c# .net pdf viewer : Adding a page to a pdf file control SDK system azure wpf winforms console Pro_Silverlight_5_in_CSharp_4th_edition7-part137

CHAPTER 2  XAML 
57 
Data binding expressions use a XAML markup extension (and hence have curly braces). You begin 
with the word Binding, followed by any constructor arguments (there are none in this example) and then 
a list of the properties you want to set by name—in this case, ElementName and Path. ElementName 
indicates the source element. Path indicates the property in the source element. Thus, this binding 
expression copies the value from the Slider.Value property to the TextBlock.FontSize property. 
 Tip  The Path can point to a property of a property (for example, FontFamily.Source) or an indexer used by a 
property (for example, Content.Children[0]). You can also refer to an attached property (a property that’s defined in 
another class but applied to the bound element) by wrapping the property name in parentheses. For example, if 
you’re binding to an element that’s placed in a Grid, the path (Grid.Row) retrieves the row number where you’ve 
placed it. 
One of the neat features of data binding is that your target is updated automatically, no matter how 
the source is modified. In this example, the source can be modified in only one way—by the user’s 
interaction with the slider thumb. However, consider a slightly revamped version of this example that 
adds a few buttons, each of which applies a preset value to the slider. Click one of these buttons, and this 
code runs: 
private void cmd_SetLarge(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) 
sliderFontSize.Value = 30; 
This code sets the value of the slider, which in turn forces a change to the font size of the text 
through data binding. It’s the same as if you had moved the slider thumb yourself. 
However, this code wouldn’t work as well: 
private void cmd_SetLarge(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) 
lblSampleText.FontSize = 30; 
It sets the font of the text box directly. As a result, the slider position isn’t updated to match. Even 
worse, this has the effect of wiping out your font size binding and replacing it with a literal value. If you 
move the slider thumb now, the text block won’t change at all. 
Two-Way Binding 
Interestingly, there’s a way to force values to flow in both directions: from the source to the target and 
from the target to the source. The trick is to set the Mode property of the Binding. Here’s a revised 
bidirectional binding that allows you to apply changes to either the source or the target and have the 
other piece of the equation update itself automatically: 
<TextBlock Margin="10" Text="Simple Text" Name="lblSampleText" 
FontSize="{Binding ElementName=sliderFontSize, Path=Value, Mode=TwoWay}" > 
</TextBlock> 
www.it-ebooks.info
Adding a page to a pdf file - insert pages into PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide C# Users to Insert (Empty) PDF Page or Pages from a Supported File Format
adding page to pdf; add page numbers pdf files
Adding a page to a pdf file - VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document
add page number pdf file; add a page to pdf file
CHAPTER 2  XAML 
58 
In this example, there’s no reason to use a two-way binding, because you can solve the problem by 
manipulating the value of the slider rather than changing the font size of the TextBlock. However, 
consider a variation of this example that includes a text box where the user can set the font size precisely 
(see Figure 2-5). 
Figure 2-5. Two-way binding with a text box 
Here, the text box needs to use a two-way binding, because it both receives the bound data value 
and sets it. When the user drags the slider (or clicks a button), the text box receives the new slider value. 
And when the user types a new value in the text box, the binding copies the value to the slider. 
Here’s the two-way binding expression you need: 
<TextBox Text="{Binding ElementName=lblSampleText, Path=FontSize, Mode=TwoWay}"> 
</TextBox
 Note  If you experiment with this example, you’ll discover that the text box applies its value to the slider only 
once it loses focus. This is the default update behavior in Silverlight, but you can change it by forcing immediate 
updates as the user types—a trick you’ll pick up in Chapter 20. 
You’ll learn far more about data binding in Chapter 20, when you add data objects and collections 
into the mix. But this example illustrates two important points—how the Binding extension enhances 
XAML with the ability to tie properties from different objects together and how you can create basic 
element synchronization effects with no code required. 
www.it-ebooks.info
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
guidance on creating, loading, merge and splitting PDF pages and Files, adding a page into PDF document, deleting unnecessary page from PDF file and changing
add pages to pdf document; add page numbers to pdf preview
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Provides you with examples for adding an (empty) page to a PDF and adding empty pages to a PDF from a supported file format, with customized options.
add remove pages from pdf; add pdf pages to word
CHAPTER 2  XAML 
59 
The Last Word 
In this chapter, you took a tour through a simple XAML file and learned the syntax rules of XAML at the 
same time. You also considered two markup extensions that Silverlight uses to enhance XAML: the 
StaticResource extension for referencing resources and the Binding extension for connecting properties 
in different objects. 
When you’re designing an application, you don’t need to write all your XAML by hand. Instead, you 
can use a tool such as Visual Studio or Expression Blend to drag and drop your pages into existence. 
Based on that, you might wonder whether it’s worth spending so much time studying the syntax of 
XAML. The answer is a resounding yes. Understanding XAML is critical to Silverlight application design. 
Understanding XAML will help you learn key Silverlight concepts and ensure that you get the markup 
you really want. More importantly, there is a host of tasks that are far easier to accomplish with at least 
some handwritten XAML. In Visual Studio, these tasks include defining resources, creating control 
templates, writing data binding expressions, and defining animations. Expression Blend has better 
design support, but on many occasions, it’s still quicker to make a change by hand than wade through a 
sequence of windows. 
www.it-ebooks.info
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Perform annotation capabilities to mark, draw, and visualize objects on PDF document page. Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your VB.NET program
add page numbers to a pdf in preview; add page break to pdf
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
image adding library control for PDF document, you can easily and quickly add an image, picture or logo to any position of specified PDF document file page.
add pdf pages to word document; add and remove pages from a pdf
C H A P T E R  3 
61 
Layout 
Half the battle in user interface design is organizing the content in a way that’s attractive, practical, and 
flexible. In a browser-hosted application, this is a particularly tricky task, because your application may 
be used on a wide range of different computers and devices (all with different display hardware), and 
you have no control over the size of the browser window in which your Silverlight content is placed. 
Fortunately, Silverlight inherits the most important part of WPF’s extremely flexible layout model. 
Using the layout model, you organize your content in a set of different layout containers. Each container 
has its own layout logic—one stacks elements, another arranges them in a grid of invisible cells, and 
another uses a hard-coded coordinate system. If you’re ambitious, you can even create your own 
containers with custom layout logic. 
In this chapter, you’ll learn how to use layout containers to create the visual skeleton for a Silverlight 
page. You’ll spend most of your time exploring Silverlight’s core layout containers, including the 
StackPanel, Grid, and Canvas. Once you’ve mastered these basics, you’ll see how to extend your 
possibilities by creating new layout containers with custom layout logic. You’ll also see how you can 
create an application that breaks out of the browser window and uses the full screen. 
The Layout Containers 
A Silverlight window can hold only a single element. To fit in more than one element and create a more 
practical user interface, you need to place a container in your page and then add other elements to that 
container. Your layout is determined by the container that you use. 
All the Silverlight layout containers are panels that derive from the abstract 
System.Windows.Controls.Panel class (see Figure 3-1). 
Figure 3-1. The hierarchy of the Panel class 
www.it-ebooks.info
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Insert Text to PDF Document in C#.NET. Providing C# Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page with .NET PDF Library.
adding page numbers pdf file; adding page numbers to a pdf document
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your C# program. Perform annotation capabilities to mark, draw, and visualize objects on PDF document page.
add contents page to pdf; add a page to a pdf in reader
CHAPTER 3  LAYOUT 
62 
The Panel class adds two public properties: Background and Children. Background is the brush 
that’s used to paint the panel background. Children is the collection of items that’s stored in the panel. 
(This is the first level of elements—in other words, these elements may themselves contain more 
elements.) The Panel class also has a bit of internal plumbing you can use to create your own layout 
container, as you’ll learn later in this chapter. 
On its own, the base Panel class is nothing but a starting point for other more specialized classes. 
Silverlight provides three Panel-derived classes that you can use to arrange layout, and the Silverlight 
Toolkit adds two more. All of them are listed in Table 3-1, in the order you’ll meet them in this chapter. 
As with all Silverlight controls and most visual elements, these classes are found in the 
System.Windows.Controls namespace. 
Table 3-1. Core Layout Panels 
Name 
Description 
StackPanel 
Places elements in a horizontal or vertical stack. This layout container is typically used 
for small sections of a larger, more complex page. 
WrapPanel 
Places elements in a series of wrapped lines. In horizontal orientation, the WrapPanel 
lays items out in a row from left to right and then onto subsequent lines. In vertical 
orientation, the WrapPanel lays out items in a top-to-bottom column and then uses 
additional columns to fit the remaining items. This layout container is available in the 
Silverlight Tookit. 
DockPanel 
Aligns elements against an entire edge of the container. This layout container is 
available in the Silverlight Tookit. 
Grid 
Arranges elements in rows and columns according to an invisible table. This is one of 
the most flexible and commonly used layout containers. 
Canvas 
Allows elements to be positioned absolutely using fixed coordinates. This layout 
container is the simplest but least flexible. 
Layout containers can be nested. A typical user interface begins with the Grid, Silverlight’s most 
capable container, and contains other layout containers that arrange smaller groups of elements, such 
as captioned text boxes, items in a list, icons on a toolbar, a column of buttons, and so on. 
 Note  There’s one specialized layout panel that doesn’t appear in Table 3-1: the VirtualizingStackPanel. It 
arranges items in the same way as the StackPanel, but it uses a memory-optimization technique called 
virtualization. The VirtualizingStackPanel allows list controls like the ListBox to hold tens of thousands of items 
without a dramatic slowdown, because the VirtualizingStackPanel creates objects only for the currently visible 
items. But although you might use the VirtualizingStackPanel to build custom templates and controls (see Chapter 
15), you won’t use it to arrange the elements in a page, and so it isn’t covered in this chapter. 
www.it-ebooks.info
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Able to perform PDF file password adding, deleting and changing C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings On this page, we will talk about how
add page to pdf; add document to pdf pages
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit C#.NET: Draw Markups on PDF File. Enable users to draw various annotation markups on PDF page.
add page pdf reader; add page number to pdf print
CHAPTER 3  LAYOUT 
63 
The Panel Background 
All Panel elements introduce the concept of a background by adding a Background property. It’s natural 
to expect that the Background property would use some sort of color object. However, the Background 
property actually uses something much more versatile: a Brush object. This design gives you the 
flexibility to fill your background and foreground content with a solid color (by using the 
SolidColorBrush) or something more exotic (for example, a gradient or a bitmap, by using a 
LinearGradientBrush or ImageBrush). In this section, you’ll consider only the simple solid-color fills 
provided by the SolidColorBrush, but you’ll try fancier brushwork in Chapter 9. 
 Note  All of Silverlight’s Brush classes are found in the System.Windows.Media namespace. 
For example, if you want to give your entire page a light blue background, you could adjust the 
background of the root panel. Here’s the code that does the trick: 
layoutRoot.Background = new SolidColorBrush(Colors.AliceBlue); 
Technically, every Color object is an instance of the Color structure in the System.Windows.Media 
namespace. You can get a wide range of ready-made colors from the Colors class, which provides a static 
property for each one. (The property names are based on the color names supported by web browsers.) 
The code shown here uses one of these colors to create a new SolidColorBrush. It then sets the brush as 
the background brush for the root panel, which causes its background to be painted a light shade of 
blue. 
 Tip  Silverlight also includes a SystemColors class that provides Color objects that match the current system 
preferences. For example, SystemColors.ActiveColorBorder gets the color that’s used to fill the border of the 
foreground window. In some cases, you might choose to ensure your application blends in better with the current 
color scheme, particularly if you’re building an out-of-browser application, as described in Chapter 18. 
The Colors and SystemColors classes offer handy shortcuts, but they aren’t the only way to set a 
color. You can also create a Color object by supplying the red, green, and blue (RGB) values, along with 
an alpha value that indicates transparency. Each one of these values is a number from 0 to 255: 
int red = 0; int green = 255; int blue = 0; 
layoutRoot.Background = new SolidColorBrush(Color.FromArgb(255, red, green, blue)); 
You can also make a color partly transparent by supplying an alpha value when calling the 
Color.FromArgb() method. An alpha value of 255 is completely opaque, while 0 is completely 
transparent. 
Often, you’ll set colors in XAML rather than in code. Here, you can use a helpful shortcut. Rather 
than define a Brush object, you can supply a color name or color value. The type converter for the 
Background property will automatically create a SolidColorBrush object using the color you specify. 
Here’s an example that uses a color name: 
www.it-ebooks.info
CHAPTER 3  LAYOUT 
64 
<Grid x:Name="layoutRoot" Background="Red"> 
It’s equivalent to this more verbose syntax: 
<Grid x:Name="layoutRoot"> 
<Grid.Background> 
<SolidColorBrush Color="Red"></SolidColorBrush> 
</Grid.Background> 
</Grid> 
You need to use the longer form if you want to create a different type of brush, such as a 
LinearGradientBrush, and use that to paint the background. 
If you want to use a color code, you need to use a slightly less convenient syntax that puts the R, G, 
and B values in hexadecimal notation. You can use one of two formats—either #rrggbb or #aarrggbb (the 
difference being that the latter includes the alpha value). You need only two digits to supply the A, R, G, 
and B values because they’re all in hexadecimal notation. Here’s an example that creates the same color 
as in the previous code snippets using #aarrggbb notation: 
<Grid x:Name="layoutRoot" Background="#FFFF0000"> 
Here the alpha value is FF (255), the red value is FF (255), and the green and blue values are 0. 
By default, the Background of a layout panel is set to a null reference, which is equivalent to this: 
<Grid x:Name="layoutRoot" Background="{x:Null}"> 
When your panel has a null background, any content underneath will show through (similar to if 
you set a fully transparent background color). However, there’s an important difference—the layout 
container won’t be able to receive mouse events. 
 Note  Brushes support automatic change notification. In other words, if you attach a brush to a control and 
change the brush, the control updates itself accordingly. 
Borders 
The layout containers allow you to paint a background, but not a border outline. However, there’s an 
element that fills in the gap—the Border. 
The Border class is pure simplicity. It takes a single piece of nested content (which is often a layout 
panel) and adds a background or border around it. To master the Border, you need nothing more than 
the properties listed in Table 3-2. 
Table 3-2. Properties of the Border Class 
Name 
Description 
Background 
Sets a background that appears behind all the content in the border using a Brush 
object. You can use a solid color or something more exotic. 
www.it-ebooks.info
CHAPTER 3  LAYOUT 
65 
Name 
Description 
BorderBrush 
Sets the fill of the border that appears around the edge of the Border object, using a 
Brush object. The most straightforward approach is to use a SolidColorBrush to 
create a solid border. 
BorderThickness Sets the width (in pixels) of the border on each side. The BorderThickness property 
holds an instance of the System.Windows.Thickness structure, with separate 
components for the top, bottom, left, and right edges. 
CornerRadius 
Rounds the corners of your border. The greater the CornerRadius, the more 
dramatic the rounding effect is. 
Padding 
Adds spacing between the border and the content inside. (By contrast, Margin adds 
spacing outside the border.) 
Here’s a straightforward, slightly rounded border around a basic button: 
<Border Margin="25"  Background="LightYellow" 
BorderBrush="SteelBlue" BorderThickness="8" CornerRadius="15"> 
<Button Margin="10 Content="Click  Me"></Button> 
</Border> 
This example adds a little bit or margin space around the border and the button, which is a feature 
you’ll learn about in the next section. Figure 3-2 shows the result. 
Figure 3-2. A basic border 
www.it-ebooks.info
CHAPTER 3  LAYOUT 
66 
Simple Layout with the StackPanel 
The StackPanel is one of the simplest layout containers. It simply stacks its children in a single row or 
column. These elements are arranged based on their order. 
For example, consider this page, which contains a stack with one TextBlock and four buttons: 
<UserControl x:Class="Layout.SimpleStack" 
xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" 
xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"> 
<StackPanel Background="White"> 
<TextBlock Text="A Button Stack"></TextBlock> 
<Button Content="Button 1"></Button> 
<Button Content="Button 2"></Button> 
<Button Content="Button 3"></Button> 
<Button Content="Button 4"></Button> 
</StackPanel> 
</UserControl> 
Figure 3-3 shows the result. 
Figure 3-3. The StackPanel in action 
By default, a StackPanel arranges elements from top to bottom, making each one as tall as is 
necessary to display its content. In this example, that means the TextBlock and buttons are sized just 
high enough to comfortably accommodate the text inside. All the elements are then stretched to the full 
width of the StackPanel, which is the width of your page. 
In this example, the Height and Width properties of the page are not set. As a result, the page grows 
to fit the full Silverlight content region (in this case, the complete browser window). Most of the 
examples in this chapter use this approach, because it makes it easier to experiment with the different 
www.it-ebooks.info
CHAPTER 3  LAYOUT 
67 
layout containers. You can then see how a layout container resizes itself to fit different page sizes simply 
by resizing the browser window. 
 Note  Once you’ve examined all the layout containers, you’ll take a closer look at the issue of page sizes, and 
you’ll learn about your different options for dealing content that doesn’t fit in the browser window. 
The StackPanel can also be used to arrange elements horizontally by setting the Orientation 
property: 
<StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal" Background="White"> 
Now elements are given their minimum width (wide enough to fit their text) and are stretched to the 
full height of the containing panel (see Figure 3-4). 
Figure 3-4. The StackPanel with horizontal orientation 
Clearly, this doesn’t provide the flexibility real applications need. Fortunately, you can fine-tune the 
way the StackPanel and other layout containers work using layout properties, as described next. 
Layout Properties 
Although layout is determined by the container, the child elements can still get their say. In fact, layout 
panels work in concert with their children by respecting a small set of layout properties, as listed in 
Table 3-3. 
www.it-ebooks.info
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested