. firms. 
Data privacy and protection measures: Divergent approaches to data privacy and 
protection, particularly as regards the United States and the European Union (EU), 
reportedly impose substantial costs and uncertainty on firms, especially small and 
medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).  Industry representatives across  digital industries 
highlighted  the  need  to  find  common  ground  and  interoperability  in  regulatory 
approaches to data privacy and protection. 
Intellectual property rights (IPR)-related measures: Representatives of digital content 
providers and of Internet intermediaries
1
reported substantial, although different, IPR-
related concerns. Representatives of the content industries—including software, music, 
movies, books and journals, and video games—identified Internet piracy as the single 
most important barrier to digital trade for their industries. By contrast, representatives of 
intermediaries were concerned about being held liable for the intellectual property-
infringing or illegal conduct of users of their systems. Both content providers and 
intermediaries stressed the importance  of laws—like the U.S.  Digital Millennium 
Copyright Act (DCMA) and Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act (CDA)—
that properly balance their respective rights and responsibilities, and raised concerns 
about the lack of clear frameworks in some other countries.  
Censorship measures: Representatives of Internet intermediaries and digital content 
providers reported that online censorship of digital content and platforms is pervasive and 
growing. Digital content representatives noted that onerous content review systems in 
China  and  Vietnam,  for  example,  shorten  the window  period  for  the legitimate 
distribution  of  digital  products  and  cede  the  market  to  pirated  content. Internet 
intermediaries compared the blocking and filtering of online platforms and content to 
customs officials stopping all goods from a particular company at the border; the negative 
economic effects can be substantial. 
1
This chapter adopts the OECD’s definition of Internet intermediaries to include firms that bring 
together or facilitate transactions on the Internet by giving access to, hosting, transmitting, and indexing 
content, products, and services originated by third parties. OECD, The Economic and Social Role
April 2010, 9. 
5-1 
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Converter control easy to create thumbnails from PDF pages. Selection for compressing to multiple image formats. Cut and paste any areas in PDF pages to images.
create pdf thumbnail; pdf thumbnail
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. PDF thumbnails for navigation in .NET WPF Console application
view pdf thumbnails; generate pdf thumbnail c#
Border measures and limits on immigration: Internet intermediaries also noted that 
traditional impediments—such as border measures and regulatory complexity—can 
substantially impede online business, particularly that of SMEs. Some firms in the digital 
sector also noted difficulties associated with immigration restrictions. 
While the request letter for this investigation seeks information on notable barriers and 
impediments  to  digital  trade,  many  experts  consulted  also  identified  affirmative 
principles necessary to foster the growth of digital industries and the dynamism of the 
Internet. First, and most importantly, experts stated that the free flow of data and 
information within and across countries should be the norm; any necessary restrictions 
should comply with existing trade disciplines such as non-discrimination, national 
treatment, transparency, and proportionality. Next, experts stated that regulations should 
strive for common ground across countries to minimize burdens on digital industries, 
particularly  SMEs.  Moreover,  Internet  governance  should  be  consensus-driven, 
transparent, and based on input from all stakeholders to foster the trust that the Internet 
will work as expected—a trust that is required for digital trade to flourish.  
Digital Trade Localization Measures  
Government  measures  that  compel  digital  companies  to  use  local  data  servers, 
technology, and inputs, or that offer procurement preferences to local companies, may 
limit the ability of foreign companies to compete in the country implementing the 
measure.
2
A measure that requires the use of local inputs for digital products and services 
may force companies to exit the market or limit their supply chain options. When 
companies find local inputs or local operations to be cost-effective or strategic, they 
localize without the need for a government requirement. Thus, government measures of 
this type may create “localization barriers to digital trade” (box 5.1). 
Localization barriers to digital trade are evolving in step with the growth of digital 
products and services.
3
Many of the measures have operated only for a short time, have 
not been clarified, and reportedly are applied unequally and unpredictably.
4
As one 
observer noted: “These  internet  restrictions  are also  frequently vague, not  easily 
understood and are administered in an arbitrary and non-transparent manner.”
5
To 
organize the analysis in this chapter, the measures are divided into three categories: those 
that require companies to store data locally; those that mandate or encourage certain 
levels of local content; and those that provide government procurement preferences to 
local firms in the digital sectors (table 5.1). 
2
USITC, hearing transcript, March 7, 2013, 25, 38, 70, 157, 161, 186, 216, 232, 318 (testimony of 
Stephen Ezell, Information Technology & Innovation Foundation; of Joshua Meltzer, Brookings; of Jake 
Colvin, National Foreign Trade Council; of Ed Black, Computer & Communications Industry Association; 
and of David LeDuc, Software & Information Industry Association); ITIF, written testimony submitted to the 
USITC, March 7, 2013, 1; BRT, “Promoting Economic Growth,” 2012, 2–8.  
CCIA, written comments to the USTR, May 20, 2013, 6. 
4
Industry representative, cited in Berry and Reisman, “Policy Challenges of Cross-Border Cloud 
Computing,” 2012, 26.
Meltzer, “The Internet, Cross-Border Data Flows,” February 2013, 9. 
5-2 
BOX 5.1  Defining localization barriers to digital trade 
e 
There is not an established definition for localization barriers to digital trade. In submissions to the USITC, industry 
representatives and experts used the terms “forced localization,” “local data storage requirements,” “local content,” 
and “localization barriers to trade” interchangeably. However, these terms generally are not limited to measures that 
target the transmission or storage of data. For many years, governments have imposed local-content requirements in 
such areas as information technology and renewable energy in an attempt to foster the growth of domestic industries. 
Thus, USTR broadly defines the term “localization barriers to trade” as: 
[M]easures designed to protect, favor, or stimulate domestic industries, service providers, and/or 
intellectual property (IP) at the expense of goods, services, or IP from other countries. Localization 
barriers are measures that can serve as disguised trade barriers when they unreasonably 
differentiate between domestic and foreign products, services, IP, or suppliers, and may or may not 
be consistent with WTO rules.  
While localization barriers to trade may encompass a wide range of protectionist measures, this study will use the 
term “localization barriers to digital trade” to refer to those measures that have been applied to the digital sector. 
_____________ 
Sources: USTR website, “Localization Barriers to Trade,” http://www.ustr.gov/trade-topics/localization-barriers   
(accessed May 6, 2013); World Trade Organization (WTO) website, “Glossary: Local-Content 
Measure,” http://www.wto.org/english/thewto_e/glossary_e/local_content_measure_e.htm (accessed May 6, 2013). 
TABLE 5.1  Selected examples of localization barriers to digital trade 
Subject matter 
Country 
Source 
Requires local storage of data  
data  
Argentina, Australia, Canada, China, 
Greece, Indonesia, and Venezuela 
BSA, BRT, Cate, Citi 
Citi 
Mandates or encourages local content 
Australia, Brazil, China, India, and certain 
in 
EU member states 
USTR, BSA, BRT, MPAA 
MPAA 
Provides government procurement 
preferences to local digital firms 
Brazil, Canada, China, India, Nigeria, 
Paraguay, and Venezuela 
USTR, BRT 
Source: USTR, 2013 National Trade Estimate Report on Foreign Trade Barriers, 2013; BSA, Lockout,” June 2012
2012, 
9; Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), “Trade Barriers,” October 15, 2012, 2; Citi, written submission to 
the USITC, March 14, 2013, 2; BRT, “Promoting Economic Growth,” 2012, 5–6; Cate, “Provincial Canadian 
Geographic Restrictions,” 2008, 1. 
Localization  barriers to digital trade  are distinguished from companies’ voluntary 
decision to localize to lower costs, to get access to the best talent or resources, or to 
ensure that they meet the needs of consumers in the market.
6
For example, for companies 
that provide digital services over the Internet, using servers that are geographically closer 
to the user reduces latency and lowers the probability of  dropped or disordered 
information packets.
7
Thus, providers of cloud services locate servers where they make 
sense logistically and economically.
8
For digital content producers, localization may be 
necessary because “It’s not enough just to translate. The game needs to be adapted for 
each market,” according to the founder of a Russian game company.
9
Unlike these 
localization strategies, which are driven by companies’ economic needs, measures that 
explicitly or implicitly require a company to use local digital products and services often 
thwart optimal business decisions and distort trade. 
6
Industry official, interview by USITC staff, San Francisco, CA, April 16, 2013. 
7
USITC, hearing transcript, March 7, 2013, 45–46 (testimony of Michael Mandel, Progressive Policy 
Institute). “Latency” is the total time it takes a data packet to travel across a network connection. 
8
BSA, written comments to USTR, May 10, 2013. Cloud computing is discussed in chapter 2. 
Khrennikov, “Zynga of Russia That Doesn’t Want to Be,” Bloomberg, November 28, 2012. 
5-3 
Companies Have Had to Localize Data Servers to Comply with 
Policies  
Several countries require companies to store or maintain data on local servers, either 
explicitly or implicitly.
10
Explicit policies state that companies must keep data within the 
country where the data was collected. Implicit policies compel companies to store data on 
local servers by requiring, for example, that data be available for regulators to review, 
which effectively means that the data must be stored in-country. Both types of policies 
are often justified by governments as necessary to protect data privacy and/or the security 
of  systems;  however,  local  data  requirements  also  may  “serve  as  thinly  veiled 
protectionism.”
11
An example of a law that explicitly requires the local storage of data is Greek Law No. 
3917/2011, Article 6, which implements the requirements of the EU’s Data Retention 
Directive.
12
The EU directive requires Internet and telecommunications service providers 
to retain certain data about a subscriber, largely about their communications by phone 
and over the Internet.
13
However, the Greek law goes farther by also requiring that the 
retained data on “traffic and location” stay “within the premises of the Hellenic 
territory.”
14
The European Commission is “aware that the law imposes restrictions on 
electronic communications service providers regarding the geographic location of data 
generation and storage, which has an economic effect on these providers and limits their 
freedom to organise their business,” and has stated that it will take appropriate action if 
deemed necessary.
15
Data  localization  requirements  that  governments  justify  on  data  privacy  grounds 
reportedly are found in many countries.
16
For example, two Canadian provinces, British 
Columbia and Nova Scotia, have laws requiring that health records be stored in Canada 
and not moved to any other jurisdiction.
17
The provinces passed the laws in response to 
the perception that the USA PATRIOT Act would allow the U.S. government to access 
personal data about Canadian citizens.
18
Similarly, Australia’s Personally Controlled 
Electronic Health Records Act of 2012 prohibits the overseas storage of any Australian 
electronic health records, without regard to actual risks or safeguards of data storage.
19
Laws or policies that implicitly require the localization of data servers for the security of 
financial information or systems infrastructure can be challenging to identify because 
10
USITC, hearing transcript, March 7, 2013, 25, 38, 70, 157, 161, 186, 216, 232, 318 (testimony of 
Stephen Ezell, Information Technology & Innovation Foundation; of Joshua Meltzer, Brookings; of Jake 
Colvin, National Foreign Trade Council; of Ed Black, Computer & Communications Industry Association; 
and of David LeDuc, Software & Information Industry Association); ITIF, written testimony to the USITC, 
March 7, 2013, 1; BRT, “Promoting Economic Growth,”2012, 2–8.  
11
CCIA, written comments to USTR, May 20, 2013, 6; BRT, “Promoting Economic Growth,” 2012, 7.
12
Tsolias, “Privacy, Data Retention and Data Protection,” January 9, 2013; Law 3917/2011, Official 
Gazette of the Hellenic Republic, 22A/2011.  
13
Electronic Freedom Foundation website, https://www.eff.org/issues/mandatory-data-retention/eu 
(accessed May 2, 2013).  
14
Greek Law No. 3917/2011, art. 6. A summary of the law is available in Tsolias, “Privacy, Data 
Retention and Data Protection,” January 9, 2013. 
15
European Commission, “Written Response to Parliamentary Question,” June 14, 2011. 
16
BRT, “Promoting Economic Growth,” 2012, 5–6.  
17
British Columbia, Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Amendment Act, 2004. 
18
Cate, “Provincial Canadian Geographic Restrictions,” 2008, 3. 
19
USITC, hearing transcript, March 7, 2013, 27 (testimony of Stephen Ezell, Information Technology 
and Innovation Foundation); BRT, “Promoting Economic Growth,” 2012, 5; USTR, 2013 National Trade 
Estimate, 2013, 31. 
5-4 
localization requirements may arise only in practice, as companies seek to comply with 
other requirements. In the financial sector, for example, data may have to be stored 
locally to comply with government requirements related to regulatory supervision and 
ensuring continuity of operations.
20
Thus, Venezuela and Argentina limit offshore data 
processing, and China allows offshore data processing only for a bank’s corporate 
customers.
21
Indonesia’s National Bank requires that banks obtain its approval before 
any cross-border personal data transfers may occur.
22
Industry participants have focused on the harms caused by such measures. The rules can 
constrain foreign digital companies’ ability to choose where and how to store data; 
prevent companies from operating in the market; force local data storage; or require the 
restructuring of operations to comply with data requirements.
23
However, determining 
whether the measure is intended to disfavor foreign firms or achieve prudential policy 
outcomes can be challenging. In some cases, governments offer prudential reasons for 
their rules, but do not narrowly tailor them to address the concern. For example, the 
Australian and Canadian rules on health records described above apply a blanket 
requirement that certain personal data be stored in-country. By contrast, the United 
States,  which  also  provides  strong  rules  for  the  treatment  of  “protected  health 
information” under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 
(HIPAA),  allows  cross-border  transfer  if  administrative,  physical,  and  technical 
safeguards are provided.
24
Thus, the U.S. law addresses prudential concerns through a 
risk-based approach, while the Canadian and Australian measures apply a location-based 
approach. As noted by industry participants, while the objectives of these measures may 
be driven by prudential policy concerns, the means by which they are obtained must also 
be carefully considered to avoid forcing the use of local data servers.
25
Certain Local-Content Policies Extend to Digital Industries  
In some cases, governments have expressly required that companies use a specified 
percentage or quota of local digital inputs or include digital content from the country 
implementing the law. Nigeria’s Local Content Development Act of 2010 provides an 
example (box 5.2) of a broad measure that covers many sectors, including digital 
products  and  services.  As  previously  discussed,  these  measures  may  constrain 
companies’ supply chain choices, drive sub-optimal business decisions, or limit markets. 
Security-related measures also can favor local industries or set thresholds for use of local 
content. For example, China’s Multi-Level Protection Scheme  (MLPS) applies to 
banking, energy, telecommunications,  education, and  transportation.
26
The  MLPS 
ostensibly aims to protect data in networks related to sensitive infrastructure, assigning 
all software information systems a value based on their importance to “national security,
20
Citi, written submission to the USITC, March 14, 2013, 2. 
21
Ibid. 
22
This requirement is contained in Regulation No. 7/15/PBI/2007 on the Implementation of Risk 
Management in the Utilization of Information Technology. DLA Piper, “Data Protection Laws of the World,” 
March 2012, 108. 
23
BRT, “Promoting Economic Growth,” 2012, 7. 
24 
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services website, HIPAA, The Security Rule, 
http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/hipaa/administrative/securityrule/index.html (accessed May 2, 2013).
25
BRT, “Promoting Economic Growth,” 2012, 7. 
26
USITC, China: Effects of Intellectual Property Infringement, May 2011, 5-30. 
5-5 
BOX 5.2  Nigeria’s Local Content Development Act of 2010: Impact on digital products and services 
rvices 
Nigeria’s Oil and Gas Sector Local Content Development Act of 2010 (the Act) imposes a localization requirement by 
mandating the use of Nigerian companies in a range of services sectors, including many services that are provided 
digitally. The Act, which builds upon previous localization efforts, establishes a Nigerian Content Development and 
Monitoring Board to enforce requirements for Nigerian content, defined as a specific percentage of total funds spent, 
labor hours, or input volume, for any operator in the oil and gas sector.  
For digitally traded services, the Act specifies that 50 percent of the amount spent on IT management consultancy 
services must be local. The same is true for data management services, while the figure rises to 60 percent for data 
and message transmitting services and to 100 percent for general banking, auditing, and life insurance services. 
These are all digital or digitally enabled services. 
The oil and gas sector is the primary contributor to Nigeria’s gross domestic product, so the Act has had a large 
impact on the country’s other business sectors, including suppliers of digital and digitally enabled services. The Board 
has granted exemptions to the requirements, and is reported to have missed previous targets because Nigeria cannot 
yet produce enough local products and services to fill the quotas. However, the government recently has reaffirmed 
its intent to enforce the requirements.  
_____________ 
Sources: Nigerian Content Development and Monitoring Board website, http://www.ncdmb.gov.ng/ (accessed June 4, 
2013); Amanze-Nwachuku, “Nigerian Content and Indigenous Participation,” September 14, 2010; Onwuemenyi, 
“Nigerian Content: Measuring the Gains,” May 1, 2012; Vanguard News, “Local Content Policy Has Created 30,000 
Jobs,” January 22, 2013. 
social order and economic interests.”
27
Any system assigned a value of three or higher 
(out of five possible levels) must be provided by a Chinese company, owned by Chinese 
citizens,  and  use  core  technology  based  on  Chinese  intellectual  property.
28
This 
requirement will exclude U.S. and foreign companies from providing digital services to 
large portions of the Chinese market, if (as reported) systems routinely are assigned a 
value of three or higher.
29
Audiovisual quotas provide another example of explicit local-content mandates that can 
reach digital products and services. Current laws in many countries place limits on the 
number of foreign films that can enter the market, or cap the percent of time that radio or 
television stations can play foreign content, or set a minimum play time for domestically 
produced content.
30
As  people  consume  more  media  online,  these  local-content 
requirements reportedly are expanding into the trade of digital products, such as movies, 
music, and e-books, to the detriment of U.S. companies selling their content in foreign 
markets.
31
For  example, the EU’s  2007 Audiovisual Media  Services  (AVMS) Directive  has 
expanded the scope of previous directives requiring preferences for European content to 
also reach on-demand or streaming video services.
32
Although the AVMS Directive does 
not set quotas for on-demand services, it does require member states to encourage 
27
BSA, “Lockout,” June 2012, 9. 
28
USITC, China: Effects of Intellectual Property Infringement, 5-30. 
29
At the 23rd U.S.-China Joint Commission on Commerce and Trade (JCCT) meeting in December 
2012, the Chinese government committed to revise the MLPS to address industry concerns. USTR, 2013 
Report on Technical Barriers to Trade, 2013, 54; USTR, “Fact Sheet: 23rd U.S.-China Joint Commission on 
Commerce and Trade,” 2012.  
30
USTR, 2013 National Trade Estimate Report, 2013. See examples from Australia, Brazil, Canada, 
China, EU (France, Italy, Poland, Spain), Korea, Malaysia, Sri Lanka, and Venezuela, among others. 
31
MPAA, USTR written comments, October 2012, 2. 
32
Ibid., 42. 
5-6 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested