asp.net pdf viewer user control c# : Show pdf thumbnails control Library system azure .net windows console pub710124-part885

15.14
Neomillennial Learning Styles
Neomillennial Learning Styles Based on  
Mediated Immersion
Emerging devices, tools, media, and virtual environments offer opportunities for 
creating new types of learning communities for students and teachers. Bielaczyc 
and Collins indicated that:
The defining quality of a learning community is that there is a culture 
of learning, in which everyone is involved in a collective effort of un-
derstanding. There are four characteristics that such a culture must 
have: (1) diversity of expertise among its members, who are valued 
for their contributions and given support to develop, (2) a shared 
objective of continually advancing the collective knowledge and skills, 
(3) an emphasis on learning how to learn, and (4) mechanisms for 
sharing what is learned. If a learning community is presented with 
a problem, then the learning community can bring its collective 
knowledge to bear on the problem. It is not necessary that each 
member assimilate everything that the community knows, but each 
should know who within the community has relevant expertise to 
address any problem. This is a radical departure from the traditional 
view of schooling, with its emphasis on individual knowledge and 
performance, and the expectation that students will acquire the same 
body of knowledge at the same time.26
Mediated immersion creates distributed learning communities, which have 
different strengths and limits than location-bound learning communities confined 
to classroom settings and centered on the teacher and archival materials.27 In 
particular, distributed learning communities infuse education throughout students’ 
lives, orchestrating the contributions of many knowledge sources embedded 
in real-world settings outside of schooling and fostering neomillennial learning 
styles.
The benefits of learning styles enhanced by mediated immersion in distributed 
learning communities are illustrated in Table 1.
Mediated immersion likely has other influences on learning style yet to be 
discovered, but these initial findings have a variety of implications for strategic 
planning and investment in higher education.
Show pdf thumbnails - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
how to show pdf thumbnails in; generate pdf thumbnails
Show pdf thumbnails - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
view pdf thumbnails in; pdf first page thumbnail
15.15
Educating the Net Generation
Implications for Higher Education’s Strategic Investments
Table 2 presents speculations about how the emergence of neomillennial learn-
ing styles may influence higher education. Emphasis is placed on implications for 
strategic investments in physical plant, technology infrastructure, and professional 
development.
These ideas are admittedly speculative rather than based on detailed evidence 
and are presented to stimulate reaction and dialogue about these trends.
Table 1. Neomillenial Versus Millennial Learning Styles
Neomillennial Learning
Millennial Learning
Fluency in multiple media, values each for the types of 
communication, activities, experiences, and expressions it 
empowers.
Centers on working 
within a single medium 
best suited to an 
individual’s style and 
preferences
Learning based on collectively seeking, sieving, and 
synthesizing experiences rather than individually locating 
and absorbing information from some single best source; 
prefers communal learning in diverse, tacit, situated 
experiences; values knowledge distributed across a 
community and a context, as well as within an individual.
Solo integration of 
divergent, explicit 
information sources
Active learning based on experience (real and simulated) 
that includes frequent opportunities for embedded 
reflection (for example, infusing experiences in the Virtual 
University simulation <http://www.virtual-u.org/
in a course on university leadership); values bicentric, 
immersive frames of reference that infuse guidance and 
reflection into learning-by-doing.
Learning experiences 
that separate action and 
experience into different 
phases
Expression through nonlinear, associational webs of 
representations rather than linear stories (for example, 
authoring a simulation and a Web page to express 
understanding rather than writing a paper); uses 
representations involving richly associated, situated 
simulations.
Uses branching, but 
largely hierarchical, 
multimedia
Co-design of learning experiences personalized to 
individual needs and preferences.
Emphasizes selecting a 
precustomized variant 
from a range of services 
offered
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Ability to show PDF page thumbnails for quick navigation. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. C# HTML5 PDF Viewer: View PDF Online.
pdf preview thumbnail; pdf no thumbnail
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Ability to show PDF page thumbnails for quick navigation. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: View PDF Online.
enable pdf thumbnails in; how to make a thumbnail of a pdf
15.16
Neomillennial Learning Styles
If we accept much of the analysis above, four implications for investments in 
physical and technological infrastructure are apparent:
 Wireless everywhere—provide total coverage of the campus; subsidize 
uniform mobile wireless devices offering convergence of media (phone, PDA, 
gaming, Internet)
 Multipurpose habitats—creating layered/blended/personalizable places 
rather than specialized locations (such as computer labs)
 Augmented reality—experiment with smart objects and intelligent contexts 
(via GPS and RFID tags and transceivers)
 “Mirroring”—experiment with virtual environments that replicate physical 
settings but offer “magical” capabilities for immersive experience
This is not to imply that campuses should immediately undertake massive shifts 
toward these four themes, but rather that students of all ages with increasingly 
neomillennial learning styles will be drawn to colleges and universities that have 
these capabilities.
Four implications for investments in professional development also are appar-
ent. Faculty will increasingly need capabilities in:
 Co-design—developing learning experiences students can personalize
 Co-instruction—using knowledge sharing among students as a major source 
of content and pedagogy
 Guided social constructivist and situated learning pedagogies—in-
fusing case-based participatory simulations into presentational/assimilative 
instruction 
 Assessment beyond tests and papers—evaluating collaborative, non-
linear, associational webs of representations; using peer-developed and 
peer-rated forms of assessment; employing student assessments to provide 
formative feedback on faculty effectiveness
Some of these shifts are controversial for many faculty; all involve “unlearning” 
almost unconscious beliefs, assumptions, and values about the nature of teaching, 
learning, and the academy. Professional development that requires unlearning 
necessitates high levels of emotional/social support in addition to mastering the 
intellectual/technical dimensions involved. The ideal form for this type of profes-
sional development is distributed learning communities so that the learning process 
is consistent with the knowledge and culture to be acquired. In other words, fac-
ulty must themselves experience mediated immersion and develop neomillennial 
learning styles to continue teaching effectively as the nature of students alters.
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Thumbnails can be created from PDF pages. Following demo code will show how to convert all PDF pages to Jpeg images with C# .NET. // Load a PDF file.
how to view pdf thumbnails in; generate thumbnail from pdf
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Demo Code: Search Text From One PDF Page in C#.NET. The following demo code will show how to search text from specified PDF page. // Open a document.
.pdf printing in thumbnail size; pdf files thumbnails
15.17
Educating the Net Generation
Table 2. Speculations About Higher Education Now and in the Future
Dimension
Now
Future
Location 
and physical 
infrastructure
Locations and physical 
infrastructures configured 
to accomplish specialized 
forms of activity (such as 
dorm room or apartment, 
classrooms, student cen-
ter, library, computer lab)
Direct physical manipula-
tion of equipment in sci-
ence lab
Wearable devices and universal wireless 
coverage mean access, information, com-
putational power no longer tied to physical 
space (such as a computer lab)
Most activities distributed across space 
and time, so tailoring space to particular 
purposes (such as library reading rooms) 
often no longer necessary
Notion of place is layered/blended/mul-
tiple; mobility and nomadicity prevalent 
among dispersed, fragmented, fluctuating 
habitats (for example, coffeehouses near 
campus)
Virtual simulations complement equip-
ment-based science labs
Smart objects 
and intelligent 
contexts
Inert objects and contexts 
with information available 
only via signage
Physical presence on cam-
pus only way of “being 
there”
Information virtually connected to locations 
(such as campus buildings linked to online 
maps) and objects (such as textbooks 
linked to course ratings by students)
“Mirroring”: Immersive virtual environ-
ments provide replicas of distant physical 
settings
Social group
Roommates, members of 
dorm or apartment, class-
mates
Far-flung, loosely bounded, sparsely knit, 
and fragmentary communities (indepen-
dent of cohabitation, common course 
schedules, or enrollment at a particular 
campus)
Collaboration
Collaboration dependent 
on shared physical pres-
ence or cumbersome vir-
tual mechanisms
Middleware, interoperability, open content, 
and open source enable seamless informa-
tion sharing, collaborative virtual manipula-
tion of tools and media, shared authoring 
and design, collective critiquing
Personal 
customization
Little or none
“Napsterism”: recombining others’ designs 
to personally tailored configurations28
Customized services based on data mining 
for patterns of personal characteristics 
and behaviors
C# PDF replace text Library: replace text in PDF content in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Demo: Replace Text in Specified PDF Page. The following demo code will show how to replace text in specified PDF page. // Open a document.
can't view pdf thumbnails; cannot view pdf thumbnails in
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
C#.NET Sample Code: Delete Text from Specified PDF Page. The following demo code will show how to delete text in specified PDF page. // Open a document.
disable pdf thumbnails; pdf thumbnail html
15.18
Neomillennial Learning Styles
Cognition
Finding information
Sequential assimilation of 
linear information stream
Seeking, sieving, synthesizing disparate 
sources of data
Multitasking among disparate experiences 
and information sources 
Focus on associative interconnections 
among chunks of information
Constant reflection on and sharing of 
experience
Mind extended via distributed cognition, 
sensation, memory
Identity
Identity expressed in the 
context of face-to-face 
groups interacting with 
local resources
Virtual identity unfettered by physical at-
tributes such as gender, race, disabilities
Self continuously reformed via an ever-
shifting series of distributed networking 
with others and with tools
Self as an electronic nomad wandering 
among virtual campfires, no longer needing 
a local physical infrastructure to articulate 
identity
Instruction
Instructor designs and 
delivers one-size-fits-all 
content, pedagogy, and 
assessment
Students are passive re-
cipients
Learners influence design of content, 
pedagogy, and assessment based on 
individual preferences and needs
Knowledge sharing among students as a 
major source of content
Guided social constructivism and situated 
learning as major forms of pedagogy
Case-based participatory simulations 
complement presentational/assimilative 
instruction
Assessment
Student products gener-
ally tests or papers
Grading centers on indi-
vidual performance
Students provide summa-
tive feedback on instruc-
tional effectiveness
Student products often involve nonlinear, 
associational webs of representations 
(for example, authoring a simulation and a 
Web page to express understanding of an 
internship rather than authoring a paper 
that synthesizes expert opinions)
Peer-developed and peer-rated forms of 
assessment complement faculty grading, 
which is often based on individual accom-
plishment in a team performance context
Assessments provide formative feedback 
on instructional effectiveness
C# PDF Text Highlight Library: add, delete, update PDF text
C#.NET Demo Code: Highlight Text in Specified PDF Page. The following demo code will show how to highlight text in specified PDF page. // Open a document.
html display pdf thumbnail; create thumbnail jpeg from pdf
C# TIFF: C#.NET Mobile TIFF Viewer, TIFF Reader for Mobile
Create thumbnails for fast navigation through loading on-demand pages; Viewer in C#.NET. As creating PDF and Word this parameter can choose the page show type:0
no pdf thumbnails in; pdf thumbnail
15.19
Educating the Net Generation
Conclusion
While generational descriptions can be useful, they also oversimplify. Differences 
among individuals are greater than dissimilarities between groups, so students in 
any age cohort will present a mixture of neomillennial, millennial, and traditional 
learning styles. Predictions of the future also carry risk. The technologies discussed 
are emerging rather than mature, so their final form and influences on users are 
not fully understood. A substantial number of faculty and administrators will likely 
dismiss and resist some of the ideas and recommendations presented here.
However, widespread discussion among members of the academy about the 
trends delineated above is important, regardless of whether at the end of that 
dialogue those involved agree with these speculative conclusions. Further, to the 
extent that some of these ideas about neomillennial learning styles are accurate, 
campuses that make strategic investments in physical plant, technical infrastruc-
ture, and professional development along the dimensions suggested will gain a 
considerable competitive advantage in both recruiting top students and teaching 
them effectively.
Endnotes
1. Chris Dede, Pam Whitehouse, and Tara Brown-L’Bahy, “Designing and Studying Learning 
Experiences that Use Multiple Interactive Media to Bridge Distance and Time,” in Current 
Perspectives on Applied Information Technologies: Distance Education and Distributed 
Learning, Charlambos Vrasidas and Gene V. Glass, eds. (Greenwich, Conn.: Information 
Age Press, 2002), pp. 1–30.
2. Chris Dede, “Vignettes About the Future of Learning Technologies,” Visions 2020: 
Transforming Education and Training Through Advanced Technologies (Washington, 
D.C.: U.S. Department of Commerce, 2002), pp. 18–25, <http://www.technology.
gov/reports/TechPolicy/2020Visions.pdf>.
3. Carrie Heeter, “Being There: The Subjective Experience of Presence,” Presence: Tele-
operators and Virtual Environments, vol. 1, no. 2 (Spring 1992), pp. 262–271; Bob G. 
Witmer and Michael J. Singer, “Measuring Presence in Virtual Environments: A Presence 
Questionnaire,” Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments, vol. 7, no. 3 (June 
1998), pp. 225–240, <http://mitpress.mit.edu/journals/PRES/ps00734.pdf>.
4. Chris Dede, Marilyn Salzman, R. Bowen Loftin, and Katy Ash, “The Design of Immersive 
Virtual Environments: Fostering Deep Understandings of Complex Scientific Knowledge,” 
in Innovations in Science and Mathematics Education: Advanced Designs for Technologies 
of Learning, Michael J. Jacobson and Robert B. Kozma, eds. (Hillsdale, N.J.: Lawrence 
Erlbaum Associates, 2000), pp. 361–413.
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
doc.ConvertToDocument(DocumentType.PDF, outputFilePath); Following demo code will show how to convert Word2003(.doc) to PDF. String
enable thumbnail preview for pdf files; pdf thumbnail creator
C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital
File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete This is a simple C# demo that show you how to sign your PDF document using
thumbnail view in for pdf files; view pdf thumbnails
15.20
Neomillennial Learning Styles
5. Marilyn Salzman, “VR’s Frames of Reference: A Visualization Technique for Mastering 
Abstract Information Spaces,” unpublished doctoral dissertation (Fairfax, Va.: George 
Mason University, 2000).
6. Marilyn Salzman, Chris Dede, and R. Bowen Loftin, “VR’s Frames of Reference: 
A Visualization Technique for Mastering Multidimensional Information,” Proceed-
ings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: The CHI 
Is the Limit (New York: ACM Press, 1999), pp. 489–495, <http://portal.acm.org/ 
toc.cfm?id=302979&type=proceeding>.
7. National Research Council, How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School: 
Expanded Edition, John D. Bransford, Ann L. Brown, and Rodney R. Cocking, eds. 
(Washington, D.C.: National Academies Press, 2000), <http://www.nap.edu/ 
catalog/9853.html>.
8. Chris Dede, Brian Nelson, Diane Jass Ketelhut, Jody Clarke, and Cassie Bowman, 
“Design-Based Research Strategies for Studying Situated Learning in a Multiuser 
Virtual Environment,” in Embracing Diversity in the Learning Sciences: Proceedings 
of the Sixth International Conference of the Learning Sciences, Yasmin B. Kafai et al., 
eds. (Mahweh, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2004), pp. 158–165, <http:// 
www.gseis.ucla.edu/~icls/ICLSshortproceed.pdf>.
9. Chris Dede, “Enabling Distributed-Learning Communities via Emerging Technologies,” 
Proceedings of the 2004 Conference of the Society for Information Technology in Teacher 
Education (SITE) (Charlottesville, Va.: American Association for Computers in Education, 
2004), pp. 3–12.
10. Jose Mestre, Transfer of Learning: Issues and a Research Agenda (Washington, D.C.: 
National Science Foundation, 2002), <http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2003/nsf03212/ 
start.htm>.
11. Chris Dede, Tara Brown-L’Bahy, Diane Jass Ketelhut, and Pam Whitehouse, “Distance 
Learning (Virtual Learning),” in The Internet Encyclopedia, Hossein Bidgoli, ed. (New 
York: John Wiley & Sons, 2004), pp. 549–560.
12. Janet H. Murray, Hamlet on the Holodeck (Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1997).
13. Sherry Turkle, Life on the Screen: Identity in the Age of the Internet (New York: Touch-
stone, 1995).
14. Constance A. Steinkuehler, “Learning in Massively Multiplayer Online Games,” in 
Embracing Diversity in the Learning Sciences: Proceedings of the Sixth International 
Conference of the Learning Sciences, Yasmin B. Kafai et al., eds. (Mahweh, N.J.: Law-
rence Erlbaum Associates, 2004), pp. 521–528, <http://www.gseis.ucla.edu/~icls/ 
ICLSshortproceed.pdf>.
15. Rebecca Black, “Access and Affiliation: The Literacy and Composition Practices of English 
Language Learners in an Online Fanfiction Community,” in process paper presented at the 
2004 National Conference of the American Educational Research Association, San Diego 
(2004), <http://labweb.education.wisc.edu/room130/PDFs/InRevision.pdf>.
15.21
Educating the Net Generation
16. For more information on River City and the MUVEES Project, see <http:// 
muve.gse.harvard.edu/muvees2003/index.html>.
17. Dede, Nelson, Ketelhut, Clarke, and Bowman, op. cit.
18. (a) Sasha Barab et al., “Making Learning Fun: Quest Atlantis, a Game Without Guns,” 
to appear in Educational Technology Research and Development; (b) Chris Dede and 
Marielle Palombo, “Virtual Worlds for Learning: Exploring the Future of the ‘Alice in 
Wonderland’ Interface,” Threshold (Summer 2004), pp. 16–20.
19. Sherry Hsi et al., “eXspot: A Wireless RFID Transceiver for Recording and Extending 
Museum Visits,” proceedings of UbiComp 2004; to be published.
20. Eric Klopfer and Kurt Squire, “Environmental Detectives: The Development of an Aug-
mented Reality Platform for Environmental Simulations,” in press, Educational Technology 
Research and Development.
21. Eric Klopfer, Kurt Squire, and Henry Jenkins, “Augmented Reality Simulations on PDAs,” 
paper presented at the national American Education Research Association (AERA) 
conference, Chicago, 2003.
22. Howard Rheingold, Smart Mobs: The Next Social Revolution (Cambridge, Mass.: Perseus 
Publishing, 2002).
23. William J. Mitchell, Me ++: The Cyborg Self and the Networked City (Cambridge, Mass.: 
MIT Press, 2003).
24. Stephen Baker and Heather Green, “Big Bang! Digital Convergence Is Finally Hap-
pening—and that Means New Opportunities for Upstarts and Challenges for Icons,” 
BusinessWeekOnline, June 21, 2004, <http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/ 
content/04_25/b3888601.htm>.
25. Mitchell, op. cit.
26. Katerine Bielaczyc and Allan Collins, “Learning Communities in Classrooms: A Recon-
ceptualization of Educational Practice,” in Instructional Design Theories and Models: A 
New Paradigm of Instructional Theory, Vol. II, Charles M. Reigeluth, ed. (Mahwah, N.J.: 
Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1999).
27. Dede, 2004, op. cit.
28. Mitchell, op. cit.
Further Reading
Helen Ashman, guest ed., “Special Issue on Hypermedia and the World Wide Web,” The 
New Review of Hypermedia and Multimedia, vol. 8 (2002), <http://www.comp.glam.
ac.uk/~NRHM/volume8/volume8.htm>.
Edward Castronova, “Virtual Worlds: A First-Hand Account of Market and Society on the 
Cyberian Frontier,” CESifo Working Paper Series No. 618 (December 2001), <http://
papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=294828>.
15.22
Wynne Harlen and Craig Altobello, An Investigation of “Try Science” Studied On-Line and 
Face-to-Face (Cambridge, Mass.: TERC, 2003), <http://www.terc.edu/uploaded/
documents/tryscience_execsum.pdf>.
Neil Howe and William Strauss, Millennials Rising: The Next Greatest Generation (New York: 
Vintage Books, 2000).
Diana Oblinger, “Boomers, Gen-Xers, and Millennials: Understanding the ‘New Stu-
dents,’” EDUCAUSE Review, vol. 38, no. 4 (July/August 2003), pp. 37–47, <http:// 
www.educause.edu/apps/er/erm03/erm034.asp>.
Marilyn Salzman, Chris Dede, R. Bowen Loftin, and Jim Chen, “A Model for Understanding 
How Virtual Reality Aids Complex Conceptual Learning,” Presence: Teleoperators and 
Virtual Environments, vol. 8, no. 3 (June 1999), pp. 293–316.
Don Tapscott, Growing Up Digital: The Rise of the Net Generation (New York: McGraw 
Hill, 1998).
About the Author
Chris Dede is the Timothy E. Wirth Professor of Learning Technologies 
at Harvard’s Graduate School of Education. His funded research includes 
grants from the National Science Foundation, the Joyce Foundation to aid 
the Milwaukee Public Schools, and Harvard. Dede has served as a member 
of the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Foundations of Educa-
tional and Psychological Assessment, the U.S. Department of Education’s 
Expert Panel on Technology, and the International Steering Committee for 
the Second International Technology in Education Study. He serves on vari-
ous boards and commissions, including PBS TeacherLine, the Partnership 
for 21st Century Skills, the Association for Teacher Education, Boston Tech 
Academy, and the new Science of Learning Center at Carnegie Mellon/
University of Pittsburgh, as well as federal educational labs and regional 
technology centers. Dede was the editor of Learning with Technology: 1998 
ASCD Yearbook and coedited Scaling Up Success: Lessons Learned from 
Technology-Based Educational Innovation.
www.educause.edu/educatingthenetgen/
Educating the Net Generation
Index
21st-century college graduate  9.3
311 call center  8.13
A
AAC&U  9.3–9.4,  9.14–9.16.
AASCU  14.13,  14.15
academic: advising  10.3,  10.10–10.12,  
10.16;  support  10.14 values  14.2,  
14.3,  14.9
access  2.2,  2.3,  4.7,  7.3,  9.8,  10.10,  
12.15,  12.19,  13.2,  13.13,  15.20
accounting  9.8,  9.13
achievement  2.7,  5.3,  6.11,  9.3,  9.14,  
12.6,  12.18,  12.19
ACRL  13.7,  13.14
actional immersion  15.2,  15.4
active learning  8.6,  9.12,  11.7,  11.9,  11.12,  
12.5,  12.6,  14.7,  15.9
adaptability  6.11,  9.13
administrative: applications  10.14;  policies  
10.16
admission  10.2,  10.16
Adobe  4.2,  4.3
adult learners  2.8,  10.6
advising  10.3,  10.4,  10.10–10.14,  10.16
African-Americans  2.2,  2.3
AgNIC  13.4
alignment  9.4,  14.10,  14.12
Amazon.com  5.2
American Association of State Colleges 
and Universities  2.16,  14.13. See 
also AASCU
American Library Association  13.7
American Psychological Association  12.5,  
12.21
animation  5.9,  5.12,  11.6
AOL  4.1,  13.8
Apollo Group  14.2
Apple II  4.1
applications  3.2,  3.5,  5.4,  5.8,  5.14,  6.2,  
7.3,  7.5–7.8,  7.13,  7.18,  8.5,  8.6,  9.1,  
9.2,  9.8,  10.4–10.17,  11.2,  11.3,  12.1,  
12.2,  12.8,  12.19,  13.7,  15.1
apprenticeships  15.4
AskNSDL  8.10,  8.11
Assa, Arman  4.5
assessment  4.2,  4.3,  6.5,  6.6,  6.10,  7.7,  
8.10,  8.19,  9.13–9.15,  11.8,  12.5,  12.6,  
12.21,  13.8,  13.15,  14.7,  14.13,  15.4,  
15.16,  15.18
Association of American Colleges and 
Universities  1.3,  9.1,  9.3,  9.14,  9.15. 
See also AAC&U
Association of College and Research 
Libraries  13.7,  13.14. See also ACRL
assumptions  2.11,  2.12,  2.15,  8.4,  8.5,  
8.16,  10.14,  14.1,  14.7,  14.13,  15.16
asynchronous  2.11,  8.7,  11.15,  12.3,  
14.7,  15.1
ATM card  5.14
Atomic Learning  11.8,  11.14
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested