asp.net pdf viewer user control c# : Generate pdf thumbnail c# software SDK dll winforms windows wpf web forms pub441519-part851

CHAPTER 6  
Potential Approaches for Assessing the 
Contributions of Digital Trade to the U.S. 
Economy  
In the request for this investigation, the Commission was asked to provide a report that 
“outlines potential approaches for assessing the linkages and contributions of digital trade 
to the U.S. economy, noting any challenges associated with data gaps and limitations. 
Such contributions and linkages may include effects on consumer welfare, output, 
productivity, innovation, business practices, and job creation.”
1
These analytical 
approaches will be employed in the Commission’s follow-up investigation, Digital Trade 
in the U.S. and Global Economies, Part 2 (hereinafter Digital Trade 2). This chapter 
outlines relevant literature, data limitations, and potential approaches for assessing the 
contribution of digital trade to the U.S. economy. 
Analytical Framework for Assessing Contributions  
To assess the contributions of digital trade to the U.S. economy, it is important to 
understand how the economy can benefit from the development and application of new 
digital technologies. These benefits can be grouped into six categories. First, digital trade 
can increase output and employment in the U.S. economy.
2
Second, it can increase 
consumer welfare by reducing prices and by increasing the variety of goods and services 
available to consumers. The benefits to consumers are not captured in gross domestic 
product (GDP) calculations but can be a significant part of the economic contribution of 
digital trade. Third, digital trade can significantly increase U.S. exports, especially 
exports of services, by increasing the efficiency of their delivery.
3
Fourth, digital trade 
can improve business practices, especially for small and medium-sized enterprises 
(SMEs),  leading  to  better  coordination  of  multinational  supply  chains  and  a 
reorganization of U.S. companies.
4
Fifth, digital trade can promote innovation and 
increase labor productivity.
5
Finally, engaging in digital trade can improve the financial 
performance of individual U.S. companies, particularly SMEs, by increasing efficiency 
and increasing sales.  
The most common way to quantify the contribution of an economic activity to the overall 
U.S. economy is to use an accounting approach. An accounting approach involves 
1
See request letter in appendix A. 
2
Chapters 2 and 3 provide many examples of firms in the digital content industry and digitally enabled 
industries that are growing much faster than the rest of the economy.  
3
Chapter 4 discusses these effects in its analysis of trade in services and foreign direct investment. 
4
Chapters 2 and 3 provide examples of industries that have shifted their business models in response to 
the rise in digital trade. For example, as described in chapter 2, creators in the content industries are now 
better able to directly access their consumers. As discussed in chapter 3, a recent survey of American adults 
found that a majority now prefer online banking to traditional forms of retail banking. 
5
Chapter 3 provides an illustration of ways Internet technologies can reduce costs and improve care in 
the healthcare industry. 
6-1 
Generate pdf thumbnail c# - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
create thumbnail jpeg from pdf; pdf first page thumbnail
Generate pdf thumbnail c# - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
can't view pdf thumbnails; pdf files thumbnails
identifying the industries, firms, or parts of firms that take part in the activity and 
summing their relevant sales or employment levels.
6
This is a straightforward way to 
estimate the size of the activity. In some cases, the accounting approach is top-down: it 
starts with available statistics for broad economic aggregates (like industry-level output 
or employment) and then allocates the aggregated values among their components. The 
assumptions underlying the allocations are often rough approximations based on analysts’ 
judgment.
7
The advantage of top-down calculations is that they provide more 
comprehensive measures of overall economic activity, though the resulting estimates are 
less precise at more disaggregated levels. In other cases, the accounting approach is 
bottom-up, based on a survey of market participants that provides information about their 
individual activities. The advantage of bottom-up calculations is that they may be able to 
target the activity more precisely than top-down calculations, though the resulting 
measures usually reflect economy-wide contributions less comprehensively, given the 
limited size of most surveys.  
The greatest limitation of the accounting approach, either top-down or bottom-up, is that 
it usually does not provide an estimate of the net effects of the activity on the economy. 
Accounting totals measure the share of the economy that fits the definition of the activity, 
but it is not clear what they imply about the benefits and costs of the activity to the 
economy. For example, if a sector is large and growing, does that mean that it benefits 
the economy?  
Economists usually think of an activity’s contribution as the benefits from the activity 
minus any reduction in the economy that results from the reallocation of scarce resources 
and the diversion of limited budgets. In this case, the benefits of the emergence and 
application of the new digital technologies should be at least partially offset by the 
opportunity costs of reductions in other parts of the economy. For example, employment 
growth in online industries (or in the online aspect of traditional industries) is often seen 
as being associated with declines in more traditional industries.
8
The traditional tools for analyzing net economic effects are statistical analysis and 
simulation models. They can be used to quantify the contribution of digital trade to the 
U.S. economy. These tools are described at length below.  
6
Several of the sections in chapter 2 use an accounting approach when they report the size of specific 
industries that engage in digital trade. For example, the chapter measures the growth of revenues and 
employment in the U.S. social networking industry. The chapter takes a similar approach when measuring the 
size of the software publishing industry.  
7
The literature review in the chapter provides examples of this method and the approximations that it 
entails. 
8
This is often referred to as the process of “creative destruction.” Chapter 2 notes that employment 
declines from 2007 to 2011 were most pronounced in the traditional publishing (book, newspaper, periodical, 
and directory) and sound recording industries, compared to employment growth in online publishing and 
broadcasting and Web search portals during the same period. 
6-2 
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Word
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB.NET How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Word.
create pdf thumbnails; pdf thumbnail viewer
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for PowerPoint
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for PowerPoint
.pdf printing in thumbnail size; show pdf thumbnails
Literature on Quantifying the Effects of Digital Trade  
This chapter reviews prior studies that have tried to quantify the economic contribution of 
digital trade. The studies come from many different sources, including academics, 
industry groups, federal agencies, and international agencies. The studies reviewed here 
focus on estimates of the economic impact of the Internet rather than estimating the much 
broader economic impact of information and communications technologies (ICT). The 
Internet studies vary in the economic effects that they try to estimate and the 
methodologies and data sources that they use. Most of the studies use an accounting 
approach, though some use economic models. None of the studies addresses digital trade 
precisely as it is defined in the Commission’s investigation, and none provides a 
comprehensive analytical framework that addresses all of the issues being considered in 
the current study.
9
Table 6.1 summarizes the findings in eight of the most relevant estimates in the recent 
literature. The rest of this section provides more detail about these eight studies and many 
others.  
The Effects on GDP and Employment  
Several of the studies conclude that digital trade-related industries contribute significantly 
to output and employment in the United States.
10
The most common way to measure the 
contribution of the Internet to GDP is the accounting approach described above. The 
studies identify and then sum the value of all consumption, private investment, public 
expenditures, and net exports that are related to the Internet, including investments in 
infrastructure. One 2011 study estimates that expenditures related to the Internet 
accounted for 3.8 percent of U.S. GDP in 2009.
11
The study combines a top-down 
accounting approach with a bottom-up accounting approach. The authors start with 
aggregate data on expenditures by sector and then allocate these expenditures based on 
their estimates of the portion related to the Internet. For example, in order to estimate the 
Internet portion of sales of electronic equipment, they apply a ratio based on the overall 
time spent on the Internet against the total time using the product. One 2012 study uses 
an accounting approach to estimate the contribution of the Internet to the U.S. 
economy.
12
The authors estimate that the Internet economy accounted for 4.7 percent of 
U.S. GDP in 2010. They forecast that this share will rise to 5.4 percent of U.S. GDP by 
2016. Another 2012 study estimates the contribution of the advertising-supported Internet 
to the U.S. economy using a bottom-up, firm-by-firm accounting approach. These authors 
estimate that the Internet contributed approximately $530 billion to U.S. GDP in 2011, or 
about 3.5 percent of U.S. GDP that year.
13
9
The scope of this investigation is discussed in chapter 1 of this report. Limitations in official U.S. 
statistics on digital trade are discussed in chapter 4. 
10
For example, a 2012 study finds that the Internet is a pervasive aspect of the basic U.S. economic 
infrastructure. Lehr, “Measuring the Internet: The Data Challenge,” 2012. 
11
McKinsey Global Institute, “Internet Matters: The Net’s Sweeping Impact on Growth, Jobs, and 
Prosperity,” May 2011. 
12
This study does not clearly explain the underlying methodology it used and adjustments it made to 
the data. Dean et al., “The $4.2 Trillion Opportunity: The Internet Economy in the G-20,” March 2012. 
13
Deighton and Konfeld, “Economic Value of the Advertising-Supported Internet Ecosystem,” 2012. 
6-3 
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Raster
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Raster.
pdf thumbnail html; create thumbnail from pdf
How to C#: Overview of Using XImage.Raster
See this C# guide to learn how to use RasterEdge XImage SDK for .NET to perform quick file navigation. You may easily generate thumbnail image from image file.
no pdf thumbnails in; cannot view pdf thumbnails in
6-4 
TABLE 6.1  Estimates of economic effects of digital trade in eight recent studies 
s 
Authors 
(publication year) 
Economic effects 
examined 
Estimates 
Scope 
Methods and data used 
Borga and Koncz-Bruner 
(2011), 
U.S. Department of 
Commerce (USDOC), 
Bureau of Economic 
Analysis (BEA) 
international trade 
U.S. exports of ICT-enabled private services 
es 
grew 193% between 1998 and 2010.  The 
United States exported $324 billion in ICT-
enabled services in 2010 and imported $208 
billion. 
ICT-enabled services sectors 
Uses BEA statistics on U.S. trade in 
private services. Classifies certain 
categories of services as ICT-enabled. 
Bughin et al. (2011), 
McKinsey & Associates 
revenues, 
productivity 
The total annual value of Internet search 
technologies in the United States in 2009 
was $242 billion, including $57–$67 billion in 
increased revenues of U.S. retailers and 
$49–$73 billion in search-enabled 
productivity gains.   
Internet search 
Uses various data sources and valuation 
calculations to estimate the value of 
Internet search for 11 different 
constituency groups. 
Dean et al. (2012) 
Boston Consulting Group 
SMEs, GDP 
The Internet economy accounted for 4.7% 
of U.S. GDP in 2010. Consumers value 
Internet access at $1,000–$3,500 per year, 
depending on their age. Also, the growth 
rate of SMEs was 15 percentage points 
higher if they made extensive use of the 
Internet. 
all Internet 
Uses an expenditure method to estimate 
the contribution of the Internet to GDP. 
Uses surveys to estimate the Internet’s 
value to consumers and the impact on 
the growth of SMEs. 
Deighton and Kornfeld 
(2012), 
Interactive Advertising 
Bureau 
employment 
The consumer-facing layer of Internet 
et 
industries added approximately 365,000 
jobs between 2007 and 2011, while the 
consumer support services layer added 
approximately 245,000 jobs. 
all Internet industries 
Uses advertising revenues and a variety 
of other data sources to estimate the 
contribution of the advertising-supported 
Internet to the U.S. economy. Calculates 
a dollar figure for Internet industries and 
then applies an employment multiplier to 
calculate the number of indirect jobs. 
Goolsbee and Klenow 
(2006) 
consumer welfare 
The consumer gains from residential 
Internet usage were more than $3,000 per 
year for the median person in 2005. 
residential Internet use 
Uses information on time spent online 
and expenditures from a survey. Uses an 
econometric model to calculate changes 
in equivalent variation, a measure of 
consumer welfare. 
McKinsey Global Institute 
(2011) 
GDP, employment, 
profitability 
In 2009, the Internet contributed 3.8% of 
U.S. GDP, a $500 average increase in GDP 
per capita, 2.6 jobs created for every one 
destroyed, and $64 billion in increased 
consumer welfare. Internet usage increased 
SMEs’ profitability by about 10%. 
all Internet 
Based on a global survey of more than 
4,800 SMEs in the G8, Korea, Sweden, 
Brazil, China, and India. Uses an 
expenditure method and OECD data, 
adjusted for each sector, to estimate the 
contribution of the Internet to U.S. GDP. 
Olarreaga et al. (2012), 
eBay 
international trade, 
GDP 
International trade costs are 60% lower for 
eBay transactions than for offline trade. 
There would be a 15.6% increase in real 
GDP if all trade were to go online. 
a small share of on-line eBay 
Bay 
transactions 
Uses information on eBay transactions 
and total trade values to estimate a 
gravity model of the effect of international 
distance on trade. 
USDOC, Census Bureau 
(2012) 
e-commerce 
In 2010, e-commerce accounted for 46.4% 
of the shipments of U.S. manufacturers and 
24.6% of wholesalers’ shipments. 
all of the domestic and 
international shipments of U.S. 
establishments 
Uses Census Bureau data collected in 
an annual survey of firms. 
Source: Compiled by USITC. 
Note: The G8 countries are Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the United States. 
How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Excel
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB.NET How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Excel.
how to make a thumbnail of a pdf; enable pdf thumbnails
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
Visual C#. VB.NET. RasterEdge provides this VB.NET image processor control SDK which owns the APIs for developers to create image thumbnail, resize, crop, scale
show pdf thumbnails; pdf thumbnail preview
Two of these economic studies also estimate the contribution of the Internet to 
employment in the United States.
14
Based on a global survey of more than 4,800 SMEs in 
the G8 countries, South Korea, Sweden, Brazil, China, and India, one 2011 study 
estimates that the Internet created 2.6 jobs for every job that it destroyed in 2009.
15
In a 
2012 study, the authors estimate the direct and indirect employment that the Internet has 
added to the U.S. economy.
16
First, they compute the number of jobs that depend on the 
existence of the Internet and the associated wage bill. This is an accounting approach 
based on the revenues and employment reported by large firms in the industry. Then they 
compute indirect employment by applying sectoral employment multipliers derived from 
statistics on industry employment requirements from the U.S. Department of Labor 
(USDOL).
17
The authors estimate that the consumer-facing layer of the Internet 
industries (i.e., the content and service providers discussed in chapter 2, such as 
Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube) added 365,000 jobs to the U.S. economy between 2007 
and 2011, and the consumer support services layer (i.e., marketing, programming, and 
navigation support to these Internet content providers) added another 245,000 jobs. 
The Effects on Consumer Welfare  
Digital trade can create significant benefits to consumers—benefits that are not captured 
in expenditure-based estimates of its contribution to GDP. As discussed in chapter 3, a 
significant amount of digital content is provided for free or using an advertisement-
supported business model, and it is not possible to quantify its entire economic value by 
adding up the online expenditures of consumers. Besides supplying free services, the 
Internet has made it easier to compare prices; this development has sharpened 
competition among retailers, stimulated innovation among producers who are seeking to 
distinguish themselves from their rivals, and driven prices lower. It has increased 
convenience and the variety of products available to consumers. Economists usually 
measure these additional benefits by calculating consumer surplus, which is a measure of 
consumer welfare.
18
One 2003 study estimates the benefit to consumers from the introduction of new 
products—in this case, the value of the availability of obscure books through online 
booksellers.
19
The study estimates that the Internet-facilitated availability of obscure 
books increased consumer welfare by $700 million to $1 billion in 2000. The limitation 
of this study, from the perspective of an investigation of digital trade, is that it is very 
narrowly focused. Authors of a later study estimate the consumer gains from all 
residential Internet usage in 2005.
20
These authors use survey data on time usage to 
econometrically estimate consumer benefits. They estimate that the increase in consumer 
welfare from residential Internet usage was more than $3,000 per year for the median 
person in 2005, or approximately 2 percent of income.  
14
In the hearing for the investigation, Steven Stewart discussed the difficulty of measuring employment 
effects because they spill over across industries. USITC hearing transcript, March 7, 2013, 312 (testimony of 
Steven Stewart, IBM). 
15
McKinsey Global Institute, “Internet Matters: The Net’s Sweeping Impact on Growth, Jobs, and 
Prosperity,” May 2011. The G8 countries are Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Russia, the United 
Kingdom, and the United States. 
16
Deighton and Konfeld, “Economic Value of the Advertising-Supported Internet Ecosystem,” 2012. 
17
The employment multiplier calculations estimate the spillover effects across industries, but the 
calculations are based on a different methodology than that of the computable general equilibrium models 
discussed below. 
18
Technically, consumer surplus is the monetary equivalent of the benefits that consumers receive 
when they acquire a product or service for a price below the maximum price that they are willing to pay. 
19
Brynjolfsson, Hu, and Smith, “Consumer Surplus in the Digital Economy,” November 2003. 
20
Goolsbee and Klenow, “Valuing Consumer Products by the Time Spent Using Them,” 2006. 
6-5 
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.PowerPoint
See this C# guide to learn how to use RasterEdge PowerPoint SDK for .NET to perform quick file navigation. You may easily generate thumbnail image from
create pdf thumbnails; thumbnail view in for pdf files
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.Word
Tell C# users how to: create a new Word file and load Word from pdf; merge, append, and split Create Thumbnail. You may easily generate thumbnail image from Word
pdf thumbnail; pdf thumbnails in
One study estimates households’ willingness to pay for improvements in Internet service 
characteristics based on a 2009 survey.
21
The authors find that the typical household is 
willing to pay $20 per month for more reliable service and $45 to $48 per month for 
faster speed. They find that the consumers’ willingness to pay increases with education, 
income, online experience, and youth. A 2012 study, which is discussed above, also 
reports survey evidence about how individuals value the Internet.
22
The authors of that 
study calculate consumer surplus as the difference between the value of Internet access to 
the consumer and the amount that the consumer currently pays for access, devices, and 
content. They find that consumers below the age of 25 derive an estimated $3,000 worth 
of value from using the Internet over the course of the year. Similarly, they find that 
consumers between ages of 25 and 54 derive an annual benefit of $1,000 from using the 
Internet, while consumers above age 54 derive an annual benefit of $3,500. 
The Effects on U.S. Exports  
Online platforms facilitate commerce, especially international trade in services.
23
One 
2011 study estimates that U.S. exports of IT-enabled private services grew by 
193 percent between 1998 and 2010, while total U.S. exports of private services 
increased by a more modest 117 percent.
24
The authors estimate that U.S. exports of IT-
enabled private services totaled $324 billion in 2010. 
A 2012 study reports an econometric analysis of the difference in the effect of 
international distance on online and offline trade flows.
25
The authors estimate a gravity 
model of international trade.
26
They find that the effect of international distance on 
international trade flows is 60 percent smaller for eBay transactions than for comparable 
offline trade.
27
They emphasize that online platforms are a growth opportunity for firms 
of all sizes, in both developed and developing countries. 
The Effects on Business Practices  
There is a large volume of literature that discusses how digital trade is reshaping the ways 
that U.S. companies and their foreign competitors do business, especially SMEs.
28
These 
studies are usually based on detailed surveys of market participants.  
21
Rosston et al., “Household Demand for Broadband Internet Service,” January 29, 2010. 
22
Dean et al., “The $4.2 Trillion Opportunity: The Internet Economy in the G-20,” March 2012. 
23
A 2012 study provides an overview of the different sources of statistical evidence on international 
trade in digital goods and services, but does not offer new estimates. Gresser, “Lines of Light: Data Flows as 
a Trade Policy Concept,” 2012. 
24
Borga and Koncz-Bruner, “Trends in Digitally-Enabled Trade in Services,” 2011. 
25
Olarreaga et al., Enabling Traders to Enter and Grow on the Global Stage, 2012. 
26
A gravity model is an econometric model that explains trade flows between two countries in terms of 
the size of the two countries, the distance between them, and other impediments to international trade. 
27
In a set of counterfactuals, the authors estimate that there could be a 15.6 percent increase in real 
GDP if all transactions were to go online, due to this reduction in trade costs. 
28
In the hearing for this investigation, Jake Colvin stated that digital trade levels the playing field for 
small business and entrepreneurs. USITC hearing transcript, March 7, 2013, 66–68 (testimony of Jake 
Colvin, National Foreign Trade Council). Edward Black stated that the Internet functions as a commerce-
facilitating platform. USITC hearing transcript, March 7, 2013, 215 (hearing testimony of Edward J. Black, 
Computer & Communications Industry Association). Steven Stewart stated that digital trade has a significant 
effect on the operations of global companies that should be considered in the Commission’s investigation. 
USITC hearing transcript, March 7, 2013, 200–01 (hearing testimony of Steven Stewart, IBM). 
6-6 
A 2008 publication reports the results of a survey of senior executives in March 2008.
29
The authors find that the Internet has significantly influenced how companies interact 
with their customers, including customer-driven innovation and customization. The study 
finds a more modest effect on intrafirm communications and knowledge management. A 
2012 study reports the results of a joint research project that included a survey of 
469 senior executives in 391 large companies around the world.
30
The authors find that 
technology  advances  have  significantly  changed  customer  engagement,  internal 
operations, and even business models. Finally, the U.S. Census Bureau estimates the 
share of e-commerce in the revenues of U.S. firms, based on survey responses.
31
These 
data are discussed at length in chapter 4. 
The Effects on Innovation and Productivity  
Another way in which digital trade affects the U.S. economy is through product 
innovation. Almost all digital products and services have been introduced within the last 
decade—a significant number, within the last few years. While some represent a new 
way of delivering traditional products, others are uniquely available online, as discussed 
in chapter 3. 
In addition to its contribution to product innovation, digital trade can reduce costs and 
increase the productivity of firms. There is a large volume of literature on the effects of 
investments in information technology (IT) on productivity in the U.S. economy 
(summarized in box 6.1) and a smaller but still significant amount of literature on the 
effects of Internet use on productivity.  
BOX 6.1  Studies of the effects of IT investments on productivity 
tivity 
Studies of the effects of IT investments on productivity generally conclude that IT investments made a significant 
contribution to the growth of the U.S. economy in the 1990s, but that their contribution declined after 2000. For 
example, one study finds that the use of computer networks raises productivity in manufacturing plants by about 7.2 
percent.
a
Authors of another study estimate that IT investments were responsible for two-thirds of total factor 
productivity growth in the United States between 1995 and 2002, and for virtually all growth in labor productivity.
b
Another study finds that IT was a key driver of labor productivity growth in the United States between 1995 and 2000, 
even after accounting for variable factor utilization, adjustment costs, and intangible capital.
c
However, the 
contribution was smaller after 2000. These authors argue that labor productivity growth after 2000 was driven 
significantly by multifactor productivity growth outside the IT-producing sector. One recent study reports that IT can 
increase the efficiency of collaboration and information processing but that it is difficult to quantify the spillover 
effects.
_____________ 
a
Atrostic and Nguyen, “IT and Productivity in U.S. Manufacturing: Do Computer Networks Matter?” July 2005. 
b
Atkinson and McKay, “Digital Prosperity: Understanding the Economic Benefits of the Information Technology 
Revolution,” March 2007. 
c
Oliner et al., “Explaining a Productive Decade,” August 2007. 
d
Kretschmer, “Information and Communication Technologies and Productivity Growth,” 2012. 
This review focuses on the latter group, because these studies are more relevant to the 
scope of this investigation. One 2009 study finds that a 10 percentage point increase in 
29
EIU, The Digital Company 2013: How Technology Will Empower the Customer, 2008. 
30
Westerman et al., “The Digital Advantage: How Digital Leaders Outperform Their Peers in Every 
Industry,” November 2012. 
31
USDOC, Census Bureau, “E-Stats,” May 10, 2012. 
6-7 
broadband penetration is correlated with 0.9 to 1.5 percentage point increase in annual 
per capita growth in OECD countries between 1996 and 2007.
32
One 2009 study 
estimates that one more broadband line per 100 individuals in IT-intensive countries 
increases productivity by 0.1 percent.
33
Another 2009 study finds a positive relationship 
between broadband adoption and productivity of U.S. telecommunications firms from 
1995 to 2000.
34
The gains come from installing equipment that substitutes for clerical and 
administrative tasks but also from letting firms develop new jobs, hierarchies, and 
management structures. On the other hand, a 2012 study found that the Internet has had 
only a limited impact on the growth in U.S. productivity, causing only short-lived growth 
between 1996 and 2004.
35
That author also notes that a significant portion of the 
productivity gains attributed to IT come from the IT industry itself becoming more 
productive, rather than the application of IT in other industries. 
Several studies show that Internet search technologies affect productivity. A 2011 study 
estimates the value of search technologies like Google search engines.
36
The authors use 
a bottom-up approach that identifies sources of search value, including time saved, price 
transparency, better matching of people and products, and the emergence of new business 
models like price comparison sites. They estimate that the annual value of these search 
technologies to the United States was $242 billion in 2009, including $49–$73 billion in 
search-enabled productivity gains. A 2013 study compares online search engines with 
offline library sources.
37
The authors find that people are more likely to find answers to 
questions on the Internet and to find them faster.  
Researchers have also recognized that the Internet can have adverse effects on 
productivity by creating workplace distractions. For example, the authors of one paper 
find that the number of devices and their increased usage are creating interruptions which 
can erode workers’ productivity.
38
The Effects on Financial Performance  
Finally, several of the studies in the literature estimate the effects of digital trade on 
profitability of U.S. firms based on detailed surveys of market participants. A 2011 study 
reports the results of a survey of SMEs in several countries.
39
The authors estimate that 
Internet usage by their businesses enabled a 10 percent increase in profitability. One 2012 
study finds that digital leaders—firms with high levels of investment in technology-
driven initiatives and a transformation-oriented management that is able to implement 
technology-based change—have better industry-adjusted financial performance in terms 
of revenue generation, profitability, and market valuation.
40
32
Czernich et al., “Broadband Infrastructure and Economic Growth,” December 2009. 
33
LECG, “Economic Impact of Broadband: An Empirical Study,” February 22, 2009. 
34
Majumdar, Carare, and Chang, “Broadband Adoption and Firm Productivity,” September 2009. 
35
Gordon, “Is U.S. Economic Growth Over?” 2012. 
36
Bughin et al., “The Impact of Internet Technologies: Search,” July 2011. 
37
Chen et al., “A Day without a Search Engine,” March 6, 2013. 
38
Mark et al., “The Cost of Interrupted Work: More Speed and Stress,” 2008. 
39
McKinsey Global Institute. “Internet Matters: The Net’s Sweeping Impact on Growth, Jobs, and 
Prosperity,” May 2011. 
40
Westerman et al., “The Digital Advantage: How Digital Leaders Outperform Their Peers in Every 
Industry,” November 2012. 
6-8 
Data Limitations  
Attempts to quantify the economic effects of digital trade are complicated by a number of 
data limitations. As discussed in chapters 1–3, there are many possible ways to define 
digital trade, measure digital intensity, and categorize digital industries. This makes it 
difficult to compare estimates of digital trade across studies in the literature and across 
data sources. 
One challenge is that digital products and services are relatively new, and statistical 
agencies are still developing methods for quantifying them.
41
As discussed in chapter 4, 
the U.S. Census Bureau publishes e-commerce statistics that report the share of the 
revenues of different sectors of the United States through e-commerce.
42
However, these 
statistics do not distinguish exports from domestic shipments, and they do not report 
whether the mode of delivery is physical or online. As discussed in chapter 3, the BEA 
estimates the share of U.S. services exports that are IT-enabled, but the estimates are 
based on a broad categorization of types of services rather than direct information from 
the underlying surveys, which do not ask whether the trade was digitally enabled.
43
A second challenge is that digital industries are constantly innovating. It is difficult to 
count their new products or quality improvements, since digital products are usually not 
standardized. One paper identifies the rapidly changing nature of the Internet and the 
complexity of its value chain as the greatest data challenge to measuring the Internet.
44
A third challenge is that transactions over the Internet are often untaxed, do not appear in 
the official records, and can involve illicit activities that are difficult to measure. While a 
great deal of information about digital trade is collected automatically as part of each 
digital transaction, privacy agreements and business confidentiality usually restrict the 
use of this information.  
Potential Approaches to Quantifying Economic Effects  
The Commission plans to send a survey to market participants; this will be an important 
and unique contribution of Digital Trade 2. The investigation will seek to include other 
analytical approaches that can complement and potentially corroborate the survey results. 
These additional analytical approaches are outlined in the rest of this chapter. 
Survey  
The survey that the Commission plans to conduct in Digital Trade 2 should provide 
unique insights into the economic contribution of digital trade. The survey will be an 
opportunity to ask firms directly about the effect of digital technologies on their costs and 
41
For example, one researcher warns that “digital trade presents problems of coverage, concept, and 
[inadequate] funding of statistics and measurement.” Mann, “International Trade in the Digital Age: Data 
Analysis and Policy Issues,” November 18, 2010. 
42
USDOC, Census Bureau, “E-Stats,” May 10, 2012. 
43
Borga and Koncz-Bruner, “Trends in Digitally-Enabled Trade in Services,” 2011. 
44
Lehr, “Measuring the Internet: The Data Challenge,” 2012. 
6-9 
on the customers that they serve.
45
A limitation of the survey is that the companies may 
be unable to estimate economy-wide effects even if they can accurately measure effects 
on their individual economic performance.  
Statistical Analysis  
In Digital Trade 2, the Commission will supplement the analysis of survey responses 
with statistical analysis using publicly available business and economic data. The 
statistical analysis can help to quantify economic effects that are industry-wide and that 
spill over into other parts of the economy. For example, a statistical analysis of the effect 
of digital trade on total employment in the retailing sector might address whether the 
increase in employment in e-commerce firms more than offsets the reduction in 
traditional, offline retail employment.  
Statistical analysis can, in its simplest form, provide a measurement of the differences 
between digital industries and comparable non-digital industries that is based on public 
data. One common example is to compare growth rates. A perfect comparable for a 
digital firm or industry is another firm or industry that is identical in all respects except 
that it is non-digital. In this case, the difference between the growth rates of the digital 
firm and its non-digital comparable indicates the incremental effect of digital trade on 
growth. In practice, there are no perfect comparables, but in some cases it is possible to 
find reasonable ones. In addition, there are statistical methods, such as multivariate 
regression analysis, that can control for observable differences that are unrelated to 
digital trade. The main limitation of statistical analysis is that there are always 
confounding factors that cannot be measured or controlled. Nevertheless, statistical 
comparisons can provide useful insights. 
One example of a relevant statistical analysis would be to estimate the effects of digital 
trade on the employment and output of digital industries in the United States, using 
public data from the USDOL. The first step in this analysis would be to rank U.S. 
industries by their digital intensity—for example, by calculating the share of each 
industry’s workers in digital occupations.
46
Then the analysis could estimate the 
correlation between an industry’s digital intensity in each year and its employment, while 
controlling for other determinants of industry employment. A next step could estimate the 
geographical distribution of employment in digital trade occupations and then use this 
information to estimate how much higher local unemployment would be absent the 
employment tied to digital trade.  
A second example of relevant statistical analysis would be to estimate the effects of 
digital trade on the productivity and wages of U.S. workers, again using public data from 
the USDOL. The analysis would estimate the correlation between an industry’s digital 
intensity in each year and its labor productivity. It could also use public data on 
individual workers’ occupation, earnings, and characteristics like education and age to 
estimate an earnings premium in digital trade occupations.  
A third example of relevant statistical analysis would be to estimate the effects of digital 
trade on consumer welfare. The analysis would estimate the share of recent reductions in 
consumer prices that were due to efficiency gains from digital trade. It may also be 
45
It is also an opportunity to ask for information about how digital trade has affected business practices 
and job creation and about barriers that they face.  
46
Chapter 3 provides examples of digital intensity rankings. 
6-10 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested