asp.net pdf viewer user control c# : How to show pdf thumbnails in software Library project winforms .net windows UWP pub710119-part879

12.18
Learning Spaces
learning practices consistent with learning theory and aligned with the habits and 
expectations of Net Gen students (and soon professors!) who have been “raised 
on” IT. The scenarios suggest the importance of integrating all learning spaces, 
formal and informal. For most higher education institutions, the lecture hall will not 
disappear; the challenge is to develop a new generation of lecture hall, one that 
enables Net Gen students and faculty to engage in enlivened, more interactive 
experiences. If the lecture hall is integrated with other spaces—physically as well 
as virtually—it will enable participants to sustain the momentum from the class 
session into other learning contexts. The goal is not to do away with the traditional 
classroom, but rather to reinvent and to integrate it with the other learning spaces, 
moving toward a single learning environment.
Building on these scenarios, Table 2 illustrates how Net Gen characteristics 
(such as the proclivity for group work) and learning theory might be supported 
by learning space design and IT. Learning theory is central to any consideration of 
learning spaces; colleges and universities cannot afford to invest in “fads” tailored 
to the Net Gen student that might not meet the needs of the next generation.
For example, start with the Net Gen students’ focus on goals and achievement. 
That achievement orientation ties to learning theory’s emphasis on metacognition, 
where learners assess their progress and make active decisions to achieve learning 
goals. Learning space design could support this by providing contact with people 
who can provide feedback: tutors, consultants, and faculty. This could, in turn, 
be supported in the IT environment by making formative self-tests available, as 
well as an online portfolio, which would afford students the opportunity to assess 
their overall academic progress.
Perhaps the most challenging aspect of these new learning spaces is the need 
for integration. As institutions create an anywhere, anytime IT infrastructure, 
opportunities arise to tear down silos and replace them with a more ubiquitous 
learning environment. Using laptops and other networked devices, students and 
faculty are increasingly able to carry their entire working environment with them. 
To capitalize on this, campus organizations must work collaboratively to create 
a more integrated work environment for the students and faculty, one that bet-
ter serves the mobile Net Gen students as well as a faculty faced with the initial 
influx of these students into their ranks. This will involve not only libraries and IT 
organizations but also facilities planning and buildings and grounds departments. 
Development organizations may also become involved as institutions look for the 
resources needed to implement these new learning spaces.
How to show pdf thumbnails in - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
show pdf thumbnail in; pdf reader thumbnails
How to show pdf thumbnails in - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
program to create thumbnail from pdf; create pdf thumbnail image
12.19
Educating the Net Generation
Table 2. Aligning Net Gen Characteristics, Learning Principles, Learning Space, 
and IT Applications
Net Gen Trait
Learning Theory 
Principles
Learning Space 
Application
IT Application
Group activity
Collaborative, 
cooperative, 
supportive
Small group work 
spaces
IM chat; virtual 
whiteboards; 
screen sharing
Goal and achievement 
orientation
Metacognition; 
formative 
assessment
Access to tutors, 
consultants, and 
faculty in the 
learning space
Online formative 
quizzes;  
e-portfolios
Multitasking
Active
Table space for a 
variety of tools
Wireless
Experimental;  
trial and error
Multiple learning 
paths
Integrated lab 
facilities
Applications 
for analysis and 
research
Heavy reliance on 
network access
Multiple learning 
resources
IT highly 
integrated into 
all aspects of 
learning spaces
IT infrastructure 
that fully supports 
learning space 
functions
Pragmatic and 
inductive
Encourage 
discovery
Availability of labs, 
equipment, and 
access to primary 
resources
Availability of 
analysis and 
presentation 
applications
Ethnically diverse
Engagement of 
preconceptions
Accessible 
facilities
Accessible online 
resources
Visual
Environmental 
factors; 
importance 
of culture and 
group aspects of 
learners
Shared screens 
(either projector 
or LCD); 
availability of 
printing
Image databases; 
media editing 
programs
Interactive
Compelling and 
challenging 
material
Workgroup 
facilitation; access 
to experts
Variety of 
resources; no 
“one size fits all”
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Ability to show PDF page thumbnails for quick navigation. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. C# HTML5 PDF Viewer: View PDF Online.
enable pdf thumbnail preview; pdf thumbnail
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Ability to show PDF page thumbnails for quick navigation. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: View PDF Online.
create thumbnail from pdf; create thumbnail jpeg from pdf
12.20
Learning Spaces
Conclusion
This description of learning spaces is suggestive rather than prescriptive. Learning 
spaces are complex, containing a multitude of variables. One of the key variables 
is the institution itself. Learning spaces are institutional in scope—their implemen-
tation involves the institution’s culture, tradition, and mission. These institutional 
factors must be taken into account in order to design learning spaces to meet the 
needs of Net Gen students. 
We must remind ourselves that today’s students are only the “first wave” to 
exhibit Net Gen characteristics. Soon they will be graduate students and assistant 
professors, bringing their Net Gen work habits to the faculty ranks. In addition, 
faculty who are baby boomers and Gen-Xers are acquiring Net Gen characteristics 
as they become more facile with—and dependent upon—IT. Planning for Net Gen 
requirements cannot be dismissed as catering to a single generation. IT and the 
work habits that IT encourages are here to stay; planning for the Net Generation 
is tantamount to planning for the future.
No single magic formula will guarantee successful learning spaces on every 
campus. It is clear, however, that it will not be enough if we simply place projectors, 
computers, and DVD players in the classrooms. Nor will it be adequate just to 
provide scores of publicly available computers. Such tactics, in isolation, may have 
little impact. Learning space design is a large-scale, long-term project, involving 
building and maintaining consensus, curricular vision, emerging technology, and 
layout and furniture options, as well as intracampus organizational collaboration. 
Learning space design requires a collaborative, integrated approach, with an 
overarching vision that informs and supports specific projects.
The starting point for rethinking learning spaces to support Net Gen students 
begins with an underlying vision for the learning activities these spaces should 
support. This vision should be informed by learning theory, as well as by recogni-
tion of the characteristics of the students and faculty who use these spaces. An 
institution’s specific culture, organizational structure, and fiscal circumstances 
enter the equation, as well. Once a vision has been established, the more concrete 
phases of planning can begin.
Acknowledgments
The author would like to thank his friend and colleague, Joan Lippincott of the 
Coalition for Networked Information, for sharing insight and advice, as well as 
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Thumbnails can be created from PDF pages. Following demo code will show how to convert all PDF pages to Jpeg images with C# .NET. // Load a PDF file.
pdf thumbnails; .pdf printing in thumbnail size
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Demo Code: Search Text From One PDF Page in C#.NET. The following demo code will show how to search text from specified PDF page. // Open a document.
cannot view pdf thumbnails in; pdf thumbnail generator online
12.21
Educating the Net Generation
for her permission to use some of the ideas we articulated in our EDUCAUSE 
Quarterly article.
Endnotes
1. American Psychological Association, Board of Educational Affairs (BEA), “Learner-
Centered Psychological Principles: A Framework for School Redesign and Reform,” 
revision November 1997, <http://www.apa.org/ed/lcp.html>.
2. National Research Council, How People Learn: Bridging Research and Practice, M. 
Suzanne Donovan, John D. Bransford, and James W. Pellegrino, eds. (Washington, 
D.C.: National Academies Press, 1999), pp. 12, 47; online edition available at <http:// 
www.nap.edu/catalog/9457.html>.
Further Reading
American Association for Higher Education, American College Personnel Association, 
and National Association of Student Personnel Administrators, “Powerful Partner-
ships: A Shared Responsibility for Learning” (June 1998), <http://www.aahe.org/ 
assessment/joint.htm>.
Robert B. Barr and John Tagg, “From Teaching to Learning—a New Paradigm for Under-
graduate Education,” in Learning from Change: Landmarks in Teaching and Learning in 
Higher Education from Change Magazine 1969–1999, Deborah DeZure, ed. (Sterling, 
Va.: Stylus Publishing, 2000), pp. 198–200. Originally published in Change, vol. 27,  
no. 6 (November/December 1995), pp. 12–25.
Jacqueline Grennon Brooks and Martin G. Brooks, In Search of Understanding: The 
Case for Constructivist Classrooms (Alexandria, Va.: Association for Supervision and 
Curriculum Development, 1993); online edition available at <http://www.ascd.org/
portal/site/ascd/template.book/menuitem.ccf6e1bf6046da7cdeb3ffdb62108a0c/
?bookMgmtId=4101177a55f9ff00VgnVCM1000003d01a8c0RCRD>.
Malcolm B. Brown and Joan K. Lippincott, “Learning Spaces: More than Meets the Eye,” 
EDUCAUSE Quarterly, vol. 26, no. 1 (2003), pp. 14–16, <http://www.educause.edu/
ir/library/pdf/eqm0312.pdf>.
Nancy Van Note Chism and Deborah J. Bickford, eds., The Importance of Physical Space in 
Creating Supportive Learning Environments: New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 
No. 92 (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2002).
National Research Council, How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School: Expand-
ed Edition, John D. Bransford, Ann L. Brown, and Rodney R. Cocking, eds. (Washington, 
D.C.: National Academies Press, 2000), <http://www.nap.edu/catalog/9853.html>.
Lennie Scott-Weber, In Sync: Environmental Behavior Research and the Design of Learning 
Spaces (Ann Arbor, Mich.: Society for College and University Planning, 2004), <http://
www.scup.org/pubs/books/is_ebrdls.html>.
C# PDF replace text Library: replace text in PDF content in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Demo: Replace Text in Specified PDF Page. The following demo code will show how to replace text in specified PDF page. // Open a document.
generate thumbnail from pdf; how to show pdf thumbnails in
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
C#.NET Sample Code: Delete Text from Specified PDF Page. The following demo code will show how to delete text in specified PDF page. // Open a document.
can't view pdf thumbnails; create thumbnail from pdf c#
12.22
About the Author
Malcolm Brown is director of academic computing at Dartmouth College. In 
this capacity he oversees IT support for teaching, learning, research, classroom 
technology, and media production. He has been active with the New Media 
Consortium (NMC), serving as chair of the NMC Board for 2003–2004, and is 
on the project board for the NMC Horizon Project for 2005. One of his areas 
of particular interest is learning theory and its application in the classroom. 
He has presented on these topics at the EDUCAUSE and National Learning 
Infrastructure Initiative (NLII) conferences and has participated in NLII focus 
sessions as well as Project Kaleidoscope’s planning workshops for National 
Institute of Technology and Liberal Education (NITLE) schools. Brown has 
also taught courses on topics in intellectual history in the Jewish Studies 
program at Dartmouth.
www.educause.edu/educatingthenetgen/
C# PDF Text Highlight Library: add, delete, update PDF text
C#.NET Demo Code: Highlight Text in Specified PDF Page. The following demo code will show how to highlight text in specified PDF page. // Open a document.
pdf thumbnail preview; enable thumbnail preview for pdf files
C# TIFF: C#.NET Mobile TIFF Viewer, TIFF Reader for Mobile
Create thumbnails for fast navigation through loading on-demand pages; Viewer in C#.NET. As creating PDF and Word this parameter can choose the page show type:0
show pdf thumbnails in; how to view pdf thumbnails in
13.1
Educating the Net Generation
Net Generation Students 
and Libraries
Joan K. Lippincott
Coalition for Networked Information
Introduction
The University of Southern California’s Leavey Library logged 1.4 million visits 
last year.1 That remarkable statistic illustrates how much a library can become 
part of campus life if it is designed with genuine understanding of the needs of 
Net Generation (Net Gen) students. This understanding relates not just to the 
physical facility of the library but to all of the things that a library encompasses: 
content, access, enduring collections, and services. Libraries have been ad-
justing their collections, services, and environments to the digital world for at 
least 20 years. Even prior to ubiquitous use of the Internet, libraries were using 
technology for access to scholarly databases, for circulation systems, and for 
online catalogs. With the explosion of Internet technology, libraries incorpo-
rated a wide array of digital content resources into their offerings; updated the 
network, wiring, and wireless infrastructures of their buildings; and designed 
new virtual and in-person services. However, technology has resulted in more 
modernization than transformation. There is an apparent disconnect between 
the culture of library organizations and that of Net Gen students. This chapter 
will explore how libraries might better adapt to the needs of Net Gen students 
in a number of specific areas.
Libraries and digital information resources can play a critical role in the 
education of today’s students. Libraries license access to electronic journals, 
which provide key readings in many courses, and set up electronic reserve 
systems to facilitate easy use of materials. Libraries are an important resource 
for assignments that encourage students to go beyond the course syllabus. They 
provide access to the marketplace of ideas that is a hallmark of American higher 
education. Since much of the learning in higher education institutions takes place 
CHAPTER 13
©2005 Joan K. Lippincott
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
doc.ConvertToDocument(DocumentType.PDF, outputFilePath); Following demo code will show how to convert Word2003(.doc) to PDF. String
pdf reader thumbnails; pdf preview thumbnail
C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital
File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete This is a simple C# demo that show you how to sign your PDF document using
create thumbnail jpg from pdf; how to create a thumbnail of a pdf document
13.2
Net Gen Students and Libraries
outside the classroom, libraries can be one important venue for such learning. 
The library can play a critical role in learning directly related to courses, such 
as writing a paper, and processes related to lifelong learning, such as gather-
ing information on political candidates in order to make informed choices in an 
upcoming election. Libraries provide collections, organized information, systems 
that promote access, and in-person and virtual assistance to encourage students 
to pursue their education beyond the classroom.
It is difficult to generalize, but this chapter will use some characteristics of the 
Net Gen student that have been described by a number of researchers.2a,b,c,d 
Given that this generation of college students has grown up with computers and 
video games, the students have become accustomed to multimedia environ-
ments: figuring things out for themselves without consulting manuals; working 
in groups; and multitasking. These qualities differ from those found in traditional 
library environments, which, by and large, are text-based, require learning the 
system from experts (librarians), were constructed for individual use, and as-
sume that work progresses in a logical, linear fashion.
What are some of the major disconnects between many of today’s academic 
libraries and Net Gen students? The most common one is students’ dependence 
on Google or similar search engines for discovery of information resources 
rather than consultation of library Web pages, catalogs, and databases as the 
main source of access. Since students often find library-sponsored resources 
difficult to figure out on their own, and they are seldom exposed to or interested 
in formal instruction in information literacy, they prefer to use the simplistic but 
responsive Google. Another disconnect is that digital library resources often 
reside outside the environment that is frequently the digital home of students’ 
coursework, namely, the course management system, or CMS. Library services 
are often presented in the library organization context rather than in a user-
centered mode. Libraries emphasize access to information but generally do 
not have facilities, software, or support for student creation of new information 
products. All of these disconnects can be remedied if appropriate attention is 
paid to the style of Net Gen students.
Access to and Use of Information Resources
When students use a wide array of information resources that they seek out on 
their own, they can enrich their learning through exploration of topics of interest. 
However, with the vast resources of the Web available, students must first make 
13.3
Educating the Net Generation
choices about how to access information and then which information resources 
to use in their explorations and assignments. Increasingly, students use Web 
search engines such as Google to locate information resources rather than 
seek out library online catalogs or databases of scholarly journal articles. Many 
faculty express concern that students do not know how to adequately evaluate 
the quality of information resources found on the Web, and librarians share this 
concern. Libraries need to find ways to make their information access systems 
more approachable by students, integrate guides to quality resources into course 
pages, and find ways to increase their presence in general Web search engines. 
Newly emerging services such as Google Scholar are providing access to more 
library resources in the general Internet environment. Libraries also need to be 
more cognizant of Net Gen students’ reliance on visual cues in using the Internet 
and build Web pages that are more visually oriented.
The Library Versus the Web
Net Gen students clearly perceive the open space of the World Wide Web as their 
information universe. This is in opposition to the worldview of librarians and many 
faculty, who perceive the library as the locus of information relevant to academic 
work. Students usually approach their research without regard to the library’s 
structure or the way that the library segments different resources into different 
areas of its Web site. Library Web sites often reflect an organizational view of the 
library (for example, how to access the reference department or online catalog); 
they do not do a particularly good job of aggregating content on a particular 
subject area. Students usually prefer the global searching of Google to more 
sophisticated but more time-consuming searching provided by the library, where 
students must make separate searches of the online catalog and every database 
of potential interest, after first identifying which databases might be relevant. In 
addition, not all searches of library catalogs or databases yield full-text materials, 
and Net Gen students want not just speedy answers, but full gratification of their 
information requests on the spot, if possible.
Recent surveys exploring college student use of the Web versus the library 
confirm the commonly held perception of faculty and librarians that students’ pri-
mary sources of information for coursework are resources found on the Web and 
that most students use a search engine such as Google as their first point of entry 
to information rather than searching the library Web site or catalog.3a,b Several 
campus studies also examined where students gather information for a paper or 
13.4
Net Gen Students and Libraries
an assignment. One study at Colorado State University yielded information that 
58 percent of freshmen used Google or a comparable search engine first, while 
only 23 percent started with a database or index.4
The world of information is large and complex. There are no easy answers to 
providing simplified searching to the wealth of electronic information resources 
produced by a wide range of publishers using different structures and vocabu-
laries. Students may perceive that librarians have developed systems that are 
complex and make sense to information professionals but are too difficult to use 
without being an expert.5 However, as new generations of information products 
are developed, producers and system developers should try to address the in-
formation-seeking habits of Net Gen students. Libraries and the global service 
provider OCLC are working with Google so that information from peer-reviewed 
journals, books, theses, and other academic resources can be accessed through 
the Google Scholar search service. This is a step in the right direction, taking 
library resources to where students want to find them.6a,b Libraries also need to 
integrate more multimedia resources into their searchable content; this type of 
digital content is becoming increasingly important to Net Gen students, who may 
wish to study an audio recording of political speeches and incorporate segments 
into a term project as well as access books and journals on the topic. However, 
libraries typically incorporate information objects into their catalogs only when 
those resources are owned or licensed by the library. Is this still a relevant strategy 
in a world of global access to information via the Internet?
Locating Quality Digital Information
Providing mechanisms for information seekers from academe to locate quality 
information resources in a particular subject area is also a challenge for libraries—a 
very important one. Many academic libraries provide “library guides” or pathfind-
ers to quality information resources, available through the library Web site, but 
typically they are not heavily used. A limited number of subject disciplines have 
developed coordinated Web guides to information resources; a notable example 
is AgNIC (http://www.agnic.org), serving the field of agriculture. Some libraries 
are developing mechanisms to link subject pathfinders into course management 
systems for every course at the institution. This useful strategy brings the infor-
mation to the place where students will be actively engaged in academic work. 
Librarians at the University of Rochester looked for new ways to bring quality sub-
ject resources to the attention of students. They recognized that “undergraduate 
13.5
Educating the Net Generation
students’ mental model is one focused on courses and coursework, rather than 
disciplines.” Therefore, they developed a mechanism to incorporate pathfinders 
into every course at the institution using the course management system.7
Both students and faculty believe that the library is doing a poor job with helping 
them discern which Web resources are suitable for academic work.Libraries are 
addressing this concern by developing portals to catalogs, licensed databases, and 
Web sites that would meet the kinds of criteria used in building academic library 
collections and by working with such projects as Google Scholar.
Incorporating Visual Cues
Designing Web pages that are responsive to Net Gen students’ style would also 
help guide students to appropriate content or help them when they have problems 
with searches. A study of high school students’ Web searching revealed that 
students relied heavily on information displayed in graphic form on Web pages 
and often relied on graphics and visual cues to interpret the relevance of such 
pages.9 Libraries and information service providers generally do not design their 
resources with such criteria in mind. Incorporating students on design teams and 
giving them the go-ahead to reenvision the way the library displays its resources 
would be a useful method of developing information that resonates better with 
Net Gen students.
To summarize, Net Gen access services will:
 Continue to integrate library information into Google or other popular access 
mechanisms
 Offer simplified and graphic ways for students to approach subject searches
 Integrate subject guides or pathfinders into CMS or other locations conducive 
to use
 Integrate searching of “open” Web resources and materials owned or licensed 
by the library
Library and Information Services
Librarians often take great pride in the personalized information services they 
offer to their constituencies and the classes they teach to incorporate information 
literacy into the academic curriculum. While many of today’s Net Gen students 
have grown up with technology, they do not necessarily have the requisite 
knowledge or skills to use technology and digital information in ways appropri-
ate to the academy. Librarians should persist in their efforts to find ways to help 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested