production of and access to European works.
33
Different member states take different 
approaches to this mandate. For example, the Czech Republic, Spain, Italy, and Austria 
require on-demand services to maintain a quota of European works in their on-demand 
libraries, while Wallonia (in Belgium), the Czech Republic, Italy, and Spain require on-
demand services to contribute to the financing of European audiovisual works.
34
The 
effects  of  the  expansion  of  the  AVMS  Directive  to  new technologies and delivery 
systems remain unclear; the European Commission solicited comments from April to 
August 2013 on the EU’s future regulation of audiovisual content.
35
The promotion of local content in digitally delivered services is not limited to Europe. 
The Chinese Ministry of Culture reportedly has  classified online games as “cultural 
products” and has supported the domestic industry so effectively that today Chinese 
games account for an estimated two-thirds of the domestic market, an increase from 
30 percent in 2003.
36
The Australian government has reserved the right under the U.S.-
Australia FTA to impose content quotas to Internet-based services.
37
The expansion of 
local content rules to the digital sector threatens to increase costs or limit access for 
foreign companies.  
Some Government Procurement Rules Favor Locally Based Digital 
Services or Providers  
Some  trading  partners  are  using  public  procurement  to  support  their  local  digital 
companies.  The  WTO’s  plurilateral  Government  Procurement  Agreement  (GPA)  is 
focused on disciplining and maintaining an open market for public procurement.
38
In the 
evolving  digital  sector,  however,  governments  reportedly  are  using  a  variety  of 
justifications to limit public procurement to local companies. For example, Brazil, which 
is  not  a  signatory  to  the  GPA,  enacted  law  12.349/2010  to  allow  restriction  of 
procurement for strategic ICT goods and services to those developed domestically.
39
This 
requirement is further bolstered by Brazil’s “Bigger IT Plan,” which includes a price 
preference  in  procurement  for  software  products  certified  as  locally  developed.
40
Government  procurement  rules  are  often  combined  with  other  practices  that  create 
localization barriers to trade—for instance, in China, where the government employs a 
wide range of “indigenous innovation” tools (box 5.3). 
33
See Directive 2010/13/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 10 March 2010 on the 
coordination of certain provisions laid down by law, regulation or administrative action in Member States 
concerning the provision of audiovisual media services (Audiovisual Media Services Directive), art. 13. 
34 
European Commission, “Final Report on the Application of Articles 13, 16 and 17 of Directive 
2010/13/EU,” August 24, 2012, 5. 
35 
European Commission, “Green Paper: Preparing for a Fully Converged Audiovisual World,” 2013.  
36
China’s censorship regime also has contributed to the dominance of domestic firms, as discussed in 
the section on censorship measures. Economist, “Special Report,” April 6, 2013, 10. 
37
MPAA, USTR written comments, October 2012, 16; Australian Government, Department of Foreign 
Affairs and Trade website, http://www.dfat.gov.au/fta/ausfta/outcomes/01_overview.html (accessed April 30, 
2013). 
38
WTO website, “Government Procurement,” 
http://www.wto.org/english/tratop_e/gproc_e/gproc_e.htm (accessed May 4, 2013).  
39
Chaves, “Innovation Financing in Brazil,” May 30, 2012, 2. 
40
BSA, “Lockout,” June 2012, 5; BSA, written testimony to the USITC, February 28, 2013, 6. 
5-7 
Pdf thumbnail - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
cannot view pdf thumbnails in; pdf no thumbnail
Pdf thumbnail - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
thumbnail pdf preview; create pdf thumbnail image
BOX 5.3  Localization barriers to digital trade and indigenous innovation 
ation 
Unique technical standards, public procurement limitations, and state support all reportedly have been used to 
support domestic or “indigenous innovation” in China. These same measures may also operate as localization 
barriers to digital trade, in China and elsewhere.  
For example, industry participants are concerned that China’s practice of developing technical standards that are 
unique to China rather than adopting global standards, as well as the limitations it has placed on the participation of 
foreign companies in standards development, will be extended to cloud computing. In recent years, China has 
introduced a number of unique technical standards applicable to ICT products purchased in China, including efforts to 
develop a unique encryption standard called WAPI, a UHT/EUHT standard for wireless networks, and a mobile 
communication TD-SCDMA standard. There are indications that the use of unique standards is expanding to reach 
software  and  cloud-based systems.  For  instance, China’s  National  Information  Security  Standards  Technical 
Committee recently issued a document establishing domestic cloud computing standards: “Information Security 
Technology: Government Department Cloud Computing Service Provider Basic Security Requirements.”  
Another means by which China may be localizing digital products and services is by supporting companies located in 
China. According to the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF), the Chinese government “offers 
tax-breaks and low-cost office space to cloud computing companies that locate in Beijing.” The Chinese government 
has also launched a project, National Cloud Computing Pilot Cities, which offers procurement preferences to Chinese 
applicants for grants. The American Chamber of Commerce in China (Am-Cham China) reports that the Chinese 
government has granted billions of yuan to Chinese-based cloud computing projects. The Chinese government has 
not provided clear information about how foreign companies can participate in these projects, though it committed at 
a recent JCCT meeting to provide “fair and equitable access.” 
Such measures are not restricted to China. USTR’s Technical Barriers to Trade and National Trade Estimate reports 
identify other countries that use government procurement preferences, standards manipulation, and state support, 
among other measures, to bolster domestic companies. The French government reportedly is providing state support 
to national digital companies, and  the South African  government passed the Electronic  Communications and 
Transactions Law, which poses regulatory burdens on digital trade. India’s government passed a rule that requires 
government agencies to offer Preferential Market Access (PMA) for ICT goods that include a certain percentage of 
Indian content, though this rule applies only to physical products. 
_____________ 
Sources: USITC, China: Effects of Intellectual Property Infringement, May 2011; Breznitz and Murphee, The Rise of 
China in Technology Standards, January 16, 2013; USTR, Report on Technical Barriers to Trade, 2013; Castro 
(ITIF), Statement to the House Judiciary Intellectual Property, Competition and the Internet Subcommittee, July 25, 
2012; USTR, 2013 National Trade Estimate Report on Foreign Trade Barriers, 2013, 161, 334; Am-Cham China, 
“2013 White Paper,” 2013, 266–70. 
Data Privacy and Protection-Related Measures  
Companies in all industries must comply with privacy and data protection laws generally 
intended to  protect individuals’  personal  information.
41
Compliance  can  be  difficult 
because countries often do not apply the same legal framework to data protection and 
because data rarely stays in one location. Instead, online transactions may instantaneously 
transmit information around the world. Under these circumstances, determining which 
country’s laws govern particular transactions, and what legal requirements must be met, 
can be extremely difficult (box 5.4). 
41
The United States generally uses the term “data privacy” on the assumption that only private 
information can be protected. By contrast, Europe refers to the broader term “data protection,” which may 
extend to information that is in the public domain. U.S. government official, interview by USITC staff, 
Washington, DC, March 19, 2013. 
5-8 
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Word
As you see, you are allowed to define and control the size of thumbnail. DOCXDocument pdf = new DOCXDocument(@"C:\1.docx"); BasePage page = pdf.GetPage(0
pdf files thumbnail preview; create thumbnail from pdf
How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET.
view pdf thumbnails in; how to create a thumbnail of a pdf document
BOX 5.4  Privacy in the cloud: What laws apply? 
pply? 
Differences in data privacy laws across countries are often of major significance to cloud computing companies 
because the cloud is distributive in nature: data is collected, stored, used, processed, and duplicated in multiple 
places, often at the same time. For example, as Flaherty and Ruscio have explained: 
[A] Cloud Provider in the United States can be dealing with personal information of users in 
Canada and Australia, while utilizing data processors in India, who access the data on 
servers located in Uruguay, all of which is backed up on servers located in Ireland. 
Moreover, as Microsoft has noted, countries often make unpredictable assertions of jurisdiction with regard to cloud 
computing. Some take the view that only the country in which the data is stored has jurisdiction; others assert 
jurisdiction so long as the service is offered there or a user associated with the data resides there; still others base 
jurisdiction on the service provider’s place of business, regardless of where the data or users are located.  
Similarly, the Entertainment Software Association (ESA) has noted legal compliance challenges facing operators of 
cloud computing services in the video game industry. Different jurisdictions often impose different legal standards for 
law enforcement access, data retention, data security, censorship, and other requirements. For example, a company 
that complies with a law enforcement request from one country may risk violating the privacy laws of another country 
that also asserts jurisdiction over the data, putting the firm into a legal Catch-22. This unpredictability can depress 
interest in cloud computing and other innovations, and substantially limit the ability of cloud computing companies 
and their customers to do business in multiple markets. 
_____________ 
Source: Flaherty and Ruscio, “Stormy Weather,” 2012, 3–4; Microsoft, written comments to the U.S. Department of 
Commerce (USDOC), December 6, 2010, 3; ESA, written comments to the USDOC, December 6, 2010, 3. 
Countries Take Divergent Approaches to Data Privacy and 
Protection  
A key distinction among privacy regimes is whether the country has an omnibus law that 
applies across sectors or whether requirements vary by sector. The EU provides the 
primary example of the omnibus approach. By contrast, in the United States and other 
countries,  different laws govern data  protection in particular industries (table  5.2).
42
Because the U.S.-EU economic relationship is the world’s largest,
43
this difference in 
approach can create substantial difficulties for firms. 
Under the U.S. sectoral approach to privacy protection, the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act
44
regulates  how  financial  institutions  collect,  disclose,  share,  and  protect  personally 
identifiable financial information; the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability 
Act (HIPAA)
45
regulates the use and disclosure of protected health information; and the 
Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act of 1998
46
regulates online collection and use of 
the  personally  identifiable  information  of  children.
47
An  additional  important
42
The section on localization barriers to trade includes a discussion of particular requirements that 
different countries apply to health records.  
43
The U.S.-EU relationship accounts for approximately one–third of total goods and services trade and 
nearly half of global economic output. USTR website, http://www.ustr.gov/countries-regions/europe-middle-
east/europe/european-union (accessed May 30, 2013). See also chapter 4. 
44
Pub. L. No. 106-102, 113 Stat. 1338 (1999) (codified at 15. U.S.C. §§ 6801–6809). 
45
Pub. L. No. 104-191, 110 Stat. 1936 (1996) (codified as amended in scattered sections of 42 U.S.C. 
and 29 U.S.C.) 
46
Pub. L. No. 105-277, 112 Stat. 2681-728 (1998) (codified at 15 U.S.C. §§ 6501–6506). 
47
Wolf, written testimony to the USITC, March 7, 2013, 2.  
5-9 
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for PowerPoint
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for PowerPoint
generate pdf thumbnails; can't view pdf thumbnails
VB.NET Image: Program for Creating Thumbnail from Documents and
language. It empowers VB developers to create thumbnail from multiple document and image formats, such as PDF, TIFF, GIF, BMP, etc. It
how to make a thumbnail of a pdf; pdf first page thumbnail
TABLE 5.2  Diverse approaches to privacy, data protection, and breach notification 
Subject matter 
Country 
Source 
Sectoral approach to privacy/data protection 
Brazil, Dubai, Greenland, India, Singapore, Thailand, 
the United States, and Zimbabwe 
BSA 
Recognized by the EU as having adequate data 
protection 
Andorra, Argentina, Canada, the EU, Guernsey, 
Israel, Jersey, New Zealand, Switzerland, the Faroe 
Islands, the Isle of Man, and Uruguay 
BSA, 
USTR 
Privacy/data protection laws considered generally 
compatible with the APEC Privacy Framework 
Argentina, Australia, Canada, the EU, Japan, Korea, 
Malaysia, Mexico, Russia, Singapore, and the United 
States  
BSA, 
FTC 
Mandatory reporting of data breaches 
Austria, Germany, Norway, Spain, Mexico, the 
United Arab Emirates, the United States (46 states, 
the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. 
Virgin Islands) 
Nymity, 
Bevitt, 
BSA 
Sources: BSA, Global Cloud Computing Scorecard, 2013; USTR, National Trade Estimate2013; Nymity, “Sectoral 
, “Sectoral 
and Omnibus Privacy and Data Protection Laws,” 2012; Bevitt et al., “Dealing with Data Breaches,” 2012; and FTC, 
“FTC Becomes First Enforcement Authority,” July 26, 2012.  
characteristic of U.S. privacy law is the targeted enforcement of privacy requirements by 
the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the Department of Health and Human Services, 
and other federal and state regulators.
48 
In fact, based on the activist role of privacy 
regulators, and other aspects of the U.S. system, researchers have found a strong regime 
of “privacy on the ground” in the United States, notwithstanding the lack of an omnibus 
law.
49
By  contrast,  the  EU  has  a  regionwide  Data  Protection  Directive,  with  national 
implementing laws in all EU jurisdictions.
50
It allows the transmission of EU personal 
data to third countries only if the country is deemed to provide an adequate level of 
protection by reason of domestic law or international commitments.
51
The European 
Commission  has  found  that  only  a  handful  of  non-EU  countries  have  adequate 
protections (table 5.2).
52
Moreover, although the EU has a regionwide directive, each member state enacts its own 
implementing  laws.  These  laws  can  vary  greatly,  creating  inconsistency  and 
unpredictability  for  firms  seeking  to  transfer  data  within  the  EU  and  on  to  third 
countries.
53
Industry  representatives  state  that  addressing  the  “fragmentation, 
inconsistency, redundancy and procedural complexity” caused by different national data 
48
For example, the Attorney General of California and Amazon, Apple, Google, Hewlett-Packard, 
Microsoft, and Research in Motion recently reached a voluntary agreement that establishes a set of standards 
to improve privacy protections in mobile applications. Harris, “Privacy on the Go,” January 2013, 4; see also 
FTC, “FTC Staff Comments,” January 2011, 2, and Digital Trade Coalition, written comments to USTR, 
May 10, 2013, 3. 
49
“Privacy on the ground” means how corporations actually manage privacy and what motivates them. 
Bamberger and Mulligan, “Privacy on the Books and on the Ground,” 2011, 247; Wolf and Maxwell, “So 
Close, Yet So Far Apart,” Summer 2012, 9. 
50
Directive 95/46/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 24 October 1995 on the 
Protection of Individuals with regard to the Processing of Personal Data and on the Free Movement of Such 
Data. 
51
Wolf and Maxwell, “So Close, Yet So Far Apart,” Summer 2012, 9. 
52
European Commission, “Decisions on the Adequacy of Protection of Personal Data,” n.d. (accessed 
May 6, 2013). 
53
Wolf, written testimony to the USITC, March 7, 2013, 3; U.S. government officials, interview by 
USITC staff, Washington, DC, March 19, 2013; industry representatives, interviews by USITC staff, San 
Francisco, CA, April 16, 2013. 
5-10 
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Raster
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Raster.
pdf files thumbnails; enable pdf thumbnails
Create Thumbnail in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
or Images; Create Thumbnail; Generate Barcodes on Your Documents; Read Barcodes from Your Documents. Multi-page Tiff Processing; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading
pdf thumbnail generator; how to make a thumbnail from pdf
protection requirements within the EU should be a priority of the of the Transatlantic 
Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) negotiations.
54
Another  comprehensive approach  to  privacy regulation  is  found  in  the  Asia-Pacific 
Economic Cooperation (APEC) Privacy Framework, endorsed by APEC members in 
2004.
55
The framework includes nine high-level principles governing the collection, use, 
and  handling  of  personally  identifiable  information.
56
According  to  the  USDOC’s 
Internet Policy Task Force, it is a useful model for groups of countries with common 
values but sometimes  divergent policy frameworks.
57
Countries identified  as having 
privacy regimes that are generally compatible with the APEC framework are listed in 
table 5.2. 
Witnesses  at  the  Commission’s  hearing  stressed  the  importance  of  achieving 
“interoperability”  among  countries’  varying  privacy  regimes.
58
In  contrast  to 
harmonization, interoperability assumes that while there are different privacy approaches, 
the  outcomes  generally  will  be  similar  and  thus  should  be  entitled  to  mutual 
recognition.
59
More specifically, privacy interoperability requires that organizations take 
on binding obligations to protect private information based on established criteria; that 
there  are mechanisms to enforce these  obligations; and that regulatory agencies can 
depend on each other to ensure that these obligations are honored when data travels 
around the world.
60
Without this mutual recognition, there is the potential to cause substantial damage to 
consumer  trust  in  the  Internet;  to  erode  business  opportunities  for  data-related 
innovations, for example, in the areas of analytics and Big Data; and to raise costs for 
businesses  complying  with  multiple  divergent  standards.
61
Moreover,  unnecessary 
regulatory complexity often favors large incumbent firms over new entrants and small 
firms. SMEs have reported that they do not have the regulatory expertise and resources 
54
Digital Trade Coalition, written comments to USTR, May 10, 2013, 7; The Internet Association, 
written comments to USTR, May 10, 2013, 8. 
55
APEC has 21 member economies: Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, 
Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Peru, the Philippines, Russia, Singapore, 
Taiwan, Thailand, the United States, and Vietnam. 
56
These principles are as follows: preventing harm, notice, use collection limitation, choice, security 
safeguards, integrity, access and correction, and accountability. Harris, “The APEC Cross Border Privacy 
Rules System,” March 2013. 
57
The USDOC’s Office of the Secretary, with the assistance of the National Telecommunications and 
Information Administration, the Patent and Trademark Office, the National Institute of Standards and 
Technology, and the International Trade Administration, has created an Internet Policy Task Force to conduct 
a comprehensive review of the nexus between privacy policy, copyright, global free flow of information, 
cybersecurity, and innovation in the Internet economy. USDOC, Internet Policy Task Force, “Commercial 
Data Privacy,” 2010, 55–56. Updates on the work of the task force are published on its website 
http://www.ntia.doc.gov/category/internet-policy-task-force
58
As noted in the Citi submission: “[a] primary goal of any regulatory scheme concerning cross border 
data processing should be the establishment of global interoperability of national legal and regulatory 
requirements.” Citi, written submission to the USITC, March 14, 2013, 6.  
59
USITC, hearing transcript, March 7, 2013, 138 (testimony of Edward Gresser, Globalworks 
Foundation); USITC, hearing transcript, March 7, 2013, 109–10 (testimony of Joshua Meltzer, Brookings 
Institution). Harmonization efforts aim for a higher level of similarity among regulatory approaches. 
60
USITC, hearing transcript, March 7, 2013, 60, 107–8 (testimony of Martin Abrams, Centre for 
Information Policy and Leadership). 
61
USITC, hearing transcript, March 7, 2013, 60, 107–8 (testimony of Martin Abrams, Centre for 
Information Policy and Leadership); industry representatives, interviews by USITC staff, April 16, 2013, San 
Francisco, CA; industry representatives, interviews by USITC staff, April 18, 2013, Redwood City, CA. 
5-11 
Create Thumbnail Winforms | Online Tutorials
Create Thumbnail; Generate Barcodes on Your Documents; Read Barcodes from Your Documents. Multi-page Tiff Processing; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode
create thumbnails from pdf files; show pdf thumbnails in
How to C#: Overview of Using XImage.Raster
Empower to navigate image(s) content quickly via thumbnail. Able to support text extract with OCR. You may edit the tiff document easily. Create Thumbnail.
can't see pdf thumbnails; view pdf thumbnails in
necessary to navigate the complex privacy landscape, noting particular problems with 
nontransparent and subjective privacy rules at the EU member state level.
62
Interoperability Challenges: The U.S. and EU Systems  
Interoperability is also more likely to be obtainable than harmonization because of the 
different cultural and legal starting points on privacy across countries.
63
In the United 
States, for example, the use of personal information is generally permitted unless a law 
prohibits  it; this  is  due in  part  to strong protections for freedom of expression and 
commerce.
64
By contrast, the EU generally prohibits the collection and processing of 
personal data unless a law explicitly permits it.
65
The EU does not consider the U.S. data protection framework adequate, mainly because 
it is based on sector-specific legislation and self-regulation rather than an omnibus law.
66
To enable continued data flows between these two major trading partners, the EU has 
approved  a  Safe  Harbor  provision,  which  requires  eligible  U.S.  firms  to  certify 
compliance with various EU data-handling requirements (box 5.5).
67
Although the Safe Harbor Framework is seen as providing a valuable mechanism for data 
transfer between the EU and United States, firms reportedly face ongoing  problems 
navigating the broader EU privacy landscape:  
Different  EU  member  states  implement  the  EU  Data  Protection  Directive 
differently, causing uncertainty and increasing costs for U.S. and EU firms. The 
European Commission has estimated that this variation costs European firms an 
estimated 2.3 billion euros (approximately $3 billion) each year.
68
A comparable 
estimate  is  not  available  for  the  burden  on  U.S.  firms,  although  anecdotal 
evidence suggests that the EU’s privacy regime, and particularly nontransparent 
differences  across  member  states,  impose  substantial  costs,  especially  on 
SMEs.
69
The EU has recognized that there is a need to update its Data Protection 
Directive to provide a regionwide regulation applicable in the same way in each 
member state and address other shortcomings.
70
62
Industry representatives, interviews by USITC staff, April 16, 2013, San Francisco, CA; industry 
representatives, interviews by USITC staff, April 18, 2013, Redwood City, CA. 
63
Notwithstanding divergent starting points, both the U.S. and the EU approaches are grounded in the 
Fair Information Practice Principles, which form the core of the 1980 OECD privacy guidelines and focus on 
empowering people to control their personal information as well as ensuring adequate data security. USITC, 
hearing transcript, March 7, 2013, 61 (testimony of Martin Abrams, Center for Information Policy 
Leadership). 
64
USITC, hearing transcript, March 7, 2013, 60 (testimony of Martin Abrams, Center for Information 
Policy Leadership); Wolf and Maxwell, “So Close, Yet So Far Apart,” Summer 2012, 8. 
65
The EU approach is predicated on the idea that privacy is a fundamental human right; thus the 
collection and processing of all personal data should be regulated.
Wolf and Maxwell, “So Close, Yet So Far 
Apart,” Summer 2012, 9. 
66
Wolf and Maxwell, “So Close, Yet So Far Apart,” Summer 2012, 10. 
67
For their part, EU firms may be subject to the regulatory jurisdiction of the FTC and other 
enforcement authorities with regard to their handling of U.S. personal data. 
68
European Commission, “How Will the EU’s Data Protection Reform,” 2012. 
69
Industry representatives, interviews by USITC staff, April 16, 2013, San Francisco, CA; industry 
representatives, interviews by USITC staff, April 18, 2013, Redwood City, CA; Digital Trade Coalition, 
written comments to the USTR, May 10, 2013. 
70
Wolf and Maxwell, “So Close, Yet So Far Apart,” 2012, 10; Microsoft, written comments to the 
USDOC, December 6, 2010, 3. 
5-12 
BOX 5.5  Elements of the U.S.-EU Safe Harbor provisions and data protection requirements 
quirements 
The U.S.-EU Safe Harbor Framework went into effect in 2000. It is a voluntary framework, administered by the 
USDOC’s International Trade Administration. General elements include these: 
To join the Safe Harbor, U.S. firms must undertake to comply with specific privacy principles in the areas of 
notice, choice, onward transfer, data integrity, security, access, and enforcement.  
Compliance with the Safe Harbor framework enables the transfer of personal data from the EU to the United 
States across industrial sectors. Exceptions include financial institutions and telecommunications common 
carriers, which are governed by different rules. 
Over 3,700 U.S. companies have self-certified to the Safe Harbor Framework requirements since its 
implementation (not all of these certifications remain current). More than 70 percent of these companies are 
SMEs.  
Other approaches for compliance with EU Data Protection requirements include:  
“Model Contracts,” which are standard contractual clauses that EU authorities approve and must be included 
in agreements that involve the transfer of personal data outside the EU; and 
“Binding Corporate Rules (BCRs),” which are a set of policies that apply to intra-company transfers of data 
worldwide, and not just to the United States. 
 The review and approval process for BCRs has proven to be time-consuming and costly. To date, 
fewer than 50 companies have had BCRs approved by the relevant authorities across EU member 
states.  
 Given the substantial compliance costs, large multinational companies generally are the only ones 
that have availed themselves of BCRs. 
_____________ 
Sources: Wolf, written testimony to the USITC, March 7, 2013, 3; USDOC, Office of Technology and Electronic 
Commerce, “Comparing the U.S.-EU Safe Harbor Framework,” March 7, 2013; Lamb-Hale, written testimony to the 
House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee, September 15, 2011.  
U.S. companies involved in cloud computing and social networking have faced 
particular challenges with regard to their business models and privacy practices, 
often as a result of different requirements and interpretations across EU member 
states. 
 For example, the USDOC recently had to issue “clarifications” on how 
the  Safe  Harbor  Framework  should  be  applied  to  cloud  computing 
service providers to rebut more stringent interpretations being articulated 
by data protection authorities in EU member states.
71
 Social network  providers reportedly are classified as  data controllers 
under  the  EU  Data  Protection  Directive,  making  them  subject  to 
obligations that potentially conflict with their basic business models.
72
For example, data controllers are required to minimize their collection of 
data to a level that is “adequate, relevant, and not excessive.”
73
However, 
social networking platforms focus on collecting the most data possible 
from  users to  create  rich  and highly  accurate profiles  that  facilitate 
information sharing among users, thereby enhancing the value of the 
platform.
74
Tensions between the Directive’s requirements and the social 
71
USDOC, “Clarifications Regarding the U.S.-EU Safe Harbor Framework,” April 2013. 
72
Martinez and Pardillo, “Impact of Privacy Regulation,” 2012, 135. 
73
Ibid. 
74
See chapter 2 for a discussion of social networking websites. 
5-13 
networking business model have spurred EU efforts to revise and update 
its regulatory framework.
75
New Approaches to Privacy and Data Protection in the United States and 
Europe  
Both the United States and the EU have proposed fundamental changes to their privacy 
and data protection regimes. The Obama Administration has proposed a new privacy 
framework, which includes a Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights and the development of 
enforceable industry codes of conduct through a multi-stakeholder process led by the 
USDOC. The proposal also includes a commitment to interoperability between different 
countries’  privacy  regimes  through  mutual  recognition  of  different  frameworks.
76
Government and industry  privacy experts who support enactment of a baseline U.S. 
privacy law state that that it would foster the free flow of data by clarifying the ground 
rules and increasing interoperability at the international level, where the EU framework 
has held sway in the absence of a U.S. omnibus law.
77
For its part, the European Commission has proposed a new privacy framework that would 
replace the 1995 directive. The U.S. and EU proposals are similar in their focus on 
“privacy by design,” meaning that privacy considerations should be built into every stage 
of product development and that those who collect and use personal data should be held 
accountable and obtain informed consent.
78
Language in the EU proposal that provides 
for a “one-stop shop” for data protection, and that brings more interoperability across 
member states, also has been favorably reviewed by U.S. firms.
79
The proposals differ substantially, however, in their approach to enforcement. The United 
States places continued importance on voluntary and flexible codes of conduct, subject to 
enforcement by regulators. By contrast, the EU proposal contains broad new consumer 
rights—the right to have data deleted (the “right to be forgotten”) and to move data from 
one service to another (“data portability”)—that are not part of existing or proposed U.S. 
laws.
80
Industry representatives have noted problems with these proposals; for example, 
the  right  to  be  forgotten  reportedly  is  inconsistent  with  the  data  backup  and 
synchronization services that cloud computing providers guarantee to their customers.
81
The EU proposal is also more stringent in the area of data breach notification. The laws 
of 46 U.S. states, as well as the laws of several countries, reportedly mandate notification 
in the event of a data breach (table 5.2). However, the EU proposal would impose fines of 
up to 2 percent of a firm’s annual global revenue—an amount that many stakeholders 
consider to be unreasonable, given the uncertainty and discretion surrounding the draft 
75
Martinez and Pardillo, “Impact of Privacy Regulation,” 138, 2012. 
76
White House, “Consumer Data Privacy,” 2012, 31; Wolf and Maxwell, “So Close, Yet So Far 
Apart,” 2012, 11. 
77
Kerry, statement to the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, June 29, 
2011, 3–5; Torres, “The New Frontier,” February 22, 2013; U.S. government official, interview by USITC 
staff, Washington, DC, March 19, 2013. However, within the framework of the TTIP negotiations, some 
industry representatives highlight the strength of the existing U.S. regime and state that there should be no 
presumption of substantial changes in U.S. or EU law. The Internet Association, written comments to the 
USTR, May 10, 2013, 7; Digital Trade Coalition, written comments to the USTR, May 10, 2013, 10–11. 
78
Wolf and Maxwell, “So Close, Yet So Far Apart,” 2012, 11.   
79
Allan, “Facebook Views on Privacy,” 2013, 143; Digital Trade Coalition, written comments to the 
USTR, May 10, 2013, 7–8; The Internet Association, written comments to the USTR, May 10, 2013, 8. 
80
Allan, “Facebook Views on Privacy,” 2013, 143. 
81
Industry representative, interview by USITC staff, San Francisco, CA, April 16, 2013. 
5-14 
law’s provisions.
82
There remain substantial differences in the latest privacy proposals in 
the EU and United States. 
IPR-Related Measures  
The Internet  facilitates access to large  amounts  of content that  would  otherwise be 
difficult, if not impossible, to access, contributing to innovation and creativity. On the 
other hand, it also creates opportunities for significant intellectual property theft and 
infringement.
83
Digital content representatives who testified at the Commission’s hearing 
identified Internet piracy as the most damaging barrier to digital trade in their industry. 
By contrast, Internet intermediaries focused on the chilling effect that overly broad or 
unpredictable legal obligations can have on their ability to deliver valuable services. 
Digital content representatives also have recognized the importance of clearly defined 
liability guidelines. An  ongoing  challenge  for  governments  is  facilitating  a  balance 
between  IPR  protection  and  online  commerce  and  innovation,  in  an  era  of  rapidly 
changing technologies and business models.  
Digital Content Representatives Identify Piracy as the Single Most 
Damaging Trade Barrier  
Innovative software and digital content companies that rely on copyright, trademark, 
patent, and trade secret protections report that effective IPR protection and enforcement 
are critical to their economic success and growth.
84
Conversely, IPR infringement or 
piracy is identified as the “single-most damaging barrier and impediment to digital trade” 
because it “undercuts legitimate services, harms investors in content production, and 
cheats law-abiding consumers.”
85
Specific examples were provided at the Commission’s 
hearing (box 5.6).  
Determining  the  size  and  scope  of  Internet-enabled  IPR  infringement  is  extremely 
challenging; infringing files are traded online, and websites offering counterfeits are 
launched  and  accessed,  countless  times  each  day.  As  a  result,  estimates  of  online 
infringing activity often represent only a small snapshot of the total, although even the 
snapshots  suggest  extremely  large  volumes  of  IPR-infringing  content  online.
86
For 
example, an analysis of Internet  traffic commissioned by NBC Universal found that 
approximately  99  percent  of  BitTorrent  traffic  on  peer-to-peer  (P2P)  networks  is 
82
Rand, “Privacy and Data Protection,” 2013, 66; Wolf, written testimony to the USITC, March 7, 
2013, 4; Digital Trade Coalition, written comments to the USTR, May 10, 2013, 12–13. 
83
For example, the White House has noted that U.S. companies, law firms, academia, and financial 
institutions are increasingly experiencing cyber-intrusion activity against electronic repositories containing 
valuable trade secrets and other data. White House, “Administration Strategy on Mitigating the Theft,” 
February 2013, 1; Meltzer, “The Internet, Cross-Border Data Flows,” 2013, 8. The following sources contain 
a more extensive discussion of cybercrime and cybersecurity issues: Verizon, “Data Breach Investigations 
Report,” 2013; Mandiant, “APT1: Exposing One of China’s Cyber Espionage Units,” 2013; Norton, “2012 
Norton Cybercrime Report,” 2012. 
84
LeDuc, written testimony submitted to the USITC, March 14, 2013, 4. 
85
IIPA represents the publishing, business software, entertainment software, independent film and 
television, motion picture, music publishing, and recording industry associations. IIPA, written submission to 
the USITC, February 28, 2013, 7; RIAA, written submission to the USITC, February 28, 2013,7; MPAA, 
written submission to the USITC, March 15, 2013 (“The most immediate, most pernicious impediment and 
threat to the digital offerings of audio-visual content is the theft of that content”).  
86
USITC, China: Effects of Intellectual Property Infringement May 2011, 2-13 to 2-14. 
5-15 
BOX 5.6  IPR infringement-related barriers to digital trade  
trade  
Representatives of the music, publishing, software, and movie industries reported the following IPR infringement-
related barriers to digital trade:  
Foreign web sites that facilitate infringement  
RIAA categorizes different types of infringing sites as follows:  
Hubs that enable users to upload content to “lockers” accessible to others, including Rapidgator, 
Turbobit, DepositFiles, and PutLocker;  
P2P networks such as The Pirate Bay;  
Infringement directories that are dedicated to increasing access to infringing content;  
Search applications that enable users to search for content and then link to sites where it can be 
illegally obtained; and  
Streaming sites that provide on-demand and unauthorized access to copyrighted materials. 
Book and journal publishers report taking action against foreign sites offering an “Internet library” of more 
than 400,000 unauthorized copies of e-books in 2012. The sites made the e-books available for free 
downloading, reportedly earning more than $10 million annually for the sites’ operators in Ireland from 
advertising, subscriptions, and donations. 
The entertainment software industry reports two emerging problems in particular: the online theft of “digital 
entitlements,” such as game keys and virtual currencies, and the establishment of unauthorized servers that 
use the publishers’ digital assets to host unauthorized game play. 
Songwriters and music publishers, who are overwhelmingly small businesses, report that the inability to take 
down infringing online content on foreign sites substantially undermines their ability to collect royalties. 
The movie industry reports that one of the leading sources of infringing copies of audiovisual works online is 
their illegal recording in theatres. 
End-user software piracy  
This type of business software piracy includes the installation of software on multiple computers beyond the 
terms of a license, as well as client-server overuse, in which more than the authorized number of 
employees have access to a program. The software may be obtained from online or offline sources. 
Unauthorized software installation onto PCs, mobile devices, and media boxes  
Manufacturers  and  dealers  reportedly  install  illegal  copies  of  software,  movies,  music,  television 
programming, and other creative materials on Internet-connected devices.  
Circumvention of technological protection measures (TPMs)  
TPMs are intended to ensure that works made available in the digital and online environments are not easily 
stolen. However, there are reportedly entire business models built around providing devices or technologies 
to circumvent TPMs. 
_____________ 
Sources: IIPA, written submission to the USITC, February 28, 2013; BSA, written submission to the USITC, 
February 28, 2013; Association of American Publishers (AAP), written submission to the USITC, March 14, 2013; 
Entertainment Software Association (ESA), written submission to the USITC, March 7, 2013; National Music 
Publishers’ Association, written submission to the USITC, February 28, 2013.  
copyright  content  being  shared  illegally.
87
An  economic  consulting  firm,  Frontier 
Economics  (on  behalf  of  the  Business  Action  to  Stop  Counterfeiting  and  Piracy), 
estimated the value of digitally pirated music, movies, and software (not the actual losses 
resulting from the infringement) at $30–$75 billion in 2010, growing to $80–$240 billion 
by 2015.
88
87
Envisional, An Estimate of Infringing Use, 2011, 2 (estimate excludes pornography distributed over 
these mechanisms). P2P networks and BitTorrent are defined in the glossary.  
88
Frontier Economics, “Estimating the Global Economic and Social Impacts,” February 2011, 5; IIPA, 
written submission to the USITC, February 28, 2013, 8. 
5-16 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested