asp.net pdf viewer user control c# : Show pdf thumbnails in control SDK system azure .net asp.net console pub44155-part863

FIGURE 2.1  Expanding footprints of leading online firms 
Source: Oliver Wyman, “A Money and Information Business: The State of the Financial Services Industry 2013,” 
April 2013, 17. 
Apple was incorporated in 1976 as Apple Computer, Inc.,
5
originally selling 
mainly assembled PCs and an operating system for computer hobbyists.
6
Apple 
now  designs,  manufactures,  and  markets  smartphones,  tablets,  PCs  and 
5
“Computer” was dropped from the company’s name in 2007 to reflect its new focus on consumer 
electronics after the introduction of the iPhone. Stonington, “Technology: Apple’s Greatest Hits and Misses,” 
n.d. (accessed May 30, 2013). 
6
To make a working computer, users still had to add a case, power supply transformers, power switch, 
keyboard, and video display. While the Apple I kit was of limited public appeal, the Apple II computer 
introduced in 1977 was fully assembled and designed for the mass market. Linzmayer, “30 Pivotal Moments 
in Apple’s History,” March 3, 2006. 
2-3 
Show pdf thumbnails in - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
pdf preview thumbnail; pdf first page thumbnail
Show pdf thumbnails in - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
pdf thumbnail fix; how to make a thumbnail of a pdf
accessories, and portable digital music players, and sells a variety of related 
software (including server, OS, application, and mapping software), peripherals,
networking  solutions,  cloud  services,  and  third-party  online  content  and 
applications.  Apple  also  sells  and  delivers  online  content  (including  music, 
movies, and books and other publications) and apps through its online stores. 
Notable Apple acquisitions include Siri Inc. (an app developer offering a voice-
based digital personal assistant) and several mapping companies.
7
Facebook was incorporated in 2004 as a restricted-membership college website 
to help students get to know each other. Facebook has grown to become the 
leading U.S. social networking site that has a significant global presence. In 
addition to social networking, Facebook currently offers email, a chat and SMS 
service, a platform to help developers create social apps and websites, and an 
analytics platform to help advertisers track their performance. A recent notable 
Facebook acquisition was Instagram (a photo and video sharing website).
8
Google’s origins date to a 1996 graduate school research project to create an 
Internet search engine. The company was incorporated in 1998. Google’s current 
products and services include Internet search services, social networking, online 
content, and content access tools; online products and services, including a Web 
browser; email, voice, and text messaging services; mapping and geographic 
services; cloud  storage  services;  advertising  services; operating  systems  and 
platforms; and a variety of business-oriented products and services. Google has 
partnered with several IT hardware companies to develop consumer electronics, 
including smartphones, tablets, and Internet-connected glasses. Google also has 
an ongoing project to develop a national broadband network by installing fiber 
optics lines in communities in selected U.S. cities.
9
Notable Google acquisitions 
include Motorola Mobility (a manufacturer of telecommunications equipment 
including smartphones and tablets) and YouTube (a video sharing and viewing 
website).
10
Microsoft was founded in 1975 as a microcomputer operating system vendor.
11
Microsoft’s current products and services include software (including server, OS, 
and  application software  as  well  as  cloud-based  software  services);  devices 
(including PC accessories, smartphones, tablets, and gaming consoles); Internet-
based products and services (including a Web browser, email, Internet search, 
cloud storage, and a Web portal and content delivery site); servers; developers’ 
products (including an online training and certification program); business and
7
Linzmayer, “30 Pivotal Moments in Apple’s History,” March 3, 2006; Guglielmo, “Apple 
Acquisitions Are Few but Notable,” Fortune, October 4, 2012.  
8
Facebook, Annual Report, 2012, January 2013; Associated Press, “Hits and Misses in Facebook 
History,” May 1, 2013; Etherington, “Facebook Closes Instagram Acquisition,” Techcrunch, September 6, 
2012. 
9
Google, Annual Report, 2012, January 2013; Google, “Our History in Depth,” n.d. (accessed May 24, 
2013); Google, “Google Fiber: About,” 2013. 
10
Google, “Google to Acquire Motorola Mobility,” Press release, August 15, 2011; Google, “Google to 
Acquire YouTube,” Press release, October 9, 2006. 
11
Microcomputers were early forms of PCs. The name “Microsoft” is a combination of the words 
“microcomputer” and “software.” Fortune, “Bill Gates and Paul Allen Talk,” October 2, 1995. 
2-4 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Ability to show PDF page thumbnails for quick navigation. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. C# HTML5 PDF Viewer: View PDF Online.
can't see pdf thumbnails; pdf preview thumbnail
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Ability to show PDF page thumbnails for quick navigation. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: View PDF Online.
enable pdf thumbnails in; thumbnail view in for pdf files
enterprise services and products; and online content, through a partnership with a 
national  broadcasting  network.  One recent notable  Microsoft acquisition was 
Skype (a VoIP service).
12
Digitally Delivered Content  
Digitally  delivered  content  represents the  online  versions of traditional  content, and 
includes Internet-delivered music, games, movies, TV, radio, and books.
13
Companies 
that provide such content to consumers may operate exclusively on the Internet or may 
also distribute traditional physical content; however, only the Internet-delivered portion is 
within the scope of this investigation.
14
An increasing share of content is being delivered 
over the Internet, though the share of, and effect on, physical sales varies by industry. 
This section provides an overview of the economic effects of digital trade on U.S. content 
industries, focusing mainly on the online music, games, videos, and books industries. It 
includes  discussions  of  the effects  of  online  content  on  consumer expenditures and 
employment;  describes  different  business  models  used  in  content  industries;  and 
highlights important trends in the growth of Internet delivery in the content industries. 
Economic Effects of Digital Trade on U.S. Content Industries  
It is difficult to isolate the effects of digital trade on revenues and employment in the 
content industries as a whole from the effects of confounding fac
tors, such as the 2008‒
09 economic downturn, changes in consumer preferences, and others. Several content 
industries report declining physical sales in recent years, while online sales have grown—
in some cases completely offsetting the declines in physical sales. However, in some 
cases  online  content  may  not  be  a  substitute  for  physical  content,  but  rather  an 
inseparable complement. Particularly in the video game and TV industries, the content 
delivered  online  may  be a  component  of  the  larger  experience.  One  computer  and 
communications  industry  report  stated  that,  as  a whole,  the  entertainment  industry, 
including music, games, videos, and books, is “booming.” That report points to more 
content choices for consumers and more opportunities for businesses and artists to make 
money as evidence of the health of the entertainment industry.
15
12
Microsoft, “Microsoft: Products,” 2013; Microsoft, “Microsoft Officially Welcomes Skype,” 
October 13, 2011. 
13
These examples are illustrative of traditional content industries that have a significant or growing 
online presence. Other parts of the publish industry, such as newspapers, magazines, and scientific 
periodicals, as well as the photographic industry, also derive increasing amounts of their revenue from online 
distribution. 
14
For example, a traditional broadcast radio station may also broadcast its programming over the 
Internet; the Internet, or online, portion would be within the scope of this report, but not the traditional 
broadcast. Similarly, a cable TV network may supplement programming over cable networks with the same 
programming available through a website; only the portion viewed via the website is within the scope. 
Amazon sells physical books as well as downloadable e-books online; only the e-books are within the scope 
of this report.  
15
Masnick and Ho, The Sky Is Rising, January 2012.  
2-5 
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Thumbnails can be created from PDF pages. Following demo code will show how to convert all PDF pages to Jpeg images with C# .NET. // Load a PDF file.
pdf thumbnail; program to create thumbnail from pdf
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Demo Code: Search Text From One PDF Page in C#.NET. The following demo code will show how to search text from specified PDF page. // Open a document.
disable pdf thumbnails; show pdf thumbnail in html
Online Content’s Effects on U.S. Consumer Expenditures  
Digital trade has increased U.S. consumers’ access to a rapidly growing amount of online 
content.  However,  particularly  in  light  of  the  2008–09  economic  downturn,  slow 
economic recovery, and other factors, including lower prices for  online content and 
increased piracy of copyrighted material, it is not clear that digital trade has led to a 
significant  change  in  overall  U.S.  consumer  spending  on  content  in  general,  or 
specifically to an increase in consumer spending on online content. 
Recent data show that overall average annual consumer spending on entertainment—both 
physical and online—decreased 1.2 percent from 2006 to 2011, while total average 
annual consumer expenditures increased 2.7 percent over the same period.
16
The decline 
in consumer spending on entertainment resulted in a decline in the share of consumers’ 
annual expenditures accounted for by overall entertainment spending, from 4.1 percent in 
2006 to 3.9 percent in 2011. While this overall decline may indicate that consumers are 
enjoying  less entertainment, the fall in consumers’ entertainment spending may also 
reflect the increased availability of online entertainment accessible at a lower cost and the 
proliferation  of ad-supported  free  content. Also,  the decline may  reflect  consumers’ 
having easier access to pirated copyrighted online content—a substantial concern of the 
content industries, as reported by witnesses at the Commission’s public hearing for this 
investigation.
17
Copyright issues are discussed further in chapter 5.  
There is some evidence that online offerings have led to an increase in overall online 
content consumption. For example, according to one recent survey, 30 percent of those 
who have read electronic content—meaning books, magazines, newspapers, or journals 
in digital  format—reported  spending  more  time  reading  since  the  advent  of digital 
content.
18
In general, people preferred reading e-books when they were traveling or 
commuting or when they wanted to get a book quickly, all these scenarios representing 
instances where reading might have been foregone in the absence of digital content. 
There  may also be an analogous trend across many  content industries. As noted in 
chapter 1, the widespread availability of high-speed Internet access and the proliferation 
of Internet-connected mobile devices have extended the amount of time spent on the 
Internet and have made accessing digital content more convenient. 
Online Content’s Effects on U.S. Employment 
The impact of digital trade on U.S. employment in content-related industries is also 
mixed. No data are available distinguishing employment in online content industries from 
employment in traditional content industries; consequently, the data presented in this 
section are a composite of employment in both online and traditional content industries. 
From  2007  to  2012,  employment  in  the  content  industries  declined  by  14  percent 
16
Entertainment includes fees and admissions; audio and visual equipment and services; and other 
entertainment supplies, equipment, and services. Spending on pets, toys, hobbies, and playground equipment 
are excluded from these calculations. USITC calculations based on U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of 
Labor Statistics (BLS), Consumer Expenditure Survey, 2006–2011, September 2012. 
17
Several witnesses spoke of piracy concerns with respect to online entertainment content at the 
Commission’s public hearing for this investigation. See USITC hearing transcript, March 7, 2013, 240–42, 
330–31 (testimony of Greg Frazier, Motion Picture Association of America); 348–49 (testimony of Mitch 
Glazier, Recording Industry Association of America); 262–63 (testimony of Stevan Mitchell, Entertainment 
Software Association); 251, 256, 293, 300–302, 327 (testimony of Michael Schlesinger, International 
Intellectual Property Alliance). 
18
Rainie et al., “The Rise of e-Reading,” Pew Internet and American Life Project, April 4, 2012. 
2-6 
C# PDF replace text Library: replace text in PDF content in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Demo: Replace Text in Specified PDF Page. The following demo code will show how to replace text in specified PDF page. // Open a document.
create pdf thumbnails; pdf thumbnails in
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
C#.NET Sample Code: Delete Text from Specified PDF Page. The following demo code will show how to delete text in specified PDF page. // Open a document.
show pdf thumbnails; create thumbnail jpg from pdf
(table 2.2).
19
The declines were most pronounced in the publishing (book, newspaper, 
and directory) and sound-recording industries. Employment in other information services 
(NAICS 5191) grew 38 percent. This growth was driven by growth in Internet publishing 
and broadcasting and Web search portals (NAICS 519130), which account for 71 percent 
of  employment  in  NAICS  5191;  employment  in  the  NAICS  519130  group  grew 
67 percent over  the  same time period. This  is noteworthy  because  the  employment 
growth in the NAICS 519130 group is exclusively attributable to online products and 
services, including search engines, whereas the other sectors include both online and 
traditional components.
20
19
Content industries are defined to include all of NAICS 51 except for non-game software publishing 
(only a portion of 5112 is included); 518 (data processing, hosting, and related services); and 517 
(telecommunications). 
20
As noted in chapter 6, this trend of declining employment in traditional industries accompanied by 
increasing employment in comparable online industries is referred to as creative destruction—that is, the 
technology-driven creation of new industries and jobs and consequent decline in industries and employment 
associated with older technologies. 
2-7 
C# PDF Text Highlight Library: add, delete, update PDF text
C#.NET Demo Code: Highlight Text in Specified PDF Page. The following demo code will show how to highlight text in specified PDF page. // Open a document.
print pdf thumbnails; view pdf image thumbnail
C# TIFF: C#.NET Mobile TIFF Viewer, TIFF Reader for Mobile
Create thumbnails for fast navigation through loading on-demand pages; Viewer in C#.NET. As creating PDF and Word this parameter can choose the page show type:0
create thumbnail from pdf; generate thumbnail from pdf
TABLE 2.2  U.S. employment in the content industries (online and traditional), 200712 
12 
Industry 
NAICS 
2007 
2008 
2009 
2010 
2011 
2012 
% change 
2007–12 
% change 
2011–12 
Newspaper, book, and directory 
publishers 
5111 
642,370  
604,506  
521,540  
489,875  
468,234  
445,612  
–30.6 
–4.8 
Game publishers 
5112* 
16,228  
16,898  
16,171  
16,645  
17,516  
18,392  
13.3 
5.0 
Motion picture and video industries 
5121 
359,205  
364,847  
344,798  
362,181  
342,324  
346,865  
–3.4 
1.3 
Sound recording industries 
5122 
21,704  
18,359  
16,700  
16,471  
16,704  
16,201  
–25.4 
–3.0 
Radio and television broadcasting 
5151 
237,682  
232,545  
212,327  
211,044  
213,699  
214,698  
–9.7 
0.5 
Cable and other subscription 
programming 
5152 
91,929  
83,875  
85,820  
83,513  
74,416  
75,489  
–17.9 
1.4 
Other information services 
5191 
127,566  
136,760  
130,580  
142,838  
158,365  
175,676  
37.7 
10.9 
Total content industries 
1,496,684   1,457,790    1,327,936    1,322,567   1,291,258  1,292,933  
1,292,933  
–13.6 
0.1 
Content industries’ share of total employment 
1.09% 
1.09% 
1.03% 
1.02% 
0.98% 
0.98% 
Source: USDOL, BLSQuarterly Census of Employment and Wages, total private employment estimates as of September; September 2012 data are 
are 
preliminary. 
Note: Data for game publishers are not broken out by BLS. Data here are based on an estimate that game publishers represent 6.4 percent of total 
software publishers (5112). This figure is provided by the estimates in BLS, Economic Census, 2007. The percent changes reported here 
consequently reflect changes in software publishers as a whole, and not specific trends for game publishers.  
2-8 
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
doc.ConvertToDocument(DocumentType.PDF, outputFilePath); Following demo code will show how to convert Word2003(.doc) to PDF. String
create thumbnails from pdf files; create thumbnail jpeg from pdf
C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital
File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete This is a simple C# demo that show you how to sign your PDF document using
show pdf thumbnails in; pdf thumbnail viewer
Effects of Online Content on Content Creation  
The effects of expanding digital trade, and the consequently increased availability and 
consumption of online content, is most visible at the content delivery or retail stage of the 
content creation value chain.
21
The increased availability of Internet-delivered content 
also affects activities, costs, revenues, and employment at other stages of the value chain. 
In some cases, online content eliminates the need for traditional content intermediaries 
such as distributors, marketers, and advertisers.
22
Because of lower digital distribution costs and the higher visibility that can be gained 
through social networking, authors, songwriters, musicians, and other content creators are 
now able to reach consumers  directly  much  more easily. For books and music, the 
following trends have been observed: 
Books.  Some  independent  authors—including  those  rejected  by  traditional 
publishers—have met with successful sales by self-publishing e-books and have 
gone on to license movie and other rights.
23
Self-published e-books are also 
gaining increasing prominence in online bookstores, where they are typically 
priced lower than traditionally published e-books.
24
Retailers have begun to 
embrace  self-published  books  with  featured  virtual  shelf  space,  such  as 
iBookstore’s “Breakout Books.”
25
Retailers do this for a variety of reasons, 
including the  ability to offer books at lower prices and  the ability  to  offer 
increased diversity thanks to unlimited Internet shelf space. 
Music. Independent songwriters and musicians, similarly to independent authors, 
are able to make their music available online without going through music labels. 
In theory, the lack of an intermediary affords the musician or author higher 
royalty payments, though the size of the royalty stream depends on the digital 
format and licensing agreements.  
Content Delivery and Online Business Models  
Online content may be accessed in several forms—most commonly via downloading or, 
increasingly, streaming. Table 2.3 describes the most common online content delivery 
mechanisms. While downloads are by and large the most prevalent online content form, 
streaming is growing across content industries, enabled by faster broadband, shifting 
consumer preferences, and new business models. Streaming is many users’ preferred 
21
The content creation value chain in this instance refers to the creators—including authors, game 
developers, and composers—who then sell or license their creations to publishers (software publishers, book 
publisher, music publishers) or other intermediaries who facilitate reproduction, distribution, marketing, 
advertising, and licensing for the content creators for sale to the public. 
22
Although this section is focused on the delivery of content via the Internet, content industries are 
increasingly using the Internet and Internet (digital) technologies in the sense that the production of the 
content itself may rely on digital networks. For example, in the movie production industry, digital 
technologies have lowered production costs and facilitated certain activities, such as digital animation and 
postproduction editing, which can be done remotely with an Internet connection. Even delivery of movies to 
theatres is increasingly handled digitally via a satellite link or broadband Internet connection. Digital 
technologies in general have eliminated the need for costly traditional film (most film makers now use digital 
files) and reduces the cost of film editing and assembly.  
23
Emburg, “Big Publishers Terrified of Kindle Mavericks,” October 23, 2010.  
24
Coker, “Why eBook Retailers Are Embracing Self-Published Authors,” February 12, 2013. 
According to Coker, a self-published book priced at $2.99 nets the author about $2.00; for the author to make 
$2.00 on a traditionally published book, it would have to be priced over $11.00. 
25
Kaufman, “Apple to Highlight Self-Published Books,” February 5, 2013. 
2-9 
TABLE 2.3  Digital content delivery mechanisms 
sms 
Permanent downloads 
Users download a digital file, akin to purchasing a physical product in that the user has a 
copy of the content that can be accessed offline at the user’s leisure. However, rights of 
digital download owners are arguably more limited than the rights of those who purchase 
physical copies of content in that terms-of-use agreements and technical safeguards 
frequently limit the transferability of digital content, tethering it to a particular device or set of 
devices. For example, an e-book purchased from Amazon may only be read on a Kindle e-
reader or on a mobile device via an Amazon app, while purchases from Apple can only be 
read on Apple devices.
a
Limited downloads 
These downloads are limited either by time, by the number of uses allowed, or by the devices 
evices 
they are accessible from. For example, users can “rent” a movie online (or via app) from 
iTunes at a lower price than it costs to “buy” the movie.  
Streaming 
Streaming enables viewing or listening in real time, requiring Internet access for the duration 
of the content. Streaming services do not allow a user to store the content offline for later 
use. Streaming is often offered through a subscription service where users gain unlimited 
access to vast libraries of content (for example, Netflix or Spotify) rather than make individual 
purchases. 
Streaming may be interactive, i.e., “on demand,” allowing users to specifically request 
particular content, such as with Netflix, Hulu, ABC.com, Spotify, and Rhapsody. Interactive 
streaming refers to the transmittal of a digital file to the user to be played contemporaneously 
with the request.
b
Alternatively, streaming may be non-interactive, such as with Internet Radio, where users 
choose among webcasts over which they have less control (i.e., Pandora, iHeartRadio, live 
news feeds). Here, services provide live or predetermined music programming to multiple 
simultaneous users.
c
Hybrid—cloud storage 
rage 
service 
This model combines the idea of purchasing to own with online rather than offline storage. 
This may involve purchasing online content through the service and storing it, or uploading 
an existing content library for storage and access across devices. Already common for digital 
music, the movie industry is also promoting use of an online “locker” to store purchased 
video content.
d
Source: Compiled by the USITC. 
C. 
Hiltzik,“E-book Restrictions,” December 22, 2012.  
Harry Fox Agency, “Digital Definitions” (accessed February 28, 2013).  
Webcasters may operate exclusively on the Internet or may retransmit traditional radio content. Harry Fox 
Agency, “Digital Definitions” (accessed February 28, 2013).  
Through a service called UltraViolet, consumers can store movie and TV episodes they purchase online, allowing 
them to stream or download them to any connected device. In a partnership with TV and Blu-ray player 
manufacturers, consumers who purchase certain hardware will get free UltraViolet titles from participating studios, 
including Sony Pictures, Twentieth Century Fox, and Warner Bros. Orden, “Online Movie Sales Log Rare Increase,” 
January 8, 2013. 
method of listening to music, as well as the most common way users access online 
video.
26
E-books, by contrast, are almost exclusively downloaded. Entities involved in 
the  delivery  of  online  content  may  use  a  combination  of  the  delivery  mechanisms 
described above and monetize them in different ways. Common business models include 
charging per use, offering subscriptions, and providing advertising-supported content for 
free—or various permutations of all three approaches. Additionally, many companies 
have adapted their strategies to account for mobile Internet use. U.S. copyright laws may 
also affect content providers’ choice of business model and digital delivery mechanism.  
26
Streaming is a way of delivering and receiving multimedia content in which the multimedia content 
is constantly received by and presented to an end user while being delivered by a provider. Content may 
include music; movies, TV programming, and videos; radio broadcasts; games; financial data; and closed-
captioned text. Streaming is made possible by the faster broadband Internet connection speeds. 
2-10 
Charging per Use  
Some online content providers charge per use—most often per download or per “view” 
of a video. Charging per use allows consumers to target their purchases most closely to 
their desired  volume of use. Charging per use also allows content providers (online 
distributors or intermediaries) to charge for single downloads (for example, a single 
music track, a single TV episode, or a single book volume), which may encourage users 
to return  to  buy  additional  tracks, episodes,  or  volumes,  or  even the  entire  album, 
episode, or collection. The online distributor or intermediary retains a percentage of this 
fee.  This  so-called  “agency  model”  is  also  a  common  business  model  for  e-book 
providers.
27
Offering Subscriptions  
Subscription-based models are commonly associated with content streaming over the 
Internet, both interactive and non-interactive. Users pay a set monthly or annual fee for 
unlimited access to a library of content. For example, U.S. Netflix customers pay a 
monthly fee for unlimited streaming of their movie and TV content. A Rhapsody monthly 
subscription combines music streaming and downloads,
28
while Audiobooks provides 
similar subscription services for audio-recorded literature. Subscription services’ primary 
benefit to consumers is their vast content options available for a fixed payment, giving 
users access to more content than they could purchase outright. Subscription streaming 
services may also generate value for consumers by recommending content that fits a 
user’s listening or viewing patterns, introducing them to new films, authors, or artists that 
they  might  otherwise  never  have  discovered.  Nevertheless,  some  users  may  prefer 
“owning” content in the form of permanent downloads, and may use subscription models 
to identify content that they proceed to purchase through the same service or another 
one.
29
Subscription streaming services require Internet connectivity for listening, though other 
subscription services may allow downloads for a period of time, which can be stored and 
listened to  offline.
30
 challenge  for  the providers of subscription-based  services is 
maintaining large enough content libraries to attract and keep subscribers.
31
Offering Content (Often Advertising-supported) for Free  
A large portion of online content is free to the user, with revenue generated through the 
sale of advertising space.
32
Consequently, most online content providers compete with 
traditional  forms  of  media  for  advertising  revenues.  The  value  of  U.S.  Internet 
advertising reached $37 billion in 2012, second only to broadcast TV ($40 billion) and 
ahead of cable TV ($33 billion), magazines ($23 billion), newspapers ($19 billion), and 
27
Under the agency model, online distributors or other intermediaries act as agents for the publisher. 
The publisher sets the retail price, and the distributors or intermediaries receive a predetermined margin. In 
contrast, under a wholesale model the publisher sells the product to online distributors or intermediaries who 
then resell the product at whatever price they like. E-book pricing has become an issue of legal contention in 
recent years. Guardian, “Ebooks: Defending the Agency Model,” March 12, 2012; Wall Street Journal
“What Is ‘Agency Pricing’?” April 11, 2012. 
28
Rhapsody website, http://www.rhapsody.com/what-is-rhapsody/get.html (accessed May 24, 2013). 
29
NPD, “After 10 Years Apple Continues Music Download Dominance,” April 28, 2013. 
30
Cameron and Bazelon, “The Impact of Digitization of Business Models,” June 2011. 
31
Ibid. 
32
A number of online content providers provide both free, advertising-supported content and fee-based 
content allowing users to access additional features and content or to eliminate ads. 
2-11 
radio ($16 billion). Internet advertising has surpassed all forms of media advertising over 
the last five years except broadcast TV.
33
YouTube is an example of the advertising-supported model, where users can view for 
free unlimited video content that other users have uploaded to the site.
34
Similarly, 
network  TV  channels  often  have  websites  where  users  may  stream  free  episodes 
interspersed with commercials. Free tiers of use are becoming more common among 
music-streaming services, which may offer both a free version with ads and subscription 
versions uninterrupted by ads. At least one company offers the free tier without ads, with 
the goal of attracting users who will eventually be willing to pay to omit ads from 
additional content.
35
This approach is also common among newspapers, which provide a 
limited  level  of  online  access  for  free  to  draw  in  readers  before  requiring  a  paid 
subscription. Others,  however,  embrace advertising  as a  central component  of  their 
business model. Pandora continues to offer free access coupled with advertising as a 
central part of its business plan
36
to compete with traditional radio.
37
Mobile Models  
Online content providers are also adapting their business models to incorporate mobile 
software  applications  (apps)  as  users  spend  increasing  amounts  of  time  on  mobile 
devices, as described in box 2.1. Companies may take a variety of approaches. For 
example, Pandora offers its mobile app for free, but limits the hours of free ad-supported 
listening, requiring users to purchase a subscription for unlimited mobile listening. By 
contrast,  PC-based  ad-supported  listening  to  Pandora  is  unlimited.
38
The  company 
decided to cap free listening on mobile devices because the royalties it pays per song are 
the same, but advertising revenues per listener hour on mobile devices are less than half 
than those generated on traditional computers.
39
Internet companies dependent on advertising are working to adapt their strategies to 
attract  mobile advertising.  Within  Internet  advertising,  ads  on  mobile  devices  have 
increased rapidly, with revenues growing from $641 million in 2010 to $3.4 billion 
in2012,
40
and projected to reach $27 billion by 2017.
41
Because the shift to mobile device 
use  is  an  ongoing  and  rapidly  increasing  phenomenon,  audience  measurement  and 
targeting are less advanced than for PC-based advertising. Much of the content viewed on 
mobile devices is accessed through apps, where consumer tracking, customization, and 
other  marketing  measures  reportedly  are  more  difficult  than  for  Web  browsers.
42
33
IAB, Internet Advertising Report: Full Year 2012, April 2013. 
34
YouTube also offers fee-based content. 
35
Rdio offers a free tier of content without advertising, meaning that it is forgoing ads as a source of 
revenue and paying royalties on the free music essentially out of pocket. Sisario, “For Many Digital Music 
Services,” January 28, 2013. 
36
Advertising accounted for 88 percent of Pandora’s revenue in 2012. Pandora, “Form 10-K,” 2012.  
37
Sisario, “For Many Digital Music Services,” January 28, 2013. Pandora also offers a fee-based ad-
free service, Pandora One.  
38
Pandora, “Form 10-K,” 2012.  
39
Mobile listening hours account for around three-quarters of total listening hours. Pandora, “Form   
10-K,” 2012; Sisario, “Pandora to Limit Free Listening,” February 27, 2013. 
40
Search advertising, in which ads are linked to particular search terms, accounts for nearly half of 
Internet advertising revenues ($16.9 billion). Search engines are discussed later in this chapter. IAB, Internet 
Advertising Revenue Report: Full Year 2012, April 2013. 
41
eMarketer, “Facebook to See Three in Ten Mobile Display Dollars,” April 4, 2013. 
42
Lohr, “A Big Data Weapon for the Mobile Ad Challenge,” April 3, 2013. 
2-12 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested